* Posts by Brewster's Angle Grinder

1524 posts • joined 23 May 2011

The UK's Investigatory Powers Act allows the State to tell lies in court

Brewster's Angle Grinder
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"...its unlikely she will find a way to tear up the Human Rights act anytime soon, you should read this and it tells you how hard it will be..."

These hurdles are exactly the hurdles Brexit has to jump. So the Human Rights Acts could tag along like a legislative remora. Whether it would be swept aside or last the distance to get royal ascent from William V is another matter.

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Jeremy Hunt: Telcos must block teens from sexting each other

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Coat

Re: "Because there is technology that can identify sexually explicit pictures "

"No there isn't"

Oh there is. The false positives are through the roof. The false negatives, likewise. But it does occasionally permit a legitimate image or block an explicit one.

Mine's the one with the pocket full of training images for my smut filter, thanks.

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A Rowhammer ban-hammer for all, and it's all in software

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Holmes

Re: Solution

"...good luck figuring out when your money pays for an actual difference in quality.."

If only there was some way a reviewer or end user could test it. Hmmm.

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Three certainties in life: Death, taxes and the speed of light – wait no, maybe not that last one

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@mage

"Not just Einstein, but Maxwell and others."

I didn't understand half the letter. But it's argument was that gravity and "light" (massless particles) dodn't propagate at the same speed. That's undoubtedly weird, but not necessarily fatal.

And while the author argued it was light that was faster, I saw nothing to say it couldn't be gravity that was slower (it's all relative...). Slower gravity is plausible if gravitons self interact -- they would naturally find the earlier universe stickier than the present day one.

So I read this as yet more evidence we don't understand gravity. Which, yes, means more problems for Einstein (cf dark matters vs MOND). But Maxwell, in as much he survived being mugged by Dirac and Feynman, is fine.

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Here's the thing: We've pressed pause on my startup

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I take it your definition of suboptimal that is "anything less than 100%". We've all come to expect perfection as standard.

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CERT tells Microsoft to keep EMET alive because it's better than Win 10's own security

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Re: Great point he's making

I've got 32 bit tools I compiled under Win95 that still run fine on Win10.

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Not fake news: Facebook reinvents SVG

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Re: Only if you don't need to view it..

Web Animations are supported on Android >= 5. And there are polyfills, although I don't know how good they are.

Although, given Google's track record, it might not be supported on SVG. (Yes Chrome teams: why don't you remove dataset on SVGElement and then, when everybody found the last of the bugs that caused, add it back. FFS.)

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LAKE OF frozen WATER THE SIZE OF NEW MEXICO FOUND ON MARS – NASA

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Re: Less thatn 200m down

I'm thinking dig a hole, let it sublime, and condense the evaporate.

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Irish eyes are crying: Tens of thousands of broadband modems wide open to hijacking

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Re: Frontier disables the firewall on all there DSL routers

The trouble is, when they break into your router you probably need an ICBM.

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UK PM Theresa May's £2bn in R&D still a drop in the ocean

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Joke

All I'm saying is that R&D will account for 6% of GDP by 2020, without the Government having to announce any new spending.

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Pluto has massive underground oceans, say astro-boffins

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"Qualitively" (aka I can't be bothered to dig out any fomulae)

The most important point is that Pluto is phase locked to Charon; i.e. Pluto always presents the same face to Charon. For that to happen, there must be body tides in Pluto. How much heating they cause is another matter.

I'd be tempted to say the heating would be greater if the barycentre was inside Pluto, and Charon's orbit was more eccentric and less coplanar. But maybe Charon's mass (12% of Pluto's) more than makes up for that.

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Facebook 'fesses up to fudged ad metrics … again

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Re: Overestimating imaginary numbers

Put an advert in a paper. A person buys the paper but never opens the page. That's a "view" too. (I was going to say something similar about TV. But IIUC the way they measure it means that isn't the case.)

Note Facebook have a play to completion count of videos. That's one ways of coping with the problem of videos not being watched. (And they underestimated it.)

And increasingly ads measures whether or not they are visible. (We're getting new features to do this in HTML5/javascript because advertisers are clogging up web pages with crud to detect it.)

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Forget razors and blades, APIs are the new gotcha

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Re: Double edge blades

How hairy are your legs??!

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Security bods find Android phoning home. Home being China

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"suggest you check your $PATH for /usr/bin or /sbin because whois is part of the standard unix/linux networking command set and has been for decades."

The program 'whois' is currently not installed. You can install it by typing:

sudo apt-get install whois

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Trollface

Re: Here you go, girly will help you

>Go to the command line (know what that is?) and type whois 118.193.254.27

It says: 'whois' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.

What do I do now?

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Microsoft just got its Linux Foundation platinum card, becomes top level member

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Re: Great news!

>I'd be more concerned about poisoning the well.

Systemd got there first.

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NASA discovers mysterious super-fast electrons whizzing above Earth

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"And the answer turns out to be 9000m/s."

There are some really good answers on that stack exchange page. But they're mostly talking about "outer space". You want the relevant speed in the interplanetary medium close to earth.

The paper seems to be talking about the thermal speed of electrons, and sets the upper limit at 100eV which is ~6000km/s. (I've ignored relativistic effects.) That's more or less consistent with honeste_vivere's stackexchange answer which sets the upper limit at "5170 km/s". So I'd go with ~5000km/s.

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Fake election news meltdown vortex sucks in Google

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"The Internet provides a mechanism for the Truth to route around the Censorship,"

It also provides a mechanism for lies to route around censorship. It turns out there are more lies than truth.

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Re: Google vs Wikipedia

Google's aim is to provide accurate information. (Or people might be forced to use Bing.) Facebook's aim is to keep you entertained. (And there isn't an alternative, however improbable, in sight.) So Google are more likely to fix it. (And, according to Tim O Reilly, they took a financial hit when they walled off content farms. So they have form in forgoing short term gain,)

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NHS IT bod sends test email to 850k users – and then responses are sent 'reply all'

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Headmaster

"Can any one of you thumbs down people explain WHY you voted me down?"

The question mark at the end of the second paragraph; El Reg grammar pedantry is legendary.

Honestly, you didn't get the joke and provided an incoherent response in a whiny tone. I didn't down vote you but you deserved them all. Be informative, be funny, or advance the conversation.

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What went wrong at Tesco Bank?

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Re: @jfdidave

I've just realised how trivial cracking a password stored as hashed pairs would be:

Cracking any pair by brute force is a search for a two character password.(64*64 iterations?)

Once you have at least one letter, cracking every other pair is reduced to a brute force search for a single missing character.

And if you didn't salt each pair separately, and the password contains a duplicated character, then cracking is reduced to a brute force search for a single character.

Storing hashed pairs of characters offers NO security.

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@jfdidave

The number of combinations can be halved, if the pair are sorted by index (i.e. if you always ask for the second and fourth characters, and never for fourth and second).

But what's the maximum allowed length of password? You have to provision for that.

And what about Natwest, who ask for four characters?

Edit: And, as some points out below, the net protection from all these hashes is far less than decent encryption.

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IPv4 is OVER. Really. So quit relying on it in new protocols, sheesh

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Joke

Re: Meanwhile

"What you possibly want is IPv8."

Google have trademarked V8. So it will have to be V10.

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The Reg seeks online community manager

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Trollface

Re: A bridge too far

They do seem to be asking for an extrovert to sell a site written for introverted misanthropes by introverted misanthropes.

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McDonald's sues Italian city for $20m after being burger-blocked

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Because they seem to be doing this without TTIP and I've read so many wild claims about what TTIP allows that my credulity has snapped.

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Re: *GOOD*

"It's Florence. The US constitution does not apply globally..."

Constitutions aren't the sole prerogative of the US. Indeed, many other countries have them. And you you will find Article 41 of the the Italian constitution (PDF) says:

"There is freedom of private economic initiative. It cannot be conducted in conflict with social utility or in a manner that could damage safety, liberty, and human dignity. The law determines appropriate planning and control s so that public and private economic activity is given direction and coordinated to social objectives."

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China passes new Cybersecurity Law – you have seven months to comply if you wanna do biz in Middle Kingdom

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Re: Really?!?

>Forbidding people from "disseminating false information to disrupt the economic or social order" sounds good in principle....[a] balanced implementation of that in the UK might have improved the piss-poor Brexit debates...

We have a similar law in respect to elections. The DPP is currently considering whether to prosecute.

@See: El Graun.

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We're going to have to start making changes or the adults will do it for us

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He was getting at real phenomena and it was worthwhile saying. But tying it in with the lack of female programmers made me cringe and undermined it.

And, anyway, women use formfeeds...

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Re: And within this article...

Opening brace on the same line or the next line.

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Re: The problem in IT is the anarchic attitude...

"There could be reasons, behind rules and standards, you can't see, but are there because someone looking at the overall picture found they are needed."

Experience suggests rules long out-last the reasons for them being there. But emotional attachment and institutional inertia prevent them being changing. ("Look, I wrote the rule. This is the reason I wrote it. We no longer need it, in fact it's counterproductive, and we need to do away with it.")

The other day somebody posted a link to this brilliamt article about managing geeks The geek aversion to rules is generally an example of geeks working round performance inhibiting damage.

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Icelandic Pirate Party maroons itself from coalition talks

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The Cinderella complex

"Tell that to Nigel Farage and his Brexit cronies."

That would be the people who won criticising those who lost for not getting on and making the winners' plans a reality.

"We won! It's the democratic will of the people! Now do what we say."

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Apple, Mozilla kill API to deplete W3C battery-snitching standard

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Re: It's one standard in a long row of idiotic web standards

You could always release your own stripped down browser.

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Tesco Bank limits online transactions after fraud hits thousands

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Joke

Re: Is this different?

I think it will turn out to be zero-factor authentication causing a 2-day outage.

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Google knifes Eclipse Android Developer Tools

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Re: Android Studio

Our experience is Apple nets twice the revenue of Android.

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Ghost of DEC Alpha is why Windows is rubbish at file compression

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Re: So why not create a new v2 compression scheme?

"...the disc access probably wasn't a simple case of "send a few bytes to the controller and wait"..."

Ah, yes, the joys of "Programmed IO" (PIO) -- "rep insb", "rep insw", "rep outsb" and "rep outsw"; your single threaded processor would be tied up shunting sectors through a port, byte by byte.

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Re: This explanation explains everything

These days, cross boundary access is a performance boost: it means you can pack data structures tighter so the data is more likely to be in the cache.

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WebAssembly: Finally something everyone agrees on – websites running C/C++ code

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Re: Portability??

"You can already compile C or C++ to for example JavaScript (yes, source code) or Flash/AVM2."

And webasm is just about making that use case perform better. That's it.

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Google man drags Emacs into the 1990s

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Re: Whats this GUI thingy?

Oh local notifications work. And I'll cut him some slack for iOS10. But it somehow modifies the `at` member of the structure so you can't reuse it. Then there's the whole not coalescing multiple schedule calls. And the cancellation architecture. And, as you say, the issue with foreground notifications not happening. And there are a whole bunch of PRs on the github page that should be in the mainline Android release. None of which bodes well for the source when I look at it. (Come to that, the work around for iOS10---set the alert to repeat---doesn't smell great; I hope that's down to Apple)

I'm not annoyed with the author; who's writing it in his weekends for free. But notifications are pivotal part of mobile. Cordova could do with getting their act together, particularly as there is a spec which Chrome implements on the desktop.

Anyway, it allowed us to gauge interest. We'll probably fork it next iteration and modify the java/objective C. By the sounds of it, you should probably be doing the same.

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Brewster's Angle Grinder
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Re: Whats this GUI thingy?

That wouldn't be the truly abysmal local notifications plugin, would it?

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Windows Atom Tables popped by security researchers

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Re: Super cool name!

"But if nobody has considered that an Atom Table can be modified by other malicious programs, likely they aren't sanitising the input. And given their length of history, there are bound to be thousands of apps that can be crashed in particular ways with a dodgy Atom Table entry that they try to use."

Windows machines were single user machines so if an app was running it was probably authorised by the user and to be trusted. And, anyway, if you could manipulate the atom table you could simulate key presses and mouses click and find umpteen other vectors far easier to exploit that putting shell code in a string and attempting a buffer overflow. Sanitisation was done to protect against corrupted files, stupidity (a user coming along and tweaking your registry keys) or a bug in another program. It wasn't done to protect against malicious programs.

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IndexedDB pulls away from less-loved web storage options

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await new API();

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How Google's Project Zero made Apple refactor its kernel

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Re: This isn't an easy bug class to fix

If the performance issue was x86 specific then it would show up on Linux and Windows.

But it appears it's the hardware task switch which is slow on 32 bit processes. However that's only used for transitioning between kernel and user land. (See stackoverflow.)

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HMRC to create new compliance team focused on 'gig economy' workers

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Re: IR35, is currently costing the taxpayer around £440m a year

"The biggest issue has to be that HMRC have decided they can ignore any contracts in place and how the relationship actually works to create their own 'deemed contract' based on how they think things are happening and prosecute on that basis."

That's the situation in the UK. You can't just sign a bit of paper saying "I'm self employed" and make it so. But if HMRC really have ignored how the contract "actually works", you'll be able to convince a judge and he'll chuck it out. Been there; done that. Although I only won on appeal.

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Reports: Twitter chainsaw massacre redux on the cards

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"There's nothing on Twitter that doesn't exist on dozens of other online services."

Volume of people. Okay, even there they lose out to Facebook. But they dwarf pretty much every other online service.

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Is this the worst Blockchain idea you've ever heard?

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Pirate

My conclusion about Etherium is they read Accelerando and decided to get on creating Economics 2.0.

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Donald Trump running insecure email servers

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Re: Thar she blows!

For Trump, embarrassing would be cogent policy documents, invoices from actresses hired to accuse him of sexual assault and forty years amicable correspondence with a Mexican imam, including an offer to sponsor his citizenship. I'm not holding my breath.

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May blocked plans to bring in more Indian IT workers – Vince Cable

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Joke

On the plus side, if sterling continues dropping at the current rate, then by 2017 India will be outsourcing all their IT work to us.

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Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

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@Doctor Syntax

"If you see early films of London the streets were just as crowded as they are now but with horse drawn traffic. I suppose, however, that London itself is bigger."

There were 300,000 horses in London c.1900 and there are 2.6million cars registered in London today. In that time the human population has only increase by about a third (Wikipedia says from 6.6E6 to 8.6E6).

I reckon the horses produced more pollution, too.

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Re: Errrm

For an example of people not being ale to do replacements jobs, look at supermarkets replacing cashiers with delivery drivers. Not every cashier can drive. And not everybody who can drive can load and unload create of foods.

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Re: Errrm

"The new technologies result in new work that hadn't previously been envisaged. How many of the people reading this have a job that even existed 100 years ago?"

In the 19th Century (~100 years ago) there were over 3 million horses in the UK and they were mainly working animals. Today there are about a million, mainly in leisure and sports. We haven't been able to redeploy all the horses because they're not up to doing the jobs we have. That's the danger of robots and AI -- that not everybody is up to doing the jobs for which, yes, there might be a huge demand.

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