* Posts by Brewster's Angle Grinder

1350 posts • joined 23 May 2011

Page:

Tor onion hardening will be tear-inducing for feds

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Hopeless...

I looked up the definition of "Turing machine". Security isn't mentioned.

Translation: I think this means Alan Turing is responsible for all computer security problems because, as we all know, you can't bolt security onto a working project; it has to be built in from the start.

2
0

Hey cloud lawyer: Can I take my client list with me?

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Suspenders?

According to God's own dictionary, a garter is "a band warn around the leg to keep up a stocking or sock. ■ N. Amer. A suspender for a sock or stocking." While a suspender is defined as, "Brit. an elastic strap attached to a belt or garter, fastened to the top of a stocking to hold it up. 2. (suspenders) N. Amer. a pair of braces for holding up trousers."

That's almost as transparent as 200 denier black stockings. But I think we have garters and suspender belts. But you uncivilised rogues don't know what a garter is and call suspender belts garters. I may be wrong as I wear, um, tights...

2
1

Laser probers sniff more gravitational waves from mega black hole smash

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Dark matter

Yes, but primordial black holes could be created during inflation. And for us to have overlooked them, they'd need masses in the range 20-100M. (For reference, the upper limit for stellar processes is around 30M.)

0
0

Friends with benefits: A taxing problem for Ireland in a post-Brexit world

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

"...that the cherished British tradition of reasoned argument and respect for one's opponents seems to have gone out of the window. How British is that?"

About as British as a broken bottle in a bar room brawl.

1
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: "reject the referendum result"

"Once the result is in, whatever it is, that's a big chunk of uncertainty removed."

If we vote "stay", then the uncertainty goes. But if we vote "leave", then it's 2 - 10 years more uncertainty as we negotiate the divorce.

5
0

Lester Haines: RIP

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

El Reg simply will not be the same.

2
0

Judge slams BT for blaming engineer after 7 metre ceiling plunge

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Very weird

@Roland6

Agreed. Pretty much the only new information is that a jury of our peers found BT guilty. Otherwise we know no more than before it started.

3
0

Microsoft's paid $60 per LinkedIn user – and it's a bargain, because we're mugs

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

"But unless we start acting rationally..."

Have you met the human race?

17
0

Microsoft buys LinkedIn for the price of 36 Instagrams

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Medusa Was A Mere Dilettante

"...and then sells them off for the price of the Carthage."

0
0

RIP ROP: Intel's cunning plot to kill stack-hopping exploits at CPU level

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

There's a XKCD for this, but I can't be bothered to find it.

"This is perhaps the one industry where everyone expects you to deliver a unicorn by yesterday and make the demand with a straight face."

Look, you have a working horse. How much harder can it be to add one little horn? It doesn't have to have a spiral or anything; a plain horn is fine. Just get me a unicorn and be a bit more positive about it.

1
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: System + User Stacks

I'm too young to have programmed a PDP-11. (*flutters eyes attractively* - hey, eyelashes are one of the things don't sag with age.) But I'm talking about two stack pointers accessible simultaneously via their own dedicated instructions: PSHS, PSHU, PULS, PULU. We're not talking about a stack in SMM mode or kernel mode that the CPU switches to on an interrupt or at the call gate. Imagine if AMD had introduced rsp2 and push2 and pop2 instructions to go with it.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Gradual retreat of the von Neumann machine...

Or back to a code segment, a data segment, and a stack segment. And because different index registers defaulted to different segments, you tended to stick with it. The thing was, we all hated it. Ideally you had all four segments pointing at one 64K window (a .com file). Otherwise, it was lots of jiggery pokery. The 386 was a breath of fresh air because you could use a flat memory model. But as I understand, it permissions were attached to the segment, hence the need for the NX bit on the page table.

2
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

"To summarise, if you had wanted to introduce this feature about 40 years ago, it would have been trivial and (quite probably) implemented purely as a compiler code-gen strategy."

All hail the 6809 and its two stacks: the "system" stack and the "user" stack. Great for forth (the computation stack and the return stack) but useless for much else. It did function as a useful extra index register. though.

3
0

Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

My memory of the case was that the court said APIs are copyrightable in principle, but it could nevertheless be fair use to use them, and chucked it back to the lower court to decide. The lower court has now said, "Yup, it was fair use" and the senior court will have to decide whether that decision was sound. But just because the appeal court agreed with Oracle the first time, it's a mistake to think they will agree a second.

6
0

Firefox 48 beta brings 'largest change ever' thanks to 'Electrolysis'

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Coat

A bigger hole is needed.

It's okay downvoters, I was only joking. I know that Windows 10 really takes 20 hours to install, not 20 minutes.

4
1
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Joke

Re: At last

Are you sure that wasn't a Windows 10 install?

6
4

Oracle to sue cloud sales 'whistleblower' for 'malicious prosecution'

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Deserves more upvotes.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Classic tactic

And more bluntly: intimidate.

7
0

Jaxa's litany of errors spun Hitomi to pieces

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Escape? In our moment of triumph?

Hitomi worked within design parameters until an error lead to them exceeding those parameters.

And however small the risk of a torpedo up the jaxi, the consequences for the death star were catastrophic. (And they had the father of the space wizard on their side so they full knew what was possible.) So maybe, just maybe, they should have provided some mitigation: something that might have limited it to explosions in the interior and a loss of power rather than the destruction of the entire station. Or, if the reactor really was that dangerous, maybe they shouldn't have put it at the centre of the bloody station. Maybe they should have put it on a nacelle.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: So-

They subcontracted to the same company that built the Deathstar.

1
0

Planet 9 a captured alien, astroboffins suggest

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

MikeBrownFacts

Mike Brown an create a planet by merely saying, "It exists".

1
0

Want a Brexit? Promise you'll sort out UK universities' £1bn research cash loss

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: The answer is...

I'm not good at creating wealth. But I'm really good at creating losses. Huge fucking losses. Can I still comment?

1
0

Catz: Google's Android hurt Oracle's Java business

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Aha, an isonomikos!

Is the supply of lawyers in the universe held constant, then?

1
0

UK needs comp sci grads, so why isn't it hiring them?

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

@AndrueC

Most people can bash out "chopsticks" on a piano. Few people can play Rachmaninov. Same with coding, I think.

Disclaimer: I have ZERO qualifications in Comp.Sci

3
0

Inter-bank system SWIFT on security? User manual needs 'revamp’

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Alert

As I've said before, we really need an icon for "We need an icon for..."

3
0

Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

Since that burglary in the street last week, we've all learnt that locks are no longer able to securely defend our homes. So we have all done away with locks on all windows and doors.

1
1

Blocking ads? Smaller digital publishers are smacked the hardest

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

We need a cultural shift towards paying for stuff.

I suspect we'll be adding advertisements to our app shortly because desktop sales are sinking and, despite a six-figure user count, not enough people are upgrading from the free mobile version. Initially, the advertising will be a stick to push you towards the paid version. But if the advertising revenues look solid we'll move more of the content to the free version -- on the assumption the more content we provide, the more people will use it, and the better advertising revenues will be. As I say in the title, if you don't want advertising, you need to start paying for stuff.

And I'll hold my hands up and say I'm as guilty as the rest of you of not sticking my hand in my pocket. And yes, I run ad blocking in the browser.

9
2

A UK-wide fibre broadband investment plan? Don't ask awkward questions

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Well you say that

Have you checked you don't live in a Baba Yaga hut?

2
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

All your points are valid. But why should a private company care about any of that?

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Trollface

This complicated, expensive, time-consuming problem MUST have a simple solution.

But, waaa, I want faster broadband! And, waaa, it should be easy - it's just idiots laying cables! And, waaa, I want somebody else to pay! And, waaa, a commercial organisation shouldn't be maximising shareholder returns, they should be maximising my quality of porn!

4
2

Kepler space telescope spots 1,284 new planets

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Oh dear...

Thanks. This is far more elegantly articulated than the plaintive cry I uttered before arriving at your comment. We don't have to amplify the polarisation of society.

2
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: I'm calling it !!!!

Why do people have to bring religion into this? Really, why? What has any of this got to do with ${deity} one way or another?

6
2

Ireland's tax arrangements are as clear as a pint of Guinness

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Disposing of VAT and personal income tax

@DougS

The only people exempt from corporation tax in the UK are sole traders and I presume, if we were doing this for real, we would make them pay corporation tax. (If you're a small business, this might actually be simpler.)

Your analysis also overlooks the ability to raise capital. I think that's more important than the limits of liability.

But it wasn't a serious suggestion.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: The problem with getting rid of corp tax

Equally, we could do it the other way round: we could dispose of VAT, income tax, and personal taxation in all its varied forms, and just tax corporations. After all, it doesn't matter where in the system we tax it; and all that money has to flow through these wealth "creating" businesses at some point...

3
0

Tabby's Star's twinkle probably the boring business of calibration

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: But why would it show a consistent decline over 100 years?

@Martin My memory of the original paper is they did do exactly that. This new paper suggests that when you test hundreds of stars (rather than a couple) you find the trend in KIC846285 is unusual but not extraordinary.

0
0

Lyft, Uber throw Texas-sized tantrum over Austin driver law

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

It does sound disproportionate.

If I hire a cab, I want to be certain the vehicle is well maintained, the driver competent, and the journey insured. How does fingerprinting the driver help? Are Uber drivers stealing cars, spending the night hiring it out as a taxi, and then retuning the vehicle before the registered owner wakes?

1
5

Server-jacking exploits for ImageMagick are so trivial, you'll scream

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Lest we forget

Yeah, PNM files have saved my hide. But that was in the days before PNG.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

I hate to defend H4rm0ny, but

If this was an SQL injection caused by home-spun quoting, everybody would condemn the coder as idiots who should have used placeholders. But because its happening on the command-line, everybody's defending it. (Ironically, the unix command-line has the potential to be a safe API: but not when the tokenisation is done by a shell.)

1
0

Old, complex code could cause another UK banking TITSUP – study

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: "Even if something has been written in Java in 90s that is still 20 years ago."

As any fule kno: software documentation wasn't invented until 2003 so the code will be undocumented.

2
1

One black hole, three galaxies, four BEELION solar masses – found by accident

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

@Rich11

I can construct solutions to the Einstein Field Equations which bridge between causally disconnected patches. Or those patches could be brought into contact again if space contracted superluminally. Neither can be completely ruled out, although both are very unlikely.

1
0

Docker hired private detectives to pursue woman engineer's rape, death threat trolls

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Troll mentality? - a story of abuse

Someone got a bit obsessed with me on Twitter: they invited me to their home, wanted my address so they could come visit (thank $deity I don't use my real name) and made suicide threats. I talked to them sympathetically but unemotionally until they realised I wasn't interested, and then they moved on.

I suspect, but can't prove, they became a voluminous and slightly incoherent commenter on the popular blog of a well-known sf writer.

1
0

Good enough IT really is good enough. You don't need new hardware

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: why is everything Javascript these days?

@Skoorb Which is why you use '==='.

But PHP has an equals operator that coerces. And if you've come from, C++, you dumbly expect a == b to call decltype(a)::operator==(decltype(b)) (If you implemented std::string yourself, you could alter operator== to get some of those behaviours, if you wanted.) And while we're on the subject of C, how well do you know the promotion rules in C/C++? Because they make the above look straightforward.

All languages have misfeatures.

0
3

Hackers so far ahead of defenders it's not even a game

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: I will openly admit

You could write a bot and single handedly bury them.

3
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

ηβπ

(See title.)

1
0

Vanity dating site BeautifulPeople popped

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: I'm the only HOT Reg reader?

I was tempted to down vote you out of pure spite.

6
0

If Android’s wings are clipped, other Google platforms may gain

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: people shown they like app(lication)s, not browsers

"They are the ones that took more than others to start, and don't have a native UI."

A blank web page starts quicker than any other app I've got on my phone. I agree start up time is a huge problem, but that's true of native apps as well: they've got to load quickly because it happens so often, whereas a desktop app can take minutes and nobody cares. That's one of the adjustments you have to make when coming from the desktop.

And, as for UI, none of the apps I have here seem to use a native UI; they all seem to invent their own. And none of them appear to be web apps.

What we have is a network operator writing a crud app shocker. If they'd written it as a native app, it would still be crap. But I wrote my first commercial app in 8086 assembler. I've written apps in C++. And I've not felt more limited by web apps than by native ones; so far, everything I've needed is there.

0
0
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: people shown they like app(lication)s, not browsers

*cough* phonegap (cordova) *cough*

Also embedding native webviews.

0
0

'Impossible' EmDrive flying saucer thruster may herald new theory of inertia

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

@Chemist

"Which you shouldn't really AFAIK. A particle of zero rest mass has no increase in mass with velocity - indeed it is constrained to travel at c at all times in a vacuum."

No, he's right. GR has no notion of mass; its defined in terms of energy and momentum (cf the Stress-Energy tensor) and it's the energy that shapes the metric ("distorts spacetime"). So every particle and non-gravitational field distorts spacetime. (And if the gravitational field itself could distort spacetime then that might explain dark matter.)

The reason we talk about rest mass is precisely because a particle has an "effective mass" or "relativistic mass" that depends on the relative speed between it and you. It's that effective mass that means two observers travelling at different speeds end up agreeing that a particle has the same total energy, even though they disagree about its kinetic energy (speed).

0
3
Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

@frank ly

"...if they are affected by gravity (attracted to matter) when they are fairly stationary?"

Photons are never stationary; however much you confine them, they'll still bounce around at the speed of light. Being massless means travelling at the speed of light; no ifs or buts.

"If you're equating the energy of a photon to an 'effective mass'...then you'd have a situation in which X-ray photons...should be deflected more by gravity."

This argument turns out to be the same as arguing heavier masses experience greater acceleration than lighter ones, which Galileo disproved. Do the full calculations and you'll see the angle of deflection is independent of mass. (And we can check this by looking for chromatic aberration in gravitational lensing which, AFAIK, isn't seen.)

However Bob is right inasmuch as photons do distort space time. If that wasn't the case, ~90% of the mass in a proton wouldn't count for gravity (since only ~10% of the rest mass of a proton is due to the rest mass of its constituent quarks). But the distortion caused by a photon is negligible: we can't even measure the gravitational interaction between protons, and they have a rest mass of ~1GeV.

5
0

Chrome lives in dog years: It's seven years old but just turned 50

Brewster's Angle Grinder
Silver badge

Re: Those damn poorly coded sites

I take it you're using the definition of "poorly coded" that means "has greater than zero bugs"?

1
0

Page:

Forums