* Posts by BitDr

112 posts • joined 3 Jun 2011

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ACHTUNG! Scary Linux system backdoor turns boxes into DDoS droids

BitDr

Re: Not Necessarily

Or, "Tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed"... Hmmm he (who shall not be named) was a politician too.. so same difference I guess.

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BitDr

Re: This is a very poor article.

There seems to be a slight uptick in vague articles about scary exploits in Linux; enough so that I'm beginning to wonder how (or why) they get past the editors. These kinds of "stories" smack of scare tactics that would be more at home in a FUD marketing campaign than in an IT news publication read by professionals & enthusiasts.

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Why Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi 2? Upton: 'I drank the Kool-Aid'

BitDr

Re: Wow..... just look at all the hate.

The trouble is that it's not the fans of the WIndows OS that are doing the work, it's Microsoft.

The Windows OS can't be rebuilt by it's fans to run on new or unusual hardware because the fans don't have access to the source, making it impossible for them to perform the task. If they had the source then they would also be in violation of the EULA, which is a whole other problem for them.

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Microsoft tells big biz: No free Windows 10 for you, crack wallets open

BitDr

Re: Win 8 & Win 10 vsWin 7

"The problem is that you want to locate things by knowing where everything is - that went out with the Ark."

So the problem is people like to be organized? Imagine if every time you went to work your had to search for everything because nothing was where you left it. Doesn't that sound like fun?

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Why Microsoft's 3D HoloLens goggles aren't for Google Glassholes

BitDr

I like it...

Applications abound, but I (and people like me) have to be able to develop on our platform of choice. It also has to be secure, imagine graffiti (or worse) popping into your holographic-space. I can think of loads of uses for this, but it needs independence from the Internet and any particular O/S. It has to be able to work with everything or it will fail. If a design shop runs Macs and wants to write software to display it's UI, or a part of it's UI in this device then it should be doable. Same for the *nix Operating Systems. It can't be Internet dependent, but its nature necessitates network dependence, which can be exclusive of the Internet.

I like it! Well done! Now, lets see if the business-types at MS screw it up... my gut tells me they will be greedy and try to tie it to their ecosystem to monetize the crap out of it. This will result in the Zune-effect taking hold and the product dying before it gets any real traction.

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LEAKED: Samsung's iPHONE 6 KILLER... the Samsung Galaxy S6

BitDr

Samsung...

I was looking at Samsung, nice devices, but with one niggly little design oversight that drove me crazy while I used it. The back button is on the right side of the device, which is fine for languages that read right to left, but my native toung reads from left to right, and when I turn back a page I turn back from the left side. It doesn't seem like much, but it is an oversight that keeps me from buying one of their otherwise lovely devices.

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Microsoft will give away Windows 10 FREE - for ONE year

BitDr

Re: Security / Trustworthy Computing

Trustworthy computing was never intended to benefit you, it was for them! They could trust that the version of windows was not stolen.. and you thought that it meant that you could trust the OS? Kind of like UEFI and secure boot, it's not for you really, it's for them.

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Go Canada: Now ILLEGAL to auto-update software without 'consent'

BitDr

Re: Not bad

Uh huh... so an ISP can try to force you to install software. What if you are running Linux? Will they justify kicking you off their network because they can't install their security tools?

Madness.

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BitDr
Facepalm

Re: hmmm...

Yeah.. everyone EXCEPT the slime-ball criminals is affected by their misguided efforts. The goodie-goodie-nambie-pamby-left-leaning-social-engineering-think-of-the-children idiots don't understand is that criminals by definition do not obey the law. They also have a problem with scope... as in the Internet is global and good-luck applying your nation's laws to someone in a country on the other side of the planet, perhaps in the opposite hemisphere.

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Tesla S P85+: Smiling all the way to the next charging point

BitDr

Re: If only..

I don't understand the down votes on this one. A fuel cell in conjunction with super capacitors or batteries (preferably the former) is a good solution. H2 storage is problematic but the biggest problem is the stigma created by the Hindenburg disaster. If the Titanic had that kind of power over ships there would be no cruise-ship vacations. That meme is much more difficult to overcome than anything else.

On another note, electric motors are not engines. The lump under the bonnet is not a motor it is an engine. What's the difference? A motor converts one form of energy directly into another (electrical to mechanical), an engine has one extra step. It employs a chemical process to liberate energy from a fuel and then converts that energy into another form. Or think of it this way, an engine powers a motor, a motor can not power an engine.

Batteries and fuel cells are engines, a super capacitor is a storage vessel, like a high-pressure gas-cylinder or a tightly wound spring.

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Dotcom 'saved' Xmas for Xbox – but no one can save Sony's titsup PlayStation Network

BitDr

Connecting the dots...

All three thousand of them. Lizard squad gets 3000 vouchers from Kim Dot com to stop their attack on the game networks, and three thousand tor relays then spin up to try to take down tor.

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IBM and Red Hat power up for virtualisation on Power systems

BitDr

Unused CPU cycle myth

"un-used CPU cycles are just asking for mean glances from financial types who've read airline magazines about cheap cloud servers"

The financial types need a swift kick in the arse. My servers idling in my business cost me only the electricity to run them and occasional hardware maintenance (replace a drive in a RAID, etc.). For a 4GHZ Multi-core/Multi-CPU server (be creative) costing 100,000.00 [insert your currency here] the first minute of up-time sees each second cost .0000004 [insert your currency here] per cycle. As time passes that number gets lower!

<sarcasm>Oh yes.. VERY expensive. </sarcasm>

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

BitDr

Re: Why?

Starting THOUSANDS of VMs? For who? If you're talking computing as a service then forget about it. Why the heck would rely on someone else and get in the blame-throwing game when problems inevitably arise? My servers, my VMs, My Data, My Business. When you work for me your VM it is spun up 24/7/365 with backup servers at the ready should things go south.

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BitDr

Re: Hasn't this happened already with Upstart?

Now John this

"So just use syslog, like the default Debian install of systemd does."

is condescending, and ill-deserved. It's like telling a pilot who wants to go to the moon to "just build a rocket and go like NASA did". Sys admins and businesses are looking at spending time and money figuring out how to undo Mr. Pottering's good intentions, why is that? If systemd was truly a drop-in (transparent) replacement it would cause no angst (although I'm sure SOMEONE would complain).

However, now that the deed is done it's all going to come down to money, the question is whose going to get that money? Will I absorb the cost to change everything and allow systemd to infiltrate my servers going forward, or should I freeze everything where it is and put resources into an alternative distro like Devuan. I have to ask: "Does systemd brings any tangible or financial benefit to my server environment and business operation"? So far the answer is "no".

Perhaps systemd can improve desktop PC boot-time, but so can using an SSD, which truly IS a drop-in replacement; but even THAT no longer matters as many desktops here are virtual and up 24/7/365 (except the Windows VMs, they seem to need rebooting to remain stable).

Keeping on track with who gets the money, GNOME 3 is out, as is Windows 8 and the future Windows 10. Our users liked Gnome 2.x and it worked well, so Mate gets our support (yes financially) as does Windows 7 (but far less-so). We don't encourage Windows because with the exception of a certain nameless accounting package (that we're working to replace), it really is irrelevant and just increases costs.

We were set to start sending funds to CentOS but their implementation of BIOSDEVNAME and subsequent gushing about now being officially aligned with RH caused us to re-evaluate their strategic direction. It's not looking good for CentOS in our shop, although that too is subject to change.

In real-estate it's all about location, in system administration & business I.T. it's all about stability. We are always looking to improve things, but we need to do it in a sane manner. It's evolution vs revolution. If you change something critical, no matter how well-intentioned the change, you must QA & regression test it before releasing it. It has GOT to be ROCK solid, well documented, and transparent in it's use & maintenance. Miss ANY of these and you had best go back to the drawing-board.

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BitDr

Uptime and the false need for a quicker boot...

My desktop runs 24/7/365, as do my servers. The desktop is a Fedora 14 box which does everything except NetFlix. As of late (the last 6 months or so) I've been using a VM more and more. Eventually, my desktop will be a VM hosted on the more powerful of the two servers. The beast-under-the-desk will get replaced by a SFF thin-client terminal device.

The laptop gets no use, but the netbook (an Aspire One) runs Fedora 14 and boots from an SSD in under 30 seconds, no need for anything faster. A tablet is the computer-on-the-road, and it's boot time is abysmal compared to everything else in the stable.

So, for faster boots, use an SSD and keep your home partition on spinning rust (preferably a RAID).

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BitDr

Re: Off to a bad start

@ John Sanders

I think the question being asked is "why". Why are binary logs a requirement? What's the driver? Logs are for people to read and understand so they can work with the data. Binary is not user friendly, text is. If the need is for machine readable logs then use XML (and no sneaking in binary objects while we're not looking!).

Just because something CAN be done doesn't mean that it SHOULD be done. My instinct tells me to run in the opposite direction of any distro using systemd, the more I learn about it the more I see it as a single point of failure, and a huge mass of spaghetti. The siren call of BSD is getting stronger by the day.

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Fake antivirus scams: It's a $120m business – and alleged ringleaders have just been frozen

BitDr
Thumb Down

Re: Finally!

The people who make the fake anti-malware are indeed lower than whale feces. A customer called me about this very kind of manipulative bovine excrement just yesterday.

Systemd is an insidious evil that needs to be put out of our misery, as does BIOSDEVNAME for named devices (though that could be fixed by remapping them to the original naming scheme), but I digress.

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UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan

BitDr

Re: Whatever.

The way things are going in the LINUX world I'm probably going to migrate my servers to BSD.

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BitDr

Re: Pottering just doesn't get it.

Insane? No. Dumb like a fox? Perhaps.

We can pretty much all agree that server environments really don't benefit from a quicker boot time simply because they are rarely rebooted.

Given that the above is true, and given that systemd is being pushed by server vendor we can say that the actual purpose systemd is NOT because we need faster boot times.

Given that systemd is beginning to control almost everything, and holds forward that it makes life easier to tweak when it comes to services. I postulate that the real purpose of systemd is to grab GNU/LINUX by the throat and dictate terms to any and all who use it.

All good is hard. All evil is easy.

Dying, losing, cheating and mediocrity are easy.

Stay away from easy.

--Scott Alexander

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You dirty RAT! Hong Kong protesters infected by iOS, Android spyware

BitDr

Re: Still don't get it...

OK, someone who does not want to have their device controlled by the manufacturer NEEDS to root it. But you're talking about preference, so you prefer to be controlled and in the walled garden. Fine. However to your point of defining need as opposed to preference, lets say you have a nexus one, it's getting low on RAM, everything you have installed on it are tools you use daily. Wait a minute, there's YouTube sucking up a few MB, and FaceBook standing guard over another few MB. They can't be moved to the SD memory and you can use the websites... no app needed... but they also can't be uninstalled! Hmmm, you can't afford a new phone, but you heard a buddy talking about how he rooted his phone and installed some neat apps; he also said something about "freeing up memory". So you get in touch with him and root your phone to eliminate the craplettes. Now you have more memory and don't need to find a few hundred [insert your currency here] for a new device, or get locked into a contract by getting a "free" upgrade.

There.. a case where someone could NEED to root their phone. That their privacy is enhanced is a side benefit.

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BitDr

Loads of Permissions

Agreed, too many apps want access to everything on your device, those do not get installed on mine. A really good example is my bank's app. It wants access to everything but I can use their web-site without that kind of privacy invasion.

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BitDr

Rooting != Intelligent_User

The average user, having seen some neat things that can be done with a rooted device, only needs to know someone who can root their device for them. They were probably cautioned at the time it was done, but all they heard was "blah-blah-blah be careful yadda yadda" .

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FBI boss: Apple's iPhone, iPad encryption puts people 'ABOVE THE LAW'

BitDr

Interesting thing...

Laws change (albeit slowly), therefore "the rule of law" of any given nation is subject to the culture of the nation's government at any given point in time.

Rights trump the law, governments and law-enforcement ignore this at their peril because history shows that it will eventually bite them on the behind.

Many atrocities have been comitted within the rule of law.

Unlike a law, a right can not be taken-away, oddly enough IMHO neither can they be granted (although they can be taken for granted). Priviliges are granted, rights are not. For example no one has the right to subjugate another, but everyone has the right to place themselves in subjugation. This brings up the interesting question of how to maintain subjugation of someone once they have placed themselves in that position, because there is no right to do this. That would be a contract.

I used subjugate in the above example because of the image it conjures up, We're not talking enslavement, that is the extreme; we're talking about turning over control, piecemeal-like, of your daily existence-activities into the hands of others. The treatise-length (which this post is in danger of becoming) EULAs are good examples.

Encryption of personal information is keeping that information under your control, that's why it is called "personal" information. If it was written down on paper and stored in a safe in your house the law-enforcement agencies would not be able to go to the mortgage holder (which might be you), demand a key to your home, contact the maker of the safe, demand a master-combination/key, drive to your domicile, and search the premises at any time they pleased, for any reason they can think of.

Law enforcement is the immune-system of civilization, if it becomes cancerous it can kill both itself and the body in which it lives.

Rule of law, yes; but not to the detriment of civilization.

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DEATH TO TCP/IP cry Cisco, Intel, US gov and boffins galore

BitDr

Re: Might this be the DAP of networking?

What is needed is better infrastructure, reducing the amount of data flying about it will buy some time but ultimately more capacity is required.

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BitDr

I would think that by its very nature (targeted entity) there are no proxies.. your device is the targeted "entity".

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

BitDr

Stability & evolutionary change Vs change driven by ADD & the latest shiny

I, as many others, use what just works. Developments of the last few years (systemd, wayland, touch GUIs for the desktop, predictable device names, etc.) have me considering moving away from Linux to BSD.

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Listen: WORST EVER customer service call – Comcast is 'very embarrassed'

BitDr

Re: Service Call.

With many businesses there is no way to actually register a complaint. If means to do so is given it is usually email and the canned response you eventually receive makes it obvious that no one actually read and understood your attempt to communicate. Businesses today only want to sell product, sign you up for a subscription, and most offer only email as a means of contact. There is a feeling of general apathy when it comes to customer service.

I recently posted a query to an ISP about their high speed wireless business services (4G/LTE) for rural businesses. asking if they had plans for a more symetrical Upload/Download service as I might become a customer if they did. I explained that their service of 10MB/s down and 1MB/s up was not conducive to running a business that uses VOIP phones, hosts their own email server, and their own colloboration tools, allows staff t remote into their desktop from the field, and remotley admins customer's servers.

I got a message back from their support staff saying they couldn't discuss this kind of thing in email and that they would be happy to look into my account and resolve my issues if I would just call them.

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Judge says there's no such thing as a 'Patent Troll'

BitDr

Lots of articles/documents in Groklaw about her involvement in the cases that were covered by the site.

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Google's Quickoffice taken behind shed ... 'Oh, what's the gun for?'

BitDr

Re: Not unexpected

Seems a no brainer, libre office on DALVIK... must be problematic though, the guys at Libre should have had this in the works a long time ago.

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FCC: We're GUTTED people think we'd gut net neutrality

BitDr

OK, the question is do we have the will and ability to take our toy away from them? Move the cheese, so to speak.

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Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Great changes, but sssh don't mention the...

BitDr

Re: Veredict: skip

This;

"allow a common codebase on the different devices, with an adaptive UI that can change on the fly from 'phone in my pocket with finger friendly controls' to 'desktop computer UI with more mouse and keyboard oriented controls'. "

is a noble goal, and one which I find myself in happy agreement with, however requiring the computing device to connect to the Internet in order to supply SAAS or OSAAS is utterly distasteful eg. you can then be held hostage by those who have taken over the Internet pipes.

So, a UI that works well as a touch UI, and doesn't change too much when it becomes keyboard centric, and a computing device that can use multiple displays as it sees fit (provided it is authorised on them). Hmmm.. Just as an aside, I recently started using a Blue Tooth mouse on my XOOM when I am at the office (already had a keyboard), and was surprised at how good it all worked. Just had to remember not to double click on an icon to start an app. But Mouse wheel scrolls through the different "desktops", or through the apps when viewing them. Everything works as expected.

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BitDr

Re: The fixation with 'serarch' for everything

Fascinating. A keyboard centric GUI... whatever for... just use the shell. There... fixed that for ya.

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A scanner, darkly: Master data-miner Google tweaks terms of service

BitDr

Thats it for them then...

I've migrated my default search engine on all platforms to one that does not track their users. My GMail is a shell account used for nothing relevant (i.e. a spam trap for companies who ask me for my email (if I give it to them)), and I don't use Google Hangouts. Is placing people in an information bubble quasi-equivalent to a feedback loop? i.e. You see what you're interested in and only what is relevant.

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Too late, Blighty! Samsung boffins claim breakthrough graphene manufacturing success

BitDr

Applying for a patent to use a material in a device... isn't that a bit like trying to get a patent to use wood in houses, steel in shelving units, plastic in [insert your item here].

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Crap turnover, sucky margins: TV is a 'terrible business' – Steve Jobs

BitDr

Re: Jobs was a genius

I've got a 52" LG DLP that is a truly wonderful unit, even if it is 8 years old. The picture is sharp, the colours are vibrant and sound is excellent. I would buy another DLP in a heartbeat (if I could). The lamp in this one has been replaced twice (4 years use per bulb) , and I have one more spare.

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Today: Get REAL about data location in the cloud

BitDr

My data, my servers, my premises, my terms. Nuff said.

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Netflix original TV shows gamble pays off... to the tune of 10m new viewers

BitDr

Cable company and teleco owns infrastructure, teleco also owns content creation, these guys are pushing for different pricing for data delivery based on the KIND of data (as if the ones and zeros were somehow different). If they succeed then they are essentially in a position to strangle competition as they own the pipes.

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Fedora back on track with Schrödinger's cat

BitDr

"The default Fedora install CD still installs the GNOME Shell, though there is now, helpfully, a series of animated tutorials to help you get a handle on the counter-intuitive interface that is GNOME 3."

"counter-intuitive interface" is exactly what a GUI is NOT supposed to be.

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Microsoft caves on Xbox One DRM and used-game controls

BitDr

Good spin...

The entire strategy appeared to be one of phasing out physical media while, during transition, locking existing physical media to their servers.

"You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc," Mattrick said.

"The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world."

Really? That is pretty good spin they put on the tsunami of negativity that came their way.

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Tesla's Elon Musk v The New York Times, Round 2

BitDr

Re: They're both full of $#!T

In town driving uses the most energy, so taking a two mile trip in down town Manhattan might sound innocent enough, but if you're stuck in stop-and-go in traffic for an hour with the heater going it is going to put a severe dent in your battery capacity.

During an auto show (about 20 years ago) I spoke with a fellow who was promoting electric conversions or some such. His enthusiasm was all well and good, but when asked how the vehicle would perform (range-wise) on a cold Canadian evening (-15C) with heater, headlights, drive-motors, windscreen wipers, marker lights etc. all needing power, subsided slightly. A simple solution to the demands made on the batteries for cabin heat would be to use something other than electric power... perhaps resurrect the old VW gas-heaters (modified for Propane or Natural Gas).

Another point from the story. The Journo says that Tesla put the wrong size tires on the vehicle. Was he trying to imply that this might be the cause for the discrepency in the logged speed and what he said he did? Wouldn't the car record what it is displaying on the instruments?

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Microsoft blasts PC makers: It's YOUR fault Windows 8 crash landed

BitDr

Re: Windows 7 stock?

"Most Windows 7 machines with touch suffer from awful lag, poor detection around the edges of the screen and often quite low touch resolution."

Ummmm... so would W7 also perform badly with a really kick-butt capacitive touch screen? If so then the problem is not the hardware.

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BitDr

Success...

It was Mr. Gates who said something along the lines of "Success is a lousy teacher, it convinces otherwise smart people that they can't lose". The executives at MS would do well to heed those words.

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Microsoft says Google trying to undermine Windows Phone

BitDr

Three words for MS

Corel Word Perfect

MS allegedly screwed Corel when they were trying to port Word Perfect to Windows 98, not a nice feeling is it MS? Of course nothing has been proven in either instance, it's all allegations and such, but eventually things will work out, and perhaps the phrase "reap what you sow" will become associated with one of the two.

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Troll sues Apple for daring to plug headphones into iPhone

BitDr

Greedy troll... stupid USPTO

I have a 1988 cell phone with a 'mic-in' jack.

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You know who else hates Windows 8? Hackers

BitDr

Re: "Quit spreading FUD!" says the chorus of astroturfers.

The ignorance of the consumer is being used to control/ensnare them, walls are being built around them and they can't see it because they see most geeks as frothing-at-the-mouth zealots who talk down to them, usually in tongues they don't understand. Meanwhile the Redmonds of the world offer a glib smile, a warm handshake, a shoulder to lean on, and some nice hot coco just before leading them to their newly-decorated cell and locking them inside.

The man with the smile and handshake will win every time over the rude zealot, he knows this, and he knows that just calling something "security feature" will help him immensely; especially if he controls it and requires it be enabled and others require it disabled. The psychology at work here is more important to the Redomnds of this world than any actual security provided; that lock in can be attained at some future date is just icing on the cake, that hardware manufacturers might have to bend to your will is cherries on the icing.

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BitDr

Re: Skeptical...

"Until its proven that secure boot isn't the anticompetitive scheme that it clearly can be, everyone should be on their guard."

And if it CAN be abused then it eventually WILL be abused.

UEFI is a straight-jacket dressed up as a security blanket.

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Never mind fat-bellied tech titans, give enterprise upstarts a chance

BitDr

"make my life easier and allow me to get more done for a cheaper price. Ultimately, isn't that the point of IT?"

Why, yes, yes it is the original point of IT, but the train seems to have gone completely off the rails. Today the point of IT appears to be to keep users on the treadmill spending their hard-earned dosh.

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BOFH: Hasta la Vista... luser

BitDr
Facepalm

Accurately describes...

Most of my customer base. Just yesterday I cleaned up a browser that had toolbars consuming one third of the available screen real-estate, and that was the least of the issues.

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BBC Watchdog crew sink teeth into dodgy PC repair shops

BitDr

Pirated software...

I refuse to install anything without the install media and licenses, even GPLd software must conform to this rule (although I can create the install media). Many business owners are of the opinion that because they paid for Office or Windows they can install it as many times as they want on as many machines as they want as long as they own the machines. Ummmm.... no. You want to do that then you pay for the licenses or you use Libre or Open office (or some such) and get off the software-crack (sic).

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Ay caramba, Ubuntu 12.10: Get it right on Amazon!

BitDr
FAIL

Kicked them to the curb long ago...

I actively discourage UBUNTU to those leaving Windows as my experience with other converts has shown that the Unity Interface drives them quite mad. Fedora is out of the picture because of Gnome 3 (same kind of insanity).

For me, just thinking of using either Unity or the Gnome 3 shell interface as a work environment sets my teeth on edge. I do keep tabs on developments in both to see if sanity is returning to the development teams, as yet there is no reason to be optimistic.

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