* Posts by User McUser

450 posts • joined 6 May 2011

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Virginia man charged in intriguing 'suspicious bacon' case

User McUser
Joke

Stop the Fighting: American -v- British Bacon

Regardless of your personal preferences, I think we can all agree that they are both better than whatever the hell CANADIAN bacon is supposed to be.

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Facebook Messenger: All your numbers are belong to us

User McUser
Holmes

Re: When is a phone not a phone...

so you like sticking pins in insects?

That's entomology, not etymology.

If you had studied the history of how words change over time, you wouldn't have made that mistake.

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Server retired after 18 years and ten months – beat that, readers!

User McUser

Luxury...

It's not a server, but when I left my previous job about 1.5 years ago there was a user with who was still using a PDP-8/E. I assume it's still in use.

We also had a fully functional, but thankfully unused, Osborn 1 on the shelf complete with dual-floppies and a 1200baud modem. My boss at the time once joked that nothing gets thrown out as long as somebody remembers how much we paid for it.

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Juniper's VPN security hole is proof that govt backdoors are bonkers

User McUser
Devil

Re: humble pi

That's nothing - the Bible says that π is exactly 3:

"[King Solomon] made the Sea of cast metal, circular in shape, measuring ten cubits from rim to rim and five cubits high. It took a line of thirty cubits to measure around it." 1 Kings 7:23

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FAA introduces unworkable drone registration rules in time for Christmas

User McUser

In other words, the FAA took a worst-case scenario [...]

Isn't that what they're *supposed* to do? I don't want my pilot to be prepared for the "reasonably unlikely scenario" I want her/him to be ready for the worst-case scenario.

I don't really see what the big deal is - just pay the $5, put the damn sticker on there, and then don't be a fucking asshole with your quad-copter. Problem solved.

I wonder if people bitched about having to register their cars and/or get driver's licenses when those first started.

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And the reasons for buying new IT gear are as follows ...

User McUser

Re: That photo

My experience is that ordinary consumer-grade kit can last an awful long time if it is left running continuously.

In my previous job at a University, I once had to nurse along an ancient as hell Gateway 2000 Pentium II based PC because it was the only machine in the shop that still had a 16-bit ISA slot. Said slot was populated with an extremely expensive to replace interface board for a scientific instrument.

We had to keep it running 24/7 because if you ever turned it off, it was far more likely to *stay* off than turn back on. But once you convinced it to boot, it ran just fine (Windows 2000 if you were wondering.) Eventually they got a grant to replace the whole thing and I flung the old system with great glee into the dumpster.

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Infosec bods rate app languages; find Java 'king', put PHP in bin

User McUser

Re: PHP et al

I'll admit I don't know much PHP but I don't see how your second example solves the problem. Can you elaborate?

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Apple pays two seconds of quarterly profit for wiping pensioner's pics

User McUser

Math?

A London pensioner has defeated Apple in court, bagging £1,200 [...] Central London County Court ruled in favor of the bloke, awarding him a fifth of his £5,000 claim and an additional £773 to cover legal costs.

5000 * .2 + 773 != 1200

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WordPress.com ditches PHP for Calypso's JavaScript admin UI

User McUser

Re: Arrrgh!

The whole Internet uses JavaScript these days, must be a pretty poor experience with it off. Do you guys really think remving [sic] JavaScript improves your protection somehow? Can't tell if you're joking :/

OK, first off some pedantry: The Web != The Internet. The Web is merely a protocol running on top of The Internet.

Second, most websites work remarkably well with Javascript disabled. The main difference is that I see fewer ads but all of the actual content I was looking for since most ads these days are served from 3rd party advertising services and are deployed using Javascript (to read my cookies or whatever so they can "personalize" my advertisement-viewing experience.) Sure some site don't work very well without Javascript, and some like Google Maps don't work at all but A) I can easily and quickly re-enable Javascript and then the site works just fine and B) there aren't as many of these as you might think.

Finally, because a lot of malware these days is being delivered by 3rd party advertising providers. If my browser doesn't execute the Javascript that would fetch those malware laden ads, I don't get them. Sure there are other attack vectors in the browser but without the ability to automatically execute they must rely on more obscure passive methods, like malformed JPEGs or something like that. It is far less likely that a specific website will be hacked to include such things versus using a 3rd party advertising service mainly as a matter of scale. If a group hacks a site like The Register, they can affect/infect its readers only; if they push malware out via ad networks, they can affect/infect *way* more people on many different sites without having to hack into anything. So yes, running w/o Javascript does lower my exposure to malware on the web even if it does not fully eliminate it.

As they say, don't knock it until you try it:

Firefox: QuickJS

Chrome: Quick Javascript Switcher

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User McUser
Go

Re: Arrrgh!

I use the Firefox plugin "QuickJS" to enable or disable JS with a shortcut key so I can turn it back on when a site requires it (like Google Maps or my webmail interface.)

When I turn Javascript OFF, my web browsing experience improves considerably; fewer ads (ZERO animated ads), WAY faster loading times, considerably lower exposure to malware, lower CPU usage (leading to lower battery drain), no crazy pop-up windows, no sudden hijacking of my pointer when I accidentally mouse-over something, no full-screen lightbox-stlye offers to subscribe to their newsletter or take a survey or whatever, nothing that stops me from right-clicking on the page, or using my keyboard to move the page around, no blocks on copy-paste...

Boy, now that I think about it what exactly is the downside to disabling Javascript?

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Tor Project: Anonymity ain't free, folks. Pony up

User McUser
Happy

And it's Tax Deductible too

From https://www.torproject.org/donate/donor-faq.html.en:

If you pay taxes in the United States, your donation to Tor is tax deductible to the full extent required by law. The tax ID number for the Tor Project is 20-8096820.

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EE plans to block annoying ads on mobile network

User McUser
Facepalm

Re: Eh?

Which is why personalisation/targeting is not the devil people make it out to be.

No, it's just worthless. Usually I see a ton of "targeted" ads for things I've already bought - like when I bought a cordless screwdriver I started seeing ads for cordless screwdrivers. However yesterday I had something altogether new happen.

I'm on Newegg.com buying an SSD and some RAM to upgrade my grandmother's laptop. The SSD and RAM are *in my cart* and I am *in the process of checking out.*

NewEgg's site is running a little slow so I open my email in another window while I wait. Along side my email is an ad - an ad for NewEgg to be precise. An ad featuring the *exact two items that are already in my cart.*

So thanks targeted advertising for trying to sell me something *while I was already in the process of buying it.* That was super useful.

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Belling that cat: Oz boffins pass entanglement test

User McUser

Re: "Two-cubit operations"

Good thing puns are too cheap to meter - I've been doing this furlong time.

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Mozilla releases iOS app version of Firefox browser for world+dog

User McUser

Re: Add-ons

Agreed.

Though right now there's no real point in getting it. No add-ons, no "about:config" (or equivalent) for tweaks, and same rendering and JS engines as Safari (AFAICT.) Well I guess if you use the Mozilla bookmark sync then that'd be nice to have.

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F-Secure makes SENSE of smart home IoT insecurities

User McUser
Trollface

“Patching light bulbs is not going to happen,” said F-Secure chief exec Christian Fredrikson. “With SENSE you don’t have to worry if you smart TV is secure or not.”

Better still, by using my own IoT protection scheme, which I call "COMMON SENSE", I don't connect my TV or lightbulbs to the Internet at all.

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OmniRAT malware scurrying into Android, PC, Mac, Linux systems

User McUser
Paris Hilton

In my youth, my brother and I had a pair of mice as pets, Luke and Marmalade. One morning we found that Luke had been (mostly) eaten by Marmalade. We re-christened the survivor "Marama-luke" and got on with it. Taught me a lot about life.

There's nothing objectively wrong with rodents as pets. Weeds are just plants growing where you don't want them and vermin/pests are just animals in a place where you don't want them. (Eye of the beholder, to each his own, if you could see her through my eyes, etc.)

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'Anonymous' says anonymous KKK dump wasn't from Anonymous

User McUser

And what if Twitter released details of the 388 'hearts', how would those people feel being outted?

It wouldn't bother me at all because I have no idea what you're talking about. I'd Google it but the words "hearts" is a rather broad term on which to search.

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Sennheiser announces €50,000 headphones (we checked, no typos)

User McUser
Headmaster

Re: shit music

@Jon Massey - In addition to being a year on the Gregorian calendar, the number "2001" is also the commonly used short-hand title of a film produced in 1968, the full title of which is "2001: A Space Odyssey." The first part of the composition "Also Sprach Zarathustra" features prominently in the film's first act.

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'Profoundly stupid' Dubliner's hoax call lost Intel 6,000 hours of production

User McUser

Phoning it in

Have any actual terrorists ever called in an actual bomb threat where there was indeed an actual explosive device ready to go off? Seems that all I ever hear about is chumps like these two idiots who are just having a laugh at everyone else's expense.

I'd think that a serious terrorist would announce the bomb by detonating it and claiming responsibility afterward. What would be the point in warning everyone?

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Bacon can kill: Official

User McUser
Unhappy

Getting cancer isn't even the worst part...

The *worst* part is going to be the waves of intolerable smugness emanating from vegetarians and vegans once they read this.

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Of course you can text and call while driving – it's perfectly safe

User McUser
Go

Encryption and digital signatures help stop parts being replaced with malicious counterfeit components, improving driver safety and protecting from malware embedded in non-authorised equipment, for example.

Just so long as after-market part manufacturers aren't locked out giving the manufacturers a lucrative parts monopoly.

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El Reg celebrates Back to the Future Day

User McUser

Doc was right, this *is* great Scotch.

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WIN a 6TB Western Digital Black hard drive with El Reg

User McUser

"Yoga ova' Lenovo Yoga"

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The Emissionary Position: screwing the motorist the European way

User McUser

Get rid of the N?

Gasoline and diesel are both hydrocarbons, and if burned with pure oxygen would produce water and carbon dioxide. But burned in air, which contains a lot of nitrogen, some other compounds are produced as well, especially as the temperature rises. Indeed, it will in a diesel running at low power, where a tiny amount of fuel finds a vast amount of oxygen and burns like crazy. This results in high temperatures and NOx – the x being the classic variable to denote that various numbers of oxygen molecules can be bound to one of nitrogen.

Then why not just remove the nitrogen from the air?

There are a number of ways of doing this for medical and industrial applications. Surely one or more of these methods could be applied to diesel engines.

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AD-NNIHILATION: Apple-approved iOS tool blocks ALL ads in apps, Safari, Apple News

User McUser

Meet the new Boss, same as the old Boss

Been also allows people to view ads through a sponsored "earn mode," in which adverts are allowed through, your traffic is run through the Been VPN service, and you earn points that can be converted into rewards.

So I'm trading advertisements and tracking by dozens of companies for advertisements and tracking by just *one* company?

Can't quite tell if this is "optional" or the whole point of the app...

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Child abuse, drug sales, terrorism fears: Why cops halted a library's Tor relay ... for a month

User McUser

It's the same as giving free knives to anyone who wants them.

What's your point? They want the knives, so they get them, and then what?

Put a table full of various knives outside your house with a sign saying "free knives" and see how long that lasts

I'm willing to bet that it will last until all the knives are gone. What's the scenario you envision that specifically makes this table of free knives in front of my house a bad thing? I am keen to understand your position here because from my point of view that's called a "yard sale."

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Hey you! Better 'fess up to submarine cable cockups, FCC demands

User McUser
Devil

For our complete rules...

radio stations will be required to say where people can find the full rules online.

Forourcompletecontestrulesgotoofficialcontestrulesdotcomslashrulesslash-toofasttounderstandclearlygoodluckrememberingithahaha

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Intel's 6th gen processors rock – but won't revive PC markets

User McUser
Unhappy

Thinner devices with longer battery life

Who keeps demanding thinner and thinner computers? Is it just some bizarre reverse penis-envy thing among manufacturers? Laptop anorexia?

How about instead, they build a regular thickness laptop with 4x the battery capacity of the thin ones?

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Super Cali grabs its big stick, beats Uber 'cos it's odious

User McUser

So everybody who sells stuff on ebay without their own corporation is an employee of ebay?

No more than listing an item for sale in the Classified Ads section of your local paper makes you an employee of that newspaper (as in, not at all.)

eBay does not tell you what to sell, who to sell it to, nor what forms of payments you can accept or how those payments are processed; they just rent you a bit of space on their website to advertise your wares. Conversely, Uber requires its so-called contractors to "accept trip assignments handed out by Uber, and have ride fares processed and paid by Uber."

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Heigh ho, oh no! Politically correct panto dumps Snow White’s dwarfs

User McUser
WTF?

Wait wait wait... They're short *humans*?

Wow, I always took the term "dwarf" in the context of this fairy tale to be the characters' race; that is dwarves in the folklore or Tolkien sense.

I had no idea that they were supposed to just be humans in the the lower 5th percentile of height. Is this established in the original version or something? I admit I have only ever seen the Disney one...

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Can't get a woop, woop! Twitter gives politicians nice Gaffe-Delete button

User McUser

Theoretically, when I have a Twitter account, they're working for me.

Yes - in exactly the same way that a farmer works for the cows.

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Vaio returns from the dead wearing sharper suit, bolts in neck

User McUser

Re: Sony screwed it all up .....

chasing the mid to bottom market and churned out a whole load of plastic crap.

And it was such *lousy* plastic too; flimsy and brittle and usually textured for some dumb reason. Some models even had textured *trackpads* which irritated me to no end.

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Adulterers antsy as 'entire' Ashley Madison databases leak online

User McUser
Coat

Re: The real issue

sounds just like a porn star(let) name to me.

So clearly they lived on Madison street, but who names their first pet "Ashley"?

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Ballmer's billion-dollar blunders: When he gambled Microsoft's money and lost

User McUser

And other times it worked out pretty well.

Ballmer sought to chase down one of Microsoft's competitors when it reached into a market that Redmond hadn't already conquered.

In Ballmer's defense, that strategy had worked pretty well for Microsoft in the past. Off the top of my head, here are 6 instances where Microsoft wrested control away from the market leader(s) by introducing a functional equivalent.

Stacker -> DoubleSpace

1-2-3 -> Excel

WordPerfect/WordStar -> Word

OS/2* -> Windows NT

Lotus Notes -> Exchange

Netware -> Windows NT and later Active Directory

*Not sure if OS/2 really counts as a "market leader," but IBM was still a force with which to be reckoned so I'm including it anyway.

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Robo-taxis, what are they good for? Er, the environment and traffic

User McUser

Re: Screw the jobs

@Bumpy Cat

Exactly, that's the problem. If only the wealthy can afford it then there will NOT be a lot of lamp carriers because there won't be enough demand for the service to create the jobs.

If there ARE a lot of lamp carriers then the competition between them will drive down the price allowing less affluent people to afford the service.

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User McUser

Re: Screw the jobs

In the 1500s there were men with lamps who would light your way home from the pub. They made a meagre income from that. There were many of these people and only the richest could afford the service.

Hang on a tick - if there were lots of lamp carriers who were paid next to nothing then why is it that only the richest could afford it?

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Bootnote: The Land of the Free - Ha!

User McUser

Some additional points

The phrase "Land of the Free" dates to 1814 with the poem, and later song, "The Star Spangled Banner" so references to it in regards to the Revolution (as we call it) is a bit of an anachronism.

The Slave Trade Act of 1807 merely outlawed the buying and selling of slaves - it did not end slavery nor free any slaves on British soil. Furthermore, in 1785, Lord Mansfield (who presided over Somerset v. Stewart) ruled that "black slaves in Britain [were] not entitled to be paid for their labour." It wasn't until 1833's Slavery Abolition Act that slavery was eliminated entirely* from the British Empire.

Slavery in the United States probably would have ended at more or less the same time as it did in England had it not been for the Cotton Gin. By reducing the time it took to process cotton bolls from hours to minutes, the profits from the cotton industry soared; the labor effort needed for cotton production shifted entirely from processing to harvesting and as a result the number of slaves nearly doubled from 1790 to 1810 increasing nearly six-fold, some 3.95 Million or ~12% of the population, by 1860. This contributed immensely to the creation of the material wealth from which the US *still to this day* benefits. It's also what primarily fueled the resistance to abolition - there was simply too much money involved.

*Except for slaves owned by the East India Company plus a few other exceptions - though these were ended by 1843.

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UK politicos easily pwned on insecure Wi-Fi networks

User McUser

Re: No SSL/TLS?

What they did was inject a "please log in" popup

From the way the article and the video are portraying it, it would appear that only MEP Honeyball got a pop-up phishing message. Lord Strausburger had an unencrypted VOIP session packet-sniffed/recorded and the password capture method for MP Davis was not specifically stated, although HE said: "Alarmingly, the password would have been broken no matter how strong it was. Public Wi-Fi is inherently insecure: usernames and passwords are shown in plain text in the back of a Wi-Fi access point, making them simple for a hacker to steal" which implies heavily that he was not using an encrypted protocol for at least one his logins. Password reuse did the rest.

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How a Cali court ruling could force a complete rethink of search results

User McUser
Boffin

Re: Exactly how is this a problem?

sometimes that becomes genericized past the point of practicality.

For reference in case you travel - http://popvssoda.com/

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Trump carded: Wannabe prez's hotels 'ground zero' in banking breach

User McUser
Mushroom

Re: Trump as President

Yeah, It's all a big joke until you remember that America A LOT of these ------>

:(

At that point, the words "President Trump" become the scariest thing you'll ever hear in your life.

"This will be the finest, classiest, most well respected Nuclear Holocaust the world has ever seen. Boom."

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Uber execs charged, will stand trial in France

User McUser
FAIL

Re: As usual the french make up the law as they go along

you don't arrest individual members of staff of a company for the policies and activities of the company itself

Right, well as soon as you figure out a way to arrest and imprison corporations, you be sure and let us know.

Meanwhile we'll all just have to settle for the next best thing; arresting the people who *carried out* those company policies.

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Hi-res audio folk to introduce new rules and weed out impure noises

User McUser

Re: Monty....

Processing data from the CD (at rate of over 4Mbits/s)

I thought Red Book audio was ~176 KBps (which is ~1.4Mbps.)

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Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

User McUser

Proprioception

Try doing certain things to yourself when you've got a blindfold or hood on, and see how much easier it is when you can see what you're doing.

You know, blind people still manage to toss one off when the mood strikes. If you can't locate Nigel Jr. without being able to see it, then you should probably visit your doctor.

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Hey, Sand Hill Exchange. Shouting 'blockchain!' won't stop the Feds

User McUser
WTF?

Wait, what?

But because they're private companies there's no way of being short them. Yes, you can clamour to be allowed to invest in them, pushing prices upwards. You can stay out of the market entirely, meaning you're not pushing up prices. But you can't speculate that they're over-priced and thus contribute to the correction of that possible over-valuation.

This sounds like utter nonsense to me... A private company's "valuation" is pure fiction - until there are actual shares you can buy and sell you might as well be talking about the price of Unicorn farts.

Say some economic speculator decides that Uber's pre-IPO value is twice that of the previous valuation. What real-world change does this trigger? And suppose another expert says it's actually only worth half of the original valuation; is the latter right and the former wrong? Or is the whole thing just speculation and meaningless guesswork until the stock goes on sale and we find out the real answer? And what if the company just stays private forever, what do you do then?

I've not often been flabbergasted by economic theory before but this one makes my brain hurt.

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THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

User McUser
Megaphone

He was right at the time...

probably best known for co-writing the 1968 book Population Bomb, which in early editions stated that basically everyone in India would inevitably starve to death due to overpopulation in the 1970s and the same fate would overtake the USA in the 1980s.

In Professor Ehrlich's defense, had it not been for the efforts of Norman Borlaug et al., he would have been absolutely right!

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Climate change alarmism is a religious belief – it's official

User McUser
Alert

give up their cars, regular washing, central heating, healthcare, foreign travel etc.

Why would we have to give those things up when controlled nuclear fission exist? No greenhouse gasses and uranium is cheap and plentiful.

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Japanese female fish in sperm-producing strangeness

User McUser
Go

So, gay couples can have thier own kids now?

So two homosexual individuals could, theoretically, now have their own children (that is, genetically related to both parents)? Just have to flip the fox13 switch to the opposite for one of them, (and in the case of two males, find a surrogate womb) do some in vitro fertilization, and they're good to go.

Probably won't be that easy in practice partly because the experiment was on fish and mammals are probably just different enough, but mostly because people don't like change. After all, look how insane everyone acts about gay *marriage*, and that's just a legal status. The religious wack-jobs are going to completely lose their shit when gay people want to start making their own children.

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Russia's to blame for pro-ISIS megahack on French TV network

User McUser
Joke

jihadist propaganda contained in the message were full of grammatical mistakes

At the very least we can eliminates the famed "Grammar Nazis" as the source of the hack...

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Armchair cyber-army vandalizes Uncle Sam's Army.mil website

User McUser

Re: Nice.....

Hmm, it sure puts the wind up the supposedly impregnable US military.

Obligatory XKCD link: http://xkcd.com/932/

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Everything old is new again: Man mugged in New York, only this time for his Bitcoins

User McUser

Gimmie all yer BitCoins.

Huh, I figured a BitCoin robbery would go something like this:

https://thenib.com/give-me-all-your-bitcoins-1a1d9f5e630 (scroll down for comic)

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