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* Posts by Ian Yates

858 posts • joined 12 Jun 2007

Boffins spot planet that could support life... just 12 light years away

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Ping Time

"Just talk and don't worry about a two way conversation"

That sums up my general attempts at being social (in hindsight)

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Anonymous hacks Westboro Baptists over Sandy Hook protests

Ian Yates
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Re: Probably...

"There shouldn't be "proper channels" as regards the Interwebs, Ian"

That wasn't what I was talking about. I meant proper channels with regards to free speech in the state; in this case, the USA.

It should be pretty clear that the WBC are purely abusing their right to free speech and there should be sensible ways of curbing that. IANAL, but I would think banning their right to protest in public, initially for a short time, would be a fair and just response.

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Ian Yates
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Re: Probably...

"A right must be tempered with responsibility. If this group was in the UK they wold have been arrested by now for the shit they say. because its illegal to be racist or homophobic etc here"

And that's exactly my point: "there should be proper channels to correct/punish this behaviour". Although, I'm personally not a fan of how far the UK laws go, due to the ease with which they can and have been abused.

Anon's biggest "win" here is in highlighting the WBC to the world (again) for being the twisted individuals they are. While we'd probably normally try to starve them of publicity, what needs to happen is more people in the USA get riled up and actually raise complaints against them.

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Ian Yates
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Unhappy

Re: Probably...

I'm with AC @ 08:55.

The right to free speech has to be universal.

While I don't condone the WBC in any way, if you believe a particular group is abusing their right in order to preach hate, there should be proper channels to correct/punish this behaviour; Anon's kind of vigilantism (while funny) does breed a "we're louder so we know best" skew on what free speech is.

Or in this case, "we're more technically competent, so we control your interwebs".

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It's official: Mac users are morally superior to Windows users

Ian Yates
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FAIL

Fact: Saying "Fact." is not an acceptable substitute for actual facts.

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Ian Yates
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Stop

Re: Statistics

"thousands of other peoples opinions"

Well... let's be fair, thousands of other people's choice to use one particular donation site, that I've personally never heard of.

I'm not a Mac user, but all of my donations are either direct debit or paid directly to the charity/organisation.

So the headline should be (if it was serious) "Qgiv is used by Mac users more than Windows users" or "Qgiv detects more 'Mac' user agents than 'Windows'", since user agent spoofing is hardly complex.

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Siri: Can you make a Raspberry Pi open a garage door?

Ian Yates
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IT Angle

Re: Wow, just wow

"the story here isn't about a garage door opener"

Makes more sense. I was wondering why you'd need something so computationally powerful just to open a garage door ;)

Can't see the video at work

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Micro-computer bakers open Raspberry Pi shop

Ian Yates
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Thumb Up

Re: Pah!

I used to love adding a "cheat", such as infinite lives/ammo to character 1 or removing collision on a certain wall, for when I played multiplayer with a friend

Good times

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Pentagon hacker McKinnon will NOT be prosecuted in the UK

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: Good

10 years!

I can't even imagine what he and his family went through; I feel old just thinking about how long it's been since his story first came to light.

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Frack me! UK shale gas bonanza 'bigger than North Sea oil'

Ian Yates
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Holmes

Is it just me...

"more energy for the nation than North Sea oil"

I took this to be a surreptitious nod to Scotland that we weren't worried about their potential independance. Although, I could just be growing overly cynical.

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Apple loses iPhone patent lawsuit

Ian Yates
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Stop

Re: The Irony

While this is certainly Apple getting a taste of their own "obvious" medicine and watching them lose at their own game gives a warm fuzzy feeling, the patents in question are still rediculous.

The two regarding incoming calls basically boil down to: phone receives call and displays contextual tasks, user selects the task (accept/reject) to perform.

True, Sony and Nokia land-grabbed these concepts in the 90's, but seriously, what else would you do with a phone that receivse incoming calls?

I agree with the poster below that says that almost all IT patents are obvious or prior art. It's just land-grabbing and patent trolling. The system is still broken and this is still just irrelevant numbers being batted from one corporation to the next.

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Facebook ditches mobile HTML with native Android app

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: Oh, awesome.

"android movie rentals don't work"

Yikes! I'd better let them know, as it's working on my rooted Sensation...

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Stroustrup on next-gen C++: I didn't want to let go of my baby

Ian Yates
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"It's pretty good for device drivers and graphics libraries and other low level stuff."

I agree.

If I need to write something that has to manipulate data as quickly as possible, I'd opt for C++ and all of the wonderful memory control it provides; if I need a GUI or high-level RESTful web service (etc.), I'd go for Java or C# depending on any existing infrastructure.

My time is money, as is the time of the people that need to maintain my code in future, and C++ just costs more of both.

Sod the "best" arguments, the purpose of a programming language is to abstract away the problems you don't need to solve for your current work. If memory efficiency isn't important, why include it within your current solution when you could spend the time on other things?

That's the reason I don't do assembly at work, anyway. YMMV.

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The Sons of Kahn and the assembly language of the internet

Ian Yates
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Re: C# is dead

"But of course, you need professionals to work with a professional system, and MS did everything in its power over the last 2-3 decades to de-professionalize the programming world."

As someone who moved through C++, Java, and into .NET, I actually agree with you.

I have a real problem trying to hire people who know/care what .NET is and how the CLR works, even at a high level.

A GC is not some black magic that you should assume will do its job correctly, nor is the JIT. You need some understanding of what happens at run time in order to understand what tools are suited to what tasks. /rant

That aside, anyone who "manually builds an installer from their local workstations" is in the wrong role or has their hands tied by a manager who is in the wrong role (I've been there).

.NET has had brilliant CI and packaging tools for a long time (my current personal favourite being TeamCity), as well as NuGet, which can save hours, in the right hands.

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Ian Yates
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Re: C# is dead

Ignoring that you've gone from "C# is a rip off of Java" to ".NET [...], just like Java" (which isn't the same thing):

So you also believe that Java rips off UCSD Pascal, since that uses a VM for each process? Or that C++ rips off C?

I completely agree that C# is an evolution of Java (which is being strangled to death by Oracle), but Anders thingamy (could look it up) was a major Pascal/Delphi guy, and there's a lot of those languages in (ignoring syntax) C# and .NET as a whole.

Also, check out NGEN, which does compile .NET to a "native binary".

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Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: C# is dead

"C# was a rip off of Java anyway"

Except that... it wasn't. Sure, there are a lot of similarities to is, but that's like saying Java is a rip off of C++.

C# has many influences in it (including Java), but it also had things like autoboxing, "foreach" iteration, and generics long before Java (no thanks to Oracle).

On top of that, it has many features that Java still lacks entirely, then ot least of which is a well-defined Date/Time API.

I'm a Java, C#, and C++ developer. Each language has strong and weak areas (productivity, expert cost, and maintainability included), but saying C# ripped anything off is doing a massive disservice to the team that designed it.

Also, you can call C# a dead language as much as you want, but check the job listings for greenfield projects. Maybe London is unique in the world, but I have more work requests for my team doing C# than any other language.

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Guatemalan judge orders McAfee released from detention

Ian Yates
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Re: Has anyone stopped to consider ...

I think you can drop the "sub-" bit. All of the red tops have been known to create sensational stories on the barest of rumours; it's just the careful wording that (usual) keeps them from libel, but enough readers take it as fact to be an issue.

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Linux kernel dumps 386 chip support

Ian Yates
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Facepalm

Re: The joys of open software

I know you're a troll but... "Every major release changes everything all over again"

Surely, that's exactly the definition of a major release? If it doesnt include breaking changes, the convention is to call it a minor release or revision.

Remember that (commerical) Windows versioning is more related to the GUI than any underlying architecture.

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Ian Yates
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Re: How not to build a 32-bit CPU

I remember doing that on my first home PC (massive steel-framed beige box that it was).

When it was finally retired by my dad's purchase of a 486, I took the thing apart and was slightly disappointed to find that the values shown on the 7-segment display were purely down to the state of the toggle button (being now much wiser, it clearly makes sense).

On the plus side, it meant that I was able to fit it to the 486 case and continue with the placebo "active turbo!" fun ;)

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Ian Yates
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Windows

Re: How not to build a 32-bit CPU

"ended up with anything less crufty than x86"

As always, it's the marketting and "ease" of use that wins, not the better implementation or sophistication.

I used to be surprised at how well x86 coped with the exploding computing market, but (as you said) Windows lock-in pretty much guaranteed that no one really wanted to put money in to alternatives.

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Samsung's smart TVs 'wide open' to exploits

Ian Yates
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I'll stick to my home-built HTPC.

True, it isn't quite as sleek as an all-in-one, but it is considerably more future-proof hardware-wise, and the I trust the FOSS community far more than Samsung in releasing security and feature updates for it. Plus, I have or can use any media streaming provider of my choice, rather than whichever ones are asked to and can be bothered to release a half-arsed "app" for my particular TV.

Perfectly highlighted by the fact that Linux has only just dropped 386 support, but how long will Sammy (and the others) continue to release updates for the current batch of "smart" TVs?

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Boffin: Android's on-board malware scanner utterly FAILS

Ian Yates
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While not a solution for the average Joe user, LBE Privacy Guard can do exactly that

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.lbe.security.lite&hl=en

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Ian Yates
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WTF?

"Like Windows, Android fans have gone mad for gimmicks and features."

I can only assume that you're singling Apple or BB users out as not going "mad for gimmicks and features"... So what would you call BBM, Siri, Facetime, etc.?

The rest of your post was equally bizarre...

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Behold ATLAS, the fastest computer of 50 years ago

Ian Yates
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Google

Think what you like about their business practices, but I have a lot of respect for the work Google put in to preserving and celebrating historical technical and scientific achievements.

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Arbitrators side with Foxconn in brain-damaged worker case

Ian Yates
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Re: Inspiring

"burning-building stopper"

Is there much work in stopping burning buildings from doing whatever it is that they need to be stopped from doing? As a professional keyboard tapper (dual-roled with screen staring), I'm open to alternative lines of work.

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The best tablets for Christmas

Ian Yates
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Pint

Agreed. It would be nice to know what the top three could have done for the extra 15%.

He described the N7 as almost impossible to beat (amongst other hyperbole), but 85% leaves a large gap for someone to improve (assuming there are quantifiable reasons for the score).

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John McAfee blogs from Guatemalan jail, says coffee excellent

Ian Yates
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Joke

He's probably just got a virus

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Explosion of DANGEROUS IT GEAR injures and CRIPPLES MEDICS

Ian Yates
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Facepalm

Re: new shapes for computers and ways of interaction

In an office environment or a busy hospital? I don't see how that could work.

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Microsoft's anti-Android Twitter campaign draws ire, irony

Ian Yates
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"LG phone build quality has never been good"

If you're referring to the Nexus 4 here, I think that's a little unfair. Google take some control in the Nexus builds and I've seen nothing but praise for the build quality of the N4.

Personally, I've always found Samsung to have the cheapest feel (certainly the SGS2 felt cheap and flimsy), but the SGS3 is supposed to be well made.

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AI boffins take on Angry Birds

Ian Yates
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Re: Random levels required

From similar competitions I've been involved in, I would expect they've been given some levels to develop against but the results are recorded against levels that only the judges have access to.

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First pic of Ashton Kutcher as the great Steve 'jOBS'

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: Apple haters can start getting their rotten tomatoes ready now

Either my morning coffee hasn't taken affect or you were very subtle in your own irony.

"some people hate Apple/Jobs with a vengance or blindness"

"anything with Mr Kutcher in makes me cringe"

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Xboxes stay on sale but may cost Microsoft money in Google case

Ian Yates
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Re: Curious argument

"I still want to know what this microsoft patent everyone is infringing is."

I thought it was pretty much known that it's the FAT32 extensions? I could be wrong, but that was my understanding.

Everyone wants to store data in a compatible way and, annoyingly, FAT32 seems to be the unspoken industry standard.

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Littlest pirate’s Winnie-the-Pooh laptop on the way home

Ian Yates
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Pirate

Re: Just goes to show

"Profit driven manufactured "artists" are."

In fairness to Chisu, she's gone on record as saying that the case has nothing to do with her and she hasn't asked anyone to go after copyright holders on her behalf.

Of course, the chances are she isn't even the "owner" of her musical releases, so it will be some Big Label that sees any kind of "compensation" for this.

As others have stated, the whole thing is a complete farce.

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Hold the front page for ETERNITY: Murdoch kills The Daily

Ian Yates
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Childcatcher

Re: Don't knock the Daily Mail website

And countdowns until almost-celebs are 16 alongside headlines shouting about disgusting paedo perverts and the increasing sexualisation of our children?!

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A valid use for Windows 8?

Ian Yates
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Thumb Up

Re: Well, sort of.

@GJC Take a look at MediaPortal, if you already have Windows.

It was originally a MythTV fork but (IIRC) is now a ground-up separate project.

I mostly use it for streaming (online and local - the My TV Shows plugin is amazing), but I have two SD and one HD digital receivers in it and it works pretty well. The setup is more akin to Linux/MythTV than your typical Windows user might like, but I'm sure you'll manage.

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Ian Yates
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Windows

"which seems like a stupendously stupid thing to do"

I think, from their POV, it's very smart. They have to pay the DVD playback licence for every instance of Windows they ship that can play DVDs, regardles on if any of the users ever actually use it for that (hence "Business" flavours not being able to). By stripping the functionality out to an optional "upgrade", they can control these costs.

It's a sensible decision given that physical media is becoming less popular/important.

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Tech titans lose our loyalty: Are fanbois a dying breed?

Ian Yates
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Linux

Re: Are fanbois a dying breed?

There's a difference between buying/using kit from one company for a long time and only buying from one company because you believe they're the best and can do no wrong, no matter what anyone else says.

I only have Android phones and tablets, not because Android is teh bezt!, simply because it does what I want in a way I've grown to like with hardware choices I like.

I don't believe that Android completely defeating iOS would be a good thing for consumers, in much the same way that Microsoft/Apple "winning" the desktop wouldn't be. But I agree with Trevor that those days are likely long behind us as people tend to be more tech-savvy.

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Sex offender wins case against Facebook vigilantism

Ian Yates
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Holmes

Re: People who

"Only when you go to paedophile does it suddenly become a word to describe an offender"

Not true - "phile" just means loves or likes. The fact that (an adult) loving children (too much) is illegal (in some cultures) is indifferent to the meaning of the word.

Another example of an "illegal" one would be necrophile.

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LOHAN's mighty orb launch live NOW

Ian Yates
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Pint

Well, I say...

Congrats to all involved and their hard work.

Doesn't look like it went 100% to plan, but a max altitude of over 27k (and down again) is still pretty impressive.

Looking forward to the debrief. Enjoy your pints!

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Ten badass brainy computers from science fiction

Ian Yates
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Pirate

Re: Deep thought ...

The Reg will be a far calmer place once the different warring (bickering?) factions can ignore each other... I'm not sure it's a brave new world I'm looking forward to. I always enjoy the rabid and pointless arguments ;)

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Apple ships 'completely redesigned' iTunes 11

Ian Yates
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Windows

Re: This is going to take some getting used to

I may be on my own, but I think UI design for media managers hit its useful peak years ago.

The number of use-cases for them is pretty low and most people just want to access a song/album/artist/playlist/genre quickly.

Even my original Nomad Jukebox Zen (how I miss thee) had an entirely usable interface with just a clickable scroll wheel. I could build playlists on the fly back in 2002, a feature that went missing from many subsequent products.

On the desktop, I'm still a WinAmp user. Sure, I don't get to see the album art while browsing (though I could), but I've just always found it quick and easy to browse my music collection and sync a playlist to any device.

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Google GRINCHES have change of heart, bring back Christmas

Ian Yates
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Joke

Eh? It didn't.

They coded it; they released it; the users testers spotted it; they fixed it.

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Troll sues Apple for daring to plug headphones into iPhone

Ian Yates
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Pint

Re: Karma

Rubbish! Just look at the innovation that has gone in to this patent.

They filed this in 2002, which everyone knows is before "mobile phones" were able to be used to transmit your voice, hence the idea they had to add a microphone to the headphones. Genius!

Or maybe the innovation that the USPTO care about is being innovative enough to file for a patent that no one else bothered to?

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New Tosh drive can wipe out 4TB 'near instantaneously'

Ian Yates
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Boffin

Re: 5 better then 3 ?

Probably true. I'm possibly a little short-sighted in that the environments I've worked have either weighed on the stable-cheap-large side (where my gut says three platters would be best) or the get-it-fast side (where we've had the budget to build large SSD arrays).

I've not personally bench-marked on the performance difference in the number of platters, but you've piqued my interested to have a look around.

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Ian Yates
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Flame

"WD's three-platter 4TB SATA product now faces competition from Toshiba's [...] five 800GB platters"

Err... unless WD's drives have a large failure/corruption rate, I don't personally see that as much of a competition.

Even if Tosh's prices are significantly lower, the power and heat reduction are normally enough to convince those with the PO-power.

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America planned to NUKE THE MOON

Ian Yates
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Angel

Re: Note on Sagan

Surely, the important point is that if it has proven to be impossible to record/measure such supposedly major effects (i.e., curing cancer) of something that appears to be undetectable, does it even matter?

Lump it in with psychics and homeopathy.

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Annual reviews: It's high time we rid the world of this insanity

Ian Yates
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Black Helicopters

Re: Ironic

"based on contribution record" and thus how little time you spend doing your real job ;)

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Ten Linux apps you must install

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Sad

Pff! GUI? CLI? I hand etch the binary on the hard disk, as God intended!

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Kobo Glo illuminated e-reader review

Ian Yates
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Re: Obvious flaws

"I can feel my eyes relax when I put my screen down and pick my book up."

Agreed. I stare at a computer screen all day and definitely notice the difference between then reading a book/e-reader in the evening over reading something on my phone/tablet.

It's not so much that your (or mine, at least) eyes feel more tired reading on LCD, it's that they feel less tired when reading non-LCD stuff.

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