* Posts by Steven Roper

1436 posts • joined 10 May 2011

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Why does the NSA's boss care so much about backdoors when he can just steal all our encryption keys?

Steven Roper
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And that's even assuming that the NSA of today doesn't eventually morph into the NSDAP of tomorrow.

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Diablo escapes from patent hell, condemns Netlist to legal purgatory

Steven Roper
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Oops...

Should've sued them in Texas!

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Marathon race ace FOUND ON MARS – NASA boffins overjoyed

Steven Roper
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Roughly 35 million dollars per mile

So, about the same mileage costs as your average American SUV then.

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Steven Roper
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Given that the Earth is rather larger than Mars, a quick desktop calculation shows that 26 miles is 1/819 of the way around Mars' circumference. Plugging that back into Earth's circumference means the equivalent coverage of Earth is about 48.9 miles. Still only a tiny percentage though!

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NetApp: Don’t know about the hybrid cloud? Then you’re a dummy

Steven Roper
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Re: The cloud...

"Don't worry. I tried to explain some benefits of cloud in another post and got downvoted. Genuinely don't know why."

Then let me explain cloud avoidance in simple layman's terms:

One, I don't control the box the data is stored in, and therefore who can get to it. Two, I don't want my data held to ransom for whatever monthly fee you choose to charge me to access it. Capiche?

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This is what happens when a judge in New York orders an e-hit on a Chinese software biz

Steven Roper
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Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand

there's the MAFIAA shill...

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Steven Roper
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...marking it out as a company that consumers should be more cautious about.

On the contrary - it marks it out as a company that has the guts and balls not to cave to the fucking Yanks and their bully-boy politics, and therefore marks it out as a company I should be pleased to do business with.

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Google Glass NOT DEAD. We're just making it 'ready' says chief

Steven Roper
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@Jason Bloomberg Re: something like glass has its applications

Movies portraying VR/AR in science fiction rarely, if ever, touched on the invasive corporate monitoring aspects of it, or if they did, they did so only the the most abstract sense. This is why the applications of face-recognition and metadata correlation seem to have taken everyone by surprise. It is this aspect, this misuse of the technology and not the technology itself, that brought about the global hostility to Glass.

It's not just that Glass was a wearable semi-hidden camera; it was the face-recognition software behind the camera and the fact of Google tracking everyone though it that was the main driver of opposition against it. Had corporations like Google NOT pursued this "we want to spy on everything you do so we can discover all your psychological weaknesses and exploit them for profit" mentality, had the Glass device used only local storage and allowed the user to control what data went where, I believe there would not have been such a hostile reaction.

Nobody likes to be spied on, no matter how noble the intentions of those doing the spying might be. Nobody likes to have their weaknesses probed so they can be more easily manipulated, especially when those doing the manipulating are solely interested in milking you for as much money as they can squeeze out of you. That's exactly what the marketing industry is all about - finding ways to bypass conscious decision-making processes in order to make people want to buy something.

And then there's the intelligence and police agencies, all scrambling for the delicious absolute surveillance and control this technology imposes, who are ostensibly there to protect us, but from what? They are there to enforce the laws, and that is all, and with the laws being less and less about mandating civilised behaviour and more and more about protecting the rich and increasing corporate profits at the expense of every other liberty we hold dear, who are those agencies really fighting for? Not our freedom, that's for sure. Not for a long time.

Everyone knows this, subconsciously if not consciously, and that is why any such technology will now be vigorously opposed no matter what form it takes. The technological utopias imagined by sci-fi authors aren't going to happen, not now, not ever. Corporate greed and intelligence-agency megalomania have seen to that.

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Woman caught on CCTV performing drunken BJ blew right to privacy

Steven Roper
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Re: Rape!

I've long noted the the most bigoted misandrists are mainly men, and you're a prime example. I really hope you end up falsely accused of rape or molestation and have your fucking life ruined as you so richly deserve. Filthy PC suck-up cockroaches like you are the ones undermining real efforts to fight injustice, by causing people to backlash against genuine equality movements. Spewing bigoted male-hate like you are doing is exactly what makes people think wrongly that equal-rights movements are all about hating on whites and males instead of achieving real equality, and so they naturally fight back with even more bigotry.

So do the world a favour and just shut your fucking sanctimonious mouth, and let the reformers who actually possess more than one brain cell do their job. You aren't helping women or any other victims of injustice in your crusade to show how politically correct you are, and you're hampering real efforts to achieve equal treatment for everyone.

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Man hauled before beak for using drone to film Premiership matches

Steven Roper
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Trollface

Re: Ban them.

Nicely trolled David, you reeled in a right bagload, good job mate!

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German court slaps down Uber's ride-sharing app

Steven Roper
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Re: Crystal Ball Gazing

"Under the terms of Transatlantic trade treaty legislation Your law stops us from conducting our business in the way we (Americans ) want..."

Sounds like you fellas have been saddled with the same treasonous sellout of your national sovereignty to American corporations as we have here in Australia with the TPP. Any national government signing these fucking trade agreements should be collectively charged with high treason.

And America scratches its head and wonders why the rest of the world hates its fucking guts.

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Steven Roper
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Re: I can't wait....

"Hi! I'm Johnnycab! Where can I take you tonight?"

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Banks defend integrity of passcode-less TouchID login

Steven Roper
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You don't have to render anyone unconscious or take them to hotel

"I can imagine the situation in which a fraudster meets someone in a bar..."

... and says "Hi, didn't we meet at blahblah last year," buys them a drink, and gets their fingerprints off the glass. And then uses it not just for accessing bank accounts, but for identity theft in general, since more and more organisations are relying on biometrics like fingerprints these days.

The problem then becomes obvious: biometrics can't be changed like stolen cards and tax file numbers. So once someone has your fingerprints, retina scans, voiceprint, whatever, and is using them to commit criminal acts, you're fucked for the rest of your life.

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Insert coin to continue: GameOver ZeuS zombie MUTATES, shuffles back to its feet

Steven Roper
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Never mind a sex change, these vermin incense me to the point where I want to advocate bringing back hanging, drawing and quartering.

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Steven Roper
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Re: Takedowns

" that botnet takedowns could only deliver a coup de grâce if bot masters were PUBLICLY executed."

There, fixed that for you again!

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Cisco posts kit to empty houses to dodge NSA chop shops

Steven Roper
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@GameCoder Re: Forgetting the spy angle

There's a reason why compromised hardware is a much bigger concern than TLAs sneaking agents into your executive structure.

Agents are expensive, and take a lot of effort to insert and maintain. The old adage about "for every sword raised at the front ten backs must bend in the field" applies equally in this case as well - for every agent in place, a support staff back at HQ has to be maintained to receive the agent's information, process it, and provide the agent with intel and orders.

So this would only be a concern for big players. I'd be surprised if there weren't various TLA agents at or near the top of corporations like Microsoft, Amazon, Google and even Cisco. But the chances of ASIO going to the trouble of inserting an agent into our little back-street SMB are vanishingly small.

Not so with hardware. Automated information processing is a far more serious threat to privacy, confidentiality and even liberty than any amount of manned spying, because it is far cheaper than manpower and a lot more global in scope.

Consider a parallel: face-recognition software vs. a room full of security bods at a CCTV control centre. Security bods can't watch everyone all the time; they have a list of photos of wanted criminals and scan the camera feeds for them, ignoring everyone else. But face-recognition software tracks everyone, everywhere, all the time. And all it has to store is the metadata: Citizen 17548923 identified via Camera 6485 at Lat 34°55'22.7" S Lon 138°35'58.9" E on 2015-03-07 06:33:45 UTC. So it isn't about having to keep years of AV footage - such metadata can easily be retained on everyone for many years simply because it reveals a lot without taking up much storage.

In the same way, hardware backdoors allowing remote software to regularly collect data means it doesn't matter if a human is looking at or using your information. Software analysis is a much greater threat than human observation, simply because it is orders of magnitude cheaper, more thorough, ubiquitous and far-reaching.

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On 50th anniversary of first spacewalk, Aurorae light up two planets

Steven Roper
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Aurora on Mars?

I thought Mars didn't have a magnetic field, which is essential to the formation of aurorae. Although if it does, I can see how the aurora would reach much deeper into the atmosphere than on Earth, since the aurorae can only occur in low-pressure, rarefied gases - and the Martian atmosphere is rarefied enough that an aurora could get much closer to the surface. That would be a sight to see for an astronaut on the ground! How interesting.

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Sick of these new dot-words? Join the .club – it's the only one challenging .com

Steven Roper
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Value of dot-coms falling

"That's 55 percent: a high figure, and could well point to the fact that the value of dot-coms is falling."

Not at all surprised that the value of dotcoms is still falling, and that's even since the dotcom bubble of the 90s. The cybersquatters domain investors have only themselves to blame: people learned many years ago that searching for stuff on the internet by typing "<subject I'm interested in>.com" into the browser address bar was the worst possible way to do it, simply because such efforts invariably led to a parking page devoid of anything useful, offering the domain for sale - or more likely, some spammer's malware-ridden link farm.

These days, few people remember what or where the address bar even is; most people now simply type what they want into Google* and click the result links - or they follow links posted by their friends on Facebook. Consequently, the domain name is no longer as relevant as it used to be, and these days it doesn't matter if your company has to use something like thisisaverylongdomainnametotypeintoyourbrowseraddressbar.com, since the major driver of traffic now is search engine rank and social media referrals, not so much "accidental drive-by" traffic.

These days, you don't tell people to "point their browser" to your domain, you just tell them to "find us on Facebook" and link them to your site from there.

*How many times have you given someone a domain name only to see them type it into the search box instead of the address bar and then click the search result from there?

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Adobe: Flash, pah. Look, we're doing just fine in the cloud, thank you

Steven Roper
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Re: I am one of these

Until you move to a different company, or your employer changes policy and starts expecting employees to pay their own subs, or Adobe decides to jack up the pricing once it has everyone's work to ransom, and then one day you'll find that all your work for the past however-many-years is no longer accessible or editable. You might not find it such value for money then.

Enjoy. You'll learn. Most likely the hard way. But I, and I'm sure many others, would prefer it if you'd kindly not take the rest of us, who prefer to retain control of our own software assets and data, down with you by funding this execrable rentism business model.

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Microsoft shows off South Korean PC-on-a-stick

Steven Roper
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Re: lucomsamerica.com

Getting a site translated professionally is time-consuming and expensive. Getting some underpaid subaltern to whack your Asian-language website through Google Translate is much quicker and cheaper. And with the level of grammatical idiocy displayed by the majority of the English-speaking population, I doubt they lose much business due to the appalling grammar. Most of their customers are probably so used to badly-translated Asian sites that they no longer even notice.

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Boffins build Cyborg beetles, fly them by remote control

Steven Roper
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Re: Headline

"It's a sign of the times that commenters on a tech site should be concerned about how bugs in an experiment feel."

For me it's not so much about how the bugs might feel, but more about the dangerous slippery slope* that this kind of research and experimentation entails. Inevitably, research that starts with doing things to bugs, soon moves on to frogs, then rodents, then monkeys, and eventually human beings. And of course there are all kinds of justifications for it; in this case "search and rescue," a nice populist application to soothe the uneasiness that people feel about the idea of developing technology that allows people to directly control the actions of other living things. After all, if it's a case of a bug being used to save a life then what's wrong with it being a frog? Or a mouse? Or a monkey? Where does the justification stop?

Even if you say, well it would stop short of human beings, there is still the fact that if it can be done to a monkey, someone somewhere in the world will apply it to human beings, legally or illegally, regardless of legislative frameworks. What matters is not whether it will be done, what matters is simply that it can.

Furthermore, coupled with the advent of indetectable and invasive nanotechnology, this sort of thing has the potential to become something truly horrific. If you look at issues such as contemporary slavery, which is unfortunately prevalent even in supposedly free nations, you can begin to imagine some of the absolute horrors this kind of research could unleash.

For every worthwhile justification for such research, there are a dozen ways it can be misused. The question is, do the benefits it could confer outweigh the dangers represented by such research? This is the sort of thing that, like nuclear research, needs to be subject to strict controls imposed by an international regulatory body similar to the IAEA, and forcibly stopped the moment it advances to any creature more advanced than, say, a frog or a mouse - to ensure it can never be done to people.

*I find it interesting these days that the "slippery slope" argument is increasingly being dismissed as a logical fallacy alongside such expressions as "ad hominem" and "appeal to authority". I suspect this is a particularly nasty piece of social engineering being employed by certain elements of society to dismiss concerns about not only the misuse of technology, but such things as invasive surveillance and far-reaching police powers, etc. etc.

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Internet Explorer LIVES ON, cackle sneaky Microsoft engineers

Steven Roper
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Re: Hmm...

If my bank insisted on my using a particular browser to access its site, I'd be switching banks in a big hurry. Designing a site only for a particular browser implies non-standard design practices that would inevitably result in serious security vulnerabilities, even leaving aside the element of lack of choice.

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CIOs: What tech will be running your organisation in 2020?

Steven Roper
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As IT manager for my company

I can say that we'll probably be running much the same tech as we are running now, and have been for the last 10 years.

Our main office server box is 2006 vintage, and had a motherboard and CPU upgrade in 2010. The office machines date from 2004 - 2009, the art room roughly the same period, albeit they had motherboard/CPU upgrades in 2012, and only one new art/design machine (an AMD 8-core) was purchased last year.

On the mobile front, we're using Toshiba laptops and Samsung Slates with Windows 7 circa 2012ish, and Galaxy S4s with Android circa 2013. (And we have one Apple iPad I'm ashamed to say, but that's solely used for testing to make sure our websites and ebooks work on iThings. We do have an elaborate office cleansing ritual for those forced to use it! ;) )

All of it does everything we need it to reliably, and everything is a known quantity that everyone knows how to use effectively.

With the flattening of Moore's law over the last several years (CPU power and storage sizes have stopped increasing exponentially), unless some earth-shattering new technology like holodecks or transhuman consciousness-uploading tech appears in the next 5 years, I can't see us using anything vastly different to what we're using today. Probably there'll be a few more minor hardware upgrades but that's abut it.

If it ain't broke, why fix it?

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Battle for control of Earth's unconnected souls moves to SPAAAACE

Steven Roper
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Re: Foundation

Let's hope the story does turn out to be an Arthur C. Clarke novel and not a George Orwell one.

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Steven Roper
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Re: Did I miss....

"I don't like this expression 'First World Problems.' It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World Problems.

All the silly stuff of life doesn't disappear just because you're black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations.

Here's a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are."

-Teju Cole.

So you see, Hans, that while you might think you're being all sensitive and politically-correct by arguing to defer all other solutions in favour of eradicating poverty and starvation, in fact you are showing your ignorance and bigotry by assuming that people in Africa are only concerned with basic survival, rather than communication and wanting to be a part of the larger world.

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Google MURDERS Google Code, orders everyone out to GitHub and co

Steven Roper
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@AC Re: My advice would be...

The reason why that is in there is presumably because there is an assumption that one cannot imagine an internet without "google search".

Actually I made that qualification not because I can't imagine an internet without it, but because it's the one service they can't pull - it's their bread and butter. I personally use DuckDuckGo most of the time, but DDG's lack of tracking and search history is both a benefit and a pitfall. Sometimes I want localised results based on my search history and for that I go to Google. But yes, for everything else it's DDG.

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Steven Roper
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My advice would be never to start using any Google service other than basic search for anything important in the first place. I learned years ago the perils of coming to rely on a Google service only to have it yanked out from under you a couple of years later. I'll never rely on them again.

Incidentally, I wonder how long it will be before they yank Google Analytics and a billion webmasters cry out in terror before being suddenly silenced. Notwithstanding that GA is already blocked by a host of privacy tools, that and Google's notorious unreliability, are why our websites use only our own in-house analytics code.

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Alibaba hopes to roll net-connected car out of the cave

Steven Roper
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If any country needs automated cars

it's China. They have far too many people to be let loose on the roads as they are. If you've ever seen pictures of that new massive freeway they built, that at 250 km long, has since become the world's largest car park, you can understand why.

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Pathetic PC sales just cost us a BILLION dollars, cries Intel

Steven Roper
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I think the main reasons businesses aren't upgrading are twofold:

1. Our systems work, they satisfy all our present and foreseeable needs, our staff know how to use everything and we can provide our customers with the level of service they've come to expect form us. If we upgrade, we have to retrain all our staff to use the new interfaces Microsoft have foisted on us and we have to iron all the bugs out of the new systems. Ours ain't broke, so we ain't gonna fix 'em.

2. RENTISM IS NOT A BUSINESS MODEL WE WILL EVER ACCEPT. We are not, under any circumstances whatsoever, going to be put in a position where we have to continuously pay every month to continue to use software we've already paid for once. Microsoft can stick their Office 365 rentism scheme sideways into the most painful orifice they can find on their worthless, greedy arseholes, because we are not going to be put in a position where they can hold all our work and data to ransom unless we pay whatever they demand every month to keep using it.

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Does my star look big in this? Milky Way 50 per cent fatter than expected

Steven Roper
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So if our glalaxy is 1.5x bigger than we thought

does this mean we're bigger than the Andromeda Galaxy now?

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$1.3 million survelliance systems fights Logan bogans

Steven Roper
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Bananas one day, police state the next

I've long considered Queensland to be Australia's answer to North Korea, ever since the Bjelke-Petersen days. What with his gerrymandering, their barely-shy-of-death-penalty marijuana laws, then their draconian if-you-know-a-bikie-you're-also-guilty laws, and now this, I have a sackful of very good reasons why I would never cross South Australia's northeastern border!

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MPs 'alarmed' by millions of mugshots on Brit cops' databases

Steven Roper
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@Sebastian A Re: pushing boundaries.

It will have to get a LOT worse than this before people rebel. North Korea stands as a stark example of the extent of oppressive conditions people are willing to tolerate without rebellion or revolution.

Remember the boiling frog analogy. I'm absolutely certain that if half the laws and legal practices we tolerate today, had been suddenly imposed all at once back in the 1970s, people would have stormed Parliament House the same way they did the Bastille in 1789. But because these laws have crept in one by one over many years, using safety/fear as justification, they've been able to impose conditions that would have been considered absolutely intolerable 40 years ago.

So I doubt very much there will ever be a revolution now, because the powers that be have the boiling frog technique worked out pat. What the future holds in my mind doesn't bear thinking about. I just live one day at a time hoping it doesn't get too bad before I shuffle off this mortal coil. At least with no children I don't have to be concerned about where civilisation goes after I'm gone.

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Crap employers banned from enforcing backdoor crim records checks

Steven Roper
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Re: And what about?

I've never been asked this, but then I haven't been in the job market for a long time. But if I were, and I was asked to provide access to my private accounts at an interview, my response would be something along the lines of:

"Obviously I cannot give out that information. And in all honesty, what does it say of your company's attitude to IT security that you would even ask for such information and expect an answer? If I tell you, how could you trust that I wouldn't give out my login details to your company's systems in future if someone required it for whatever reason?"

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Google will make you live to be 500, claims Ventures president

Steven Roper
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I hope I die before any of this becomes a reality

If you want a vision of the horror that would be extended life under Google, have a gander at this Youtube video.

Although it deals with uploading your consciousness to a computer system rather than preserving your organic body, I have no doubt that the "terms and conditions" imposed by our corporate overlords in exchange for longevity would certainly follow similar patterns.

This is the modern equivalent of burning in hell for all eternity. The oblivion of death is paradise compared.

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China reveals 'Internet Plus' plan to modernise and go cloudy

Steven Roper
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Big Brother

Re: Great Firewall of China reloaded?

Yes, that would be why the Chinese government loves the idea of "cloud" so much - it makes the Ministry of Truth's job so much easier. Instead of having to recall and reissue thousands of copies of newspapers (or hard drives) revising BB's dayorder to show that Eastasia has always been at war with Oceania and not Eurasia, they only need to update the one cloud server and presto! it's automagically updated for everyone, and nobody can prove otherwise.

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UK Supreme Court waves through indiscriminate police surveillance

Steven Roper
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@Peter Gathercole re: posting as AC

Actually, there is a good reason for posting AC.

The police may or may not read El Reg, but you can bet a lot of IT bosses do - and most of us here work in IT. Given that you can easily lose your job for stepping even an inch out of line these days, you have to confront the very real possibility that one of your workmates or bosses might be reading your comments here. Especially since said workmate or boss only has to click your name above your comment and they can read everything you've ever posted. Even if you're using a pseudonym, there's a good chance someone at your workplace can figure it out or might recognise it from somewhere.

So if you want to post something controversial without risking your job, you'd do it as AC, not to evade the police, but to evade your pointy-haired boss from telling you that "those opinions don't reflect the attitude of our company" and using it as an excuse to give you your marching orders.

Of course in my case I'm a partner in the company I work for, and I promote free and honest expression in our workplace, so this doesn't affect me or our people so much, but for many here it would be a very real danger.

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Turnbull says no need to future-proof NBN

Steven Roper
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Re: No FTTN to FTTP pathway?

In New Zealand we had FTTN completed in about 2010

That's because New Zealand doesn't consist of 8 million square kilometres of the kind of terrain one normally only encounters in Frank Herbert novels. Australia has a lot of peculiar issues when it comes to infrastructure, and I'm not at all surprised that the whole NBN project has gone awry; I knew it would the moment Labor first mooted it, simply because I know what this country is and what its environment does to man-made objects. I'd wager few, if any, of the high-living politicians mooting it from the comfort of their air-conditioned Sydney and Canberra offices, have ever actually ventured out into the Great Red Nothing that most of this continent consists of; if they've seen anything of it at all, it is most likely through the little window of an aircraft flying just under Mach 1 10 kilometres above it, and so it was inevitable that they'd grossly underestimate the problems and costs involved.

Even if we discounted connecting all the rural centres and gave each city its own satellite uplink instead of running cables all over countryside comparable to that of Arrakis, Australian cities are not like most others in the developed world. They sprawl out over a huge area, making it an expensive proposition to connect up each separate house. My own home city of Adelaide, for example, is geographically bigger than London, but has only 1/8 of the population. From this you can work out that the per-capita cost of hooking up a city the size of Adelaide would be more than 8 times that of London; since Adelaide's median income is definitely not 8 times that of the average Londoner, it's not at all surprising that we've had these difficulties, and in fact I find it amazing that we've achieved as much as we have!

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Australia's social media censorship law – for the children - all-but passes

Steven Roper
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I don't see how this is censorship

All this law is doing is essentially extending existing harassment and abuse laws into the social media space. It's pretty specific that the material to be removed must be directly targeted at a particular Australian child before it can be the subject of a complaint - that is, it has to refer to or address an actual person, and consist of an attack on, or harassment of, said person.

I don't see any way in which, say, advocates of political correctness could use this law to take down anti-feminist or anti-progressive commentary, for example, since such commentary is generally not targeted at specific individuals. In fact, laws like this could well be used against such individuals, since the standard MO of PC advocates is to harass and attempt to smear and ruin the lives of those who disagree with them.

Facebook lynch-mobbing and the media-induced hounding of individuals for the sake of sensationalism has become a serious problem that needs to be addressed, and this law is a step in the right direction. Preventing targeted and directed harassment and abuse of individuals is not censorship. It's straightforward civilised behaviour.

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Murky online paedo retreat: The Nether explores the fantasy-reality divide

Steven Roper
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Re: @x7

"You appear to be attempting to equate paedophilia with homosexuality."

I was hoping you would be intelligent enough not to attempt to use that particular strawman to try to bolster your position. I guess I overestimated you. I should have known better, given the mindlessly Orwellian mentality you've been exhibiting.

No, I have not equated homosexuality with paedophilia at all. What I did was to examine the psychological mechanism behind fanaticism and denial. At no point did I draw any comparison between homosexuality and paedophilia, the only comparison I drew was in certain peoples' negative reactions to them and the reasons for said reactions.

I could just as easily have used a comparison with a fanatical Islamist wanting to ban bacon being a secret bacon-lover, or a rabid anti-smoker covering for her craving for a cancer stick, or a fanatical temperance-movement crusader trying to cope with his alcohol addiction, but in my ignorance of your sheer stupidity I chose to use the homosexual analogy instead. Silly me.

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Steven Roper
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@x7

I believe that those who are most fanatical in their opposition to something are often secretly enamoured of it themselves, and so they speak out to hide the fact from others as well as reinforce their own denial.

This principle has already been demonstrated in the case of anti-gay fanatics: many of them are secretly gay, or have homophilic desires, which their culture and upbringing causes them to deny, and this denial is what drives their anti-gay fanaticism.

That's not to say that everyone who dislikes gays is secretly gay. There are certainly many who are simply uncomfortable with the idea, but they don't go on banner-waving crusades about it. There is discomfort and avoidance, and then there is fanatical zealotry.

If this is true of homosexuals and anti-gay fanatics, it is likely also true of vocal anti-paedophile crusaders like yourself. Yes, most people are rightly protective of kids. But when they start frothing at the mouth and demanding that the most basic freedoms be flushed down the toilet to further their cause, as you have clearly been doing in this thread, that's the kind of fanaticism which is usually covering for denial.

Which is why I'd be more concerned about somebody like you being left alone with kids I care about, than someone like the fictional Sims. At least he knows what he is. How well do you know what you are?

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March 24th: The day most Australian download allowances become inadequate

Steven Roper
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Re: What they fail to mention...

Yep. You can bet that Game of Thrones, the show that made Australia famous for piracy, won't be in Netflix's lineup because that greedy bastard Murdoch wants you to pay $120 a month for premium Foxtel to watch that one show. I can see a massive uptake in VPN subscriptions from Australia as soon as the new copyright enforcement regime comes in and people start getting nasty letters from their ISPs!

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W*nkers of the world unite to SAVE THE PLANET one jerk-off at a time

Steven Roper
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Does it generate power from torque or frequency?

Given that the "ball in a tube" mechanism presumably has a fixed mass for the ball, its momentum - and therefore the energy recovered - would be a function of frequency of motion, not torque. So a power wanker who pulls his pudding at a rate of 80 strokes a minute with a force of 80 newtons per stroke, would only generate about half as much electricity for a given ball mass, as a rapid-fire chicken choker at 160 strokes a minute with a force of 40 newtons per stroke, despite consuming the same number of joules in the process.

It seems to me that a better mechanism for converting oscillatory motion into electricity could be devised, perhaps one that would produce low volts / high amps for the power wanker, and high volts / low amps for the chicken choker, which can then be transformed as required, so as to maximise power conversion efficiency regardless of the stroking style of the power source.

Given the difficulty of varying the ball's mass, a good solution would be to provide different models with different sized metal balls, which buyers can choose to suit their wanking technique: big, heavy balls and tubes for the power wankers and small, light balls and tubes for the chicken chokers.

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Christmas Eve email asked Oz telcos for metadata retention costs by Jan 9th

Steven Roper
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Re: Question

VyprVPN apparently do keep logs and will hand them over upon request, according to TorrentFreak. I've been using Private Internet Access for over 6 months so far and I've no complaints.

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Trans-Pacific trade treaty close to signoff says USA

Steven Roper
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Flame

Any government that signs the TPP is comitting treason against its nation and its people

I've long maintained that Tony Abbott and his cronies should be charged with high treason if they sign this TPP as it stands. The provision that foreign corporations are allowed to sue a democratically elected government for passing laws they don't like, is nothing less than blatantly selling our nation's sovereignty to foreign powers. Which is an act that, throughout recorded history, has been globally regarded as treason.

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FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*

Steven Roper
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Seems they've forgotten what "broadband" actually means

When I was in tech college, the meaning of "broadband" I was given to understand meant that the data was transmitted over a broad band of frequencies or channels, as opposed to "narrowband" which meant the data was sent using a single carrier frequency or channel.

But, just as the media have misappropriated the term "hacker" to mean "cyber-criminal", it seems the term "broadband" has now been misappropriated to simply mean, "internet access that is faster than yours!"

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HP's pet lizard is FERAL PERIL says wildlife group

Steven Roper
Silver badge

Re: Missed one

...Europeans humans...

Of course. Better exterminate all those evil overprivileged white male cishet shitlord scum who are the sole cause of all that that is wrong with the world, right?

Sanctimonious PC hatemongers like you are what is wrong with the world.

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Australian spookhaus busted for warrantless tap of own phones

Steven Roper
Silver badge

Re: Idiots, morons and dickheads!

Apparently not. Fairfax reports this:

Yes, but Fairfax is a big corporation that the laws of the land don't apply to. The ten-years-in-prison clause is only for the little guys like you and me. If one of us had published this bungle on our little Wordpress blogs, WE'D be looking at 10 years' chokey, but Fairfax and Murdoch's minions have effective carte blanche.

Always remember the Prime Directive of 21st century lawmaking: one law for us, and another for them.

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'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts

Steven Roper
Silver badge
Big Brother

Re: The determination!!

Hell, why not just go the whole hog and bring back the guillotine, the gallows and the garrotte. We even could bring back public burnings of the worst ones, just to set the example for others who dare to speak out of line! Or hanging, drawing and quartering for extra spectacle!

That reminds me, while our governments are busy using Orwell's political diatribes as instruction manuals, there's a scene in the Radford movie our parliamentary do-gooders might like. When Winston and Julia meet in Victory Square to arrange their first excursion, truckloads of prisoners are being brought in and tied up to stakes around the square. One guard goes along machine-gunning them in the legs and letting them hang there in agony for a few minutes until the next guard comes along popping caps in their skulls. I'm sure our modern Moral Guardians and Easily Offended Purveyors Of Political Correctness would revel in this kind of rally, cheering on the public executions of the outspoken and other doubleplusungood crimethinking ownlifers.

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