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* Posts by Rampant Spaniel

1619 posts • joined 26 May 2011

Royal Navy parks 470 double-decker buses on Queen Elizabeth

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Bust-up

The most pressing question musty be how far can it throw Prescott, and how soon can we try.

Tsunami warnings at the ready!

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BOFH: You can take our lives, but you'll never take OUR MACROS

Rampant Spaniel
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Access gets fat more stick than it deserves, usually because people don't understand what it is aimed at and the fact that access isn't a database. Jet is the database and it is a vaguely acceptable single user database. The beauty of access is its ability to do what the bean counter wants without screwing up the central database and with a more user friendly user interface. Our had had its fair share of wonky scripting languages but if you want to drag a significant amount of data off a corporate database and play around with it with zero risk of falling down and stairs, access is what you need. It's also pretty cheap and easy to lean (compared to say Oracle forms and plsql). If you want to run a new report is usually a matter of a few minutes work and you are done. It's those scenarios where access shines.

However, try and run an entire department of a single jet database and toy get what you deserve. If you want to make a quick read only front end for an entire department to access a corporate database then access does that well.

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FCC to spend $2 BEEELLION to install Wi-Fi in US schools

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Science...

Excellent, thank you. Sadly it is not just a primary school, it takes kids up to 13/14 years or 8 th grade. I agree there's lots they can learn concept wise but by 10 years they should really start on practical skills, not to mention the fun parts like what happens when a lump of sodium meets water. They should be enthralled by the majesty of the world around them and how to make it go bang, not watching videos of other people doing it on an ipad which is the way some schools have gone.

Their preschool is excellent but we had planned to send or kids to immersion school for their normal kindergarten through high school years. It had been repeatedly hinted that I may be press ganged into being the schools science teacher (patents are all but required to 'teacher up') so your information is much appreciated! Being able to adapt what I know or want to teach to kids to their level and also into another language is daunting but should be good fun, plus who can argue with a class size of 6 :) Luckily we have a wealth of botany and ecology to work on in the earlier years.

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Rampant Spaniel
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The school my kids preschool is attached to has pc labs, wifi, I pads for each kid etc, what they don't have is any science labs. There isn't a bunsen burner in the entire place. It's run by the papists so that's to be expected. Luckily they are off elsewhere for their main schooling.

Whilst it's important to ensure technology is a part of the curriculum it shouldn't be at the expense of core subjects. Spending hundreds of thousands on Ipads , wifi etc when you can't even teach basic sciences is setting up an entire generation for failure. I'm all for supporting schools in the boonies, you don't get more boonies then 2500 miles from the mainland, but that support should be across the board.

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AMD details aggressive power-efficiency goal: 25X boost by 2020

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: power arbitration

You may mock but AMD designers stole my idea of running their processors so hot they could be used to heat up Hollands pies.

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'I got a little bit upset by that Register article...' says millionaire model. Bless!

Rampant Spaniel
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Which are those? I just had a nose about and the nearest I could find was something about removing passports from people going abroad to wage jihad? (personally I'd prefer revoking their breathing rights).

The site itself seems to be utter dross, how it cost 400k? 2 k for the site and 398 k on parties to 'promote' it sounds closer to the mark. Mind you, aren't NESTA the chumps who paid for clowns to go on holiday (I assume not on a clown holy war)

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Rampant Spaniel
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In a time of enforced austerity what are we doing giving money to that clothes house instead of using it for essentials like the health service, policing, education (which would be far closer to NESTA's actual purpose) or supporting food banks. It might 'only' have been a few hundred k but that's serious money, especially when the quango administering it probably cost the same amount over again to cut the cheque, they seem to spend a fair percentage of their budget on 'management'.

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Adobe all smiles as beret bods spaff cash on non-cloud Creative Suite

Rampant Spaniel
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Totally agree. If Internet speeds (latency and throughput) and cloud storage pricing vastly improved it might make more sense if their servers are doing the processing , especially if they used al a carte pricing. As it stands their products ( for me at least) gsry less attractive as time passes.

It seems they are given the choice of innovating or just trying to con money via restrictive licensing and opt for the latter every time.

If they want my money then deliver a product that is worthy of it, the more effort you put into milking your cash cows the more I will resist spending my money.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Rather than paying adobe in perpetuity

Ditto, lightroom does all I need and more. I have ps cs1 but can't remember the last time I needed it. Money better spent on scrumpy and pies!

Get it right in camera and post is a doddle, no needed for expensive software.

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Assange™ makes fresh bid for FREEDOM from Scotland Yard's 'physical encirclement'

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Maybe he could get out by

A large catapult on the roof might work, would be worth watching them try!

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DANGER MOUSE is back ... and he isn't half a GLASSHOLE

Rampant Spaniel
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No, leave DM alone. By the time they have finished modernism him he will be a lesbian and have a different accent each scene. DM worked as is. Leaving aside supergran, most kids TV was of a very high quality then, especially compared to the badly dubbed dross flung at our kids these days (although there are a few exceptions). They had plotlines that changed, effort was put into the animation and music. Just watch Fraggle Rock, Thunder cats et al then watch pokemon.

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Tom Hanks NICKED my COPYRIGHTED PIC, claims Brit photog

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: especially if the copyright wasn't registered

Not quite :) Copyright is formed at the creation of the work and you can sue, but you can only sue beyond the value of the work \ your loss if the work is registered (at least in the US). i.e. no punitive damages unless it has ALSO been registered.

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Rampant Spaniel
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I hope he sues. Whilst it's possible that Hank's never had anything directly to do with the infringement (most likely it was some agency hired to manage his internet image etc) the people responsible should be educated. As they are American a lawsuit and damages is the most appropriate way of doing that.

His 20 quid may be a little low. I assume from that he is talking about its value as microstock as opposed to selling it via an agency as 'macrostock'*. Given the resolution used, the quality of the execution and the strength of the original concept the licence would have been in the 500 to 800 region, well worth recouping. I'm not sure if he would be able to go for punitive damages, especially if the copyright wasn't registered.

The comment from the beeb is golden! I assume then they will not be claiming any copyright over any of the work they put into the public domain over the airwaves or via the internet? I think they may be confusing trademarks with copyright? Or just making it up as they go along.

*Microstock is basically where a SMWAC uploads thousands of pictures of their kids, their holiday to Skegness and half rotten fish heads on the beach to a website and maybe gets paid a quid or two for a very generic licence if they are lucky but in theory the volume of sales makes up for a decent total (there are occasionally some decent microstock images but in general its dross). Macrostock is where photographers place a more honed selection of images with an agency who sell more specialised licences for much higher sums. At the end of their career a photog might have thousands of images placed but they will placed an order of magnitude less that microstock photogs over the same timeframe.

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Softbank gobbles T-Mobile ... 1 year after AT&T tried it on – report

Rampant Spaniel
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If they want a fourth player make dish use that spectrum it has. That way they get a strong 3rd player and have new sprint divest some high dial spectrum and setup a network hosting deal with dish to give them a jump start. Sprints network vision equipment should cope with this fairly easily. They could also force sprint to increase its footprint. There is a small chance this might work out well. There's a very large chance bribed politicians and gross ineptitude will screw it all up.

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Poll: Climate change now more divisive than abortion, gun control

Rampant Spaniel
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Yes but which scientists do they trust? Usually the ones that age with the conclusion that suits whatever position that is most convenient to them. There are plenty of scientists with 'proof' on both sides of climate change.

There is far too much motivated money in the game, scientists are bending data to suit whatever position their donors hold.

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WTF is NET NEUTRALITY, anyway? And how can we make everything better?

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Andrew

It shouldn't matter what the packet is, the different companies along the way just need to be paid what is fair. People slate last mile providers for being paid twice, but they have 'twice' the network. They not only have the huge backbone and metro networks that other providers have but they also have a residential network which is extremely expensive to build out and isn't cheap to maintain and upgrade. It's not unreasonable to expect them to recover the costs appropriately, nor is it unfair to split that charge between both ends of the connection based upon usage.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: @ Irony Deficient

Sadly cable and dsl don't really keep each other honest here. The dsl provider bounces in and out of bankrupcy manages a minor upgrade which prompts the cable company to just about beat them, then they head bank into bankruptcy. To be fair geography kills the dsl here, theres no dense grid of housing but rather long lines along the coast. DSL is alright for the few properties near the exchange but we are half an extinct volcano away and they will only sell you dsl if you beg and accept it will be a sub 1mbps speed. They did roll out fiber on another island though. If they can manage that on all islands we may finally have a decent fight between cable and the local telco. As it was DSL was just at a significant disadvantage technology wise and the cableco had no incentive to do better than it was.

LTE & wimax (officially CTD now) aren't really a huge threat for moderate to heavy users because of contention. If and when DISH finally uses some of that massive haul of spectrum they have things may change. Sprint is also dabbling with fixed antenna LTE and their 25\2600 MHz spectrum which might change things (an external yagi would overcome many issues with higher dial spectrum).

Honestly, the two larger celcos don't want to really offer much by way of home wireless internet because how can you justify selling something price competitive in the home market with say a 100GB cap, but a higher monthly charge for 4GB of cell phone data? One spectrum has been refarmed away from 2.5/3/3.5G technologies and additional spectrum has been auctioned there could be a market for it but I'm thinking by then the cable companies will have upped packages again and moved the goal posts. Thats also before we get into backhaul issues with celcos (imagine just how quickly AT&T respond to a request from Sprint for backhaul?! :) ) and permits (up to 18 months in some places) slowing down progress.

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Amazon granted patent for taking photos against a white background – seriously

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Prior art??

As silly as it may be the Patent office is only there to record and to act as the most basic of filters. The courts decide on the validity of a patent if there is ever a challenge. It helps keep the cost of the patents low, at least initially. I am in no way saying this is better or worse, personally I don't care, but that is how it was explained to me. Honestly I think it damages the credibility of the entire system, but it has been mentioned to me that you have to have credibility before it can be damaged.

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China 'in discussions' about high-speed rail lines to London, Germany – and the US

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Ring of Fire?

Very interesting point! The 'ring of fire' does actually loop downwards in the shape of a crescent, following the islands which border the bottom of the Bering Sea. The distance is approximately 6-800 miles. However, earthquakes are not isolated to the edge of the ring, they can occur hundreds of miles from the edge of the ring (we get them locally in Hawai'i although they are usually M 3-5).

It will be interesting to see what their solutions are. Also if they will use different trains for different climates? It would seem sensible to use at least different engines designed to cope with the hotter countries than you would use for the Siberian > Alaska stretch. Designing 200mph train that can go from 45C to -70C would be a sizable challenge.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Theres no doubting it is possible, theres not much new here (besides the length of undersea tunnels) but in reality it comes down to scale and economics. They can build it but will it be financially viable? Then you have the political hurdles at each border and the potential terrorist target aspect. Personally I would rather travel either fairly slowly on a train with plenty of space or very fast on a supersonic jet than the middle ground on the flying meat markets we have now but I'm probably in the minority.

I'm somewhat shocked that the Chinese haven't built a supersonic passenger jet already. The ruskies copied Concord(e), the French and British designed Concord(e) on paper and sliderules, I figured it would be a decent project for the Chinese to show off and entirely within the realms of possibility. Not sure I would fly on the first flight however :)

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US broadband providers holding last-mile traffic ransom, ISP alleges

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Very short memories at L3

That is one way of looking at it (and no I haven't forgotten that at all and addressed it above), the other is that the money paid for data ingress subsidies the cost of the home broadband connection. The same model is used by every single provider of any size. Smaller ISP's such as individual towns with their own ISP may mix free public peering with paid transit because they don't have the scale to justify peering with major telcos but besides that every last mile ISP does the same. Last mile providers not only have to manage the backbone that other providers do but the last mile network, hence larger charges.

You also neglect to consider that not all that data will go to that telcos last mile customers, plenty of it will be going to another ASN either within the country or abroad. Parity is not distracting when it comes to peering, it is essential to how peering actually works. Whilst there can, and usually is, a level of disparity it cannot be too extreme otherwise they would never sell any transit and they would recover the cost from their residential subscribers. This balances the cost based on use.

It is also important to realize that the ISP's are not targeting Netflix, they are not filtering or blocking ports etc, this is nothing more than Netflix using an intermediate ISP who has maxed out their interconnects (which affects all traffic equally) and is refusing to pay more and trying to elicit sympathy from the public by hoping they won't realize the con.

Forcing last mile providers to accept all data ingress gratis could happen, or the rates could be fixed (although not in the USA, no chance of that happening) but I can't believe anyone would believe this would result in anything getting cheaper? It would just shift the cost elsewhere, anyone who thinks that the ISP's would just shrug and make less money is momentously naive. If anything they would use it as a way of making even more money, hiding an increase in new charges. The current system actually works, both ends of the chain pay an amount based upon roughly the amount they use sharing the cost of the end to end infrastructure plus profit to the providers.

If the ISP's were actually deliberately blocking on QOS'ing Netflix then that would be unacceptable, unfortunately Netflix just uses a hell of a lot of data so is being hit hardest by the reality that no matter how you try and avoid it using intermediaries, you are going to have to pay the piper. You can negotiate to peer directly or ensure intermediaries have enough peering or transit capacity. In the end it seems they are paying to peer directly.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Very short memories at L3

Not what I am saying at all. As it stands Netflix have a contract with level 3 so the immediate solution is level 3 need to pay for transit to the cable cos et al, or try and negotiate more peering which is highly unlikely to happen.

The discussion is regarding this being a net neutrality issue, which or is not. It is simply a capacity issue, Netflix could be sending any kind of data, if the volume was the same the result would be the same. Peering only works where it is mutually beneficial, you cannot build a business plan based on undercutting tier 1 isp's then trying to dump it for free on the same isp's you just undercut. Remember Netflix is paying level 3 and no doubt others to perform a service, exactly the same add cogent 's customers did, but in just the same way the do not have the capacity to get it to the required destination and have maxed out their free peering agreements.

When you run a server or servers you pay (usually via a DC) one or more isp's to get your data to the end users, you don't need to pay every isp, but the isp's you do pay have an obligation to actually supply the routes they sell. If they have congestion they need to add capacity or route out another way. Level 3 is saying that the last mile networks should accept higher peering ratios for no other reason than it needs it to keep selling huge amounts of transit for cheap.

If the mrtgs showed parity or even closer to it they might have an argument but if they showed parity I doubt there would be an issue. This isn't net neutrality, this is basic economics, they sold something they couldn't deliver and aren't prepared to pay to make good on their deal.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Very short memories at L3

Nobody is artificially throttling Netflix, at least not directly. The intermediate carrier simply does not have enough network egress capacity to the last mile isp's. They can pay for it or Netflix can directly. Now the last mile carrier could be deliberately not sending add much traffic as they could back over the peering to artificially inflate the ratio, I certainly wouldn't put it past them, but I suspect it's simply a case of them not having the volume given the natural disparity with VOD.

The bottom line is the last mile isp's will make X amount of money, no matter where you cut their income they will make it up elsewhere. Either Netflix pays which means you pay, or an intermediate carrier pays and passes the charge onto Netflix who passes it on to you or the last mile isp just ups your monthly fee and you pay directly. Just like banks, they will always find a way, no matter what you stop them charging it always ends up costing you the same overall.

As regards paying for 100mbps. You don't, you do not have a leased line, you have a contested connection that at best should work at that speed within their network. You are not guaranteed a link of that speed to any other server although you may get it. The cost had always been borne by both ends of the connection based upon relative volumes. (Baring Oz which at least for a while only charged for one way iirc).

Is just how it is, it could change but it won't make your bill any cheaper.

Bottom line. Level 3 under bid and cannot get rid of the data they have so are having to consider paying for transit because a last mile provider won't continue to take it for free in ever increasing volumes. Cogent did exactly the same and l3 complained about it, but now is ok, I guess they can both look down on HE now.

I like Netflix, it uses a lot of data though and if it costs me an extra dollar or two a month (directly or indirectly) it isn't the end of the world.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Canada quashed this balloney ...

Am I going senile or did you move from Vietnam? ☺

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Let's see how the ISPs spin this

Perhaps they will use exactly the same argument L3 used when they depeered cogent for exactly the same reason the cableco's aren't increased the ratio caps with L3? Whilst I don't doubt for a second the cablecos are doing this for malicious reasons, they are doing it behind a cloak of reason. The very reason L3 used to defend its own business model from attacks by bottom feeders like Cogent. Peering is supposed to be mutually beneficial. Transit is there for when it isn't. If L3 sold transit to Netflix for dirt cheap rates, undercutting what they would have paid other Tier 1 ISP's then why should Cox et al offload that additional traffic for free?

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Rampant Spaniel
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Very short memories at L3

Frm the mrtg graphs posted it showed a traffic ratio of 5:1. Whilst virtually everything said about the cableco's being gimps is true, there is an underlying truth to their position on peering vs transit. Peering is supposed to be mutually beneficial, otherwise you buy transit. There is normally a ratio set at which point the agreement can be dropped. It can be pretty generous, 3:1 is about the maximum I have seen for normal agreements. I can kind of see the argument from the cableco, if another ISP undercuts you on price then expects to dump the traffic on your network for free that is a little tight. If you cannot do your fare share in the peering agreement, be in acting as a long haul jump or last mile, then why should an ISP continue to act as your last mile. Once the benefit to the other party declines you need to buy transit rather than peer.

The 'upgrades' people keep mentioning are not to backbones, routers etc, they are simply more ports or higher port speeds at free peering points. They could get this pretty much for free at public exchanges but it would be likely to offer poor performance as the partners who would want to peer would probably not be last mile ISP's.

The reason that larger ratio's are allowed (than 1:1) is because it can be beneficial to one ISP to have access to certain routes to improve performance even if it means accepting an unequal amount of traffic in return.

Cogent ran into similar problems, massively undercut established ISP's (literally by an order of magnitude), dumped the traffic onto their relatively impressive backbone then find you actually have to be able to get rid of that traffic. They had peering arrangements but frequently overran their ratios and got all upset that they got depeered. <irony> L3 was one of the companies that depeered Cogent for exactly this reason (Sprint, Telia and a few others also depeered cogent). If the agreement is not fair then you need to buy transit, that is the way the market works. It might not be fair in some peoples minds, it might need changing, but you cannot do exactly what you complained about another company for doing then cry hard done by. You either agree that peering should be unlimited and give up on selling transit, or you live by fair ratio rules. If you are going to ride share the school run and all of a sudden find yourself doing 4 days a week and the other family only 1? You might have your hand out for gas money no?

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Symantec: Antivirus is 'DEAD' – no longer 'a moneymaker'

Rampant Spaniel
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I found having a virtual machine (with free AV s/w) for internet usage pretty good for avoiding unwanted attention, that and staying away from certain areas of the internet. These days running a VM is insanely easy, free as well. No special knowledge needed, just download a prebuilt image.

I did try norton for a year, mostly to cover tablets and phones, especially those the kids have access to but putting it on the desktops & laptops had a huge impact on performance so I went back to avast.

Does anyone have any thoughts \ experience on andoid anti virus? Best programs etc?

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The verdict is in: Samsung to pay Apple $120m chump change, but gets tiny rebate

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: .. biting the hand that feeds your supply chain ..

If samsung tried that apple would be in talks with intel (if they aren't already in frequent talks with them) about using intels spare fab capacity.

Samsung and Apple do business because it makes sense, samsung can deliver the scale apple needs and the quality at a sensible price point. Apple can write a big enough cheque to samsung to help them overlook squabbles. Whats a few hundred million in legal fees and fines compared to billions a quarter for cpu's and dram? It's a rare example of common sense prevailing.

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You TWITS! Facebook exec erects billboards shaming texting drivers

Rampant Spaniel
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Replace the airbags with spikes :) This should instantly result in improved driving standards.

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Boffins demo FIVE MICRON internal combustion engine

Rampant Spaniel
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Nooooo :) all new Ford ecokaboom engines have a turbo to make up for their pitiful displacement and allow them to quote an mpg that is an order of magnitude or from what you can realistically expect to get If it will last long enough before expiring!

Although the new Aston inspired grille ads at least 20hp.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Awesome, add a turbo and you have next year's Fiesta engine.

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Softbank boss promises 'massive price war' if he can buy T-Mobile US

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Blah, blah, blah

They sped up network vision, they decided to keep virtually all the clear sites to increase site density rather than decommissioning them as planned, they launched 'framily' etc. Son has managed to shake some things up but I think he has been fighting the culture at sprint which is why we are seeing senior staff leaving and not add much progress as anticipated.

I'm not sure the merger will help much, tmo's spectrum is generally over committed although the do have 50MHz of mid dial spectrum in most markets and there would be significant savings. The technology difference is minor given the move to lte, newer phones would just have a couple of extra bands and keep the legacy gsm / cdma voice carriers and a small 1x/ hspa commit for a few years. It will be very interesting to see what Dish does, they may prove key.

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Rampant Spaniel
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With dish amassing spectrum they could form a new 4th player and buy tmo's site leases (which sprint realistically won't need the majority of over time) or enter a network sharing deal with the newly merged company. Sprints network vision sites are designed to be able to easily support more bands and different tech (gsm, lte ca etc).

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Indonesia plans 10 Gbps FTTP as part of 20-million-premises broadband project

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: I applaud their ambition.

Thinking about it you could probably manage it a lot cheaper by bonding multiple connections either via an iso that supports it (eclipse?) or in property using something like a firebrick (there's another company makes a similar product but all I can remember was it was yellow, the joys of parenthood destroying brain cells sorry).

Bonding at the isp will probably cost more and add a little latency but will give you double the connection speed for a single transfer, in home bonding will give you double the total capacity but not for a single transfer and without any change in latency).

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: I applaud their ambition.

I guarantee you can get a faster connection. You will just need to pay the install fee for the leased line and the monthly rate will not be 12.99. I live on a volcanic rock in the middle of the pacific and I can get a 1 gbps drop, just not in the same order of magnitude pricing wise as a consumer product. You may encounter some fun with permits if you live in an area of outstanding beauty but money solves that.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Every time...

Pono is a Hawaiian term, it means balanced / fair / righteous and about 20 other things. Very haole of them to use it on a commercial product.

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NASA's 2015 budget plea: Jobs, pork, small business – OK, science

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: easy solution

Yes because what the world needs is more MBA's :) We might run out of lawyers then what we use for ballast under railway tracks.

I did a stint at DuPont in research and I honestly did not find what you mention although that was commercial research, designing and evaluating catalysts, rather than pure academia. The biggest ism I ever encountered was ageism. I always found the world outside far worse for isms. The corporate world isn't much better. Don't women hold less than 5% of CEO positions for fortune 500 companies? I doubt it is much better at board level.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: easy solution

I get the feeling you may be deliberately misunderstand the situation. Yes the budget for CMO and AMO is a fair portion of the total budget but the scope of their responsibility is significant. You are talking about maintaining, commissioning and decommissioning all their facilities as programs come and go, dealing with all the training and safety costs, the IT spending, the list is pretty long. They have to deal with keeping facilities just because the state its just because a senator pulled some strings or with , in the space of a couple of years demolishing or decommissioning 70+ buildings at one site alone because constellation was canceled, or with downsizing the rocket propulsion testing facility at White sands after the shuttle got canned. They built a groundwater treatment plant due to some contamination, the budget also covers buying supercomputers ($150 m a year on IT iirc).

Seriously, those two departments are a catchall that deal with pretty much anything and everything that isn't directly related to a currently in progress project. If anything it seems like they deliberately shift costs out of projects and into this budget to make their missions look cheaper.

I don't advocate writing a blank check but a normal company doesn't work the same way, NASA isn't a company. It has to operate in a world where maintaining any kind of mission stability is akin to wallpapering fog. How efficient is any company going to be when you give it a task as large as constellation then can it 6 ish years later.

Companies like space x etc can do what they do cheaply and efficiently because they don't have to deal with anywhere near as many unknowns. NASA put men on the moon over 40 years ago from a start point of not having a clue what most of the problems would be, these companies are rethinking an existing solution to make it more efficient.

NASA is cheap, the f35 program would find NASA for somewhere around 50 years. We throw money at the military like crazy, we found $800 + bn for the war in Iraq yet we can't find the money for peaceful space exploration?

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: easy solution

Half the college sports budgets would free up nearly $4bn, even just removing the subsidy would provide over $2.3bn a year (I know that's not a direct government expenditure). That should allow for some more projects.

I agree with using more cost effective private solutions for near earth 'routine' stuff as long as they are safe and that doing it in house wouldn't allow for synergies. NASA should be doing (and be funded to do) more ambitious projects. Yes they are inefficient compared to a private company but they also manage to do things private companies cannot. The shuttle would have been cheaper if it hadn't of had military requirements and how many of these (admittedly very talented) young space companies are standing on NASA's shoulders. We need NASA, we also need it to be doing bat sh!t crazy stuff like a moon base or landing on an asteroid. Not even because of what we might discover there or the technologies we might invent along the way but because we need to inspire the next generation. We want kids to aspire to be scientists who design supersonic passenger jets and Moon bases not just football players or Paris Hilton clones, that can be their fallback. What chance do we have when is not a priority for us?

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'That was quick!': AT&T ends $450 T-Mobile poaching promotion

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Not Bribe

No you are missing the point :) at$t are so evil it must be considered a bribe yet when tmo pay people is them being all helpful and nice and not to be considered bribery.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: This t-mo CEO is rude and unprofessional

At$T's gsm is fine add they have low dial spectrum which is better for building penetration, that and they generally have a better built out network so gsm is not really to blame. Tmo is making advances with mimo which will help plus it purchased some 700 MHz lower A block spectrum from Verizon but it comes with issues (channel 51 interference in some markets for a while, not nationwide, needs new rru's and antenna at every site, will mean a move away from sharing handset design with at&t potentially = higher cpe costs). Right now sprint (when its network vision rollout completes and there's nation wide triband lte) and Verizon have the brightest future although upcoming auctions (aws & 600MHz) could change.

Legere is just creepy though. I challenge anyone to find a picture of him smiling normally. Time will tell if he can build the network he is selling, right now it's sub par.

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Apple wants sales ban on Samsung smartphones nobody is selling

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Xerox should sue then me thinks lol

Why? If you know the history you know Xerox have no case. It wasa tragic case of not knowing the value of what you have.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: R & D

Amen to that. Throw the 13bn sammy are going to spend on marketing at R&D and they won't need to advertise in the first place. The note 3 is great but I'm not sure how much better a phone needs to be, a mild spec bump won't see me buying a note 4.

The legal and marketing budgets might just make a difference!

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Rampant Spaniel
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Re: You're banning it wrong

The s2 is still being sold quite a lot, just through mvno's and regional carriers. It's cheap and has a huge amount of aftermarket trinkets for it, plus it isn't all that bad specification wise. I think El reg has mistaken it not being sold directly by tier one cell networks for it not being sold at all.

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Rampant Spaniel
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Quite a few regional carriers sell the s2 as well. It's cheap and for ghetto pcs or mvno operations it's a good choice.

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HTC: Shipping Android updates is harder than you think – here's why

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: Hence

That's the trade off with Apple. They release an upgrade and it's usually compatible with most of their phones (although sometimes not all features will work with all phones) but to be fair this is at the expense of choice. Apple only needs to test it against a few phones and several steps are in house for Apple that aren't for Android phone makers. I'm not suggesting either approach is better, it's just a choice between pretty much guaranteed updates for a couple off years (by which point you will probably upgrade) or having more choice over the specification of your phone. I would not be shocked to find that Samsung released more phone variants in 2013 than Apple have released in total.

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British Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing receives Royal pardon

Rampant Spaniel
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Re: What A Crock of SHIT

Exactly. The law was grossly unsound and when it was removed from the books it should have resulted in am official apology to anyone with a conviction and any convictions being expunged. A pardon suggests guilt. He may have broken a law but the law was as unsound as they get. It should never have been a law and if our elected officials weren't spineless, greedy, moronic sacks of excrement it would have been dealt with properly.

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Google: Surge in pressure from govts to DELETE CHUNKS of the web

Rampant Spaniel
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alleged illegal activity

One can only presume it was submitting an accurate expense claim.

I agree people should not be able to publish lies but an important piece of information is missing, had the allegation been tested in court and is the removal backed by an injunction based on it being proven untrue. If not there is a big problem here. No person should have any more (or any less) protection here. If it is untrue the author should face consequences, if it is true then the authors right to free speech is paramount. We have courts to decide if it is true, if the author publishes prior to a judgement then they leave themselves open to a greater punishment. I have a deep suspicion regarding any unnamed mp getting to silence allegations about crimes, for all we know it could have been TB and Iraq War crimes.

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