* Posts by Steven Roper

1462 posts • joined 10 May 2011

CIOs: What tech will be running your organisation in 2020?

Steven Roper

As IT manager for my company

I can say that we'll probably be running much the same tech as we are running now, and have been for the last 10 years.

Our main office server box is 2006 vintage, and had a motherboard and CPU upgrade in 2010. The office machines date from 2004 - 2009, the art room roughly the same period, albeit they had motherboard/CPU upgrades in 2012, and only one new art/design machine (an AMD 8-core) was purchased last year.

On the mobile front, we're using Toshiba laptops and Samsung Slates with Windows 7 circa 2012ish, and Galaxy S4s with Android circa 2013. (And we have one Apple iPad I'm ashamed to say, but that's solely used for testing to make sure our websites and ebooks work on iThings. We do have an elaborate office cleansing ritual for those forced to use it! ;) )

All of it does everything we need it to reliably, and everything is a known quantity that everyone knows how to use effectively.

With the flattening of Moore's law over the last several years (CPU power and storage sizes have stopped increasing exponentially), unless some earth-shattering new technology like holodecks or transhuman consciousness-uploading tech appears in the next 5 years, I can't see us using anything vastly different to what we're using today. Probably there'll be a few more minor hardware upgrades but that's abut it.

If it ain't broke, why fix it?

8
1

Battle for control of Earth's unconnected souls moves to SPAAAACE

Steven Roper

Re: Foundation

Let's hope the story does turn out to be an Arthur C. Clarke novel and not a George Orwell one.

0
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Steven Roper

Re: Did I miss....

"I don't like this expression 'First World Problems.' It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World Problems.

All the silly stuff of life doesn't disappear just because you're black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations.

Here's a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are."

-Teju Cole.

So you see, Hans, that while you might think you're being all sensitive and politically-correct by arguing to defer all other solutions in favour of eradicating poverty and starvation, in fact you are showing your ignorance and bigotry by assuming that people in Africa are only concerned with basic survival, rather than communication and wanting to be a part of the larger world.

4
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Google MURDERS Google Code, orders everyone out to GitHub and co

Steven Roper

@AC Re: My advice would be...

The reason why that is in there is presumably because there is an assumption that one cannot imagine an internet without "google search".

Actually I made that qualification not because I can't imagine an internet without it, but because it's the one service they can't pull - it's their bread and butter. I personally use DuckDuckGo most of the time, but DDG's lack of tracking and search history is both a benefit and a pitfall. Sometimes I want localised results based on my search history and for that I go to Google. But yes, for everything else it's DDG.

3
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Steven Roper

My advice would be never to start using any Google service other than basic search for anything important in the first place. I learned years ago the perils of coming to rely on a Google service only to have it yanked out from under you a couple of years later. I'll never rely on them again.

Incidentally, I wonder how long it will be before they yank Google Analytics and a billion webmasters cry out in terror before being suddenly silenced. Notwithstanding that GA is already blocked by a host of privacy tools, that and Google's notorious unreliability, are why our websites use only our own in-house analytics code.

15
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Alibaba hopes to roll net-connected car out of the cave

Steven Roper

If any country needs automated cars

it's China. They have far too many people to be let loose on the roads as they are. If you've ever seen pictures of that new massive freeway they built, that at 250 km long, has since become the world's largest car park, you can understand why.

0
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Pathetic PC sales just cost us a BILLION dollars, cries Intel

Steven Roper

I think the main reasons businesses aren't upgrading are twofold:

1. Our systems work, they satisfy all our present and foreseeable needs, our staff know how to use everything and we can provide our customers with the level of service they've come to expect form us. If we upgrade, we have to retrain all our staff to use the new interfaces Microsoft have foisted on us and we have to iron all the bugs out of the new systems. Ours ain't broke, so we ain't gonna fix 'em.

2. RENTISM IS NOT A BUSINESS MODEL WE WILL EVER ACCEPT. We are not, under any circumstances whatsoever, going to be put in a position where we have to continuously pay every month to continue to use software we've already paid for once. Microsoft can stick their Office 365 rentism scheme sideways into the most painful orifice they can find on their worthless, greedy arseholes, because we are not going to be put in a position where they can hold all our work and data to ransom unless we pay whatever they demand every month to keep using it.

22
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Does my star look big in this? Milky Way 50 per cent fatter than expected

Steven Roper

So if our glalaxy is 1.5x bigger than we thought

does this mean we're bigger than the Andromeda Galaxy now?

0
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$1.3 million survelliance systems fights Logan bogans

Steven Roper

Bananas one day, police state the next

I've long considered Queensland to be Australia's answer to North Korea, ever since the Bjelke-Petersen days. What with his gerrymandering, their barely-shy-of-death-penalty marijuana laws, then their draconian if-you-know-a-bikie-you're-also-guilty laws, and now this, I have a sackful of very good reasons why I would never cross South Australia's northeastern border!

2
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MPs 'alarmed' by millions of mugshots on Brit cops' databases

Steven Roper

@Sebastian A Re: pushing boundaries.

It will have to get a LOT worse than this before people rebel. North Korea stands as a stark example of the extent of oppressive conditions people are willing to tolerate without rebellion or revolution.

Remember the boiling frog analogy. I'm absolutely certain that if half the laws and legal practices we tolerate today, had been suddenly imposed all at once back in the 1970s, people would have stormed Parliament House the same way they did the Bastille in 1789. But because these laws have crept in one by one over many years, using safety/fear as justification, they've been able to impose conditions that would have been considered absolutely intolerable 40 years ago.

So I doubt very much there will ever be a revolution now, because the powers that be have the boiling frog technique worked out pat. What the future holds in my mind doesn't bear thinking about. I just live one day at a time hoping it doesn't get too bad before I shuffle off this mortal coil. At least with no children I don't have to be concerned about where civilisation goes after I'm gone.

7
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Crap employers banned from enforcing backdoor crim records checks

Steven Roper

Re: And what about?

I've never been asked this, but then I haven't been in the job market for a long time. But if I were, and I was asked to provide access to my private accounts at an interview, my response would be something along the lines of:

"Obviously I cannot give out that information. And in all honesty, what does it say of your company's attitude to IT security that you would even ask for such information and expect an answer? If I tell you, how could you trust that I wouldn't give out my login details to your company's systems in future if someone required it for whatever reason?"

8
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Google will make you live to be 500, claims Ventures president

Steven Roper

I hope I die before any of this becomes a reality

If you want a vision of the horror that would be extended life under Google, have a gander at this Youtube video.

Although it deals with uploading your consciousness to a computer system rather than preserving your organic body, I have no doubt that the "terms and conditions" imposed by our corporate overlords in exchange for longevity would certainly follow similar patterns.

This is the modern equivalent of burning in hell for all eternity. The oblivion of death is paradise compared.

0
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China reveals 'Internet Plus' plan to modernise and go cloudy

Steven Roper
Big Brother

Re: Great Firewall of China reloaded?

Yes, that would be why the Chinese government loves the idea of "cloud" so much - it makes the Ministry of Truth's job so much easier. Instead of having to recall and reissue thousands of copies of newspapers (or hard drives) revising BB's dayorder to show that Eastasia has always been at war with Oceania and not Eurasia, they only need to update the one cloud server and presto! it's automagically updated for everyone, and nobody can prove otherwise.

0
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UK Supreme Court waves through indiscriminate police surveillance

Steven Roper

@Peter Gathercole re: posting as AC

Actually, there is a good reason for posting AC.

The police may or may not read El Reg, but you can bet a lot of IT bosses do - and most of us here work in IT. Given that you can easily lose your job for stepping even an inch out of line these days, you have to confront the very real possibility that one of your workmates or bosses might be reading your comments here. Especially since said workmate or boss only has to click your name above your comment and they can read everything you've ever posted. Even if you're using a pseudonym, there's a good chance someone at your workplace can figure it out or might recognise it from somewhere.

So if you want to post something controversial without risking your job, you'd do it as AC, not to evade the police, but to evade your pointy-haired boss from telling you that "those opinions don't reflect the attitude of our company" and using it as an excuse to give you your marching orders.

Of course in my case I'm a partner in the company I work for, and I promote free and honest expression in our workplace, so this doesn't affect me or our people so much, but for many here it would be a very real danger.

7
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Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN

Steven Roper

Re: No FTTN to FTTP pathway?

In New Zealand we had FTTN completed in about 2010

That's because New Zealand doesn't consist of 8 million square kilometres of the kind of terrain one normally only encounters in Frank Herbert novels. Australia has a lot of peculiar issues when it comes to infrastructure, and I'm not at all surprised that the whole NBN project has gone awry; I knew it would the moment Labor first mooted it, simply because I know what this country is and what its environment does to man-made objects. I'd wager few, if any, of the high-living politicians mooting it from the comfort of their air-conditioned Sydney and Canberra offices, have ever actually ventured out into the Great Red Nothing that most of this continent consists of; if they've seen anything of it at all, it is most likely through the little window of an aircraft flying just under Mach 1 10 kilometres above it, and so it was inevitable that they'd grossly underestimate the problems and costs involved.

Even if we discounted connecting all the rural centres and gave each city its own satellite uplink instead of running cables all over countryside comparable to that of Arrakis, Australian cities are not like most others in the developed world. They sprawl out over a huge area, making it an expensive proposition to connect up each separate house. My own home city of Adelaide, for example, is geographically bigger than London, but has only 1/8 of the population. From this you can work out that the per-capita cost of hooking up a city the size of Adelaide would be more than 8 times that of London; since Adelaide's median income is definitely not 8 times that of the average Londoner, it's not at all surprising that we've had these difficulties, and in fact I find it amazing that we've achieved as much as we have!

2
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Australia's social media censorship law – for the children - all-but passes

Steven Roper

I don't see how this is censorship

All this law is doing is essentially extending existing harassment and abuse laws into the social media space. It's pretty specific that the material to be removed must be directly targeted at a particular Australian child before it can be the subject of a complaint - that is, it has to refer to or address an actual person, and consist of an attack on, or harassment of, said person.

I don't see any way in which, say, advocates of political correctness could use this law to take down anti-feminist or anti-progressive commentary, for example, since such commentary is generally not targeted at specific individuals. In fact, laws like this could well be used against such individuals, since the standard MO of PC advocates is to harass and attempt to smear and ruin the lives of those who disagree with them.

Facebook lynch-mobbing and the media-induced hounding of individuals for the sake of sensationalism has become a serious problem that needs to be addressed, and this law is a step in the right direction. Preventing targeted and directed harassment and abuse of individuals is not censorship. It's straightforward civilised behaviour.

3
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Murky online paedo retreat: The Nether explores the fantasy-reality divide

Steven Roper

Re: @x7

"You appear to be attempting to equate paedophilia with homosexuality."

I was hoping you would be intelligent enough not to attempt to use that particular strawman to try to bolster your position. I guess I overestimated you. I should have known better, given the mindlessly Orwellian mentality you've been exhibiting.

No, I have not equated homosexuality with paedophilia at all. What I did was to examine the psychological mechanism behind fanaticism and denial. At no point did I draw any comparison between homosexuality and paedophilia, the only comparison I drew was in certain peoples' negative reactions to them and the reasons for said reactions.

I could just as easily have used a comparison with a fanatical Islamist wanting to ban bacon being a secret bacon-lover, or a rabid anti-smoker covering for her craving for a cancer stick, or a fanatical temperance-movement crusader trying to cope with his alcohol addiction, but in my ignorance of your sheer stupidity I chose to use the homosexual analogy instead. Silly me.

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Steven Roper

@x7

I believe that those who are most fanatical in their opposition to something are often secretly enamoured of it themselves, and so they speak out to hide the fact from others as well as reinforce their own denial.

This principle has already been demonstrated in the case of anti-gay fanatics: many of them are secretly gay, or have homophilic desires, which their culture and upbringing causes them to deny, and this denial is what drives their anti-gay fanaticism.

That's not to say that everyone who dislikes gays is secretly gay. There are certainly many who are simply uncomfortable with the idea, but they don't go on banner-waving crusades about it. There is discomfort and avoidance, and then there is fanatical zealotry.

If this is true of homosexuals and anti-gay fanatics, it is likely also true of vocal anti-paedophile crusaders like yourself. Yes, most people are rightly protective of kids. But when they start frothing at the mouth and demanding that the most basic freedoms be flushed down the toilet to further their cause, as you have clearly been doing in this thread, that's the kind of fanaticism which is usually covering for denial.

Which is why I'd be more concerned about somebody like you being left alone with kids I care about, than someone like the fictional Sims. At least he knows what he is. How well do you know what you are?

7
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March 24th: The day most Australian download allowances become inadequate

Steven Roper

Re: What they fail to mention...

Yep. You can bet that Game of Thrones, the show that made Australia famous for piracy, won't be in Netflix's lineup because that greedy bastard Murdoch wants you to pay $120 a month for premium Foxtel to watch that one show. I can see a massive uptake in VPN subscriptions from Australia as soon as the new copyright enforcement regime comes in and people start getting nasty letters from their ISPs!

1
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W*nkers of the world unite to SAVE THE PLANET one jerk-off at a time

Steven Roper

Does it generate power from torque or frequency?

Given that the "ball in a tube" mechanism presumably has a fixed mass for the ball, its momentum - and therefore the energy recovered - would be a function of frequency of motion, not torque. So a power wanker who pulls his pudding at a rate of 80 strokes a minute with a force of 80 newtons per stroke, would only generate about half as much electricity for a given ball mass, as a rapid-fire chicken choker at 160 strokes a minute with a force of 40 newtons per stroke, despite consuming the same number of joules in the process.

It seems to me that a better mechanism for converting oscillatory motion into electricity could be devised, perhaps one that would produce low volts / high amps for the power wanker, and high volts / low amps for the chicken choker, which can then be transformed as required, so as to maximise power conversion efficiency regardless of the stroking style of the power source.

Given the difficulty of varying the ball's mass, a good solution would be to provide different models with different sized metal balls, which buyers can choose to suit their wanking technique: big, heavy balls and tubes for the power wankers and small, light balls and tubes for the chicken chokers.

2
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Christmas Eve email asked Oz telcos for metadata retention costs by Jan 9th

Steven Roper

Re: Question

VyprVPN apparently do keep logs and will hand them over upon request, according to TorrentFreak. I've been using Private Internet Access for over 6 months so far and I've no complaints.

0
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Trans-Pacific trade treaty close to signoff says USA

Steven Roper
Flame

Any government that signs the TPP is comitting treason against its nation and its people

I've long maintained that Tony Abbott and his cronies should be charged with high treason if they sign this TPP as it stands. The provision that foreign corporations are allowed to sue a democratically elected government for passing laws they don't like, is nothing less than blatantly selling our nation's sovereignty to foreign powers. Which is an act that, throughout recorded history, has been globally regarded as treason.

39
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FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*

Steven Roper

Seems they've forgotten what "broadband" actually means

When I was in tech college, the meaning of "broadband" I was given to understand meant that the data was transmitted over a broad band of frequencies or channels, as opposed to "narrowband" which meant the data was sent using a single carrier frequency or channel.

But, just as the media have misappropriated the term "hacker" to mean "cyber-criminal", it seems the term "broadband" has now been misappropriated to simply mean, "internet access that is faster than yours!"

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HP's pet lizard is FERAL PERIL says wildlife group

Steven Roper

Re: Missed one

...Europeans humans...

Of course. Better exterminate all those evil overprivileged white male cishet shitlord scum who are the sole cause of all that that is wrong with the world, right?

Sanctimonious PC hatemongers like you are what is wrong with the world.

0
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Australian spookhaus busted for warrantless tap of own phones

Steven Roper

Re: Idiots, morons and dickheads!

Apparently not. Fairfax reports this:

Yes, but Fairfax is a big corporation that the laws of the land don't apply to. The ten-years-in-prison clause is only for the little guys like you and me. If one of us had published this bungle on our little Wordpress blogs, WE'D be looking at 10 years' chokey, but Fairfax and Murdoch's minions have effective carte blanche.

Always remember the Prime Directive of 21st century lawmaking: one law for us, and another for them.

3
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'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts

Steven Roper
Big Brother

Re: The determination!!

Hell, why not just go the whole hog and bring back the guillotine, the gallows and the garrotte. We even could bring back public burnings of the worst ones, just to set the example for others who dare to speak out of line! Or hanging, drawing and quartering for extra spectacle!

That reminds me, while our governments are busy using Orwell's political diatribes as instruction manuals, there's a scene in the Radford movie our parliamentary do-gooders might like. When Winston and Julia meet in Victory Square to arrange their first excursion, truckloads of prisoners are being brought in and tied up to stakes around the square. One guard goes along machine-gunning them in the legs and letting them hang there in agony for a few minutes until the next guard comes along popping caps in their skulls. I'm sure our modern Moral Guardians and Easily Offended Purveyors Of Political Correctness would revel in this kind of rally, cheering on the public executions of the outspoken and other doubleplusungood crimethinking ownlifers.

4
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Human spacecraft dodge COMET CHUNKS pelting off Mars

Steven Roper

So, is this comet now going to swing around the Sun and give us a sky-spanning lightshow later on, or is it going to pass too far out to form a large tail?

0
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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Steven Roper

Re: Barking @Yet Another Anonymous Coward

The biggest problem with Australia's voting system is not just that it's mandatory, it also uses what are called "preferences". Now, remember you HAVE to vote, and if you don't want to vote for Labor or Liberal, you could vote for a minority party like the Greens, the Sex Party, the Pirate Party, Hemp Party, One Nation and so on. But all of those parties are forced to stipulate "preferences" to other parties.

What this means is that if the candidate (and their party) you voted for doesn't get voted in, that party's votes are forwarded to the "preferred" party of their choice. So, say you vote for the Greens, and they preference Labor, but they don't get in. Then your vote for the Greens gets counted as a vote for Labor, whether you wanted Labor in power or not. You can't choose for your vote not to count at all if your desired party doesn't get in. Ultimately, because Labor and Liberal between then have an absolute oligarchy in this country, everyone is forced, through this system of preferences, to vote for one or the other, regardless of what you actually want.

Even an informal vote (e.g. a blank ballot paper, or one with a penis drawn all over it, or simply turning up and signing your name off and not putting a ballot in at all) is counted as a vote for the incumbent party, so you can't escape voting that way either.

The upshot is, if you live in Australia, you either vote Liberal or Labor, regardless of how much you hate either - or both.

4
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Bird of HEY.... that's MY DRONE! Hawk attacks geek's quadcopter in nature v machine clash

Steven Roper

Re: ROTM @Voland's right hand

The ghastly things wake me up every morning at 5:30 am with their discussion of "news of the day" on their way out to farmer fields.

Be grateful you don't live in Australia. Rooks have voices like Maria Callas compared to the Australian Sulphur-Crested Cockatoo, a large and exceedingly early-rising flock of which have taken up residence in the roadside trees right outside my house. If you haven't heard the raucous, ear-shredding shrieks of these avian abominations you have never experienced true aural agony. Trust me, these damnable creatures constitute the world's most sadistic alarm clock.

If you're feeling particularly masochistic and want to experience for yourself a sample of what I get hauled out of my sweet dreams by every morning, then give this YouTube video a listen. If you can keep that video open for more than 30 seconds, you're either deaf or an ornithological saint!

1
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Women in tech: Not asking for raises is your 'superpower' – Nadella. *chirp*...*chirp*

This post has been deleted by a moderator

10 Top Tips For PRs Considering Whether To Phone The Register

Steven Roper

The record (that we're aware of) is over half an hour!

That's an achievement to be proud of, even more so given that you kept them holding that long with nothing but hold music.

I have a specially crafted MP3 file that I've carefully honed over the years to try and match, as closely as possible, the scripts these droids use when pitching something. I came up with it because I found that simply saying I'd get the person and leaving the phone on hold never kept them on the line for more than a minute or so, and I wanted some method for maximising their time wastage while minimising my own. So the MP3 I created goes something like this:

"Good day, [My company name], Steve speaking...[5 second pause]...Okay...[8 second pause]...Uh huh...[6 second pause]...Probably not, but if you could explain it to me I might be able to refer you to someone... etc, etc.

The MP3 file is about 30-odd minutes long. The longest I've been able to hold a telemarketer on the line with it before they realise they're talking to an answering machine and hang up, is 17 minutes 36 seconds. The average is around 8-10 minutes.

So respect to you being able to tie them up for half an hour with nothing but hold music. Well done!

12
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Woman says narco-cops used her PICS to snare drug lords on Facebook

Steven Roper

Luckily she doesn't live in Australia

since our fucking government has just passed laws making it perfectly legal for ASIO to do to innocent Australian citizens what the DEA has done to this woman.

0
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Hey, non-US websites – FBI don't have to show you any stinkin' warrant

Steven Roper

Fine

If my systems are fair game for you to attack because I'm not in the USA then you're fair game for my systems to whack you with a trojan when you break into them.

7
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Australia mandates* cloud use by government agencies

Steven Roper

Well considering that cloud storage by its very nature is all three of those; namely insecure, expensive and can't do the job, I'd say our government agencies shouldn't be adopting this toxic technological trend any time soon.

4
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Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please

Steven Roper

I would be quite happy

if Google simply stopped linking to his sites altogether. I'm sick of Googling some current event and finding half the first page links to articles hidden behind Murdoch's paywalls. Especially considering that if I set my user-agent string to simulate the googlebot I can often access the articles without restriction. This means he's showing one thing to the googlebot and another to regular browsers - which I was under the impression was a huge no-no in Google's books, guaranteed to get you ranked off their index. Not to mention the sheer ironic hypocrisy in his doing this, and then complaining about Google scanning his articles and reprinting them in their news searches!

So it'd be great if Google could just wake up to this and give his shit-sites the go-by and link me to actual news sites, instead of that evil bastard's pay-per-view propaganda rags.

1
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Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears

Steven Roper

"Whenever he's browsing his playlists for stuff for us to listen to there are gaps where music that he used to be able to stream is no longer available."

And here we have another reason why I abominate this emphasis on "cloud." This is the Ministry of Truth in all its ugly glory. When all movies and songs and books are stored in the cloud and "hoarding" (I see the pejoratives for those who prefer to keep their own data are already being circulated) is a thing of the past, how easy is it to simply delete undesirable parts of history, or to edit songs and movies to suit modern PC sensibilities? All you have to do is alter or remove one file from the cloud server, and it instantly affects everybody. Looks like Winston Smith and his ilk will soon be out of a job.

I give it 10 years before our government starts making it illegal to keep your own copies of media files and mandates exclusive use of the cloud for exactly this reason. Once that happens, our journey to Orwell's nightmare will be complete. What will the penalty for keeping a diary be then? 30 years in a joycamp?

0
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Privacy law reboot needed says Oz Law Reform Commission

Steven Roper

Re: Accessible?

I believe the solution to that would be for ALL persons appearing in court to have their legal counsel appointed by the court - no matter who, or how rich, you are. If your income is below a certain threshold, then you should be eligible for a subsidy from the government to cover the cost of legal counsel and court fees, which would be reclaimable from you in the event you are convicted in a criminal case. This would put a dead stop to rich people and corporations using highly-paid mouthpiece lawyers to sway and manipulate the judicial process. If all lawyers were appointed based on equivalent competence for both sides, a much fairer trial and more accessible justice would be assured.

But since the rich and powerful and their mouthpieces are the ones that own the government and run the legal system, the chances of seeing such a remedy are about on par with those of the Curiosity rover discovering Martian crested three-winged pigs.

0
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Hot Celebrity? Stash of SELFIES where you're wearing sweet FA? Get 2FA. Now

Steven Roper

I'm just... gobsmacked... that system designers aren't limiting login attempts by default without even thinking about it.

Way back in the early 80s, when banks first started introducing ATMs, it was made very clear that if you got your PIN wrong 3 times the machine keeps your card. And in high school in 1983 on the old BBC Micro network (remember the old *I AM NAME and *PASSLOOK anyone?) 3 failed login attempts locked your account and you had to go and see the teacher to reset it.

Ever since then, I've always designed systems to lock an account after 3 failed login attempts, believing this to be industry standard practice. That it clearly now is not is utterly unbelievable, not to mention stupendously irresponsible. I say that any systems engineer designing a system without a failed-login lockout condition should be charged with criminal negligence.

11
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iCloud fiasco: 100 FAMOUS WOMEN exposed NUDE online

Steven Roper

Yes.

This is exactly the kind of scandal that is needed to wake people up to the hazards and dangers of relying on cloud storage. It is NOT secure and never will be, no matter how much buzzword fluff the marketing droids and three-letter-spooks throw around. As to all those who brush off their reliance on cloud with "I have nothing to hide, so nothing to fear" - you fucking well have plenty to fear now!

28
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Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media

Steven Roper

Re: Televising courts

Another major problem in televising court cases is cherry-picking by the media. We all know the mainstream media have their own political agendas and biased reporting and selective coverage to present one side of the story is normal these days. So of course the MSM would leave out certain statements and replay others a dozen times, in the usual Trial By Media fashion.

If we allow this, then we have to add a stipulation that if a TV station wishes to broadcast a court case it must broadcast the ENTIRE hearing UNABRIDGED and UNEDITED. Otherwise we'll simply turn our justice system into a media-biased kangaroo court.

3
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Beware WarKitteh, the connected cat that sniffs your Wi-Fi privates

Steven Roper

Re: Stats?

"I think that the wildly different content sought by searches for "Cat" and "Pussy" may be skewing the stats."

That may be true, but search engine analytics would be able to differentiate between searches for "pussy" by detecting whether the search is run with the family-friendly filter on or off...

0
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Users should PAY for their piracy says Turnbull

Steven Roper

Good

"Australia's government is applying its customary confusion to the copyright debate"

There are times when I love our government for shit like this. As long as they are all running around like chooks with their heads cut off, none of this shit is going anywhere. It's only when they're all in agreement on things that we should start worrying!

2
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AVG stung as search revenue from freebie scanners dries up

Steven Roper

I run Avast on my home PC and there is a simple way to stop the popup spam: set it to Silent/Gaming mode and leave it there. I've never seen a single advert or popup except for the once-a-year "you need to re-register" thing, at which point you just confirm your email address on the form and forget about it for another year.

2
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Turnbull to Big Content: Let your movies RUN FREE ... for a fair price

Steven Roper

"Of course, that contrasts with other ‘normal’ products; you can, for instance take a car you already own and use it in a movie without having to pay any more money."

Actually, you can't. Product placement in movies, TV shows and video games is subject to agreement with the brand or trademark owner. Car designs represent an intellectual-property factor as well. This is why you see notices in movie credits like "Vehicles provided by Ford" or similar, and why every single car you see in a movie (even ones incidentally parked or driving in the background) are all from the same manufacturer. It's why, when you see a movie character drinking a can of Coke, you can bet that Coca-Cola has had some say in its inclusion.

Any display, or even mention, of any recognisable product or brand name in a movie, TV show or video game, constitutes commercial use of that trademark, and if done without the trademark owner's permission, can render you liable for infringement action. This is why, for example, Quentin Tarantino uses his own made-up brands in his movies, like Big Kahuna Burger or Red Apple cigarettes.

Because of this, it would be almost impossible to make a live-action movie set in any inhabited area without inadvertently including a trademarked product or brand and thus having to contact the relevant trademark owners. CGI or animation is about the only way you could guarantee to avoid this exposure.

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Indian techies-in-training face down MAN-EATING LEOPARD - and WIN

Steven Roper

Re: Fauna.

"I once found a slug in the office."

Does it talk?

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Forrester says Australia, not China, is next boom market for cloud

Steven Roper

Re: "...a well-educated populace..."

Upvoted by an Australian who agrees with you.

The fact of the people of this country willingly embracing the cloud wholesale, without any forethought or consideration of privacy, control of one's data, and the associated dangers, costs and consequences, show a distinct lack of education and a decidedly sheep-like follow-the-hype mentality indicative of your analysis.

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Facebook: Want to stay in touch? Then it's Messenger or NOTHING

Steven Roper

Re: can I has all your data?

" If they remove the messaging feature from m.facebook.com then I think they'll lose a few customers, but they won't be bothered by it as the numbers will just be a drop in the ocean."

They probably won't lose any customers, since the advertising agencies that comprise Facebook's customer base aren't adversely affected by this feature change. However, Facebook may lose a fair few of the products they're selling to their customers...

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Famous 'Dish' radio telescope to be emptied in budget crisis: CSIRO

Steven Roper

Re: True, but

"What I don't understand is whether or not SQA is intended to replace the older radio telescopes."

There's also the question of instrument availability. There's already a queue a mile long of astronomers and related scientists waiting for time on the big telescopes, and this would be bottlenecked by pushing them all onto one instrument. Also, the SQA may be overkill for some projects, for which the Parkes telescope could be ideal, and shorten the queue by moving those scientists whose projects don't need the massive power of the SQA onto the Parkes dish.

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Pinterest diversity stats: Also pale and male (but not as much as Twitter)

Steven Roper

@ NoneSuch

"Would someone please post the "proper" heterogeneous mix"

Oh, that's easy: The "proper" mix in the "perfect" (read: politically correct) company is one whose board is entirely devoid of white males, regardless of what the race and gender mix actually is. As long as there are no white males.

After all, I'd love to see the gender and race makeup of the boards of, say, Huawei or Samsung or Aramco. I'd wager they consist mostly of Chinese, Korean, or Saudi Arabian males respectively. But notice how we're not seeing demands for more "diversity" on these companies' boards? Notice how it's only companies whose boards do consist mainly of white males who are being targeted? Nobody's harassing Samsung or Huawei or Mitsubishi or Foxconn or Aramco about the diversity of their boards. That's because they don't have any white males on them, so they're already politically correct.

Of course, I'll probably be accused of being a racist sexist bigot for pointing this out, but those who do so won't actually offer any reasoned argument as to why they think my perception of this is wrong.

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MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets

Steven Roper

Re: I'd also add...

"..a working magnetic core but I guess a little factor like that got overlooked in all the excitement."

And I'd wager a large moon is probably essential to the formation of said magnetic core. Note that of the terrestrials only Earth is equipped with a large moon to roil its interior with tidal forces and thus set up the conditions for the formation of a magnetic field. These tidal forces also create the conditions necessary for vulcanism and plate tectonics, both of which in turn maintain the carbon cycle and are also essential for life.

Without any large moons, Venus and Mercury lack these forces, and thus also lack the vlucanism and tectonics, and the magnetic fields necessary to protect life from solar radiation and prevent ablation of liquid water via solar wind.

If this is the case, then it's likely life-bearing planets are much less common than we might think, since besides being in the Goldilocks zone a planet would additionally need to have formed a large moon in a stable orbit to create the conditions required for life. And I would hazard that the number of terrestrials with large moons is significantly less than terrestrials in stars' Goldilocks zones, with the probability of both occurring being minute indeed.

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