* Posts by Ian Yates

878 posts • joined 12 Jun 2007

Get lost, drivers: Google Maps is not for you – US judge

Ian Yates
Flame

Re: I always use my phone for Google's GPS when I'm in California

"Never had an accident in 30+ years of driving, so your implication that I can't control a vehicle is a bit absurd by the simple evidence."

Not that I implied such a thing, I merely said that it was your responsibility to be in control.

And 30+ years or 100+ years, it only takes a few seconds for someone to pull out in front of you at high speed to cause an accident, and it won't matter whose fault it is if someone is seriously injured.

The default position I have when driving is to assume the other drivers are about to do something stupid (and I see enough doing things like high speed undertaking or sitting in blindspots). Driving is not a right.

2
0
Ian Yates
Mushroom

Re: I always use my phone for Google's GPS when I'm in California

"when I go to California, I'm in a rental car - I don't have a GPS holder on the dash."

I think it's pretty fair to say that this is your problem.

"If I need to look at the GPS on the phone, I've got to pick it up in my hand"

You really don't. You need to have sorted it out before you set off.

Not to make it sound black and white, but you are the one in control of the x tonne vehicle capable of doing serious amounts of damage, it is your job to stay in control of it. Everything else is secondary.

If you get the first part wrong, someone could die (possibly you); if you get the second part wrong, you might get to your destination late.

4
2
Ian Yates
WTF?

Re: Actual Satnav units

Cool movie; when's it out?

0
0

MISSING LINK between HUMANS and MONKEYS FOUND

Ian Yates
Thumb Up

Re: ObJoke

I love the progression of replies to this and how they were increasingly poorly received

6
1

German court says nein to Apple's slide-to-unlock patent

Ian Yates

Re: It shouldn't be patentable....

Even if you said "mobile electronic device", my very first ThinkPad back in the dark ages of the 90's had a single sliding catch on the lid in order to "unlock" it.

0
0

BT boss barks at TalkTalk for being 'copper Luddites'

Ian Yates

"amongst the cheapest ISPs as far as the general public are concerned"

Not in my area (London). A pitiful 10GB/m is £28.45 w/ line rental or £31.45 for unlimited*.

Their competitors are offering unlimited (w/ line rental) for £28 (O2; less if you have an O2 mobile), £23.98 (PlusNet), £21.45 (TalkTalk), and I pay £19 for EE (£24 if you aren't on Orange/T-Mobile).

* For the 18 months I was with BT, I ended up with a total of over £50 in hidden costs, that I had to argue with them about and eventually got removed.

1
0

Sci/Tech quango promises an end to 'events with no women'

Ian Yates

Re: Gender over Quality?

While I applaud seeing more gender equality, especially in the sausage-fest that is IT, adding a quota of females is still sexual discrimination.

8
0

Disney shutters Star Wars game unit with 200 layoffs

Ian Yates
Unhappy

Re: Shame...

I'm a big fan of Double Fine. I've always considered it a great injustice that Psychonauts passed so many people by

1
0
Ian Yates

Re: Shame...

Check out "Ben There, Dan That" and it's sequel "Time Gentlemen, Please!".

Not quite as long as DOTT, Sam and Max, Full Throttle, etc., but still a good laugh on a similar vein.

0
0

Google forks WebKit, promises faster, leaner Chrome engine

Ian Yates

While I'm not going to tout doom, I do think it's a shame that this sounds like it won't be a compatible fork that Google can use to feed back fixes and improvements to WebKit.

I don't believe multiple engines is the answer to a better web, it's multiple groups maintaining and using engines, whether they be the same engine or different ones. It's the competitiveness of the engine use that promotes the improvements.

Who knows, though, maybe in a few years Safari et al. will have moved to Blink.

As long as it's open source, there's no harm done.

1
0

Firefox: Use new stealth window to satisfy your wife, suggests Mozilla

Ian Yates

Re: Really?

From someone who isn't a Firefox user, is this story true? Seems like a glaring omission to have been lacking this feature for so long...

6
3

Major blow for Apple: 'Bounce back' patent bounced back by USPTO

Ian Yates
Angel

Re: They'd be wise to let this go

But then people would start looking in to all of the other software patents (not just Apple's) and someone might realise that it's a completely stupid concept

14
0

Experts agree: Your next car will be smarter than you

Ian Yates

Re: Do not want, and in fact this kind of thing is a fucking 'orrible idea.

They'll have blackboxes to record if/when the autopilot is engaged.

3
1

Are you in charge of a lot of biz computers? Got Java on them?

Ian Yates
Flame

Updates

It doesn't help that the updater is such an annoying little **** and seems to always have a new to apply. If I accidentally accept it, I'm then bombarded with UAC prompts at random intervals.

At some point (for me, years ago) people choose to be blind to the constant nagging and just ignore it.

7
0

Roomba dust-bust bot bods one step closer to ROBOBUTLERS

Ian Yates
Coat

Re: The ability-

Once you plop...?

9
0

Nokia deflates Google's video codec thought bubble

Ian Yates
WTF?

Re: Doesn't Nokia have a point?

A land-grab using a codec that they open sourced... http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/05/20/google_confident_on_vp8_and_patents/

Apart from their name recorded as the original owners, what do they gain from owning the codec? Their plan seems to be about having a free universal standard, which I'm all for.

5
0
Ian Yates

Re: Doesn't Nokia have a point?

Except that Google has VP8 under a royalty-free public license in order to promote a single, universally supported format.

3
1
Ian Yates

"Now everyone will use the single standard of H264 and H265 and the market won't be split by Google's proprietary bs....."

Quite right! We should all conform to the MPEG LA's "proprietary bs" (payign for licenses for products that encode or decode) and ignore the open alternative that was being offered for free to promote innovation and universal sharing of videos!

VP8 might not be perfect, but at least anyone would be free to provide support for it without worrying about a legal tap on the shoulder.

12
2

Apple share-price-off-a-cliff: Told you that would happen

Ian Yates

Re: Don't blame Apple for the price drop

"There is no fundamental difference between the above and any of those on-line gambing sites"

On an almost related level are the "analysts" who publish annual recommendations on hedge funds. I don't have it in electronic copy, but there was a brilliant article in Private Eye covering the success rate of these hedge fund recommendations in London over the last 5 years and how only one analyst has been able to make suggestions that would have given an investor a positive return.

5
1

Goblinproofing One's Chicken Coop hailed oddest book title

Ian Yates
Pint

Re: The point of this is?

Err... Friday?

2
0

GoPro accused of using DMCA to take down product review

Ian Yates

Re: Sounds like they asked for it...

On camera, natch

1
0

Joyent tools up for Amazon battle

Ian Yates
Headmaster

DBaaS

So, what is a normal database, if it isn't a "service"?

(icon: it was that or troll)

0
0

Kinky Android X-ray app laid bare as malware

Ian Yates
Devil

Re: Really...?

I was under the impression that it wasn't actually in the Google Play store, users needed to download it specifically and install it, which would require them to have already turned off the secure sources option (a stupid thing to do, unless you're dev'ing or pirating).

0
0

Researcher sets up illegal 420,000 node botnet for IPv4 internet map

Ian Yates

I won't argue over the legality, that's for the courts to decide, but there is a major difference between a "harmless" piece of code sitting and ping a network before disappearing completely and physically depriving someone of a banknote (whatever the size).

@JDX: May be I'm a minority, but I fail to see how eugenics is unethical, assuming consenting participants. Murdering people who's genes you dislike is unethical, and only vaguely related to eugenics (as I assume that's what you were referring to). Or denying non-consenting people the right to breed. Both of those add a definite unethical action.

"Probably lots of malicious malware is written to be efficient too"

Which is exactly my point: malicious. His code likely went entirely unnoticed without leaving a trace of its presence, which is exactly what I meant by "intent".

Had it scrapped network traffic or garbled config files, yes, unethical; but it did (reportedly) none of those things.

<weak metaphor>

It's akin to seeing the front door of a house open and sticking your head in and shouting "hello, did you know your door was open?". Is that unethical?

</weak metaphor>

3
1
Ian Yates
Headmaster

"Using insecure configurations and default passwords to gain access to remote devices and run code on them is unethical"

Garbage. How is it unethical? The ethics are in the intent and this guy had no malicious intent of any kind. He purposefully designed it to eat the fewest cycles possible.

3
3

Google Drive goes titsup for MILLIONS of users

Ian Yates
Mushroom

Re: Death to the cloud

Talking generically: The cloud is a tool to be considered for each possible application. It doesn't have to be the only place you put your data, and it (third-party) certainly isn't right for critical/sensitive data, but it has many uses that make it convenient.

(icon: cloud)

1
0

Build a BONKERS gaming PC

Ian Yates
Pint

Re: Bonkers? Yes... Overpriced? Most definitely

It was an interesting read, but I agree with blcollier.

I know it wasn't the point of the article, but if you still wanted the same "premium" parts and were willing to sacrifice a few % in performance, you'd probably save a huge amount of cash.

Annoyingly, though, the only i7 Extreme currently seems to be the 3970X mentioned... the next enthusiast chip down is the 3930K unlocked, but at over £300 saving for just 0.3GHz drop, you'd need to be doing something very specific (such as competitive overclocking) to care about the difference for the cost (IMHO).

3
0

Trip the fight fantastic

Ian Yates
WTF?

Re: A few comments

"The difference is the abstraction layer. A PC has to go through OS, Drivers, different communication protocols etc etc. The console is specially built with the same hardware every time. Effectively what takes 20 steps for a PC to do, may only take a console 5 because it has to work through fewer layers."

I'm sorry, but this shows a distinct misunderstanding of both PCs (which give low-level access to hardware) and modern consoles (that now have both an OS and HAL), especially since the hardware in consoles is getting closer to standard PC hardware (especially for XBoxes).

I'm not saying that they're equal, but it's probably closer to 3 and 2 layers for most things.

1
0

New nuke could POWER WORLD UNTIL 2083

Ian Yates
Mushroom

The delays to the current increase in nukes (regardless of their type) is almost nothing to do with safety, it's the companies willing to invest in building them negotiating (demanding) a higher market energy price.

Unfortunately, since there's only one company left at the table, the conversation is mostly one-sided as we know we need a future energy supply and have almost no either viable options.

0
1

Six things a text editor must do - or it's a one-way trip to the trash

Ian Yates

"Fine"? Find only goes in one direction without wrapping, and neither will limit to word boundaries. This is stuff so basic that it's been in every other MS product for more years than I care to remember.

And that's just ignoring that for something that does nothing more than display text, Notepad collapses in to a black hole the moment you try to load a file of any significant size (i.e., a log file).

Portable Notepad++ for me.

7
1
Ian Yates

Or a functional find/replace?

1
1

Dear Facebook: I heard the news today, oh boy

Ian Yates

Re: Google+ over Facebook any day of the week.

"since you only see your friends on either of these services"

Minor point, but G+ is more like a cross between Facebook and Twitter, so you actually can "meet" lots of other people (unless you disable it).

I find G+ is better for following content creators (bloggers, photographers, videos, etc.) than Twitter, as they can directly share their content rather than just link to it.

0
0

Here's the $4.99 utility that might just have saved Windows 8

Ian Yates

Re: Classic Shell?

I was coming on to say exactly that. My girlfriend's brand new laptop had Win8 and I put Classic Start (part of Classic Shell) on it.

Completely skips Metro (or whatever it's called) and works exactly as she'd expect it to.

10
2

Oz Senator says Google Glass could 'end privacy as we know it'

Ian Yates
Big Brother

Re: He has a point about privacy

Being caught, I think.

The Wifi sniffing one is different in that they were recording information being leaked to their current location, while this would be a product in a consumer's hand.

Take a look at the number of people who monitor and investigate exactly what an Android phone is doing. While they certainly could take surreptitious photos, someone would notice and the shitstorm would be epic.

Not a reason to not be vigilant, but I think it's fairly in the tin-foil hat end of the spectrum.

4
0

UK injects £88m into Euro bid to build Hubble-thrashing 'scope

Ian Yates
Coat

Re: No imagination

They're geeks, so surely YABT (Yet Another Big Telescope)?

0
0
Ian Yates
FAIL

Re: Because

Any citation for that? I cursory glance over the construction proposal shows that ARUP (UK) and another UK company have already been involved in the design and prototyping of the dome.

I can see Germany, Belgium, Spain, UK companies mentioned.

Seems like a good thing to me.

12
0

Health pros: Alcohol is EVIL – raise its price, ban its ads

Ian Yates
Stop

Re: @JohnSmith19

Sorry, but I call bullsh*t. The errosion of liberties is a gradual thing because it is not a concerted effort to hoodwink a whole population. The fact that we actual have more personal liberty than 100 years ago always seems to be forgotten (not that I would ever defend any attempt to attack the liberties we have).

No one becomes a politician to further some grand conspiracy; be that the death of democracy you speak of, or the immigration and social cleansing the older generation warn me about.

Governments are inept and pass laws almost by random; legislation is almost always a reaction to some current situation or change in public opinion. They are pandering to what they believe the masses want, in order to secure their next vote. Occassionally they'll create a short political play in which they propose something horrible in order to pass something less horrible, but if their schemes are planned more than six months in advance, I would be utterly shocked.

In this particular case, a bunch of doctors/physicians are lobbying to reduce public health problems from alcohol. Even if they have a hidden agenda, historically it has always been shown that reducing the public's alcohol intake produces a less docile populace, so what could they hope to gain from it?

Personally, I can't see any reason to be upset by the advertising ban. Some of the adverts are amusing, most are boring, and people drink what they want to drink anyway. I've never heard anyone order a "SoCo", no matter how (cringingly) hard Southern Comfort tried to push that phrase.

But if they touch my ale, they'll be hell to pay.

2
0

Big Blighty telcos ordered to block three BitTorrent search sites

Ian Yates

Re: Internet should be free from meddling by the media cartels

No one will benefit if the only people able to release music are those with a massive pot of money to fund the time and effort. It'll just be corporately-sponsored music acts everywhere.

Personally, I don't copy music because I can afford to pay for it. Although, I do have a personal limit of £5 for a typical album and will happily wait until they hit that mark.

I also equate the effort the artist put in to producing the album as the same that I might in to creating a piece of commercial software; if I did, I'd want to get paid when someone wants to make a copy for their own use.

0
0
Ian Yates
WTF?

Re: Off-the-record company comment

Ha! "Tyranny"... whatever next. Perhaps they don't know what the word means? Bless.

0
0

Google open sources very slow compression algorithm

Ian Yates

Opera Turbo, then?

0
0

Nominet tosses plan for shorter .uk domains in the bin (for now)

Ian Yates

Re: The Best That Can Be Said

Well, my view is that is creates consumer confusion unnecessarily ("Was that joebloggs.uk or joebloggs.co.uk?").

I can't understand why anyone would be so desparate for a second-level .uk domain. I'd rather see them create sensible second-levels (though I can't think of one right now) and continue "selling" the third-levels at additional cost.

0
0

Google+ goes single sign-in, exec roasts Zuck's 'frictionless sharing'

Ian Yates
Megaphone

Re: Bad enough

Not sure what you're getting at... Federated logins (SSO) shouldn't reduce security in real world terms.

Most people (anecdotal, but I'm sure you'll agree) use the same or similar passwords on everything, because they get bored of coming up with new ones (or just don't care, until something gets hijacked).

The question is, do you trust Jim's DIY Forums (yes, yes, "Fora" is the plural) to hold your password securely and deal with any external attack, or Google? Using an open standard (OAuth 2.0) means that they shouldn't be in a position to abuse the trust and access the accounts you link in, and they provide an easy 2FA from the bat.

I'd say that it improves most users' personal security by a large amount.

1
0
Ian Yates

They had (and still have) Google OpenID and OAuth 2.0 endpoints (https://developers.google.com/accounts/docs/OpenID), which are something I've made heavy use of for a number of projects.

The news is about making available additional abilities and access of information to the user's G+ and other services.

If this allows reading private posts and filtering by circle, I can retire my homegrown G+ RSS feed at last!

0
0

SimCity Classic

Ian Yates

Re: SimCopter

I really enjoyed SimCity, SimAnt, and SimTower.

I also had some of the other Sim games, but most felt pointless or flawed.

0
0

Top Firefox OS bloke flames Opera for WebKit surrender

Ian Yates
WTF?

Re: Last nail in the coffin of Opera's irrevelance

Just because they use WebKit? Surely the same could be said for Chrome or Safari, then?

0
0

You can help fix patent laws … now!

Ian Yates

Re: Prior use rights don't help much

That's where I'm confused... what situation could occur where someone has a valid claim on a novel patent but somebody else has prior use rights?

Is this just to cover dual-invention situations, where party B came up with the same idea after party A but before the patent was filed?

1
0

Traceroute reveals Star Wars Episode IV 'crawl' text

Ian Yates
Joke

Re: <rant>An unused /24?!

I guess it's: ?"(

0
0

Ready or not: Microsoft preps early delivery of IE10 for Windows 7

Ian Yates

Re: @thegrouch (Internet Explorer?)

I know from work that IE8 does the same (pity me, please), so I assume that this isn't removed from IE9 and IE10?

Not personally a fan of Chrome, but the process thing isn't really a reason to not use.

0
0

Firm moves to trademark 'Python' name out from under the language

Ian Yates
WTF?

François Marie Daudin called from 1803* where he came up with the genus name.

How can anyone take a trademark on such a common word? *cough*Windows*cough*Apple*cough*

* (a) Yes, I did have to look his name up; (b) and I know the telephone wasn't invented

7
7

Reg readers scuffle over the ultimate cuppa

Ian Yates
Coffee/keyboard

I agree in principle, but there is no excuse for the way one of my friends makes tea: she pratically whips the bag out of the water as soon as the life-giving brown infusion has begun to seep out. The result: slightly brown milk.

1
0

Forums