Feeds

* Posts by Robert Helpmann??

789 posts • joined 31 May 2011

Page:

Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Too late to the party...again.

Given MS are rather late to this somewhat narrow market, I really wonder why they're bothering.

Because this strategy has worked in the past for them, most notably against Netscape, though there are other examples. Problem is, I suspect you are right in this case, but if the only tool you have is a hammer, then every problem looks a lot like a nail.

4
0

Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Ummm, no.

All those things she said about drones - they may well be true for fighter aircraft; but next to none of it applies to the road...

Especially the part about bombing friendly forces.

To be fair, little she said quoted in the article concerned cars, though I am not sure I agree with the conclusion that they ought to be working on keeping the driver engaged in the driving process rather than perfecting the automation. The draw of automated driving systems for many if not most people is that you won't have to pay attention and can do something else entirely. Take that away and you may have a safer system in which no-one is interested.

4
0

'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Don't Worry

It's just ...whistleblower rules that make it an offence for journalists to report on security agencies' activity and data retention legislation. It's just the tip. It's for your own good. It won't hurt much. You never want to hear any of the above. None of them end well for anyone other than the person saying them.

0
0

UK's a very popular target for EMEA cyberspies – report

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Why Turkey?

Why not? It isn't as though the government there has no opponents: the Kurds, governments of other states in the same region, its own citizens (yes, this applies to all the others), members of various terrorist groups operating in the region.

And it's "Arabia" or "Saudi Arabia," not "Saudi," which is akin to saying British.

0
0

On Nov 12, a human-made space lab will try to HARPOON a COMET and land on it

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: "By August the comet will make its closest approach to the star, and cook Philae"

Comète en brochette avec atterrisseur brûlé... Mmm... tasty!

Thanks for covering this truly awesome event.

0
0

Scientists skeptical of Lockheed Martin's truck-sized FUSION reactor breakthrough boast

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: 10 years

It might change everything...

As recently alluded to here on El Reg concerning artificial lighting, I suspect that people will use whatever their current energy budget would buy at the new price point. As a race, we tend to take incremental steps in the development of new tech, but we are really good at finding ways to use resources as fast as they become available.

2
0

Roll your own Bitcoin client? Prepare to be raided

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Living in the Wild, Wild West

Whoever is developing software has responsibility to users who do not know enough to protect themselves

Yes, but what happens when they don't know enough to protect themselves? Oh, wait...

1
0

Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Cut'n'paste

Pete 2, you bring up several good points. I don't think any security system that can be defeated by a simple photo or 3D print of someone should be considered fit for purpose. As far as voice recognition, there are several ways to take into account the hack you describe. A simple way would be to have a quick Q&A between the person and the system. Both voice and content could be analyzed. Too-perfect matches should be counted as an attack, so if you ask the person for the same word in two different contexts and the response is detected to be identical, then the system should "know" it is being hacked.

I think the way to go for a reasonable amount of security for system access involves simultaneous, multiple checks. They should be as transparent as possible to the user. Any one method can be defeated. Adding layers and making them simultaneous should greatly increase the difficulty in doing so.

0
0

Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Ultrabook flexes new 'Watchband' BENDO hinges

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Corpse Mode

Because planking is passé.

1
1

Tesla's Elon Musk shows the world his D ... and it's a MONSTER

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: What? No KITT?

As usual, the science is way, way, way ahead of the politics.

Amazingly enough, this is not quite the case. For example, Washington, D.C. recently enacted legislation to account for self-driving vehicles.

1
0

Trolls have DARK TETRAD of personality defects, say trickcyclists

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Maybe there is a category of sub troll? Goblins, perhaps?

Politicians. Seems to be a good fit.

4
1

Put down that shotgun: Wi-Fi's the way to beat Zombies

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: When I leave the house ...

Braaaaiiiins !

See, that is how you can tell Zombies' phones from those of humans: they only text this one thing over and over. Besides, the biggest take-away from most zombie shows is that your fellow surviving humans are the biggest danger, not the undead.

Sorry, gotta get my coat and go. The zombies are at the door.

1
0

Internet Explorer stars in monster October Patch Tuesday

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Mmm... Swiss Cheese

Since the browser is one of the most common attack vectors, you would think that MS would put more effort into minimizing its attack surface. Of course, if they had that attitude, Windows would be Xen...

4
2

WOMEN, your 'SUPERPOWER' is ... NOT asking for a RAISE: Satya Nadella

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Joke

Performance-based Proportional Pay

...theoretically the bosses should be paid by the amount of work they actually do compared to the amount the employees do.

The are paid on that basis, it is just not a simple proportional relationship.

1
3

Protesters stop ground breaking on world's largest telescope

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Once again...

...but at least they were trying

Talk about damning by faint praise!

0
0

Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

...or better not use a standard BIOS at all but roll their own proprietary system.

The problem with this is that banks tend to value stability over everything else. My experience has been that given a working system, they would rather make incremental changes to improve security, functionality, et cetera than to replace an entire working system. To back this up, I point to the fact that banks were responsible for OS/2 being kept alive well beyond the point that IBM pulled the plug simply because many banks were using it in ATMs and for other purposes, too.

2
0

Siri ... why is this semi headed RIGHT AT ME? Phone apps distracting as ever – new study

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Just the facts

...more taxing on the mind of drivers than normal tasks...

Eddy Ito has a good point, no matter how unintentionally made. There were a number of things that the study should have addressed but that it did not. There should have been a quantified measure for each of those "normal tasks" as well as a baseline (driving with no additional tasks). The measurements given were based on subjective reporting - a notoriously weak approach - by people with a clean driving record. Throw in some teens who are familiar with Siri and I imagine the data would look quite a bit different. The outcomes were unsurprising if the sample group had no experience with the tasks being performed as any novel task would would be relatively distracting. Some of this is perhaps outside the scope of this study, but should highlight some of its weaknesses.

1
0

Adobe spies on reading habits over unencrypted web because your 'privacy is important'

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Facepalm

Re: Or it would have if I'd let it...

This isn't about Adobe Reader, it's about Adobe Digital Editions...

Well, the product in question is Digital Editions, but the article is concerned more broadly with Adobe, their actions and their responses which seem to be designed solely too deflect and mislead.

For friends and family, I have advocated ditching Reader because it is attacked enough to essentially qualify as malware in its own right. I was further encouraged to avoid their products when they moved to a subscription based program for their Creative Suite. I viewed this as milking it for all it was worth and am not interested in contributing to the Buy an Exec a Yacht charity program. This revelation was another nail in the proverbial coffin from my perspective, but the box had to be pulled out of the ground before the nail could be pounded in.

Next question: do other e-book reading applications and e-book readers also report home in the same manner?

7
0

Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Frankly speaking Khaptain if anyone is doing their banking............

Never underestimate the self-inflicted damage that people are capable of! I got called in, once upon a time, on a consulting position for a company in which all of their printers had stopped working. Nothing wrong with and no change on the printers. Same with the network. Same with the client machines. The print server... inexplicably had been upgraded to a beta version of Windows Server that had no drivers for those printers. The owners refused to back-level because "newer is always better."

Sadly, this is not the only instance I have encountered use of beta software in production. On the plus side, it meant money in my pocket. I still felt like a physician must having to explain, "No, no. If you keep stabbing yourself, it will keep hurting."

2
0

Shift up, gran! Microsoft turns living room into AR game 'space'

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge

Re: Clever but

A headset would also be better able to deal with surfaces that do not show projected images very well. My first impression of this was that it looked really cool. Then I realized that my living room does not have much in the way of plain white surfaces. The rug has a dark, complex pattern. The media center, desk and book shelves are stained wood. The sofa has a green plush upholstery. I think that it would be difficult to use this sort of setup in a environment similar to what I have.

Also, having players use headsets would allow different players to see different things, which could be used to add depth to games.

0
0

AT&T fires insider for slurping customers' social security numbers, driver licenses and more

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: It's all too difficult

If you need to do business, you need people to access information. If the wrong person or the person in the wrong frame of mind decides to use that access badly, what can you do?

The quoted person shouldn't be working in security! Frank ly, you've got a good start. Why not add in some auditing, both automated and human monitored? Robust logging with an audit trail that goes back a considerable amount of time? Restrictions on removable data and access to external networks? Granted for AT&T, this later might be difficult, but blanket statements about how impossible it is to address this issue should set management on edge. There is no security measure that cannot be overcome, but not even to attempt to address an obvious and common concern is ridiculous!

0
0

Estonia to offer 'e-resident' status to world+dog

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Why no photo?

I am curious as to why this card will not have a photo on it. If it is going to be used for verification of electronic identity, why not add a photo to it? It will, after all, have all sorts of biometric data stored on it. Also, I saw that it will require a card reader. Presumably, this will be very similar to the smart cards common among US government implementations (CACs). I wonder will the Estonian version take advantage of NFC.

0
0

Holey? COWL! Boffins build boxes to hold sketchy JavaScript libs

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: "Perhaps developers simply shouldn't use unaudited or sketchy-sourced code in production"

Yes, but that would mean investing time in auditing the code. In a production environment, the point of using third party tools is to save time, so spending that time is going to get push-back from management if it even occurs to the devs to do so in the first place. I fully agree with the sentiment, but it is going to be a hard sell in order to get this added into a coder's SOP.

1
0

Hiss-hiss! GIGANTIC SOLAR FILAMENT snakes around Sun

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: What's a mile?

Comes to about 11,637,878br` or 174,568,174ddb" give or take

`Brontosaurus

"Double-decker Bus

1
0

Rise of the Machines: FIRST HUMAN VICTIM – 2015

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Really? Worried? You had me for a minute there

Why the f*ck are they still playing the paedo/terror "the world will end" card every time we (the ones who make and design the devices and services) try jack up the security and encryption in them?

Left hand, meet right hand. Conversely, this might be an effort to generate more budget so it is important to highlight real, emerging, difficult to quantify threats. Or the people presenting this data might be unassociated with those who typically bring up the paedoterrorcrim issue. Or "they" might have simultaneous though conflicting goals. Pick as many as you feel may apply.

3
0

Chinese researchers develop fuzzy search algorithm for encrypted cloud data

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: ?

To turn the question on its head, what is the point in having data if you cannot find anything in it? Encryption helps ensure that only authorized users can access the data, not that no-one can. Too, consider that search values themselves are metadata and relate that to the tracking of telecon metadata by various government organizations. There might be a reason to develop this sort of thing based on that alone.

0
0

Facebook: Ha! Like we'd STOP trickcyclists messing with your MIND

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

What? No Kiss?

To stop people feeling violated again, Facebook says it has given researchers clearer guidelines and will review their proposals more closely if they’re aimed at ... deeply personal things...

To translate: People are still going to be violated. However, Facebook will work to make sure people don't notice. Bastards.

3
0

POISON PI sniffs WiFi from your mail room, goes on rampage

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Not likely to succeed

Have an up-vote for making me laugh. Very, very funny!

1
0

OMG!! With nothing but MACHINE TOOLS, STEEL and PARTS you can make a GUN!!

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Death Rate

Firearm-related death rate per 100,000 population per year...

Removing easy access to weapons and increasing police presence are two different aspects that affect the outcome of this. Also, focusing on the implement used in violence does not address underlying causes. Perhaps better comparisons might be homicide rate, number of law enforcement officials and average income.

Homicides/100,000 (2012)

US - 4.7 UK - 1.0 Afghanistan 6.5

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate)

Law enforcement/100,00 (2012/2009)

US - 248 UK - 307 Afghanistan 401

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_police_officers)

Average Wage ($US 2012)

Gross US - 55,047 UK - 44,222 Afghanistan 70/426 (2004/2010)

Disposable US - 38,753 UK - 29,938

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_police_officers

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/LA29Df04.html)

Still a bit simplistic, but a shot (pardon the pun) in the right direction. It's not a simple interaction between one or two factors.

1
0

Google wants to KILL apps with the 'Physical Web'

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Unicorn Crap

... is still crap. Just look at the quote:

It claimed security could be afforded through the use of URL obfuscation or log in requirements, tokens that rotated addresses, or IP address restrictions. Spam too could be fought initially through traditional search engine mechanisms.

Given Google's current approach to security and privacy, this looks a lot like dressing crap up in a fairy tale and trying to sell us all on it. Their only concern with security is how it affects them. Likewise with spam (they hate the competition). In what world should everybody be able to use anything? Isn't that kind of openness and accessibility the opposite of having security?

0
0

Mine Bitcoins with PENCIL and PAPER

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Proof of Concept

It seems this would be the sort of thing a quantum computer would be ideal to implement. I expect I will wake up to news that some academic type now owns all the BitCoin any day now.

3
0

Man's future in space ... Barack Obama: Mars. Narendra Modi: Mars. Vladimir Putin: Er, Moon

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: No Brainer, Really....

That and it is a lot easier and cheaper to gain experience there than on Mars. There is a much shorter turn-around time for transport, plus, you can bring your experienced astro/taiko/cosmo/nauts home.

4
0

Bracelet could protect user herds from lurking PREDATORS

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Apples to Oranges?

I am a bit confused concerning the comparisons being presented in the chart. The quote near the end of the article indicates that this approach is supposed to complement initial authentication methods, but the chart seems to make direct comparison with some of them. On the other hand, if the point is to simply list different authentication methods, why not list methods that require users to present a token of some sort (e.g. CAC) and other two-factor authentication methods?

0
0

FTC nails pin in Bitcoin mining rig maker Butterfly Labs

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Is that Victor Lustig?

BFL = lying scumbags, they flatly refused to refund my money and were nearly 1 year late with the shit they shipped in the end.

They were basically selling a money machine - put in a 10 and get back two 20s. It's been done plenty of times in the past for great profit, though not by the marks, so it's a good model for con artists to follow. I am sorry you were had, though.

0
0

Colias robots SWARMING out of the lab

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

What Will Happen

El Reg can't help but imagine what will happen when keen hackers equip Colias devices with weapons and lay out RoboCode arenas for real …

Beautiful, beautiful mayhem.

0
0

Home Depot ignored staff warnings of security fail laundry list

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: Security dept. is there to serve the business

It's time security folks joined the rest of the IT world in a thorough understanding that they need to justify what they do.

I'm not sure which world you live in, but what I have seen is not so much in the explanation or understanding of the requests, but in management's caring. It is easy to explain something in terms of "If you do this, you will add this amount to the bottom line." It is fairly easy to explain things in terms of "If you do this, we can cut costs in these areas." What is harder to get someone to sign off on is, "If we spend this money, the odds are good we will avoid losing more later." This last is what security budgets seem to translate to in Managerspeak. Add some regulatory teeth to the equation and you might have something along the lines of "Invest this amount now or you will end up paying this much larger amount later" which would result in better implementation of security standards.

5
0

Poverty? Pah. That doesn't REALLY exist any more

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

On the Plus Side

I am aware this diverges somewhat from the point of the article, but concerning relative standard of living, has anyone else stopped to consider that many of us (especially those of us on this forum) live comparably to royalty in years past? Many of us have portraits done of ourselves and our families. Once upon a time, only the very rich could afford to have a portrait painted. Now, we have cheap photography. Likewise with sculptures: we are starting to see 3D printing handle the market for memorials to our egos. Exotic foods, drinks and spices - things that wars were literally fought over - are readily available in our supermarkets and in many cases are offered for free (e.g. salt, pepper, sugar) when we buy a meal at a restaurant - another extravagant luxury in the eyes of our ancestors. We have education available to us and can presumably read and write. We have reasonably cheap electric lighting. Compared to gas light, candles, oil lamps, or other flame-based lighting, it's pretty darn good.. We can buy appliances to clean our floors, clean our clothes, provide us with music, show us plays, and so on. We can have a security system installed and monitored. Our phones stand in for servants that only a wealthy person could afford in years past, working as our personal secretaries, allowing us to send communicate in any number ways with virtually anyone we could wish, providing us with a library we can access at any time. It would seem that we will have self-driving cars in the not-too-distant future, making chauffeurs available to the masses.

It should not be too difficult to add to this list. Many of these things initially were driven by the very wealthy wanting them. Later, they were produced in sufficient scale to allow more and more people to afford them. I would argue that, the evils of unmitigated consumerism aside, this is not a bad thing and has in fact raised the actual standard of living immensely. Inequality is not an inherently bad thing, though its abuse - any abuse - is.

2
0

Copyright thieves' cyberlockers slurp MILLIONS from honest creators, study finds

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Follow the Money

If PayPal can do it, why can't Visa and Mastercard stand up and enforce their own anti-piracy policies?

Because BitCoin. I am not familiar with PayPal's efforts in this regard, but as they are associated with eBay which has a dog in this fight, it makes sense for them to be concerned with copyright infringement. I do not believe there is similar motivation for Visa or Mastercard.

1
0

Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Speedo?

Someone who causes an accident because they're playing angry birds on their wrist should of course be dealt with appropriately (execution ideally)...

So, should they be loaded into a giant slingshot and hurled at some random collection of debris or be forced to stay in one place while poultry is fired at them from on high? Either one works for me.

6
0

Snowden's NSA leaks have galvanised the storage world

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Inside Out?

Snowden... was simply granted too much access to valuable NSA information. That he was a contractor and not a true insider is even more worrisome for the US government.

Welcome to today's government. There are many more contractors than direct government hires. They have to go through the same vetting process as guvies and follow the same rules and get the same certifications. If there is a problem, it isn't civilian or military versus contractor, it is the environment under which all work.

4
1

UK.gov lobs another fistful of change at SME infosec nightmares

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Low Ball

It would be considerably more useful to spend 4 million on hiring a couple of hundred IT Professionals who hate script kiddies (it shouldn't take much, i'd do the job for nothing...)

Perhaps, but 20K each probably won't get you much motivation, especially once you get away from basic IT work. You get what you pay for.

0
0

Cisco sprinkles Sourcefire goodies on ASA firewalls

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Really Good Stuff

Tools of this nature are really useful. The biggest cost of any system, though, is not the software, hardware, or infrastructure. It is almost always personnel. The article rightly mentions the need for teams to manage a security suite of this scope. Amazingly, I have encountered many instances in which management was willing to fork over plenty of funds for everything except the needed people to get the job done.

I would still like to check out this new toy.

1
0

UK.gov's flagship infosec program ISN'T DELIVERING - but all's still well, say auditors

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

User Error

"The current cyber security skills initiatives have been focused on providing the skills for individuals employed in cyber security roles... which does not address the need to improve the security awareness and skills of everyone involved in the design, production and USE of software-based systems.

Emphasis added. This is the most seldom addressed area of security and, as a consequence, one of the most easily exploited. Amen, brother.

1
0

15 MEEELLION malware-infested mobiles worldwide – report

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: "Buy our services", says Kevin McNamee...

The best defence against infection is network-based malware detection... People frequently don’t take appropriate security precautions for their devices, and even when they do a malicious app can easily evade detection by device-based anti-virus. Network based anti-virus embedded on an operator’s network cannot be disabled by cybercriminals, is always on and up to date.

As pointed out above, there needs to be more going on than this. the approach advocated here is essentially "Trust us. You can put all of your eggs into our basket." This makes no sense from a security standpoint! The best approach varies by need and almost never involves a single product. Much better would have been to advocate for correctly configured anti-malware both on the network and on the hosts. At least as important is that the host OSes get patched regularly, which I understand is not the norm for Android phones.

There are obviously other technical measures that should be addressed, but I think shifting the burden of security to the network owners, no matter how much it makes technical sense to do so, will inevitably succumb to corporate need for profits and not get done right. Too, unless a mobile provider builds a network from the ground up with security as the major consideration... well, it seems that the current state of affairs speaks to that quite well.

1
0

Brainboxes caught opening Bitcoin fraud emails. Seriously, guys?

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

By Design

Because Bitcoin transactions are irreversible and difficult to trace by design, victims will have little or no recourse but to accept their losses. ...if your Bitcoin wallet is compromised, the contents are gone for ever, and there is no way to get anything back. Unfortunately, this is one of the reasons why Bitcoin fraud is becoming popular.

Welcome to the wild, wild West! This system was purposefully set up to shut out government eyes, doing away with both the good and the bad of governmental oversight. No surprise that it makes for an awfully tempting target.

1
0

TRANSMUTATION claims US LENR company

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Oxygen transmuting to Hydrogen

How to make a million bucks:

1) Start with two million bucks

2) Give half of that to these guys

0
0

Security precogs divine web vulnerabilities BEFORE THEY EXIST

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Their predictions, made with 66 per cent accuracy...

It would have been 100% except an amazing full third of the flagged web sites were subsequently patched by their administrators.

0
0

Memory troubling you, Android? Surprise! Another data slurp vuln uncovered

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge

Re: a cheque?

The article mentioned banking apps using photos of checks/cheques as an example. There are plenty of other things that being able to essentially capture a screen shot might accomplish. There are plenty of examples of extortion schemes on FB over "private" pictures that have come to light, for example.

1
0

Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Geographical Oddity

A species confined to Autralasia is responsible for the Arabian stories about Rocs? Tell me - did you do geography at school?

Because folks from that area never got out and about? I wouldn't care to speculate on the origins of a myth, but the premise of the stories I am aware of about rocs involve sailors encountering them. Of course, sailors never talk to anyone when away from their home ports and are certainly not known for embellishing a tale, so you are probably right that there is no way a story of this nature could have its roots in some far-away place.

2
1

'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race

Robert Helpmann??
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Re: That's nice.

When will people realise that electric racecars just aren't useful outside of a racetrack?

About the same time they realize that race cars in general are not useful outside a racetrack.

4
0

Page: