* Posts by Robert Helpmann??

1205 posts • joined 31 May 2011

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NINETY PER CENT of Java blackhats migrate to footling Flash

Robert Helpmann??
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Encore!

Now take this approach and apply it to every other plug-in... If it can be done without bloat (I am not placing any bets) and while avoiding possible spoofing, then it will qualify as a Good Thing™ rather than just the qualified success it is now.

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App makers, you're STILL doing security wrong

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Re: Security!=privacy

FF22, your point about the difference between security and privacy is well taken (and well said, by the way), but I think both you and the analyst both make a fundamental error in attribution: why is PayPal gathering the info they do? Yes, they might be pulling it to compare against past transactions as a fraud prevention method. Conversely, they might have some legacy code from the beta testing phase of app development. The why of it is important for a number of reasons as it has implications for where weaknesses might be in the app itself (flaws might be left in simply because no-one is paying attention to the code) or what kind of data might be leaked in the event of a successful attack (PayPal is a prime target). While I would not expect my fellow commentards to dig through EULA of these apps or to contact the app publishers, it would seem the researcher had an missed opportunity there. The flaws mentioned in the other apps were certainly that: flaws.

At the very least, one take-away should be that apps should only gather and transmit the data needed to do what they are intended to do. The more bloat that is added in, the greater the chances of flaws creeping into the mix. Also the more power the app will use, which in a mobile device can add up. The people who run the app (customers, for want of a better term) should know what info is collected, sent and retained by the app maker and have a reason of why this is done. Finally, the owner of the device on which an app is run should be able to control access rights for the app. This last should be pinned on the OS makers. Google's offering is particularly bad in this area, but I notice that the only hint as to what manufacturer's device was looked at by the analysis seemed to be Apple.

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Hubble hits 25th anniversary IN SPAAACE – time for telescope to come home

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Re: >> removed one of the scientific instruments and installed the corrective device

For how long?

As long as it continues to produce useful scientific data that costs less to obtain than that of replacing it with something else. To be sure keeping something like this requires a budget, most of which is getting the thing into place to begin with, followed on by repairing it when needed. As far as the ground support costs, well that is rather implied in the use of the equipment. In fact, one might argue that having all that data to analyze and store and all of those people involved in doing so is rather the point of the project. As Dr McCarthy was quoted in the article, there may be other options.

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Re: >> removed one of the scientific instruments and installed the corrective device

"NASA has a plan to send up a de-orbiting module that attaches to Hubble and drives it into orbital decay mode to allow it to be brought down into the ocean or on unpopulated land."

I'm not an aerospace engineer and I think it is great there is a contingency plan in place if the telescope needs to be removed from orbit, but if it can be pushed down, why not go the other direction and keep it going? Even though there are other incredible telescopes coming online, there will be plenty for all of them to do for a very long time.

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Yahoo! Mail! goes! titsup! in! Blighty! due! to! mystery! error!

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Doesn't seem fair

The UK gets the new Avengers movie ahead of the US while the US gets Yahoo! Mail and the UK does not. I think the UK came out ahead on this one.

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SUPERVOLCANIC MAGMA reservoir BUBBLING under Yellowstone Park

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Re: But how many Titanics would it fill?

Comparing X to something you've actually stood next to is about as concrete as it gets.

Well said! Especially given that it was defined as having a volume of 1,000 cubic miles which should have been good enough for those that were looking for something a little more abstract1.

1 Fine! It comes to about 18,653,228,928.7794 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

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Ransomware crims drop Bitcoin faster than Google axes services

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What it's for

"They use Bitcoin for the money laundering part and take payment with it..."

It's almost as if it was designed for this purpose.

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Neurobabble makes nonsense brain 'science' more believable

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Re: Neurolaw, neurotics, and the old frontal cortex excuse...

I find his his frontal cortex guilty as charged, and order that it shall be confiscated, taken from this place to another place, and thoroughly minced until it promises not to do it again...

Is the Judge's name in this tale Shylock by any chance?

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

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Re: maglev is the way to go

Trains on stilts are still subject to flooding, even if they are completely enclosed, as their foundations may be undercut by erosion. Traditional railways currently have service cars to check the safety of their infrastructure. I have no idea what is involved in similar efforts for maglev trains, but they have been around long enough that there is certainly an equivalent for them.

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Google vs. AWS race to the bottom detours into Super SSD Spring Sale

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What's the big deal?

Google's decided that for a month from April 21st, its Local SSD offering “will be priced at $0.055/GB/month, a 75% discount. After that time, the price will return to its normal $0.218/GB/month.”

Not sure how this would benefit anyone if they could own the SSD outright in very few months for what Google normally charges for rental.

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Google pulls plug on YouTube for older iPads, iPhones, smart TVs

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Re: Roll Your Own

...it gets out of proportion when true dumb panels get recommended and you end up with a separate panel, TV tuner, amplifier, media player etc with half a dozen plugs, half a dozen things to turn on and off, and half a dozen remotes.

You make some good points, and by its nature the implementation of something like this is going to be unique or close to it for each instance, but I do not see why you would need to worry about multiple controls or power management. I run my "remote" off an app installed on my phone. In my case, I store my media files on my NAS, so it is not powered down. I use a Pi, so leaving it on is not a big deal, but there are power solutions out there that allow for similar control via smart phone if you want to go that route.

As for the Smart TV idea, I look at them as similar to all-in-one devices of any sort. If one part goes out, you can effectively lose the package. and you are almost always paying for more functionality than you will ever use.

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Google guru: Android doesn't have malware, it has Potentially Harmful Applications™ instead

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When we say it, we mean...

Google's collective ego has grown large enough that it is warping space around it. This ought to go in the Bootnotes section or wherever El Reg is dumping its more tongue-in-cheek articles these days, not because of the reporting, but because I cannot imagine how anyone could get those things out with a straight face.

For example: "There is so much structure and connotation around the word malware that internally we don't use that word...That malware is increasing and most devices aren't protected is a myth.” Obviously, if there is no such thing as malware, it couldn't very well be on the rise, could it? Someone should have dumped a box of phones with older versions of Android on them and asked him to update the lot. A missed opportunity, to be sure, but perhaps it could be used in an encore presentation of this comedic performance.

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Evil Wi-Fi kills iPhones, iPods in range – 'No iOS Zone' SSL bug revealed

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MitM

He also said the attack can be combined with HTTP request hijacking to trick iOS apps into pulling information from an attacker's servers, allowing the miscreant to compromise the software by feeding it bad data.

Setting up a "No iOS Zone" is annoying, but being able to force victims to connect to controlled network from which a man-in-the-middle attack can be staged seems to be more severe. Different attacks for different goals, I suppose. As far as seeing it in the wild, it was used for a MitM attack, it would not be as noticeable as if the device started rebooting over and over. Time to stop wearing tin foil hats and start wrapping our phones in the stuff.

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White House cyber-general says US must be able to cyber-nuke the worst of the cyber-worst

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Re: Well that's all right then ...

This is not a tool that's going to be used on a daily basis for ordinary criminals, but to allow us to go after the worst of the worst...", trying unsuccessfully to distance himself from previous efforts by various three letter agencies. It will be used on a daily basis. It will be used against ordinary criminals. It might not be used against ordinary criminals on a daily basis, but I would not bet against it.

We waged war on poverty, drugs and terror. It looks as though we are starting a war on electrons.

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JavaScript CPU cache snooper tells crooks EVERYTHING you do online

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Re: And Another Thing

RTFA!

Yup. Missed that. Falling on my (virtual) sword now.

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And Another Thing

“In the meantime the best suggestion I have for end-users is: close all non-essential browser tabs when you’re doing something sensitive on your computer,” he says.

Perhaps we could add the use of VMs designated specifically for web browsing to that recommendation, although I am not sure if this attack will allow the attacker to access info outside the sandbox. If it will, then it offers all sorts of opportunities for mischief in the data center.

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Elon Musk wanted Google to buy Tesla, says ex-Vulture's book

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Joke

What will Hollywood do?

With gas burners, we can count on some impressive on-screen explosions because cars blow up like a pyromaniac's wet dream if they take even a ricochet. What are going to have with EVs? Localized electrical storms? Chain reaction lightning bolts? EMPs that shut down most of the grid in North America?

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VAMPIRE SQUID romps stun scientists: Unique sex lives revealed

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I'm Resting!

The phrase "gonadal resting phase" should be in much higher general usage.

It sure beats the phrase "rolled over and started snoring."

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Flying giant octopus menaces New York

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Re: Buffalo burghers

"what weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold?"

A pound of feathers. There are 12 troy ounces per troy pound.

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Lawyer: Cops dropped robbery case rather than detail FBI's StingRay phone snoop gizmo

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Unwarranted Search

They would've got a warrant first, right guys?

This is what I have been wondering about. It ought to be fairly straightforward for the FBI to claim that the details of how the tool works are classified(IANAL) and avoid giving out details that might interfere with catching baddies while at the same time providing the intercepted data. So if operational details are not the issue, what might the problem be?

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Raytheon borgs Websense to create cybersecurity behemoth

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Re: An anagram

I prefer "Absentee When Rosy" which I suppose is better than "Nosy Beneath Sewer," but whatever works for you.

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IT'S WAR: Hacktivists throw in their lot with spies and the military

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Honorable Mention

I know that it's common in the US to talk about the "War on Drugs" but for folks in Mexico, it is a war of the very real shooting variety. While not hackers, per se, online services have been used both against and by the various drug gangs. Where ISIS depends on online effacement to draw attention to itself, bloggers in Mexico try to call out the bad actors in their area. Alas, they could use some lessons in how to conceal their real-world names and locations; many have been tracked down and executed with their killers posting pictures of the deceased online as notice to the rest as to what will happen to them if they speak out.

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NASA guy to White House: Be really careful with that HTTPS stuff

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bureaucrats rather than techies

Presumably the people behind this are bureaucrats rather than techies, hence the fatuous bollocks.

TeeCee, I will go you one further: there will be a waiver process, but the only waivers that will be granted are to the very government web sites that the process originally was meant to address because it would cause too much disruption to the customers and it entails a lot of work for the developers to implement HTTPS. After that, there will be an audit which will precipitate the immediate and ill-planned roll-out of the protocol resulting in many government portals going dark for weeks.

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Apple will cut down 36,000 acres of forest in 'conservation scheme'

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Re: For people who cannot they see the wood for the trees

That all depends on the kind of forests you are cutting down

From the press release:

"In the Reed Forest of Aroostook County, Maine, wetlands, rivers, and upland forest provide refuge for Atlantic salmon, bald eagle, and Canada lynx. And in Brunswick Forest located in southern North Carolina, the high-quality pine savannas and unique plants and flowers have long made this land a conservation priority."

It's not that the trees are simply cut down, they are replanted and harvested, just like any other crop. Granted, there have been instances of irresponsible business owners not replanting, but I would hardly think that to be the case in this instance. That these are working forests would indicate that this has been the case for these tracts for some time. The forest in Maine is most likely different from its native makeup, though, so I am a little confused as to how this represents some sort of environmental statement more than a vertical business integration.

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Kremlin hackers exploited TWO 0-day Flash, Windows vulns

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Patching the Patches

Adobe independently released a patch for the CVE-2015-3043 vulnerability in its software on Tuesday...

In the mean time, I have patched my machines with an alternate PDF reader and rid myself of Adobe Flash, as well. I am trying to get my workplace environment to follow suit, but no luck so far.

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Your city's not smart if it's vulnerable, says hacker

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Re: Insurance companies might want to hear this talk.

Governments and/or insurance companies demanding some kind of certification will help clear things up.

Won't happen, at least until things go disastrously wrong. There is no such thing as a proactive government entity. To be sure, this equipment will be tested. The only question is whether it will be white hats or black hats doing the testing first. I guess this article points out which it will be.

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Google broke own security with April fool gag

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One or the Other

That omission meant “A remote attacker could" ... turn Safe Search on or off, or set location. And that's on top of the click-jacking potential, which could see users directed to false web pages.

If you were affected by the first option, then it is most likely someone doing it for the lolz, while if you were a victim of click-jacking, then there was probably a financial motive involved for which the black hats would not want to advertise anything was happening.

Talk about a true zero-day, though. If it was patched, then it had to have been done before the day was over; there does not seem to be an archive of the joke site available. I couldn't track down a copy of blighted site. The Wayback doesn't like it. Though Wikipedia has a link to the prank site, it notes that it "was removed the day after and now redirects to the main google.com site." It would be interesting to know why the flaw was posted two weeks after it was a moot point.

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The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

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No Codes for You

The solution to that problem seems obvious. Design an iron equipped with Bluetooth LE... blah, blah, blah...

Funny... the obvious solution to me would be a cheap barcode scanner in the iron... yada, yada, yada...

Have neither of you washed clothes? What are you going to be making that tag out of that will last for the entire usable life of the clothing that you will also want to allow to come into contact with your skin? What happens with clothes that lose their tags? What do you do with custom/bespoke items? If this tech is going to be applied to washers and other appliances as well, how will you deal with items other than outerwear?

Take that bright idea and play the What Could Possibly Go Wrong game. If you end up with more headaches than doing the job the way it is currently done, you're probably headed in the wrong direction.

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Netflix's house of cards to be fortified with HTTPS appliance

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Doesn't Live Up to Potential

Such a hit would cost Netflix potentially hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

I can see that there would be a sizable up-front cost to this in purchasing and setting up new kit, but if the power consumption and maintenance costs on this would range in the "hundreds of millions," I would be surprised. The company makes a few billion in profits each year, if I understand the financial statements on their web site which would put the estimated impact of this in the range of 10%, give or take. Either they think this issue might have a significant impact on their profitability or they are misstating the likely impact.

The roll-out won't be a simple affair, either, as there are Netflix clients in plenty of appliances (DVD players, game systems, etc). As a customer, I appreciate where they seem to be going with this and hope that they can get this done without any serious disruptions.

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Sysadmins, patch now: HTTP 'pings of death' are spewing across web to kill Windows servers

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Re: Raise your hand...

It is thirteen years since they promised to quit doing this stupid, freshman programmer level stuff.

Well, they suffered through the original PoD and then brought it out of retirement a couple of years ago because IPv6. Apparently building on preexisting work requires that previously corrected mistakes be repeated.

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Scientists tail whales, hails their tales of record 14,000-mile migration

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Call the OSU!

It certainly feels as if this surveillance study, one of the most intrusive to date, raises more questions than it answers - not least in the area of whale surveillance data ethics.

Would it be ethical if the researchers promised to delete the gathered data after a reasonable period of time and responded promptly and truthfully to questions posed by elected officials? Besides, this data is invaluable in preventing orca attacks. It's to keep the Western Pacific Grey Whale population safe! Won't someone think of the calves?

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Graphene spintronics crowned latest Moore's Law extender contender

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Re: Wow.

They seem to have ... gone right to "we can make science fiction sound passé" stage

Show me a positronic brain and I will cede the point. Still, good stories should inspire and, by extension, good science fiction should inspire scientists. Pretty cool stuff.

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Bank-card-sniffing shop menace Punkey pinned down in US Secret Service investigation

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When is a POS a POS?

Why does a POS system need to have a browser installed? Or any software not directly related to running the system?

The browser might be how the POS actually works. Besides, even even ATMs seem to be getting in on the fun.

I am in the middle of building a POS system for an annual non-profit event. For the client side, I am using Raspberry Pis set up as kiosks on a closed network. They will connect to a web server running a database back-end. This will all be on a closed network. This system will not handle credit card transactions as it is more cost effective to use third party kit for that. We will be handling quite a bit of PII, though, so the security concerns for this are not trivial.

At no point will any of the machines involved be allowed on the internet. I might be able to understand the use of a VPN to connect servers at one location to the home office, but cannot get my head around the idea that someone might think allowing the actual POS stations access to the internet would be a good plan.

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Default admin password, weak Wi-Fi, open USB ports ... no wonder these electronic voting boxes are now BANNED

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Who's to Blame?

The state should ask for compensation from this company. If they don't then that must mean that they (the state) did not make it mandatory that the systems adhere to even basic security guidelines.

And a direct corollary: voters should demand accountability for this. by voting. At the ballot box... oh. Well, at least by writing lots of letters to politicians and press. And since I happen to live in the Commonwealth, that means I need to send some of those out myself.

To expand a bit on dan1980's points, even assuming that the state required the company supplying the ballot boxes to comply to security best practices, they did not bother to check that the requirement had been met. Either way, our government shares at least some of the blame for this and is ultimately responsible for the situation.

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Revealed: The AMAZING technology behind Apple's $1299 Retina MacBooks – a lot of glue

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Re: Well duh!

Which would you rather have: A device which was easily upgraded/repaired because it needs to be, or one that could not be easily upgraded/repaired but doesn't need to be ?

That's a false dichotomy. I would prefer a device that I can do with as I wish within the constraints of what I can afford. By what I assume is your definition, iThings don't need to be repaired or upgraded simply because they cannot and you feel they work well enough and are indestructible enough that you don't have to worry about it. Fine. Product choice is good, but there are plenty of people who want to tinker and plenty who want to be able to make a simple repair rather than having to replace the entire device.

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There's TOO MANY data-leaking healthcare firms, growls Symantec

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Re: Almost lookes like hospital staff do not know IT

Okay, sure, patient data should be safeguarded and all that, I agree. But you can't really blame the staff for taking more care of patients than of their computers.

That's just silly. I would not expect the medical staff to handle IT support, but I would expect there to be dedicated IT staff. The medical staff should handle IT assets just as they would any other equipment and should have appropriate training to understand what to do with it. This includes how to safeguard patient records.

So much of what drives the medical field, at least in the US, is liability. Yes, hospitals are used to dealing with malpractice issues, but if they are hit with a series of sueballs because they failed to take reasonable measures with their data, I would expect the issue to ratchet up in importance in hospital execs' minds.

Oh, and "Healthcare organisations have about four times as many reported incidents as education, government, and finance sectors, which averaged around 30 each." FTFY.

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Apple splats Safari flaw affecting a BEELLION iThings

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Re: Bah!

...does anyone use Safari on windows?

Not so much any more. Apple ended support for Windows in 2012 with version 5.1.7. Good luck finding a reference to it on Apple's web site. I used to use it to make sure my web site looked reasonable for a range of browsers, but not much else. Can't think of another reason to care and this one isn't all that any more.

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Dwarf planet Ceres has TEN bright spots, astroboffins say

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Orbital Resonances

One theory is that there were rocky planets in the inner solar system that got eaten or knocked around when Jupiter started migrating inward. When Saturn pulled Jupiter outward, what was left coalesced into the inner planets we have now. There is a much better description here, for example, but it seems to be a coherent explanation, at least in part, of how our solar system came to be as it is in terms of composition and placement of the various planets.

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Android lands on Microsoft's money-machine island fortress

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Re: Excellent!

As I recall, there was no hide or hair mentioned of the Android application framework, only the Linux core behind that framework, which last I checked is still pretty tight.

Indeed. What was mentioned, though, was this:

"Kalpana apps are Webbified; built using HTML rather than using Microsoft-friendly tools and language. They are served to a WebKit-based UI from a back-end in a bank’s data centre, constructed using the Spring Framework and RESTful APIs."

If I understand this correctly, this means that ATMs will run browser-based apps (I tried looking up Kalpana, but had little luck). I can see where this might be appealing from a development point of view (easy to get people who can do this sort of thing and would speed development and deployment cycles), but not from a security perspective. For example, what happens if an ATM is cut off from phoning home? The answer to this question can dramatically affect how hackable one of these machines is. Even assuming that using a web app is the cool thing to do, why not use a microkernel OS rather than Android?

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Bloke hits armadillo AND mother-in-law with single 9mm round

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Re: Varmint?

wonton wanton!

Curse you, bad spelling jeans genes! Curse you!

Please accept my very humble up-vote.

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Re: Varmint?

From the Georgia Department of Natural Resources web page concerning native* wildlife:

Georgia Law allows the taking of certain native species -- namely rats, mice, armadillos, coyotes, groundhogs, beaver, freshwater turtles, venomous snakes, frogs, spring lizards, fiddler crabs, freshwater crayfish, freshwater mussels, and nutria -- because of their status as a nuisance or other reason.

http://gadnrle.org/node/86

As mentioned above, armadillos are destructive. They are in the process of expanding their range in the US, displacing other species as they move in. Many areas, Georgia included, encourage hunters to shoot on sight. Farmers typically do not need encouragement as they are quite destructive. There are no initiatives of which I am aware to actually impede their spread, so to me this amounts to wonton killing of the animals.

* The nine-banded armadillo is a naturalized US citizen. It cannot easily cross wide bodies of water as it does not float. It does, however, know how to use a bridge even if it is prone to jump into the axle of a 4-by-4 passing above it.

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Lib Dem manifesto: Spook slapdown, ban on teen-repelling Mosquitos

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Re: @ Graham Marsden

I almost considered creating several account just to give you several upvotes.

Well, it is a discussion about voting, so... Vote now! Vote often!

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Verizon to world: STOP opening dodgy phishing emails, FOOLS

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Re: BS

It would be nice, too, if their mobile division would update Android on the phones they sell. They certainly talk the talk, but seem to stumble when trying to walk the walk.

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Cybercrime taskforce collects huge botnet scalp on first go

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Re: Good work all round!

I wonder if there are any clues as to the source of the malware...

The list of groups associated in taking the botnet down includes representatives from Russia, the EU, the US... Wait! Canada wasn't on the list. It must have been Canadian in origin! OK, a bit if a joke, but it illustrates the sort of problem investigators face in tracking down the culprits. It's very easy to mask where an attack originates, but very difficult to track if the attackers are even halfway competent.

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US govt bans Intel from selling chips to China's supercomputer boffins

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Re: It isn't "debt" in the sense many people seem to think

The only leverage China has is to quit buying more bonds and other US assets...

T-bills can be cashed in early, but there is a penalty. On the face of it, this would seem to hurt only China to do this as they would take a loss, but it could actually hurt the US too if enough of them were cashed in at the same time. Both they and corporate bonds may be resold which may be used to drive down prices of both. This would in turn weaken the US' ability to raise funds.

These are two fairly simplistic examples of what China might do. That they do not would seem to indicate that they do not view it in their best interests to do so, not that they do not have any tools in the bag besides not purchasing more assets in the future.

These two economies have become intertwined over time. Many would argue that this is a good thing in as much as it proves a disincentive to start a shooting war. Plus, lots of people on both sides get rich. Don't knock it.

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Saudis go ape, detain Swedish monkeys at border

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Re: Thank gawdess the poor little critters didn't get shipped!

I would be fascinated to learn what constitutes "flagrant ignorance." Not first-hand, mind you.

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Drill, baby, drill: HIDDEN glaciers ON MARS hold 150bn cubic metres of precious frozen WATER

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Re: Compare and contrast

We have the entire Pacific to draw from, but TheIdiotsInCharge[tm] didn't start building desalination plants back in the 1960s ...

Santa Barbara completed a desalination plant in 1991 but mothballed it as the drought it was built during ended just as it was coming online. It is being reopened.

I have also wondered about moving flood waters around for use in areas that lack water. It would require coordination between states as well as some additional infrastructure to be built, but should be technically feasible. I wouldn't want to be the person trying to do the cost-benefit analysis, though.

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Toyota Yaris Hybrid: Half-pint composite for the urban jungle

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Re: I'm not convinced...

I get the idea, but this model looks like the worst of both worlds. It does much better at urban driving than most gas burners, but there are cheap electrics coming into the market now that perform even better. They can't be used for highway driving, but if that is a requirement, there are other options that do quite well in that area. From the review, if nothing else, this vehicle sounds pretty boring.

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Are you sure there are servers in this cold, dark basement?

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Childcatcher

Re: The funniest I've seen...

@Cpt Blue Bear, art school support is not too bad other than the lack of pay. My first sysadmin job was for one in Santa Fe, NM. At some point, they had hired someone to trench between (rented) buildings for a coax cable run between the two. Unfortunately, the trench was back-filled with the same stuff that came out of the hole, gravel and dirt, instead of packing sand around the PVC conduit that the cable was pulled through. Eventually, the driveway was used by something heavy enough to push a rock through the wall of the pipe which allowed it to fill with water. One of the two buildings had been the campus radio station. The mast was right next to where the trench had been run.

Santa Fe might not get much rain, but it gets plenty of lightning. I put in reqs to have the trench re-worked or to pull fibre through the existing conduit, but the administration wouldn't pay for it (we had just been through a round of layoffs which had eliminated the other 75% of my department). I kept all the burned out boards due to lightning strikes and tacked them to the wall behind my desk. Eventually, an admin walked into my office and asked me what they were. I got approval to fix the problem after that.

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Here we are now, entertain us: Caltech team designs micro, high-res 3D imager

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge

Re: diagnostics....

It can go in consumer electronics. It can also go into specialist equipment. Besides, as this uses light to scan, it seems reasonable that it a mirror might be used in places that it would be inconvenient to fit the electronics for whatever reason. The described chip is only 1 mm3 so even if an array of them were put together, it could be small enough to fit inside a human mouth.

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