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* Posts by Ian Yates

858 posts • joined 12 Jun 2007

Unlucky for you: UK crypto-duo 'crack' HTTPS in Lucky 13 attack

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: It's about time they made this sort of 'research' illegal

Would you rather just ignore the possibility of security issues?

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Ian Yates
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Terminator

Also, remember that you can’t hide secrets from the future with cryptograph.

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RIM blows on the dice, gets ready for its FINAL THROW

Ian Yates
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Re: It's very simple RIM.

I thought it was irrelevant.

With IMAP over SSL to the company mail server, we effectively have secure push mail, and we don't have to pay per handset like we did with BBES.

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Ian Yates
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Re: Pipping android to the post

"e.g. if apps have per-user storage"

They do. Users can't even see what other users have installed, but when a second user "installs" an app from the market, in reality it just permissions them to be able to see the already installed copy (but with a whole new data store).

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Zuck on it, Google: 'Public' Facebook events are dead to you

Ian Yates
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Coat

Re: Remove all links to Facebook from all engines please

"Who gives a fuck about the Oxford Comma?"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_comma

(Disclaimed: I'm a fan of it)

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Hard Glass Spinner Technology: HGST's new 2.5-incher

Ian Yates
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Glass platter

How brittle is the substrate compared to the more typical metal ones? Since this is aimed a laptops, I wondered what the likelihood of smashing one was.

Obviously, the damage to the heads would be fatal in either model, but recovery would be even harder if you've got to rebuild four platters from shards first.

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Yay for iOS 6.1, grey Wi-Fi iPhone bug is fix- AWW, SNAP

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Maybe, maybe not

... so... iPhone users should just fan heat every room they go in to?

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Star Trek saviour JJ Abrams joins the dark side: Star Wars VII

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Jar Jar Binks

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Chinese upstart smears Android's Ice Cream Sandwich over PCs

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Port

Isn't Wine an emulator?

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Have Brits fallen for Netflix, or do they still LoveFilm?

Ian Yates
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WTF?

And VOD is not a problem solved by broadcast... Whether they can afford to scale it, though, is a different issue.

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Pope: Catholics, go forth and multiply... your Twitter followers

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Gentle voice of reason?

Not if you're dyslexic

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Ian Yates
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Devil

"Being responsible for aids being spread [...]"

I'm reasonably anti-Ratzinger, but I'm not sure I'd word it *quite* like that... I mean, he's not going out there and actively spreading it. Although, he (and his administration) are responsible for not helping prevent the spread.

Still, semantics, since he actively did cover up the paedophile stuff.

That aside, I wonder what the conversion rate really is... My experience tends to be that the religious people I know are vehemently religious and won't discuss the alternative, the atheist/humanists are vehemently areligious (unreligious?), and the agnostics would rather everyone just shut up about it so that they can get on with their lives.

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Greenland ice SIMPLY WOULD NOT MELT in baking +8°C era 120k years ago

Ian Yates
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Holmes

Re: @ Nobody presents climate models as gospel

To paraphrase Hanlon: Never attribute to conspiracy that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

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Ian Yates
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Mushroom

@Flatpackhamster I agree, but what if *now* is the time to act? The problem* was built over the course of a couple of centuries, what if it takes at least that long to reverse?

It's right that there is research done in to both sides of the argument, the problem is how emotive it all gets. People like Lewis writing articles that effectively boil down to "ner ner de ner ner, someone with a PhD has disagreed with someone else with a PhD, so my point is proved" is just idiotic. Unfortunately, too many people have an economic position with proving things one way or the other.

The simplest argument is: If it doesn't happen, we've lost very little by trying to prevent it; if it does, we're potentially screwed (although we probably will adapt). However, the first part is only true if there is a global agreement to act, which I would put serious money on won't happen.

Ah, well; there goes my hope that the El Reg commentards were going to solve the whole thing.

* If there is one

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Asteroid mining and a post-scarcity economy

Ian Yates
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Re: Oh Joy

I'm more concerned that who ever is in charge is called Mantrid and has plans to consume the whole Universe...

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Sorry, Apple-haters, but Cupertinian doom not on the horizon

Ian Yates
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Pirate

Re: Competition is good.

"unable to innovate without Google's help, and as a result none of whom seem to differentiate their products significantly"

I'm not sure I agree with this. There is a lot of innovation going on in the hardware, it's just that the market (read: "consumers") have all decided that they like the candy-bar style with few physical buttons; a design that Apple helped to convince the majority is best.

You can't say that the Note and Note II weren't an innovation from what was around at the time. And the concept hardware that flies around every year is interesting, it's just that the manufacturers don't see enough interest to complete the R&D to market.

If anything, the complaint should be that none of them are willing to take a risk.

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UK malls use Google in desperate stab at luring shoppers off the web

Ian Yates
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Devil

Re: Blockbusters closing all stores?!?

For now

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Asteroid-mining 'FireFlys' will be ready for action by 2015, vows space firm

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: They have arrived!

You missed:

2a. Name it after a much-loved cult Sci-Fi series, in order to pull in the geek crowd

Now, where do I send my cheque?

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Google's Native Client browser tech now works on ARM

Ian Yates
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Unhappy

"32-bit and 64-bit Intel processors"

Poor AMD, getting completely fogotten. Especially since "x64" was originally their work...

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Chinese boffins crack cloaking tech for camouflage

Ian Yates
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Megaphone

Re: In aircraft combat how useful is this?

They would be the fastest, loudest birds ever witnessed.

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Holy classic car auction, Batman! They sold THE Batmobile!

Ian Yates
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Thumb Up

Surely there must be a video of him outbidding the Penguin for it?

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Record numbers of you are reading this headline right now

Ian Yates
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Pint

Re: Bumping up the stats...

Pah! It was better before the newfags turned up.

The Reg is dying.

etc.

etc.

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NRA: Video games kill people, not guns. And here's our video game

Ian Yates
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Re: An NRA spokespersons said...

"I see you have to "break" the conditions"

What are you on about?

You created the conditions with your skewed analogy, I merely adjusted them to more accurately fit the actual problem. The "kit" you picked up on was (in your version) infallible, but in real life psychology/psychiatry are far from that.

If you actually read my post you'd see that I agree that the nutter was the cause of the incident, but to argue that guns aren't a catalyst in exacerbating the total damage done is an "ingrained prejudice" of its own.

If you argue that everyone should be allowed to own semi-automatic assault rifles, why not fully automatic? Why not grenades, rocket launchers, tanks? It's an argument of reductio ad absurdum, but where is the line?

As someone who has enjoyed firing rifles and consider myself good at it, I still don't understand why any person needs more than one firearm, nor why limiting it to a pistol, shotgun, or manually cocked rifle is a problem. Also, ammunition limiting. Why are questions not asked when someone buys 12,000 rounds of ammunition?

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Ian Yates
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Stop

Re: An NRA spokespersons said...

"You are locked in a room with ten people, at least one of whom potentially has a particulalry nasty venereal disease, and you have a kit that is the only way of detecting that disease before it reaches the final stages of infection. The final stages of the diseases is irreversible brain damage, causing violent paranoia and aggression, and there is a chance the diseased will stab someone with the cutlery you have in the room. In essence, you are suggesting not using the kit so as not to cause offence, but instead throwing the cutlery away. And - no - I am not advocating stabbing (or shooting) everyone else in the room first, or that giving everyone their own cutlery to defend themselves would remove the chances of someone eventually being stabbed, I am advocating identifying the diseased and keeping them away from the cutlery so as to reduce the chances someone gets stabbed, without leaving everyone else to eat with their fingers."

This is such a poor analogy. To make it more accurate:

* The cutlery should be, say swords: not essential, designed to cause damage

* The "kit" should have a high chance of false-positive and false-negatives: psychiatry is not infallible and requires the practitioner to use their subjective experiences to diagnose many cases

* Not everyone with the disease need reach the "final stage": far more people with mental illness do not react violently

So, in this analogy, why would you say that also locking the cutlery/sword away and only lending enough out as needed is more preferable to only relying on an unreliable test but letting everyone do what they want with the cutlery/sword?

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Ian Yates
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Re: An NRA spokespersons said...

"In which case screening would seem just as if not more effective, and have the benefit of identifying and helping those with mental issues that might not turn them into killers"

Haven't read all of the replies, but I actually don't think many people would disagree that such people do need to be identified and treated before they become a danger to anyone.

But just taking in to account the cost and logistics of such an endeavour, which would be easier: limiting the number and type of guns people can own, or screening everyone in the country for potential mental health issues (which would require regular rescreening)?

Lets say (for argument) both reduce the chance of massacre equally, which would be cheapest to implement and maintain?

In an ideal world, I'd say that both would be great, but I just can't see a universal government mental health screening process being feasible.

Isn't doing something better than nothing? Are there any real legitimate arguments against preventing ownership of assault rifles, or limiting the number of guns to 1 per licensee?

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Ian Yates
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WTF?

Re: An NRA spokespersons said...

"Guns don't kill people."

Okay, so I've always understood that this was their idiotic rhetoric that a gun isn't capable of killing someone by itself; hence the normal follow on: "People kill people". The (stupid) argument that the person wielding the (semi-automatic) "gun" is solely responsible for massacre A and they would still have done it if only armed with an egg whisk.

But!

"Video games ... kill people." Makes no sense! They've completely screwed their own argument as a video game isn't really even a physical thing... are they now saying that a virtual piece of entertainment can randomly commit homicide, but a device designed to cause physical damage is incapable of it?

Bizarre. Unsurprisingly.

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Playboy fined £100k by Blighty watchdog for FLASHING SMUT at kids

Ian Yates
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Pint

Replace either the "you" or the "tube" in the popular phrase "youtube" with any sexual noun or verb and you're likely to find something.

Cheers

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Ex-Doctor Who babe Karen Gillan touts dodgy diet pills in twit gaffe

Ian Yates
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Headmaster

Re: if you want to lose weight

"Whenever people ask for advice on how to lose weight", then I say "lop off a limb!". That's the fastest way.

If they actually mean "get fit/toned", then that's a different thing.

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Titsup Windows Phone 8 orders user to cram 'boot disc' in mobe

Ian Yates
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Re: May have a point

Has anyone found any detail on what he was doing?

I can't find anything on whether he has played with the shipped ROM and found an error that shouldn't be displayed (so, hidden code) or whether he's shifted a ROM from a different product across, where the error would make sense.

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Unbelievably vast quasar cluster forces universe-sized rethink

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Buses, huh?

My God... it's full of buses!

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Boffins develop microwave weed-zapper

Ian Yates
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Alert

Re: "Far happier are those who worry about the prevalence of pesticides"

Dear $DEITY! Save us from this microwave RADIATION! (etc., etc., etc.)

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Time has already run out for smart watches

Ian Yates
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Re: Mens watches are jewelery

Agreed. Potentially, once epaper (or similar non-backlit display) has a high enough resolution, colour range, and refresh rate, it could have the appearance of a normal (albeit completely flat) watch, but respond to gestures to occasionally perform smart functions...

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Yahoo! Mail! offers! HTTPS! amid! account! hijack! spree!

Ian Yates
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Unhappy

Whoops

Wasn't aware of this exploit and told my cousin to change her password when I got some spam from her account. She did, but 12 hours later it happened again so I told her to change it to a completely different and more complicated one.

Feeling a bit mean now...

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Nvidia takes fight to Sony, Nintendo with Android handheld console

Ian Yates
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Re: Open console is needed

"The Xbox - from a business perspective, is disastrous." You're confusing 'business' and 'commercial'. From a business perspective (Microsoft's) the XBox is one of their most important products; just look how many living rooms and bedrooms they are in. Plugged directly in to most people's preferred form of entertainment: their TV.

That aside, I'd take a lot of the profit announcements with a pinch of salt. MS certainly is an odd one in that the hardware has always been sold mostly at loss, but the licensing for the various parts of the system is the real money-maker, and I've never seen anything that has been able to confirm it falls within the "XBox division's" profit centre (i.e., the profits are reported somewhere else).

If it was really losing them money on all fronts, why would they not have made some changes to it? They still plough huge amounts of R&D in to the annual dashboard refresh.

And EA deserve what they get. Their games have focused on pointless sequels for years and Origin is an abomination

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Aw grandad, I asked for an iPad and you got me an iPod

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: I wanted a Nexus 7

All I got was a pesky replicant that kept trying to tell me it was human :(

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Ubuntu for smartphones aims to replace today's mobes, laptops

Ian Yates
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Windows

Re: Great idea!

"a full desktop OS onto a phone and released Windows RT on a mobile."

Windows RT is far from a full desktop OS [citation]

Or, in more detail: "Windows RT can't run third-party desktop applications. At all."

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Hey, Apple and Google: Stop trying to wolf the whole mobile pie

Ian Yates
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WTF?

Matt's diatribes are generally divisive, but this one is just downright bonkers.

As a long-time user of Android, I'll agree that it may still lack some of the polish of iOS, but it would be insane to argue that it isn't catching up. Is Matt really suggesting that Google dropping Android would have left Apple any incentive to continue work on iOS? I saw someone use the "new" notifications system on their iPhone the other day, which clearly draws inspirations from Google's efforts (which isn't a bad thing, despite what software patent trolls think).

Competition breeds innovation and consumers starve the garbage out of the market by not buying/using it.

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MIT boffins demonstrate NEW form of magnetism

Ian Yates
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Joke

Re: Herbertsmithite (named after its discoverer)

Shame it couldn't be used as a popular food ingredient, with appropriate advertising campaign.

<sings> I feel like *cough*

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End of days: Possessed POWERPOINT predicts Mayan Apocalypse

Ian Yates
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Pint

Re: Whatever. It's SOLSTICE! Celebrate!

I truly hope that nothing happens "today" (which, let's face it, means something different depending on where you are on the Earth) that could be taken to be the "cataclysm"... it would make all the usual believers of such prophecies even more insufferable.

Anyway; last orders gentlemen.

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Apple shifts iTunes to HTTPS, sidesteps China’s censors

Ian Yates
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Flame

Re: Does this scale?

Nah. There'll be enfored MITM certificate substitution soon. If UKGov were considering it (idiots), there's no reason to think China won't go ahead with it.

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Dotcom titan funds 'Mark Cuban Chair To Eliminate Stupid Patents'

Ian Yates
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Stop

Except that software patents are stupid. Small devs do not have enough time or money to check if something they're working on is patented; I'd argue that "no patents = more innovation" in software (just look at FOSS).

Sure, trademark your look-and-feel if that's what consumers use to associate something to you, but don't pretend that dragging something across a screen with your finger is a patentable invention.

Your comparing developers of software (something that is completely intangible) with manufacturers of physical things.

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US patent office: Nice try Apple, but pinch-to-zoom is NOT a new invention

Ian Yates
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Re: USPTO=Incompetent

"let the courts decide"

Unfortunately, the juries tend to be told that a granted patent must be valid because the USPTO checked it... hmm

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ICANN'T believe it's not Apple: Vatican wins domain-handout lottery

Ian Yates
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Re: Insanity

A more obvious abuse would be ".corn"

Who exactly would be held responsible if such a TLD was used for phishing?

I don't mind new TLDs, but granting them to companies is ridiculous. Just continue with making them public (and less of them)!

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Ian Yates
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Re: a domain squatter company gets in first with a valuable TLD

Brilliant. So it's alright that ICANN is introducing a class system to the Internet?

I can't afford to buy my own TLD, so my company page will now look like some kind of budget URL. The whole thing is a sick joke.

The average Joe doesn't even understand the (non)significance of "www" before a normal domain; how are they possible going to tell the difference between "coke" and "coke.com". Perhaps a bad example; there are bound to be more ambiguous new URLs.

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Japanese firm lifts lid on Android-controlled toilet

Ian Yates
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Re: "a bidet-like spray"

Seriously? This is a remote controlled toilet and you think the idea of a targetting system for the spray is daft?

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Little spider makes big-spider-puppet CLONE of itself out of dirt

Ian Yates
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Re: Brilliant

Could you expand on your statement? I really don't get what you're implying.

Just calculating population growth backwards wouldn't get you anywhere near the correct population for a given year. Just try it to 1900 and tell me what number you get. (Hint: there were some large, unexpected population drops in that period)

I won't argue that Evolution doesn't have a belief system inherent in it; but then so does gravity. I believe (and hope) that gravity will continue to work today and tomorrow. But calling it a "religion" is hyperbole.

The key is that the theory of evolution (and gravity) is adjusted based upon what is observed, wereas religious beliefs are used to explain away observations that do not agree with the belief (e.g., "God works in mysterious ways").

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Bankrupt Kodak misses $2bn target, flogs imaging patents for $525m

Ian Yates
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Re: Even with $2.6B

Seems like a better plan (for them) would have been to devolve in to the exact kind of patent troll that they sold out to. Would give an income in the long term, with which to rebuild some kind of R&D work.

I might have read it wrong, but it sounds like everyone who might have been interetested in buying the patents (hence the $2.6B valuation) joined together and split the bill. Isn't that a form of price fixing?

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Vatican shrugs off apocalypse, fiddles with accounts dept

Ian Yates
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Megaphone

"Mayan prediction"

Wasn't a prediction, blah blah blah, move along

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Worldwide LCD price-fixing conspiracy: Another exec guilty

Ian Yates
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Re: Karaoke

I like the thought that they dropped the information in to popular song.

"Well I guess it would be nice, if I could fix my profit, I know not every outfit, can fix a profit like you."

No prizes for guessing the song ;)

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Mark Zuckerberg doesn't know how to use HTML5

Ian Yates
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Headmaster

Re: Ah, Mr Asay

Annoyingly, I can't see the graph used because we're stuck with IE8 at work, but touting such "relative" figures always rings alarm bells for me.

I don't know the figures, but if no one wanted HTML5 devs three years ago but they do today, those relative figures are going to be massive. Whereas Android jobs could have been in demand three years ago, so an equivalent (or even larger) rise in today's number will appear as a smaller relative rise.

Show me absolute month-on-month changes in *new* ads (since not being able to hire someone isn't the sign of increased demand), and I'll start to listen.

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