* Posts by Robert Helpmann??

1406 posts • joined 31 May 2011

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Drum roll, please .... Results are in for the collective noun for security vulns

Robert Helpmann??
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Pint

Re: Goosed geese

See what happens when I rely on memory alone? I read An Exaltation of Larks a while back, and it stuck that there is more than one term for geese depending on whether or not they are in flight. I had another look after your post, Sarah Balfour, and it turns out that it is more complicated than just one or the other:

"...when in flight, they are called a skein, a team, or a wedge; when flying close together, they are called a plump" - Wikipedia

Have one on me for the correction. As to your point about sheep, I dunno. Why is a shepherd called a shepherd and not a flocker?

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Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Goosed geese

Not gaggle, then, because that's for geese on the ground. "Flock" is the term for a group of geese in flight, providing fertilizer to those below.

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Uber pulls up to the bumper, plonks Jeep hackers into driving seat

Robert Helpmann??
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Mushroom

We have top men working on it right now.

The duo will be tasked with working with Uber's top infosec bods ...

Will they be working with the infosec bods responsible for securing Uber's petitions page or those entrusted with securing customers' personal info?

- If you look closely, you can see the refrigerator in the blast

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Jeep Cherokee 2.2: Capable, comfortable ... but just not very Jeep

Robert Helpmann??
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RE: Question

If one is 30% reliable and the other is 40% reliable, you find their combined reliability by multiplying the two giving 12% (oh my!) overall reliability... for example.

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Google tells iOS 9 app devs: Switch off HTTPS if you want that sweet sweet ad money from us

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: You keep on using that word...

Sorry, Tristan, but you clearly don't know what "committed" means. Here's a hint: it doesn't mean...

No, it means "locked away due to mental issues." My overall impression is that Google truly wish to encourage use of HTTPS. Perhaps they might put a bit of effort into developing tools to vet 3rd party ads for security issues (assuming they don't already). They are in a great position to do so and can think of it as securing their revenue stream. Right now, they seem to be in a position of advocating one thing and being dependent on its opposite.

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Vote now: Who can solve a problem like Ashley Madison?

Robert Helpmann??
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Joke

AJ FTW

He seems to have a fetish for 'Angelina Jolie'...

I picked one of the AJ options as there is no fixing this mess but, in keeping with the theme of the employer, I find her nicer to look at than McAfee. Although the fetish comment might work, too...

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Security for those who know they can't win the security war

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: I'm tired already just reading it

This is fantastic advice, unfortunately the rest of the article sounds more like "go to enormous lengths to protect everything 100%".

I hate to criticize writing style as I do not want to come across as making an ad hominem attack, but it is pertinent here. This entire article amounts to a collection of personal anecdotes. for example, "Lesson well and truly learned: most laptops that are stolen are by opportunistic thieves." A single sample study? The article purports to address personal security practices aimed toward protecting personal data both from unauthorized access and from accidental loss. I am not entirely sure if this was the case, which is where the writing style issue comes in for me.

Rather than continue in this vein, perhaps it would be instructive to point out a few things. First, what we are discussing here is personal security, not corporate. This implies both a comparative lack of resources, as the author rightly pointed out, and a greater need to customize the solution to the needs of the person. For example, the point about encryption of everything is rendered moot if you consider that one of the devices someone might have is a home media server. Perhaps placing it behind a firewall and setting up a cloud backup schedule for updated files only might be appropriate. Or simple offsite storage of a copy of the drives to be updated monthly would be more cost and time effective given that cloud storage might become prohibitively expensive as the library grows. What would encryption bring to the party here?

This brings up the issue that security beyond the endpoint was hardly addressed. A typical household that has internet connectivity probably has a phone per resident and perhaps a similar number of desktops, laptops, tablets or similar. It increasingly has other devices that connect to the internet. If you have a new TV or recording device or BR player or... the list goes on... you should at least understand how they work and how someone else might take advantage of them. You should take some basic precautions with your home router, perhaps setting up a separate network with your own kit and your own firewall. Put simply, the data on your devices is not the only thing you should be concerned with; there is plenty of sensitive data that can be pulled from your devices beyond your Word and Excel files.

Also lacking was how to act when outside the home. Should you connect to your hotel's wifi? If so, what kind of info should you trust to flow across their network? OK, trick question there, but the point is that it is not all about equipment. It is arguably more about behavior than anything else. Social engineering has probably compromised more data than attacks that do not make use of it. I would argue that a mandatory course in good online behavior and online risks would do more to ensure personal security than setting up encryption for all the drives in the world.

Personal security should be tailored to the individual's needs and situation, it does not stop with their files and one or two of their devices, it varies depending on situation and location, and good behavior is more important than everything else.

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Hardened Linux stalwarts Grsecurity pull the pin after legal fight

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: Non sequitur?

I get them being upset about their brand being attached to what they consider an inferior product, but this sounds a lot like they jumped on one business model and are pissed off that another business decided to take advantage of a perfectly legal, though different, way of doing business. If it is a trademark issue, then fine, take them to court. Even if it fails to gain any funds for the company, the best way to lose a trademark in the US is to fail to defend it. If it is a matter of use of their product, as long as no laws were broken, then there is nothing that can be done, even if it is a bitter pill to swallow.

I view this action as an admission that the Grsecurity business model did not work and hope the change works out well for them.

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Password 'XXXXairocon' pops Wi-Fi routers from ASUS, ZTE and others

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: That is a strong password

But there are ways to get the MAC address of a remote computer with only the IP address.

On the plus side, I believe at least one of these allows owners to change their MAC address. On the minus, none ever will. Additionally, most MAC ranges are registered by company, so an attacker could rely on a rainbow table rather than being forced to use a brute-force attack to compromise one of these boxes.

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D-Wave: 'Whether or not it's quantum, it's faster'

Robert Helpmann??
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Reverse Psychology Marketing

“...we do not address the issue of quantum speedup; rather our goal is to compare runtime performance strictly within the range of problem sizes tested.“

Letting a product stand on its own merits instead of buzzwords and hype? That is a novel approach.

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Android in user-chosen lockscreen patterns are grimly predictable SHOCKER

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: I'm guessing this is a joke. Right?

"Pattern lets you draw a simple pattern with your finger to unlock the device."

Yeah, I looked at the link, too, and was similarly underwhelmed. I decided to do a little more looking, though, and found that unless it's been patched in the past couple of years, the way the system stores pattern info is less secure that it does with PINs.

Source: Android Forensics: Cracking the Pattern Lock Protection Forensics, August 19, 2013

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Angry Birds maker Rovio takes aim at staff, axes a third of them

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: Greed to put it simply ....

They also did what many aging actors do: they started appearing in ads. There was an Angry Birds game or mini game to support a pizzeria, pistachios, a race car driver, movies, a rock band... I lost track. That's neither being ambitious nor establishing your own brand.

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Big trouble in big China: Crashing economy in Middle Kingdom body slams US tech stocks

Robert Helpmann??
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Joke

Re: What do they get from apple? @YAAC

Jobs?

Sorry, couldn't resist.

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Manhattan-sized iceberg splits from glacier – and spotted FROM SPACE

Robert Helpmann??
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Pint

Re: when measuring things in terms of Manhattans

Robert, when measuring things in terms of Manhattans, one should use a standard cocktail glass.

See, that's the sort of thing that results in space probes crashing into the sides of planets: mixing units of volume with units of area. Here, have one on me for spotting that.

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Robert Helpmann??
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Facepalm

El Reg UoM?

"The iceberg is an estimated 12.5 square kilometers 0.6 milliWales across and has a depth of around 1400 meters 10 brontosauruses, meaning a volume of 17.5 cubic kilometers just under a staggering 7 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. That would equate to enough ice to bury the entire island of Manhattan Wales under 300 metres of frozen water a light dusting of snow."

FTFY! I know it's a bit of fun, but if you are going to compare an area with a presumably well known body of land, why not stick with established precedent and use Wales? Besides, when measuring things in terms of Manhattans, you should also use miles, yards and feet as Americans are notoriously resistant to the use of metric measurements. One of the most important reasons to read The Register is that it is fun to read, at least for me. I can get most of the content elsewhere. It is the quality of the writing that keeps me coming back.

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Samsung smart fridge leaves Gmail logins open to attack

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: IoT crazy

Why the hell would I want remote control access for my fridge?

Because of the "Bring Me Beer" button!

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Směrť Špionam! BAN Windows 10, it SPIES too much, exclaim Russians

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: CAN you REALLY turn off those features?

The hint would be that the default is to gather everything it can and send it on home (Passwords? Really??) I am most interested to see how businesses and government agencies deal with this particular bit of data-gathering. Oh, wait... that's exactly what is going on here.

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Yammer security sub-standard says US Veterans' Affairs Dept

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Simple Fix

...users were unable to remove the Online Now instant messaging feature...

The appropriate response would have been to uninstall the application (coincidentally removing the Online Now feature), to block access to the Yammer site at the FW, and to sanction anyone who reinstalled the stuff. The CIO should have a really good idea as to what is permitted on their systems. He should have been thrown under the proverbial bus, not sideswiped.

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High-heeled hacker builds pen-test kit into her skyscraper shoes

Robert Helpmann??
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Joke

What Next?

I have to turn my phone off and leave it in a locker before coming to work. When my employers see this article, I guess I will have to do the same with my shoes. What's next? Ban all clothing?

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Does Linux need a new file system? Ex-Google engineer thinks so

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Grown out of work done at Google

That would explain the Googler's use of the term "metastasizing." It is refreshing when someone is up front about the fact their employer, past or present, is a cancer.

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Amazon to trash Flash, as browsers walk away

Robert Helpmann??
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Missed by that much....

My first glance at the headline made me think it was Adobe that was ditching Flash instead of Amazon. I had to explain to some of my coworkers why I was briefly happy and now less so.

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Sysadmin ignores 25 THOUSAND patches, among other sins

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: I don't think he handled this job at all correctly

Before he touched ANYTHING, he should have made 100% certain he had a way to go back to the previous state if he broke something.

I think a step back from that would have been more to the point. This was touched on above, but first he should have made sure the state things were in. Second, he should have come up with several possible courses of action. Third, he should have consulted with management and obtained informed consent before proceeding on to taking any sort of action. Management should have to accept the risk of making changes, especially of this scope and nature. Allowing them to bury their heads and later deny everything when it all goes wrong is never a good strategy. Ultimately, management is responsible and it is a good idea to keep that in mind.

I've cleaned up plenty of messes (both my own and those of others). I have found it to be useful to let those above me know just how bad things really are, especially as it makes me look that much better after it's all sorted. On the other hand, having documented that the boss signed off on something and it turned out badly because of the decisions someone else made rather than something I did has proven helpful on occasion, too.

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Canadians taking to spying on their spies

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

The only Canadians who matter are those who turn up to vote.

I'm just letting you know out of courtesy that I am stealing that and modifying to fit my own ends. Well said!

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Want security? Next-gen startups show how old practices don't cut it

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: People "trained in IT security" are a lot of the problem

I would argue that not enough people being trained in security is a major problem. I don't mean security professionals. I mean every user in the company environment ought to have at least a basic amount of training as to how they are supposed to behave and why and that it should be an integral part of corporate IT culture. In fact, while Trevor might lump this in with his Prevention category, I would argue that it is important enough to rate its own entry. When I evaluate a corporate IT product, I look at what training the company selling the product offers. Why would information security products be different in that regard?

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Hyundai ix35 Fuel Cell: El Reg on the hydrogen highway

Robert Helpmann??
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Coat

Re: What's wrong with the old fashioned way?

Burn the hydrogen in a slightly tweaked, bog standard combustion engine and avoid the rather excessive cell tax completely.

No! Jet engines all the way! Who has seen the classic 60s Batmobile and not had the visceral longing to own one of those? If widespread use caught on, we would eliminate any problem with tailgating. Also, development of this technology should lead to flying cars, so it must happen. Hydrogen jet powered cars for everyone!1

The keys are in my pocket.

1 It is election season here in the US so I am running a test of my stump speech with this. Vote now. Vote often. Vote for me.

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Who should be responsible for IT security?

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: CISO on its own?

For a bank, risk/security is very much a field in its own...

Contrast this with retail where the main thrust of "security" is to reduce shrinkage (vanishing inventory). I caught the facility security manager installing malware infested freeware on her computer on a regular basis. I could not get her to understand that her machine was connected to every other one on the network, including and especially those the company used to generate profits.

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Been sleeping well lately? No nightmares? Here's a lumbering Google bigfoot bot

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: Kill switch?

Where is the kill switch?

On the battery pack carried by the pathetic meat bag human engineer trailing along behind.

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Microsoft drops rush Internet Explorer fix for remote code exec hole

Robert Helpmann??
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FAIL

Pro Tip

An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user. If the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of an affected system.

"A simple fix for this is to not allow browsers to run under admin accounts by default. Disabling other common attack vectors in a similar manner (e.g. email clients) will result in increased security on systems. In general, it is a good idea to not do non-administrative tasks using an admin account."

- Captain Obvious (attrib.)

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Parrot drone pwned (and possibly killed) with Wi-Fi log-in

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: Bah!

The drone runs on Busybox which has had a few vulnerabilities and has been targeted in the past. You could indeed create a squad of possessed killer parrots!

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Anti-botnet initiatives USELESS in sea of patch-hating pirates

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: Why not issue a kill command?

...in case it's not obvious, the box to tick here is "Laws specifically prevent it"...

This points the way to the solution. If a politician or a sufficient number of a politician's top donors are made to realize that their servers are infected with something like this, the politician will Do Something1. This will take the form of passing legislation which we all know will fix everything. In this particular case, it might remove the impediment to two wrongs in fact making a right or perhaps fund a new agency which is authorized to cleanse this blight from the world2.

1 This is the dodgy part as it involves getting politicians to deal with something technical and have that lead to a reasonable and useful outcome.

2 Yes, the entire world, because there are no borders among the interwebs!

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Android apps are flooding on to jailbroken Win10 phones

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: This could be a win

After all; what else is ever going to tempt Android users into even trying a Windows phone?

I just upgraded to a Nexus. While doing a comparison of the various phones my service provider offered, I realized mine only offered a token Windows Phone choice and definitely not the latest and greatest. Many, probably most, people don't look beyond what their service providers offer as part of a bundled plan when shopping for a new phone, so I think "doing a better job working with the vendors" might be part of the answer to your question.

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Trend publishes analysis of yet another Android media handling bug

Robert Helpmann??
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From Never to Almost Never

Getting patches applied to vulnerable systems may however take some time due to the fragmented nature of the Android ecosystem as well as the lack of an efficient patch delivery mechanism, at least outside of Google's home-grown Nexus devices.

Exactly why I got a Nexus. I liked the old phone, but my carrier was never going to update it. So now I get security updates a bit slowly, but it's a vast improvement on never, right?

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Snowball spud gun shows comets could have seeded Earth with life

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: What if they were already here?

Couldn't that also mean that an impactor caused locally available amino acids to fuse into said peptides?

So it's an experiment that failed to disprove a hypothesis, added to the body of available knowledge, and raised more questions as well? Sounds like science. Carry on.

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Adobe pays US$1.2M plus settlements to end 2013 breach class action

Robert Helpmann??
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Blood in the Water

[Adobe] was served a ... class action lawsuit ...in which it is claimed "shoddy" security practises lead to the breach.

Just like shooting fish in a barrel, throwing that sueball at Adobe. Perhaps customers can litigate bad software out of existence. Probably not, but I am sure there are some lawyers out there willing to give it a try.

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US Air Force: 'Loose tweets destroy fleets'

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: Sign of the times

Not to be outdone, the Russians also have been caught out on social media. Security training is not something that can be done once and then left at that. It requires ongoing efforts and many, many reminders. And even after all of that, there will still be some twit who will allow unaccompanied "tech support" into the server room after giving that unauthorized individual an admin credentialed account and password.

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Surprise! World stunned to learn that AT&T is in the NSA's pocket

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: NSAT&T

Why? Because the current "Death Star" motif doesn't get the idea across?

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Testing times as NASA rattles Mississippi with mighty motor burn

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: new technology...

...one idea that would also help a bit is a massive mountain-side rail-gun style to allow a proportion of the launch momentum to be delivered from ground-based power.

There are a number of possibilities that have been explored in this regard such as firing a laser at the bottom of the craft to superheat the air beneath it. That's pretty nifty, but my favorite is the space gun which would be capable of literally firing objects into space (much as the name implies). The US Navy has a railgun project that is coming close to being able to do this with small objects, but these are meant to come back down. Still, if the research put into that could be further developed to launch things with a reasonable amount of acceleration (without turning people into paste), we might have a winner.

For purposes of comparison, escape velocity is about 11.2 kps (81 bnps) and the USN railgun will fire projectiles at about 2.5-3.5 kps (18-25 bnps) while the fastest bullet train taps out at around .17 kps (1.2 bnps).

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BLADE-WIELDING BOTS conquer humans in RADIO DEATHMATCH

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Throw Snow?

Yes, the lawnbot has blades, but the snowbot could throw shit 10 or more meters.

If it is throwing the snow, it isn't properly equipped. If it came in an updated laser-wielding model, I would lay down some cash for that.

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Use QuickTime … and become part of the collective

Robert Helpmann??
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Trollface

Re: VLC

Honestly, if you think a cobbled together media player is somehow a replacement for QuickTime then you simply don't know what QuickTime is.

Let's do a quick side-by-side comparison: QuickTime (OK, you'll have to dig through the linked user manual to get much in the way of specifics, but it's an iProgram, so it's really about the way it makes you feel any way) vs VLC. Yes, there are a few differences, but I'm hardly persuaded that I should drop VLC and join the Cult of Apple on this one.

Troll icon because you really should have.

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175 MILLION websites still powered by Windows Server 2003

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: Oh come on..

Pretty much the same went on when OS/2 went past end-of-life. Banks were responsible in large part for keeping it alive on life support long after IBM wanted to pull the plug. The usual excuse is that they are risk-averse, but to be honest it's more a case of having a huge amount of changes to be made without having the proper resources devoted to the issue. I would look to see them keep Server 2003 alive for another few years and for there to be licensed third party support after (again, as with OS/2). Windows XP is still being supported (MS is still rolling out patches to paying customers) and its official end of life was April 8, 2014. My best guess is that Server 2003 will finally die become undead around 2020.

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Er, uh ... sorry! Project Ara will not launch this year after all

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: I can't see an use for this

However, if this modular system is extended to tablet screens, keyboards and more, the possibilities become more interesting.

This! Yes, this! I am sure there were plenty of people who took a look at the Raspberry Pi when it first came out and just didn't get it. The 5 millionth RPi was sold back in February of this year. This will be a niche product by its very nature, but it will give plenty of bright souls a playground in which to enjoy themselves, to create new gadgets, and to find novel solutions to existing problems. I say good luck and please don't stop.

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China shutters 50 websites for spreading explosion 'rumours'

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: Woah. Thank $DEITY for $REDACTED Freedom of the Press

And very unlike the western democracies...

Nice troll, but it falls a bit flat. For one thing, you can publicly disagree with privately owned news media and not get hauled off to a re-education camp.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Spanish summer soother salmorejo

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

A Good Start

We used a garlic bread (with chunks of garlic in it) and initial tasting before setting it aside to chill indicate this will be tasty and hit the spot.

I am not normally a fan of unadorned tomatoes for flavor, but I am going to give this a go. The garlic bread idea looks sound, but I prefer to test the base recipe first and then tweak to fit my tastes. Another possible addition is some fresh basil. Good thing I have some on hand. Perhaps a side-by-side will be in order...

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'Sunspots drive climate change' theory is result of ancient error

Robert Helpmann??
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Boffin

Re: Count or area

One basic consideration when comparing historical data is are are you comparing apples to apples? What instruments were used then compared to now? Do they reliably measure the same thing? Are measurements taken with the same frequency? Are there any other areas in which inconsistencies might skew the data and introduce an artifact? I believe that in the case with the NOAA update many of the the differences were down to measurements by ships in the older data versus measurements by buoys in newer data. More details can be found here. It wouldn't surprise me at all if there were some similar issues with this data set.

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Dead Steve Jobs' life and times are being turned into an OPERA

Robert Helpmann??
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Paris Hilton

Non sequitur much?

"We have included a symphony, titled Alternative Energy, by composer Mason Bates below."

And is this the composer with whom the Santa Fe Opera (not the Sante Fe Opera, I believe) commissioned this work or was that just thrown in for additional entertainment value? Editor? A little help here, please.

Good choice of banner image, though.

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First SPACE SALAD on Monday's menu for ISS astronauts

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

More on the Menu

I think it is wonderful that the space station dwellers get fresh salad. I would have thought that either sprouts of some sort or an aquatic species (perhaps duckweed or watercress) would have been an easier starting point, but we certainly cannot accuse anyone up there of aiming low!

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Tobacco field bacteria offers hope for buzz-kill smoking therapy

Robert Helpmann??
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Re: Fingers crossed

Assuming this drug works as intended, it will need to be a lifetime therapy in order to be successful. Nicotine addition, like many other forms of addiction, is both physiological and psychological in nature. Stop smoking cold turkey and you feel like crap for a couple of weeks but you will be through the physiological side of quitting after that. The real problem is that smoking is a behavior. It can be displaced by another behavior, but once it is acquired, it will be on the menu for the rest of the addict's life. The joke is that millions of people have quit smoking millions of times and there's the rub: if you put the addict back in the same set of circumstances that were previously associated with smoking, the odds are extremely good that it will happen again.

This potential drug will therefor only be useful in preventing relapse in as much as it prevents the addict from ever experiencing the rewarding sensations given through smoking. In order for that to work, it will always need to be in the person's system.

While I am not saying this would not be worthwhile for people who are affected by this horrible addiction, but I can definitely see that it would be worthwhile from the perspective of drug companies as it would give them a nice steady revenue stream.

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Bitcoin can't be owned, says Japanese court, as Karpeles sweats in cell

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Not Copyright Infringement

So how do they deal with other forms of crime involving digital assets? Most money transfers these days do not involve physical assets. Likewise with high frequency trading in various stock markets. Under this ruling, if I hacked into the Nikkei or a local bank and skimmed some virtual assets, it wouldn't be theft, would it? This sounds like the quote was taken out of context given that these sorts of things would presumably already be covered under Japanese law. Perhaps these actions are better covered as fraud. Of course, it is also possible that this ruling might be overturned on appeal.

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Surprise! Evil-eyed cats MORE LIKELY to be SNEAKY PREDATORS – boffins

Robert Helpmann??
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Yes, but...

...what does that say about the mantis shrimp?

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Playing with graphene? All the cool kids are using TIN – atom-thick sheets of stanene

Robert Helpmann??
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Childcatcher

Re: Picking Nits: TIN versus Tin

Besides it is "nits", not "Nits"

Unless used as part of a title, which it is in this case.

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