Feeds

* Posts by Ian Yates

858 posts • joined 12 Jun 2007

GoPro accused of using DMCA to take down product review

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Sounds like they asked for it...

On camera, natch

1
0

Joyent tools up for Amazon battle

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Headmaster

DBaaS

So, what is a normal database, if it isn't a "service"?

(icon: it was that or troll)

0
0

Kinky Android X-ray app laid bare as malware

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Devil

Re: Really...?

I was under the impression that it wasn't actually in the Google Play store, users needed to download it specifically and install it, which would require them to have already turned off the secure sources option (a stupid thing to do, unless you're dev'ing or pirating).

0
0

Researcher sets up illegal 420,000 node botnet for IPv4 internet map

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

I won't argue over the legality, that's for the courts to decide, but there is a major difference between a "harmless" piece of code sitting and ping a network before disappearing completely and physically depriving someone of a banknote (whatever the size).

@JDX: May be I'm a minority, but I fail to see how eugenics is unethical, assuming consenting participants. Murdering people who's genes you dislike is unethical, and only vaguely related to eugenics (as I assume that's what you were referring to). Or denying non-consenting people the right to breed. Both of those add a definite unethical action.

"Probably lots of malicious malware is written to be efficient too"

Which is exactly my point: malicious. His code likely went entirely unnoticed without leaving a trace of its presence, which is exactly what I meant by "intent".

Had it scrapped network traffic or garbled config files, yes, unethical; but it did (reportedly) none of those things.

<weak metaphor>

It's akin to seeing the front door of a house open and sticking your head in and shouting "hello, did you know your door was open?". Is that unethical?

</weak metaphor>

3
1
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Headmaster

"Using insecure configurations and default passwords to gain access to remote devices and run code on them is unethical"

Garbage. How is it unethical? The ethics are in the intent and this guy had no malicious intent of any kind. He purposefully designed it to eat the fewest cycles possible.

3
3

Google Drive goes titsup for MILLIONS of users

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: Death to the cloud

Talking generically: The cloud is a tool to be considered for each possible application. It doesn't have to be the only place you put your data, and it (third-party) certainly isn't right for critical/sensitive data, but it has many uses that make it convenient.

(icon: cloud)

1
0

Build a BONKERS gaming PC

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Bonkers? Yes... Overpriced? Most definitely

It was an interesting read, but I agree with blcollier.

I know it wasn't the point of the article, but if you still wanted the same "premium" parts and were willing to sacrifice a few % in performance, you'd probably save a huge amount of cash.

Annoyingly, though, the only i7 Extreme currently seems to be the 3970X mentioned... the next enthusiast chip down is the 3930K unlocked, but at over £300 saving for just 0.3GHz drop, you'd need to be doing something very specific (such as competitive overclocking) to care about the difference for the cost (IMHO).

3
0

Trip the fight fantastic

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
WTF?

Re: A few comments

"The difference is the abstraction layer. A PC has to go through OS, Drivers, different communication protocols etc etc. The console is specially built with the same hardware every time. Effectively what takes 20 steps for a PC to do, may only take a console 5 because it has to work through fewer layers."

I'm sorry, but this shows a distinct misunderstanding of both PCs (which give low-level access to hardware) and modern consoles (that now have both an OS and HAL), especially since the hardware in consoles is getting closer to standard PC hardware (especially for XBoxes).

I'm not saying that they're equal, but it's probably closer to 3 and 2 layers for most things.

1
0

New nuke could POWER WORLD UNTIL 2083

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Mushroom

The delays to the current increase in nukes (regardless of their type) is almost nothing to do with safety, it's the companies willing to invest in building them negotiating (demanding) a higher market energy price.

Unfortunately, since there's only one company left at the table, the conversation is mostly one-sided as we know we need a future energy supply and have almost no either viable options.

0
1

Six things a text editor must do - or it's a one-way trip to the trash

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

"Fine"? Find only goes in one direction without wrapping, and neither will limit to word boundaries. This is stuff so basic that it's been in every other MS product for more years than I care to remember.

And that's just ignoring that for something that does nothing more than display text, Notepad collapses in to a black hole the moment you try to load a file of any significant size (i.e., a log file).

Portable Notepad++ for me.

7
1
Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Or a functional find/replace?

1
1

Dear Facebook: I heard the news today, oh boy

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Google+ over Facebook any day of the week.

"since you only see your friends on either of these services"

Minor point, but G+ is more like a cross between Facebook and Twitter, so you actually can "meet" lots of other people (unless you disable it).

I find G+ is better for following content creators (bloggers, photographers, videos, etc.) than Twitter, as they can directly share their content rather than just link to it.

0
0

Here's the $4.99 utility that might just have saved Windows 8

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Classic Shell?

I was coming on to say exactly that. My girlfriend's brand new laptop had Win8 and I put Classic Start (part of Classic Shell) on it.

Completely skips Metro (or whatever it's called) and works exactly as she'd expect it to.

10
2

Oz Senator says Google Glass could 'end privacy as we know it'

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Big Brother

Re: He has a point about privacy

Being caught, I think.

The Wifi sniffing one is different in that they were recording information being leaked to their current location, while this would be a product in a consumer's hand.

Take a look at the number of people who monitor and investigate exactly what an Android phone is doing. While they certainly could take surreptitious photos, someone would notice and the shitstorm would be epic.

Not a reason to not be vigilant, but I think it's fairly in the tin-foil hat end of the spectrum.

4
0

UK injects £88m into Euro bid to build Hubble-thrashing 'scope

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: No imagination

They're geeks, so surely YABT (Yet Another Big Telescope)?

0
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
FAIL

Re: Because

Any citation for that? I cursory glance over the construction proposal shows that ARUP (UK) and another UK company have already been involved in the design and prototyping of the dome.

I can see Germany, Belgium, Spain, UK companies mentioned.

Seems like a good thing to me.

12
0

Health pros: Alcohol is EVIL – raise its price, ban its ads

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Stop

Re: @JohnSmith19

Sorry, but I call bullsh*t. The errosion of liberties is a gradual thing because it is not a concerted effort to hoodwink a whole population. The fact that we actual have more personal liberty than 100 years ago always seems to be forgotten (not that I would ever defend any attempt to attack the liberties we have).

No one becomes a politician to further some grand conspiracy; be that the death of democracy you speak of, or the immigration and social cleansing the older generation warn me about.

Governments are inept and pass laws almost by random; legislation is almost always a reaction to some current situation or change in public opinion. They are pandering to what they believe the masses want, in order to secure their next vote. Occassionally they'll create a short political play in which they propose something horrible in order to pass something less horrible, but if their schemes are planned more than six months in advance, I would be utterly shocked.

In this particular case, a bunch of doctors/physicians are lobbying to reduce public health problems from alcohol. Even if they have a hidden agenda, historically it has always been shown that reducing the public's alcohol intake produces a less docile populace, so what could they hope to gain from it?

Personally, I can't see any reason to be upset by the advertising ban. Some of the adverts are amusing, most are boring, and people drink what they want to drink anyway. I've never heard anyone order a "SoCo", no matter how (cringingly) hard Southern Comfort tried to push that phrase.

But if they touch my ale, they'll be hell to pay.

2
0

Big Blighty telcos ordered to block three BitTorrent search sites

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Internet should be free from meddling by the media cartels

No one will benefit if the only people able to release music are those with a massive pot of money to fund the time and effort. It'll just be corporately-sponsored music acts everywhere.

Personally, I don't copy music because I can afford to pay for it. Although, I do have a personal limit of £5 for a typical album and will happily wait until they hit that mark.

I also equate the effort the artist put in to producing the album as the same that I might in to creating a piece of commercial software; if I did, I'd want to get paid when someone wants to make a copy for their own use.

0
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
WTF?

Re: Off-the-record company comment

Ha! "Tyranny"... whatever next. Perhaps they don't know what the word means? Bless.

0
0

Google open sources very slow compression algorithm

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Opera Turbo, then?

0
0

Nominet tosses plan for shorter .uk domains in the bin (for now)

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: The Best That Can Be Said

Well, my view is that is creates consumer confusion unnecessarily ("Was that joebloggs.uk or joebloggs.co.uk?").

I can't understand why anyone would be so desparate for a second-level .uk domain. I'd rather see them create sensible second-levels (though I can't think of one right now) and continue "selling" the third-levels at additional cost.

0
0

Google+ goes single sign-in, exec roasts Zuck's 'frictionless sharing'

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Megaphone

Re: Bad enough

Not sure what you're getting at... Federated logins (SSO) shouldn't reduce security in real world terms.

Most people (anecdotal, but I'm sure you'll agree) use the same or similar passwords on everything, because they get bored of coming up with new ones (or just don't care, until something gets hijacked).

The question is, do you trust Jim's DIY Forums (yes, yes, "Fora" is the plural) to hold your password securely and deal with any external attack, or Google? Using an open standard (OAuth 2.0) means that they shouldn't be in a position to abuse the trust and access the accounts you link in, and they provide an easy 2FA from the bat.

I'd say that it improves most users' personal security by a large amount.

1
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge

They had (and still have) Google OpenID and OAuth 2.0 endpoints (https://developers.google.com/accounts/docs/OpenID), which are something I've made heavy use of for a number of projects.

The news is about making available additional abilities and access of information to the user's G+ and other services.

If this allows reading private posts and filtering by circle, I can retire my homegrown G+ RSS feed at last!

0
0

SimCity Classic

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: SimCopter

I really enjoyed SimCity, SimAnt, and SimTower.

I also had some of the other Sim games, but most felt pointless or flawed.

0
0

Top Firefox OS bloke flames Opera for WebKit surrender

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
WTF?

Re: Last nail in the coffin of Opera's irrevelance

Just because they use WebKit? Surely the same could be said for Chrome or Safari, then?

0
0

You can help fix patent laws … now!

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Prior use rights don't help much

That's where I'm confused... what situation could occur where someone has a valid claim on a novel patent but somebody else has prior use rights?

Is this just to cover dual-invention situations, where party B came up with the same idea after party A but before the patent was filed?

1
0

Traceroute reveals Star Wars Episode IV 'crawl' text

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: <rant>An unused /24?!

I guess it's: ?"(

0
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: <rant>An unused /24?!

wowfood has a point.

Given the <rant> tag, I would assume some kind of transform declaration would handle the uppercase. In CSS terms, something like "text-transform: uppercase".

What's that? Oh, don't worry; it's not that cold out.

1
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: Obi Wan...

Does that mean the Light side and Dark side argue about using Vim or Emacs? I'll let you decide which is which ;)

3
0

Ready or not: Microsoft preps early delivery of IE10 for Windows 7

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: @thegrouch (Internet Explorer?)

I know from work that IE8 does the same (pity me, please), so I assume that this isn't removed from IE9 and IE10?

Not personally a fan of Chrome, but the process thing isn't really a reason to not use.

0
0

Firm moves to trademark 'Python' name out from under the language

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
WTF?

François Marie Daudin called from 1803* where he came up with the genus name.

How can anyone take a trademark on such a common word? *cough*Windows*cough*Apple*cough*

* (a) Yes, I did have to look his name up; (b) and I know the telephone wasn't invented

7
7

Reg readers scuffle over the ultimate cuppa

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coffee/keyboard

I agree in principle, but there is no excuse for the way one of my friends makes tea: she pratically whips the bag out of the water as soon as the life-giving brown infusion has begun to seep out. The result: slightly brown milk.

1
0

Apple tech FOUND ON ANDROID: Passbook gets pay-by-bonk

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Paris Hilton

Re: Agreed

"enter pin code"

But if NFC only works while your phone is unlocked*, why enter another PIN?

* I don't know that it does, but it should.

(Paris: bonk)

0
0

Apple refreshes MacBook Pro range

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Flame

Re: Please stop moaning about transat differences

"Cost of living has nothing to do with it and to think otherwise is an indication of a feeble mind."

Nice ad hominem...

0
1

Opera joins Google/Apple in-crowd with shift to WebKit and Chromium

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Another one down

"Opera's rendering engine being killed off in favour of Google's - that's most definitely a bad day. It doesn't really matter if Opera's renderer was good or not, it matters that a genuine alternative is going (or gone)"

Rubbish. As a long-time Opera user, I can't see any real downside to this, as long as they integrate all of the current features properly.

The rendering engine is insignificant, as long as it renders HTML, CSS, JS, etc., as the specs say. How else are we ever going to leave the current round of hacks in order to make a simpel webpage appear the same on all browsers?

I dream of the day people no longer need to check a user agent string.

0
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Pint

Re: Yes, but...

Most of the time you just have to change the agent: F12 > Edit Site Preferences > Network, then change the Browser Identification to Internet Explorer (or Firefox).

Not guaranteed, but I've found a large number then let you just carry on without issue.

1
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Not sure I agree... Opera's advantage (for me) isn't in the way it renders but in the way I use it: hotkeys, tabs, gestures, addins, My Opera, etc.

Almost all the browsers now offer a similar set of features, but the way they implement them is different enough to attract different crowds. And that isn't going to change just because they use the same renderer.

Although I use Opera for 90% of my browsing, I still have Chrome around for things like GDocs, due to a couple of annoying glitches. Hopefully Opera's shift to WebKit will mean that I don't have to.

3
0

Ask Google this impossible question, get web filth as a reward

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: There's porn? On the interwebs?

Can't do 'tube (geddit?) from work, but I'm hoping that's Avenue Q.

1
1

Tesla vs Media AGAIN as Model S craps out on journo - on the highway

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Big Brother

"vehicle logs from Broder's Model S contradict his account of the journey"

Oh good. Now your car can dob you in

6
0
Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Writer was intent on high risk of failure

It's a fair point, but he states that TWO THIRDS of the charge disappeared overnight. Effectively meaning that the Tesla S needs to be plugged in while not in use, which somewhat diminishes its use for overnight runs away from home.

20
0

Montana TV warns of ZOMBIE ATTACK in epic prank hack

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Big Brother

Re: Zombie attack No.

"Citizen, Big Brother is watching you!"

0
0

Dead Steve Jobs 'made Tim Cook sue Samsung' from beyond the grave

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: Is there anybody there?

Had it been able to do spaces, however, they would have known that it was actually a guy called Sam Sung that had pissed Jobs off once.

1
0

BYOD is a PITA: Employee devices cost firms £61 a month

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Security issues

"Note that windows desktop share and windows server share are both falling, so this isn't just anecdotal."

That wasn't my point at all; you stated that it's because MS' systems are more insecure, but I don't believe that is much of a factor at all.

The only factors I've ever seen in non-public-facing infrastructure is (a) cost, (b) existing licences, (c) existing knowledge. And pretty much in that order.

1
1
Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Thumb Down

Re: Security issues

"Industry is moving away from MS because MS systems are more insecure"

I don't know what industry you work in, but I've never seen such a move on desktops or servers.

Companies in general use whatever they want based on what the person spec'ing it (a) knew and (b) was told was available. If a company can buy Windows boxes/licences cheap and they have tools/people to manage, they will; if they can't, they'll look at whatever else their preferred suppliers have that fits the bill.

Most reasonably sized companies don't build their own servers with Linux on; they pay a supplier (IBM, Red Hat, Oracle, etc.) for a fully supported system, regardless of how good their local sysad is, which cost (initially; not discussing TCO) very similar figures to the Windows based options.

In my experience of working for a company with 250k+ employees, only the security of the public-facing servers were really a consideration, and those numbers were such a small amount compared to the internal-only ones. Internally, all employee access was logged and they relied on standard ACL to limit access. If someone was found to have hacked in to something they shouldn't, they'd be out on their ass.

3
1

Curiosity raises mighty robotic fist, punches hole in Mars

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Joke

Presumably built from the remains of the probes that first "penetrated the Martian surface"... by high speed impact

1
0

Shatners talks space, acting with fellow Canuck on ISS

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Wait one minute...

"talking to Shatner"

And how... would they deal... with the a-pparent... pauses... in the feed?

0
0

Tennessee bloke quits job over satanic wage slip

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Devil

Re: FFS

Except that 666 isn't the only possible "Number of the Beast", and no one can even agree as to what (a) the Beast is, or (b) what is represents...

5
0

Paper computers: Not mere pulp fiction

Ian Yates
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: Paper wins

Paper disproves Spock.

Dead trees win!

2
0

LibreOffice 4.0 ships with new features, better looks

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: If they have improved the interface - that's definately a good thing

There's some here: http://www.libreoffice.org/download/4-0-new-features-and-fixes/

0
0

Could this be Google's slick new touchscreen Chromebook?

Ian Yates
Bronze badge

Re: Company behind the video looks unlikely to actually be working with Google

Shame. I watched it on G+ earlier and thought that it was the first time that a Chromebook had seemed interesting.

0
0