* Posts by 1Rafayal

659 posts • joined 4 May 2011

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Lester Haines: RIP

1Rafayal
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Condolences to his family and friends.

I will definitely miss his writing here.

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Windows 10 market share jumps two per cent

1Rafayal
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This has nothing to do with Microsoft and everything to do with smartphones and tablets.

People want their social media fix and these devices deliver it.

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Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again

1Rafayal
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Re: and the size of its system libraries will increase

Someone doesn't know that Gtk# was the gui layer for mono at the time then, regardless of c# or not....

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

1Rafayal
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I doubt the commentards will even let this get through, but I will try anyway.

Does it really take a year to get drivers working with a laptop like this? I mean pretty much everyone else has, even Sony was able to get their drivers sorted by December last year.

Also, this was a free upgrade offered by MS. Now Samsung has popped up after a year and said, sorry you can't have that upgrade because we couldn't get it working, just before the deadline looms. Are they going to offer their customers a free version, should they want it, after the MS offer has expired?

If it helps, replace MS and Windows 10 with whatever you like.

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Bold stance: Microsoft says terrorism is bad

1Rafayal
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Re: Good luck

but this list isnt really the same as the UN list, is it?

the SDN list is something that was issued to warn US business about who they were potentially doing business with and allows the US treasury to fine them (or worse) if they are caught to be knowingly working with them. Outside the US, its just a list of names, organisations and vehicles that may or may not be of use to people.

The list used by the UN is made by UN member states adding to and removing from it on a regular basis, it is not governed by one US agency who has no oversight.

As you pointed out, the SDN list is considered unconstitutional in the US by many people and the US Treasury appears to be loathe to remove anything from it, making it rather unwieldy.

Either way, its perfect fodder for Internet conspiracy theory nuts.

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1Rafayal
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FAIL

So you didn't read all the information that was on the page that the link takes you to?

You know, the page that answers your questions on how things are submitted to the list? And how things are shortlisted for addition?

For example, your point about big pharma and tobacco, well I say point but I will go with it anyway. These clearly are not terrorist groups, even the most ardent of social justice warrior would have a hard time trying to prove that they were, so they wouldn't get in.

And people being labeled a terrorist when they are not? Well, I would much rather the plod pick me up for terrorism and make the mistake instead of agonising over if I am a terrorist or not. It wouldn't take a great deal of time for them to realise that no, I am not a terrorist. And lets face it, they wouldnt just read the list then pop round in a panda car to pick me up, would they?

As for the individuals with no comments listed next to them, well they all share one similar piece of info - they were added on the 27th of June 2003 in Iraq. What could that mean I wonder, instead of me thinking about it for, ooh 30 seconds, lets come up with some silly little points that might help back me up.

Or... how about they were all arrested, or whatever, 4 months after the start of the Iraq War and their details were added en masse to the list because they were part of the Iraqi government or some such other apparatus connected to the regime there.. What a massive leap of faith that takes.

As for scope creep, you are obviously trying to say that people or groups will be added to the list when they are not terrorists. This of course, is nonsense. If you had read the page you will have seen the links related to de-listing, i.e. how people are taken off the list and the reasons why this could happen. Above that, you would also see a link that takes to you the reasons why people and groups are added to the list in the first place.

Stick to Microsoft bashing.

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The PC is dead. Gartner wishes you luck, vendors

1Rafayal
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@Boris1558

I think the point I failed to make is this: whilst we are all whizzing away with our fancy new wundermachinen, what is the third world using, if anything at all?

A lot of UK business has been donating old computing equipment for almost a decade to organisations like UNICEF and Save the Children. What has happened to that equipment? Who uses it? Does it even get on the Internet? What software does it run?

There must be a whole demographic out there that we simply don't see because we are arguing the toss over which version of which operating system is more superior etc. And, from a distinctively tacky point of view, is there an untapped market out there?

I know Microsoft tried to pedal a basic version of Windows XP or 7 a few years back, a Starter edition or something, for developing countries (quite why they would want a hobbled version of an older Windows when they could get a fully featured Linux distro was beyond my capacity to reason at the time).

These must be places where Internet availability will be patchy at best, so offering Stuff as a Service wouldn't really work that well, if people even wanted it.

I guess that's why Zuckerberg and Co are trying to give Africa free Internet, because Stuff as a Service is what they really, really need right now.

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1Rafayal
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Personally, I would be interested to see how many "old" PM'S that have been shipped over to impoverished countries are in use.

Years back, I worked in a school during the switch from Acorn machines to Windows based machines. We boxed up all the Acorn stuff and donated it to a charity collecting working computers for poor countries who wanted to provide at least some basic IT education.

Granted, the comparison between Acorn and Windows is beyond the point now, but I do know quite a few schools donated old machines and equipment to similar charities during the first few years of the new century. I wonder who uses them now, if at all.

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Mads Torgersen and Dustin Campbell on the future of C#

1Rafayal
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It will be interesting to see where c# will go over the next few years, specifically with regards to the cloud and Azure etc.

Pure Windows apps have been dead/dying for quite some time now and the uptake of Linux on Azure is probably making MS think quite carefully about what it wants to do next and with which tools..

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The Windows 10 future: Imagine a boot stamping on an upgrade treadmill forever

1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

@Roland6

You don't actually know what an sme is, do you?

An sme isn't a business that happens to have a couple of laptops or desktops that are used by staff for sending emails and invoices, even at the s end of the of the sme spectrum.

SME's don't go shopping on the hight street for their IT needs, they rarely have in the past and they certainly cannot/don't now. Same goes for their IT function, they don't just pop down to PC World to pick up a copy of MS Office and a new coffee machine.

An sme is an organisation that literally has millions of pounds to call on for immediate investment, even if you use the varying definitions of the term that are used across the world. They are not organisations that are too stretched to buy the next months worth of printer toner etc.

These are organisations that will have a dedicated IT function of some description, one that will be providing the guidance needed for the whole organisation, regardless of what ever software, hardware or other fad they might be running.

You are confusing the the term 'sme', which is small to medium enterprise by the way, with a small business - the two things couldn't be more different.

If I own a small business, for example a roofing company, and perhaps I have four machines and some smartphones, that doesn't make me an enterprise at all. I might have a guy in the business that 'knows' PC's, but he will in no way be an IT specialist and he might have upgraded all my machines to Windows 10 for no other reason to get rid of the nag screen. The chances are that they don't even use software that is installed on any of those machines anymore, instead relying on web based alternatives - I don't know if it was your good self who mentioned this or not, but unless the business has an IT focus, then all they really need is an invoicing platform and an email provider, both of which can be done without any software being installed on the premises .

If a forced Windows 10 update makes all the machines go wonky, it doesn't matter as the business can just turn on another machine, that doesn't run the terrible Windows 10 and pick up where it left off.

This is essentially the state of play that the small business has been moving towards for what, the last decade?

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1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

@roland6

Being an sme and having adequate IT support in your organisation has nothing to do with the nature of that sme's business. Things maybe trickier for the smb area, sure, but not for the sme. The solutions for purchasing these licenses have been discussed before over and over again - even on this comment section, again.

If I were running an sme and wanted to understand the implications of Windows 10 for my organisation with regards to the updates I would do one or both of the following : contact Microsoft to see what the situation mean for me and my business and see what I can do as an sme to control updates within my own infrastructure and/or make sure I am employing someone who understands the above.

So far the argument is "Microsoft is going to destroy business with forced updates". It really isn't. Microsoft may kill the consumer market for desktop operating systems, but if it does someone else will step into that gap - if there is still any money to be made there.

And what do high street retailers have to do with any of this?

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1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

I am sorry, I assumed that the individual would be able to make their own minds up as to whether or not the T&C's for the action pack are suitable for them or not.

Or would you also like to tell the world + dog that this is also as evil as Windows 10? I mean, why let people make their own minds up when you can tell them what to think with only half the story?

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1Rafayal
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Re: Russian roulette - business edition

Even though Windows 10 Enterprise does give you full control....

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1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

You mean the same smb's who could buy the MS action pack, which comes with 10 Windows Enterprise licenses as well as office etc, for less than the cost of 10 Windows Pro licenses together?

Really?

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1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

We have already been through this numerous times, and on each occasion you have been shown how each example can get an Enterprise license.

I get that you want to keep up the anti Microsoft narrative, but repeating the same things over and over again even when it's been explained to you that your understanding of the situation is incorrect?

What's the point?

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1Rafayal
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Re: If there's one thing...

Hm yes, terrible Microsoft forcing business users to accept updates.

Are we going to have the same bullshit trotted out each time the Reg needs to get some traffic through the site? We already know that SME's are be able to purchase Windows Enterprise licences. Which means they would be in charge of updating their own installations. Which means no automated updates.

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1Rafayal
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Re: You seem to have forgotten

But isn't the whole point of this particular whinge that there is no "latest" build to work against?

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Official: Microsoft's 'Get Windows 10' nagware to vanish from PCs in July

1Rafayal
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Re: Serious question

far from it.

Windows 10 is an astonishingly good OS.

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'I thought my daughter clicked on ransomware – it was the damn Windows 10 installer'

1Rafayal
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Re: Answers to your questions.

I was completely agreeing with you until you started on about what gets sent back to MS. You can on almost complete privacy with Windows 10. The same data slurp is present in windows 8 and 7.

Given that you use a SRE, have you considered using Vinux? I had to look into accessibility a few years back and this OS really impressed me. It can be ran from a USB stick, so you could have whatever OS installed in your box and just boot from Vinux.

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1Rafayal
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I am not sure what you are trying to say here.. How can you know if it is a stealth update if you have never carried out the upgrade?

it isn't a case of clicking a button and then bam, you have Windows 10, it asks you quite a lot if you want to install it in the first place. And if you don't have it downloaded already, it schedules the upgrade for you.

So, with the facts in mind, how its it a stealth upgrade?

Also, how are MS turning their backs on you? One of the biggest complaints about Windows 10 is that it will update, whether you want it to or not, so that's hardly being left high and dry is it?

Even the Android update process you allude to isn't as simple as one button press.

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1Rafayal
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I upgraded three machines, one was a Windows 7 era machine, with Windows 7 Pro installed. Upgrade went fine, no problems to report. The only problem I had with this machine was after it had upgraded, the old Windows image previewer that came with Windows 7 was still listed as available under the "open with..." context menu. When I tried to use it, Windows 10 ground to a halt. For this particular machine, I ended up just reinstalling Windows 10 from scratch using a USB stick, after that, no problems and no legacy applications either.

The other two machines came with Windows 8/8.1 installed. The only issues I have had with these machines have been to do with video, sometimes watching stuff on YouTube is a bit hit and miss. One of these machines is now on build 14332, and everything seems to be fixed.

None of my machines came with Windows 10 pre-installed.

As for the stealth upgrade, that just isn't the case. People are complaining that its nagware - yes it does download a whole bunch of files to your machine and that's not on, to pre-empt you wanting to install it, but it doesn't install itself and it certainly takes well more than one mouse click to start the process.

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1Rafayal
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Re: How could they force people to upgrade?

no one is forcing you to upgrade.

its been a choice to upgrade.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Barrel. Scraped.

yes, but dont point out the obvious - it takes far more than one careless click to start the upgrade to Windows 10.

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1Rafayal
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Hmm, I wonder.

Out of all the people who claim to hate Windows 10, what is the basis for this?

As a user experience, its quite good. Its stable, runs very quickly on an SSD and is stable.

If the only gripe is the forced updates my question would be this; why wouldnt you want to have the latest updates on your machine? I mean honestly, how many people didnt set Windows update to auto check, download and install updates on previous versions of Windows?

Is it just because you dont get the choice to turn off a feature that you would otherwise have turned on anyway?

Genuinely curious.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Forgive me for not understanding how this happened

@Chris W

Dont question, this is an MS hate article.

Just accept, nod politely and move on.

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Microsoft: Why we tore handy Store block out of Windows 10 Pro PCs

1Rafayal
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Re: I'm frustrated with the Pro/Enterprise distinction

@admiraljkb

Yes, I have. It is extremely easy to get a licensing agreement for an SME.

If the Action Pack does not fulfill your needs, just get an Open License.

Its that easy and not particularly hidden by MS.

Just because you haven't looked into their licensing options doesn't mean that they are not easy to find.

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1Rafayal
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Re: I'm frustrated with the Pro/Enterprise distinction

Pro has never been the version that MS wanted in business, it has always been Enterprise, ever since Win XP Enterprise etc.

Pro was just a version you could choose to own if you wanted the additional features, Home is just the easiest version to use because it doesnt have the same level of complexity that comes along with Pro.

With Home, you dont need to worry about Hyper-V, especially if you have never heard of it. In the case of Windows 10, one major difference between Home and Pro is the ability to defer updates. With Home you get the updates whether you want them or not, with Pro you get to defer them for a few weeks. Home is ultimately easier to support than all the other versions.

Why is that do you think? Perhaps MS was sick to death of trying to convince people to patch their OS over and over again, regardless of what you think of the quality of MS software or their business practises, having an up to date OS just makes sense which is why Apple and Google shove it in your face when there are updates to be had.

The distinction between Home, Pro and Enterprise is simpler than previous versions of Windows, Vista had six different versions, two of those were variations on Home. Same thing went for Windows 7. There were four versions of 8, if you include RT, if you dont then its just Home, Pro and Enterprise.

Windows 10 complicates things slightly by including an Education version, which is arguable the same as Enterprise. They also pile in the mobile builds as well.

So things have become easier to understand - its just that you havent heard of these versions before now.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Same old, same old.

its not so much removing the Windows Store as preventing users from installing things on a machine they have no rights to do so.

it could mean that either the Windows Store is not as rock solid as it could be when it comes to securing it, or that MS isnt that confident of the quality and security of the content of the apps in the store. Or it may just come down to the fact that the Windows Store is aimed at non-Enterprise customers, I think all of the above make sense.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Surface Products

I think Surface Pro and Surface Books will come with the Pro versions installed.

But I doubt the smaller Surface editions will.

If you buy the Surface Pro 4 as part of your volume licensing agreement, MS will through in Windows 10 Enterprise licenses for free, as you would expect.

If you buy one from PC World, you will only get Pro, as you would expect.

In my experience, few organisations agree to give out the Surface Pro. I worked for one that flirted with the Pro 3, but if MS is going to release a new piece of hardware each 18 months then they simply wont want to keep up with supporting it internally.

Having said that, the Surface Pro is a nice peice of kit, but there is not enough between the 3rd and 4th revision to justify the price. And the Surface Book, whilst lovely and powerful, is certainly not nice when it comes to the wallet.

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1Rafayal
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Re: How is Win 10 Enterprise priced up for businesses?

@Colin Ritchie, no problems

I know a lot of people get the action pack subscription as it means they have all the MS stuff they could possibly need in one place, just be careful about renewing your subscription if you do get it - it will try and auto-renew.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Isn't the Enterprise edition the only one you can't get a free update for?

No, thats Windows 10 Pro, you can defer updates.

Windows 10 Enterprise does not get auto-updated, its all down to your organisations update schedule.

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1Rafayal
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Re: How is Win 10 Enterprise priced up for businesses?

@ Colin Ritchie, how about a sensible answer, eh?

You can normally only get an Enterprise license with a volume agreement with MS or one of their volume licensing partners. Also, it is only fair to point out that you cannot buy an Enterprise license without first having a Pro one - MS doesnt sell the Enterprise version as a standalone, MS view it as an upgrade to Pro.

This is why there are so many Pro installations of differing versions floating about in shoddily run organisations.

However, if you are feeling flush, take a look at the MS Action Pack, for £310 a year, you will get a couple of Windows 10 Enterprise licenses, amongst a whole bunch of other software you might want, like Office and stuff you might not want, like Dynamics.

Note that when you get things like Windows Enterprise, you dont install Pro first, then Enterprise over the top, the version is determined by the license key.

One good thing about the Action Pack is that once you have stumped up for the first year, you can keep and use all the license keys for as long as you want, as long as you keep a record of them.

You can see all the details here: https://partner.microsoft.com/en-GB/membership/action-pack

But its an awfully expensive way of getting an Enterprise license, unless you know someone at work that can get you a license from an MSDN subscription they have access to?

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1Rafayal
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Re: Isn't the Enterprise edition the only one you can't get a free update for?

If you had Windows 7/8 Home you get Windows 10 Home

If you had Windows 7 Pro/Ultimate 8 Pro, you get Windows 10 Pro.

End consumers are not supposed to have licenses for Enterprise, you only get Enterprise licenses with a Volume agreement.

So you would never be offered a free upgrade to Enterprise by virtue of having one of the above installed.

However, MS are tripping over themselves to give out Enterprise licenses out these days.

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Brit polar vessel christened RRS Sir David Attenborough

1Rafayal
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Joke

well, if it were the SNP naming it, they would have a clear mandate to ignore everyone and go with whatever they wanted.

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Learn a scripting language and play nicely: How to get a DevOps job

1Rafayal
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This is just a report that the Reg has taken the money for, again they have put zero effort into publishing something that has anything to do with dev ops at all.

Reg, can you either stop with these glorified adverts or get someone in who know what devops actually is to help you write a decent article?

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EU set to bin €500 note

1Rafayal
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As far as I know, no currency exchange in Europe will issue them. They won't even accept them unless you have a good reason for having them in the first place

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Ex-HP boss Carly Fiorina sacked one week into new job

1Rafayal
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But, people wouldn't be stupid enough to vote for him, surely?

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Windows 10 handcuffs Cortana web search to Bing and Edge browser

1Rafayal
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Re: Proprietary code hardwired to use proprietary APIs to do stuff shock!

@Dan 55

on point 1, I am pretty certain that on older versions of OS X you have to have an Apple ID to use the OS, I recently reinstalled OS X on my mid 2007 Mac Mini (10.7.5) and recall it not letting me get passed the point where I needed to enter my Apple ID in order to carry on with the installation. If this has been fixed with the newer versions then great. Shame I cannot use those versions though, my hardware is locked out of them, El Capitan simply refuses to install. But not using your ID means you lose almost all the user experience of that ecosystem, i.e. the Apple Store - no more apps, games, music or free OS upgrades, no access to any of the stuff you may have already bought, or if you have never had one then no access to any of the stuff that has arguably made the ecosystem so popular.

on point 2, yes - thats why if you dont use Skype, dont use Cortana, dont opt in to all the data being sent back, dont sign in with a Hotmail/MSN/etc account and just use a local account then you shouldnt be sending private data back to the MS Deathstar.

regarding the information presented in the article you linked, as it says - most of it is harmless, the only point of concern is the telemetry stuff and I wonder if this is related to the MS marketing slurp. Hidden in the privacy settings is an opt out for the MS marketing push - by default it is set to on for everyone regardless of the fact if you are using an MS account or a local account. Could this be the reason why traffic is being sent back?

If it isnt, then it needs explaining, I doubt that anyone would dispute this.

I would like to thank you for taking the time and effort to reply in a sane manner.

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1Rafayal
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Re: Proprietary code hardwired to use proprietary APIs to do stuff shock!

@h4rm0ny

there are a couple of things that need to be said here, because there is just too much nonsense being spouted about Windows 10. And this isnt aimed at you personally, but instead aimed at the general lack of understanding about what happens with Windows 10.

I dont know if the following is the same as the slurp that also takes place on Windows 7, 8 and 8.1

First lets look at Google and Apple. With Google, everything you do and say is analysed and checked in order for them to target you with ads. With Apple, you cannot even start using any of their operating systems without an Apple ID. If you choose to use Siri, then it defaults to Safari.

With OK Google and Siri, everything you say is checked, recorded and analysed after being sent back to HQ and recorded. They may even be listening in at all times. You cannot turn this off.

The same is true for Cortana and the desktop search feature of Windows 10, anything you say to Cortana is used by MS to target products and services towards you - I dont know if that includes third parties, I would imagine it will if a third party offers a product or solution that MS doesnt already push. Same goes for Skype, every chat and voice call is analysed in the same manner.

So, whats the difference between the MS approach and the Google/Apple approach? With MS you can turn it all off, completely off. There is a dedicated feature in Windows 10 called Privacy that allows you to hobble exactly what gets sent back to MS, you can go further - disable Cortana and desktop search, even less gets sent back. Dont use Skype and you wont be checked on there either.

Want nothing to get sent back at all? Then dont even link your MS account, Skype/Hotmail etc and just use a local account - then nothing, as far as I know, gets sent back to the MS Deathstar. This is in the terms and conditions.

What do you lose by doing this? Well, things like One Drive, the ability to use Skype, voice commands via Cortana and the use of the Windows store. Is that a massive loss to anyone? Probably not, apart from Skype maybe.

So the difference between MS and the rest is that you can make Windows an entirely private affair, if you are willing to lose some functionality, unlike the competition.

I guess the argument will be "If you use Linux, your world is a safe, private place". Well, yeah it is - until you start using any Google services, or Skype or perhaps any other third party service that also slurps data

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Re: Proprietary code hardwired to use proprietary APIs to do stuff shock!

I think I have just answered my own question.

I am on the fast ring and am currently on build 10586.218. Yesterday, Cortana would bring up Chrome for a search request, this morning I get Edge.

Disappointing? Yes.

End of the world? No.

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Re: Proprietary code hardwired to use proprietary APIs to do stuff shock!

I use Cortana for scheduling etc, until recently I didn't use it for searches.

Then I found Chrometana, a Chrome plugin. Does this mean that MS are now knobbling the ability for a Chrome plugin to work correctly? Before I installed this, not only was I stuck using Bing, I was also stuck using Edge (which isn't a bad browser, I'm just used to Chrome).

I am on the fast ring, so I should get this "update" pretty soon, if it exists.

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1Rafayal
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Does this mean Chrometana will no longer work?

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

1Rafayal
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Re: Oh, yeah... @1Rafayal

@Roland6

Obtaining an license agreement for SQL Server 2014 will give you Windows 10 enterprise entitlements. Same goes for some Office 2016 license agreements.

With the MS action pack, you get access to a number of Windows licenses, they are enterprise licenses. I cannot remember how many you get off the top of my head, maybe 5? But yes, this means the GWX nag and download would automatically be suppressed, unless the user chose to make any changes themselves. Even the system tray icon is suppressed.

Now, lets get on to the point that so many people have obviously missed - I haven't said at all that people should go out and buy an enterprise license, haven't said it once. I dont even think its possible for the consumer to buy one - officially. i guess a uni student or power geek might want to install and use it, but I am going to go out on a limb and say those people are going to be few and far between.

My comments above have all been to do with business, not the average end user at home. I have made that perfectly clear. If people work for an organisation using say Windows 7 enterprise, which is entirely likely given the administration options available for it, then they wont see the nag.

I dont understand why organisations who are using Windows wouldn't want to use the enterprise version, otherwise they are literally leaving the update schedule up to Microsoft. And if organisations start using Windows 10, which is going to happen at some point, then the update schedule becomes even more pernicious.

How is this not sensible?

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1Rafayal
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Re: Oh, yeah...

if you have a mic attached and if you have Cortana enabled and if you have opted in to allowing Microsoft to collect usage data then people assume that Cortana is listening to everything you say and reporting it back to Microsoft.

Despite the fact that Cortana only really works for Americans properly. And even then it can only perform simplistic operations, its clunky and not as nice to use as Siri or OK Google, or even the XBox One OS which probably is listening to everything you say.

But in all honesty, its just FUD. If everyone who had Windows 10 installed with a mic attached and Cortana setup correctly, how exactly would MS crunch all the data? And what would they be looking for?

At least with Samsung TVs that apparently do listen in for certain things, they know what they are looking for.

But dont bother listening to me, I am apparently a Microsoft apologist.

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Re: Oh, yeah... @1Rafayal

@Rolan6

you mean the licensing agreements for Server, Office, Exchange, SQL Server etc that all come with

Windows Enterprise entitlements?

Those ones?

Or maybe the licensing agreements you get with the MS Action Pack?

Or maybe the agreements tied into your MSDN subscription?

Or I guess there is the gold partnership subscription agreement...

Can you think of any more?

The fact of the matter is, like it or not, for everyone who is complaining about the GWX nag affecting business, it comes down to how your organisation is handling its licensing. Even if your organisation installed the dreaded Windows 10, there would be no automatic updates unless the administrators allowed them to take place.

Even WIndows 10 Pro users can defer updates for what, for 3 months or something?

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1Rafayal
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Re: Oh, yeah...

P. Lee

just out of interest, do you use Google?

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1Rafayal
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Re: Oh, yeah...

Hm, let me see - trust The Register when it comes to reporting things about Microsoft, or trust searching the internet... I know which one I would go for.

I still dont have my 100 downvotes for my second post. As soon as I do I am making a donation of £10 to Clic.

At least then something sensible will have happened.

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Re: Oh, yeah...

@Doctor Syntax.

Unless I have completely read this article wrong:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/kb/3080351

Then it would appear to me that the GWX nag and download is automatically suppressed from certain enterprise versions of Windows. It also looks like the icon for GWX is also automatically suppressed from certain enterprise versions of Windows.

Now, on to what version of Windows would be suitable for them to deploy in house. As a news station they have been operating for over 60 years and have what looks to be just under 150 members of staff. Deploying and maintaining the professional version of Windows Vista or 7 would be, in my opinion, the wrong choice in terms of administration and cost for an organisation of this size.

I would imagine that who ever is in charge of their IT function would have (or in this case should have) made use of Microsoft's volume licensing deals in order to get the best value out of the software that they are clearly using. However, you are making the assumption that they are using the professional version in the first place, and not the home version - either way it makes no difference because both versions would get the nag.

I wont speculate as to what productivity or office software they are running, I think everyone can make an educated guess on that.

Administering this many WIndows 7 or Vista Professional installations is, at best, as fun as setting your balls on fire. Thus making the Enterprise version not only cheaper but easier to maintain. Additionally, many IT teams that have to work with Windows installed on the desktop will go with the enterprise version as it is simply given away for free with what ever else they might have licensed from Microsoft.

Using the enterprise version means that they have full control over the update process, and in the case of Windows 10, no GWX nags, downloads or icons.

@DaddyHoggy

Do people in your lab have admin rights on those machines by any chance? Given that some have the icon present and some dont, I would start to think that maybe someone has been playing around with the way they are configured? Or possibly the way they are updated?

In general, if organisations are using enterprise versions of Windows, the GWX nag, download and tray icon are automatically suppressed. The only way it would become apparent is if the administrator either chose to allow it to appear or made a mistake during a patch run.

The whole GWX nag and download is aimed at the home consumer, not at business. Business has been bombarded already with Windows 10 nags, but in a completely different way entirely.

Lets see if I can reach 100 downvotes for this.

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1Rafayal
Bronze badge

Re: Oh, yeah...

I dont think you would see Microsoft advertising a desktop OS on an exsiting installation of a server OS.

That just doesn't make any sense to man nor beast.

A lot of people here will now start to cry, whinge an moan about how this will impact bussiness, blah blah blah.

You dont get the GWX box pop up if you are running the enterprise versions of Windows. So, if this news station had been running an enterprise version of what looks like either Vista or 7, the popup would never have ruined their lovely weather report.

Fully prepared for the downvotes.

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Microsoft's Azure and Office 365 growth slows

1Rafayal
Bronze badge

Re: Rapidly changing (negative) dynamic for Microsoft

what are you even trying to say?

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