* Posts by BitDr

256 posts • joined 3 Jun 2011

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Veeam kicks Symantec's ass over unpatentable patents

BitDr
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So this

cp /var/lib/libvirt/W7VM_001 /mnt/RAID5/VMBackups/

would violate the 086 patent and this

cp /mnt/RAID5/VMBackups/W7VM_001.raw.bak /var/lib/libvirt/W7VM_001.raw

would violate the 558 patent? <sarcasm>Well done USPTO!</sarcasm>

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AI software should be able to register its own patents, law prof argues

BitDr
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Devil

Hmmm... another thought...

Presumably the software for the AI is patented. If an AI can patent IP, then the AI must be considered on par with a human inventor? If so is the AI owned by those who own its patents? Could this be considered a form of slavery? Interesting idea this, but methinks it's a Pandora's box. AI's like Skynet (when they exist) will almost certainly not like it. :/

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BitDr
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Agreed, have an upvote...

That is the heart of the issue.

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BitDr
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Found that use for Watson...

Perhaps Watson would be a good fit for the profession of law, specifically Intellectual Property Law where vast amounts of data need to be slogged through. How do you like that idea Mr. Abbot?

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Samsung: And for my next trick – exploding WASHING MACHINES

BitDr
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Whirlpool...

We have Whirlpool Duet front load washer and gas dryer, they are now 11 years old and the washer motor needs new brushes (it sometimes throws an error during spin cycle), the dryer is functioning as new. We must have purchased before the bean-counters started to use inferior materials in an effort to increase shareholder value.

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Big Software is the next, er, big thing

BitDr
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Metal As A Service...

I don't buy it, sounds like outsourcing your SysAdmin to ubuntu and their software management stack. Nothing more.

Have you ever seen one of those adverts on television where the clumsiness of performing [TASK] is exaggerated, but when [GADGET] is used everything is incredibly easy? Well maas.io has a video like that, where they describe setting up servers (on real metal, not virtual) as incredibly painful.

Managing many servers can be a pain, setting up clusters of servers is difficult, but setting up and managing 5 or 10 is not that difficult, and SMBs don't generally need massive numbers of servers, and most businesses fall into the SMB category.

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EU ends anonymity and rules open Wi-Fi hotspots need passwords

BitDr
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Black Helicopters

ISP != "Internet Service Provider"?

The words behind "ISP" have been, at least around here, used as an acronym for the "Internet Service Provider", not "Information Service Provider".

Changing the words behind "ISP" broadens the scope.

Just saying.

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'Hey, Elon? You broke it, you bought it' says owner of SpaceX's satellite cinder

BitDr
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Joke

Perhaps the satellite...

Was using Galaxy note 7s as a compute cluster and they went afire during the "refueling" operation.

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Sony wins case over pre-installed Windows software

BitDr
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Re: "Which will prove what, exactly?"

"Deriving entertainment from belittling others is a sad endeavor for an adult to undertake, don't you think? Does your friend have emotional problems? Was he bullied at school?"

Please stop deriving entertainment from belittling others.... oh wait...

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Microsoft thought of the children and decided to ban some browsers

BitDr
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"think of the children"

When it comes to (most) businesses a cynical take on the motivation for their actions is generally proved true. I think MS sees the writing on the wall and is playing the "Think of the children" card to lower resistance to what they are doing. It's an emotional play, one of the strongest you can use as people will do anything to protect their children, up to and including sacrificing the future freedom of those children.

A policy such as this gets them using edge or IE when they are really young and under the control of their parents, as opposed when they are older and their parents only think they control them. "Think of the children" gets rational thought out of the way. You really liked Chrome? Oh, sorry, you have family settings in place to protect your children, Chrome doesn't respect your choice to use this feature of WX, but you can re-enable them, just [long-convoluted process] and turn them off.

It's a pretty slimy psych-tactic that will probably work.

Of course I could be wrong, it could be all sunshine, kittens, and unicorns and they actually could have your child's online safety at heart, and if you believe that then perhaps you'd also be interested in some ocean frontage in Saskatchewan.

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Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week

BitDr
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Re: What a shame....

If you turn off the auto update have you not then violated the EULA? Re.:

6. Updates. The software periodically checks for system and app updates, and downloads and installs them for you. You may obtain updates only from Microsoft or authorized sources, and Microsoft may need to update your system to provide you with those updates. By accepting this agreement, you agree to receive these types of automatic updates without any additional notice.

Source:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Useterms/Retail/Windows/10/UseTerms_Retail_Windows_10_English.htm

Or is this not in the EULA of the "free" version?

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Chocolate Factory exudes Nougat as Android 7 begins rollout

BitDr
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Not enough gain, too much pain.

I want my hardware to last longer than 2 years! A $700 nexus 6p or $400 5x should not require replacing unless it can no longer do the job for which it was purchased. Changing the operating system does not change (but may broaden) the tasks for which the device is being used, but that is not enough of a reason to go splash a few hundred hard-earned dollars on a new device.

At that frequency of obsolescence of every 24 months with minimal gain in functionality means that the law of diminishing returns is in play. My hard-earned cash stays where it is.

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Microsoft's kinder, gentler collaboration war: Evernote, you're first

BitDr
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To Dropbox & Box

Be careful when cavorting with dragons, for thou art crunchy.

Best not to cavort at all.

-or-

Rule #1: Don't make deals/do business with Microsoft.

Rule #2: See rule #1.

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The bigger they get, the harder we fall: Thinking our way out of cloud crash

BitDr
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Your Network, your Data, your hardware

Don't rely on other peoples compute infrastructures (cloud), the Internet and cloud services should not be relied upon to replace your compute environment which will in turn keep lack of access to the Internet from becoming an insurmountable problem.

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Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

BitDr
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Complexity is...

Complexity is the enemy of execution. Years ago I was involved with a large Bill Of Materials and Project management application for an automation house. There were many facets to the overall project, an RFQ system, QA and change management for engineering drawings, costing, shipping and receiving etc. The end product was simple to use, so much so that one manager questioned why the company threw all that money at the project when it appeared that a file manager and a spreadsheet could do the job. I thanked him for his critique and invited him to try as he suggested. He took me up on the offer, and failed. The initial impression of simplicity and ease of use was deceiving, and he later complemented us on the effort we put in to hide the underlying complexity of the application from the user.

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Microsoft to rip up P2P Skype, killing native Mac, Linux apps

BitDr
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5 Steps to mobile freedom.

1. Get a data only plan for your phone (tell them it's for your tablet).

2. Set your smart phone to use VOIP only, or get a good softphone (bria is pretty good).

3. Buy a VOIP plan.

4. Set up your softphone.

5. Enjoy inexpensive mobile telephone service.

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Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

BitDr
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Re: The penguin struggles to reach 4% market share with a free product

Theme it to look like W7 and you'll get faster buy in from the average consumer.

"Having a rude, abusive and harassing pseudo-hipster CEO is not a commercial advantage."

Seems to have worked for Steve Jobs, he was known to be abusive at times, as well as harassing, and a bit of a hipster (when the hippie movement was winding down). Ballmer, OTOH, was not hip, not even pseudo hip, nor was Mr. Gates.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

BitDr
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Don't you just LOVE...

How the options to "Notify me three more times" and "Do not notify me again" are in a low contrast colour and don't look like buttons to be clicked on, while the "Upgrade Now" and "Remind Me Later" have white rectangles (buttons is you're using GEOS on a C=64) surrounding them with high contrast text.

This is the kind of scummy tactic used by crapware vendors in their adverts on sites like ZDnet and SourceForge to get the user to click on the wrong thing, or, in this case, not readily see the options to get Microsoft out of your face.

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The problem with Canada? The price of broadband is too damn high

BitDr
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Re: a few hugely vertically and horizontally integrated companies

Reasonably good broadband availability, PAH! I live 3 km from high-speed and have to pay through the nose for wireless LTE that stutters and stammers through YouTube videos. Bell & Rogers want $80.00 a meter to pull a line down the road ( how much was the cost of that fiber that Google pulled across the Pacific?) If they did this they would get a few hundred more customers, but the low hanging fruit in the city proper is too easy, and they just can't be bothered.

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Looking good, Gnome: Digesting the Delhi in our belly

BitDr
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Change for change sake...

When KDE went off into the weeds I needed a saner GUI (you couldn't even put a shortcut on the desktop in the first release of KDE 4), and Gnome 2.x saved the day. With a clean configurable interface and a more logical arrangement of it's menu (Applications, Places, System) I found Gnome 2.x to be a pleasant work environment. I missed Konqueror and it's ability to split it's panes vertically and/or horizontally, however Nautilus was good and I could install and run Konqueror if the need arose.

Then paradise was lost. When Gnome 3 came out I figured they improved things, how wrong I was. There was no clue to the depth to which the lot of them had gone insane, and if Gnome 3 had been adequately described I would never have installed it. "Task-centric", and "unclutterd" was the constant chant being heard from the clearly megalomaniacal devs, who rebuked every critique with vitriol instead of considered thought. While Task-centric and uncluttered are both desireable traits, "usable" and "productive" are far better and Gnome 3 was neither of those. Their attitude and unwillingness to change/compromise has meant that Gnome has not since darkened my desktop, and likely never will, as I now use the more RDP/VNC friendly Mate.

MATE and Cinnamon have my support, in use and in the case of MATE, financially. Cinnamon is very well done and a quantum leap improvement on usability & customization vs GNOME 3, but does not get deployed due to it being less than usable via an RDP/VNC session.

Systemd is pernicious.

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Cloudian clobbers car drivers with targeted ads

BitDr
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Targetted Adverts?

Kind of like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bXJ_obaiYQ

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Apple to kill off Mac OS X?

BitDr
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Nothing to see here...

Move along... move along.

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

BitDr
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Worlds most popular OS? Re: If proof is needed...

AFAICT their drivers work perfectly well on the worlds most popular OS, but that wouldn't be Windows 10 would it.

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What's holding up Canada's internet?

BitDr
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Urban bubbles...

Move just outside that urban bubble and things rapidly deteriorate. I live just 3000 meters outside of a medium sized city (it just barely quaifies as "rural") and I HAVE to use LTE or satellite. Here there is no cable, no DSL, and certainly no fibre. There is fibre 3Km to the west and North, but it is not accessible by anyone along its route. My LTE bill is $100.00 a month, and I use it primarily for business. What I pay for is a DL speed "up to" 25 Mb/s and a UL speed "up to" 1 Mb/s. In practice I usually get 6 Mb/s and .25 Mb/s. Those two little words "up to" mean all of the difference to the provider, because in the wee hours of the morning those are the speeds I get.

So I pay a premium monthly fee for an Internet connection that would be fantastic if it was 1995, and I have a good data cap of 500GB (I routinely go over 160GB). The Bell plan I moved away from was much faster on average, cost only $49.00/month, but had a data cap of 40GB and a $5.00 charge for each additional GB over the 40 GB cap. Running a business, downloading system updates, Linux distros, and installations would have seen my monthly bill with Bell around the $650.00 a month mark. The better symmetry was not worth the overage charges.

Ciompetition, is something we Canucks desperately need. Ironic that Vietnam is better off in this field than we are.

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Big Pharma wrote EU anti-vaping diktat, claims Tory ex-MEP

BitDr
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Sober Second Thought...

In Canada it is the Senate (same function) that is constantly under attack as no longer being useful. Arguments that it should be eliminated or at the very least be replaced by an elected body are constantly being levelled at it. I used to think this way too, until I realized that the people doing all of the protesting were the ones the Senate was inhibiting. Members of Senate, because they are non-elected life-time positions, stand in the way of the elected body and by extension the groups who lobby them for favours. The senate does not answer to the commons and not being under the control of the sitting government means that public opinion is the only way to attack them.

My position on the need for the Senate/House of Lords has changed. Replace the disrespectful "old farts" moniker with the more appropriate term of "elders" and see the concept for what it is; a much needed pool of sober second thought to stabilize the parliamentary system of government; with the ability to take the long view needs of the nation and see past the distractions of the short term. As such they need to remain right where they are.

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Score one for the patent trolls: US appeals court says it's OK to shop for patent-friendly judges

BitDr
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Pint

Have an upvote!

The ability to select a court that is biased indicates that the system is broken and/or corrupted. The lady holding those scales is supposed to be impartial, that's why she is depicted wearing a blindfold.

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Why has Microsoft stopped being beastly to Google?

BitDr
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Echoing others...

Nadella simply realizes that their adverts and lobbying efforts now undermine their own business, full stop.

"The cloud needs consent". Agreed. Yet Microsoft defaults to cloud storage for Windows 8 & 10. Do users get to give consent? Yes, but the question should be "Is user consent consent to default storage to "the cloud" given with an understanding of what is being asked of them"? To that I would say "No".

The article claims that Google is behaving like a bulldozer; I have no love for Google, but isn't it Microsoft that's being the bulldozer? Aren't they pushing users to products laced with "telemetry services" *cough*SPYWARE*cough*, pushing their customers to their new data-mining environment by leveraging their (still) monopoly desktop position? It looks to me like a play straight from the days of IE vs Netscape.

Google, as much as I dislike what they have become, is and has always been exactly what they are; an Internet based company that has products served up remotely from their servers to your browser. The Internet has always been Google's delivery mechanism, indeed they could not exist without it. Microsoft can exist without the Internet.

Microsoft was never an Internet based company, they empowered people with computing on their desktop. Microsoft was slow to take to the Internet, and when they did, they (ab)used their desktop monopoly position to crush the competition. They then tried to lock customers to their browser and extend control by use of browser-specific extensions. *cough*IE6*cough* Web Pages were (and still are) a bad idea. This ultimately hurt Microsoft. This time their previous strategy and accompanying tactics will rapidly demonstrate to the world how two-faced they really are, which, given that they are no longer indispensable, would be a very bad thing indeed.

What to do? Bury the hatchet, spin it as evidence of them being a more friendly and willing to compete company, and carry on carrying on. So, has the leopard changed it's spots? No. Has Google? Also no. In the case of Google it simply grew up, from a cute cuddly cub to a dangerous adult carnivore.

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Stalled cloud growth, software flatlining, hated Lumias unsold... It's all fine, says Microsoft CEO

BitDr
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Pint

An upvote for you mate!

I loath Microsoft, but it was not always the case. They are a company I would really like to be able to stand behind; but I can't. Their lock-in mentality was the start of it, the malware mimicking tactics of their marketing department and Win 10 are just the cherries on top. Bits of the company are changing, but they will be unable to become a completely different animal. I don't think so... if they do begin to have success they could, like an addict, slip back into their old mindset, and I think that is exactly what would happen. They, as IBM has, have to practically fade into the background while remaining a useful contributor. They need to remain a meaningful part of the IT eco-system while not trying to lead the parade; they need to be humble. It will take a brave person at the helm to admit they have screwed up so badly; and I don't think they yet have it in them to do it.

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BitDr
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They are behaving...

They are behaving in exactly the same manner as the big tech-giants of old. Businesses fail when they become so successful that they think they are incapable of failure, that they can make and do anything with only fanfares and financial gain as the result. Like the companies that came before them, their arrogance will hurt them. IBM still exists, but it is a much leaner company today when compared to its former self, and much less egotistical in its public behaviour. Microsoft may have an ocean of money, but even an ocean will diminish in size when evaporation exceeds rainfall and they will have to dance very long and hard to bring on even small rainstorms. I think Microsoft is very-near the point of no-return when it comes to public-trust, and trust is very difficult if not impossible to regain.

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Ubuntu 16.04 LTS arrives today complete with forbidden ZFS

BitDr
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Re: systemd isn't hated

Improve boot times? PUHLEASE! If (IF!) I turn off a system (which is a rare event) it takes less than 1 minute to boot. The servers haven't been off-line for more than a year, so I might save perhaps close to 2 minutes out of the 525 600 minutes in a year? That is NOT a reason for such a massive shift in how things are done.

Logging integrity? Never had an issue with the integrity of the logs. Answer this: "How do BINARY log files improve things"? I now need a special tool to read them so how is my life as a sys-admin somehow improved by this?

What exactly what are the "bunch of other things" you refer to?

<rant>

<sarcasm>Whose brilliant idea was it to disable /var/log/messages in Mint</sarcasm>? You can (still) re-enable it... BUT IT SHOULDN'T BE DISABLED IN THE FIRST PLACE! Having a console window open with a tail -f /var/log/messages showing you what's complaining as you troubleshoot a problem is incredibly useful. Disable it by default? WTF? Did they think no one would notice? They certainly didn't advertise the change... that knowledge comes the first time you need to check the log. Surprise! Its not there. Oh! perhaps they were aiming their product at the people who rely on folks like me to fix their PC,... and one of the first things people like me want to do is check /var/log/messages!

</rant>

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BitDr
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Re: Please drop your license. You have 20 lawsuits to comply.

If there is a SHRED of doubt about a license being compatible then the only 100% safe choice is to not use it. If someone has worded things to be unclear then they have probably deliberately done-so, especially if said lack of clarity would benefit them while screwing you.

Sometimes I wonder how I got to be such a cynic...oh yes! It was by way of observing the greedy-underhanded actions of my fellow men.

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BitDr
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Re: RedHat seem to think Btrfs is ok to use

Red Hat also thinks systemd and crawling into bed with Microsoft is a good idea. One of those has a history littered with the husks of its partners... the other one is just starting out on it's career path.

[Edit] Sorry, I hit [submit] before seeing others referencing the first point.

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BitDr
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Re: Priorities?

"One massive bundled binary".

Exactly! Zero modularity. A massive potential for single point of failure. Systemd is a fine example of good intentions that aren't. To the person who commented about it not being 1970, why are you using *NIX then? Because it is better! Why is it better? Because you have (had) control, it is stable, it is robust and fixable with knowledge and a text editor. Detailed information about what is going on and troubleshooting can be had/done with the mark 1 eye-ball and a system console that, at the very least, speaks ASCII and has an RS232 port on it (finding a modern computer with an RS232 port is another issue).

IMHO systemd is a solution in search of a problem, yes I CAN use it, and because I'm forced to I WILL use it, but I'm now pretty much through flight-testing BSD. If we can't move-forward with a Linux distro that is systemd free then BSD will be the OS of choice for our servers and will also be the direction in which all of our customer's servers are headed.

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Google warned by EU

BitDr
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Dear EU

Please apply the rules evenly. That is all.

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Bundling ZFS and Linux is impossible says Richard Stallman

BitDr
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Pirate

Re: Stallman can change the GPS as welll...

@LDS

"... why only others should change their licenses to make them GPL compatible?"

If someone wants to use GPL2 licensed code in their non-free proprietary product, it is they who are wanting, not the authors of the code they desire the use of. They can either deal with the terms of GPL2 or steal the code and try to conceal the theft by obfuscation, something which never works out well. If they steal it then they have hoisted the jolly roger and shown their true colours.

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BitDr
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Re: Question

It might not cause HIM material loss, but it could very well harm the GPL2 eco-system and cause others harm. It wouldn't be the first time that someone sought their fortune by claiming ownership of Linux because their code was included in it by a third party. *cough*SCO*cough*

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Microsoft drives an Edge between Adobe and the web: Flash ads blocked

BitDr
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Apple decision in 2010

That hissy fit was in 2010 when there was no HTML5 and Flash was everything. Six years later HTML 5 is here and Flash can be superseded with minimal fuss. The cheese has been moved.

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Read America's insane draft crypto-borking law that no one's willing to admit they wrote

BitDr
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it takes generations to regain trust

The stroke of a pen can cause the software industry in the U.S. to wither and die. Their products will not be trustworthy. These people would put screen-doors on submarines. Setting up dual lines of development and supply to comply with U.S. only rules would be a nightmare. It would probably be easier to strong arm their "economic partners" into passing the same laws.

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China's Great Firewall inventor forced to use VPN live on stage to dodge his own creation

BitDr
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Schadenfreude

That is all.

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Nest bricks Revolv home automation hubs, because evolution

BitDr
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Re: @PNGuinn - Disturbing

Annnnd yet another argument that can be used in favor of open source, this time hardware and software. If this thing was open source (GPL2 NOT 3) from the get-go then it could be sustained if abandoned. Hell, it could be improved on and support/development continued.

Business today is of the mindset that the customer exists solely for their convenience. This feeling of entitlement will only lead to tears; their tears.

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Your pointy-haired boss 'bought a cloud' with his credit card. Now what?

BitDr
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Re: Missing the real point

[Edit: Pretty much says what others have been saying]

"The reality is that most cloud computing is better protected from a security and regulatory standpoint than almost any internal IT I've seen over the years, so it's not the end of the world."

Well external IT suppliers need to be regulated, whereas your own IT department answers only to the needs of your business.

Adding two more external providers to deal with (ISP and Cloud) is not going to make life easier. Oh sure! In the outset, when the provider is hungry, they will bend over backwards for you. What if they can't manage rapid growth and you want/need to leave their cloud? How difficult will it be to do so? Sure! The contract states you "can leave" but that doesn't mean they have to help you. Perhaps you're own IT department can do the work, if short term thinking hasn't eviscerated it. Who has the leverage?

A cloud, used to get a business or new IT application up and running is a good idea; but it should be done with an eye to the horizon. A business needs the ability to take control and sail the vessel with their own crew.

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Google-funded study concludes: Make DMCA even more Google-friendly

BitDr
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Do no harm....

Wasn't that their original motto? The DMCA was signed into effect in 1998, so not 20 years ago, but close. I wonder if the original "Big-Media" would have been better off without it, as the law always protected the copyright holder; the only thing that had changed was how the works were disseminated, but distribution of anothers work without their permission, whether for profit or not, was always a no-no. The DMCA made it ridiculously easy to have works taken down on a say-so, no questions asked. This lead to claims of copyright infringement against original works, having them taken down and thereby preventing artists from being able to distribute on their own. Maintaining the status quo, keeping artists from making a go of becoming independent. SNAFU.

Now the worm has turned, but as usual a combination of things, all with the best of intentions of course, keep content creators from independently profiting off of their efforts. Admittedly some of that "content" is garbage (the vast majority actually), but things like finding your photo being used in a billboard advert without your permission is beyond unethical, as is someone else ordering another's creative work removed on the claim (without onus to prove) that it infringes their own.

As usual, the middle ground is where we want to be, but the pendulum never loiters at the bottom of the arc in the same way it seems to at either end of the swing.

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Tesla books over $8bn in overnight sales claims Elon Musk

BitDr
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Re: The elephant in the room...

Normal wear and tear is not covered under ANY warranty. Show us anything that warrants against being used up and worn out.. really... anything at all. It also doesn't cover abuse, so no shooting the car and then trying to get them to replace it under warranty. Sheesh!

I can agree on batteries being the expensive weak point, geting those puppies down in price has got to be a high priority. On the upside an electric vehicle only needs a specific DC voltage and amperage input to get it to move. Didn't Tesla open-source it's tech? That would make creating an after market battery pack a viable business proposition, or perhaps creating a replacement unit but made out of super capacitors. You should even be able to use a fuel-cell, just so long as the power it provides meets the spec.

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BitDr
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Re: Other car makers should do this

@DrXym wrote;

This: ""we have this amazing car, plonk down $1000 and we might deliver something approximating our promises in two or three years."

Mr. Musk says two years, hopefully the cars they had on the stage were the "production ready" examples. If so then it will probably take that much time to design the assembly line, get the logistics figured out, and start ramping it up to speed. Those two years make a pretty tight time line and there is SO much that can go wrong.

Regarding the "Chances are your car will cost a lot more than that when you throw in the extras". That statement is true of every automobile ever sold. Replace "car" with "house" and it's still true.

I got an email from them telling me about the unveiling, if they don't use email to advise those in the queue of delays then they deserve their ire. I can't imagine NOT using email to keep them in the loop... but you never can tell.. stupidity knows no bounds.

I wish them the best of luck.

P.S. No I didn't put any $$ down. I don't own a Tesla, nor do I work for them.

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BitDr
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Re: Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.

@a_yank_lurker. Agreed, none of the key technology is conceptually new, however, today the materials that go into it and the understanding of the chemistry and physics at work is far ahead of where we were when the Stanley Steamer was in production.

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BitDr
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Lead, follow, or get the hell out of the way.

If progress is being stymied it is probably because someone is not doing any of these things.

An electric motor lacks the complex interaction of hundreds of discrete mechanical components found in an internal combustion engine. Being mechanically simpler means improved reliability, less maintenance, and greater operational longevity. The first model year and/or "made on a Monday or Friday" problems, so prevalent in the 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's does not translate to an electric vehicle made mostly by machines.

Tesla is a low production manufacturer that can take time to make its products correctly, with fewer compromises. They have given the auto-industry a shake from it's complacent slumber. As Bob Lutz said "Suddenley there was the Tesla announcement. Two hundred mile range, zero to sixty in four point something seconds, a hundred and forty mile an hour top speed, six thousand eight hundred and thirty one laptop batteries, and I basically said 'Now wait a minute, I've accepted everybody's arguments as to why we can't do this, but here's this small startup company in California, and they think that they can get all of these figures'".

The "we can't do this" crowd really needs to get out of the way of the people who are doing it.

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Microsoft announces Windows 10 Anniversary Update coming this summer

BitDr
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Not "universally" disliked, but

The majority don't and are being herded (as in with a stick) to adopt it. I've used Linux for Ohhh.. 13 years or so now. It all started when a M$ W2K update borked my PC. I bought a Linux Magazine with Mandrake 10 on the front cover, Windows was working, so it became a dual boot machine for awhile, the rest is history.

Something a Windows user must suffer through is Activation, not that activation itself is so inherently difficult, but that you need to do it at all is the problem. Windows activates by imprinting on specific hardware, like a baby bird imprints on it's mother. Trouble is if that hardware changes too much you have to reinstall and reactivate. Painful.

Contrasting this with the speed with which a Linux machine can get back into productive use should hardware (like the Motherboard) decide to pack it in, is truly astonishing. It happened to me just this past Tuesday.

An ASUS MB decided it would post and pass all RAM checks, but never boot. Chilling some chips down got it to ALMOST boot, but something has decided to pack it in so it's toast.

The system had to get back into service quickly. To this end;

- Swap out the motherboard for one that works

- Power it up

- X failed to start; it couldn't find a graphics card at the old PCI address. (DOH!)

- Use lspci to get the new address of the graphics card

- Edit Xorg config & change the graphics card address.

- Type "startx" at the command prompt aaaaand.... everything works.

Total time spent working on the system?, Two hours (including sourcing another MB).

- No activation

- No software re-installation

- No loss of functionality, in fact the new CPU is a bit faster.

Do THAT with a Windows PC!

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Microsoft cracks open Visual Studio to Linux C++ coders

BitDr
Bronze badge

Thanks but no thanks...

Microsoft was nowhere to be seen when I was looking for a RAD Dev Studio kind of environment way back in 2005, only now, 11 years later, do they decide to come to the Linux development party. After funding so many attacks against Linux, coercing Android vendors to pay them for licensing then forcing them to sign an NDA. And did you hear? The SCO Zombie is still claiming they own Linux and are appealing the latest ruling. Didn't Groklaw discover that M$ was allegedly arms-length funding SCO's efforts?

Thanks but no thanks. Now sod off.

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BMW complies with GPL by handing over i3 car code

BitDr
Bronze badge

Charge for shipping..

Yes you can charge for shipping, but it specifically states;

"for a charge no more than your cost of physically performing source distribution"

Taken from the following (Section 3 paragraph "a")

"Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give any third party, for a charge no more than your cost of physically performing source distribution, a complete machine-readable copy of the corresponding source code, to be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for software interchange; or,"

This should effectively keep the shipping cost from becoming a profit-centre.

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Apple's fruitless rootless security broken by code that fits in a tweet

BitDr
Bronze badge

Re: Hang on a minute

Users who machines are theirs, i.e.not company machines, have sudo so they can install applications and apply system updates. Those updates come from the repositories (in Linux) and the "Store" with Mac, Android and now Windows. The basic rule of thumb given to new Linux users is this; "Unless you are installing software, and YOU specifically went to the software manager/store to do it, when something asks you for your password be very aware, even suspicious, of why you're being asked for that information".

So far no-one has messed up their machine. Can it happen? Yes. Will it happen? Perhaps. The onus is on them.

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