* Posts by rh587

416 posts • joined 23 Mar 2011

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Latest F-35 bang seat* mods will stop them breaking pilots' necks, beams US

rh587

Re: minimum weight

Well that's an interesting point.

G applies to the entire mass of the seat. Under +G the seat and pilot are "heavier" for the charge to get moving.

If one ejected under negative g, then the pilot and seat would be "lighter", meaning even the sturdiest pilot would come in "underweight".

One presumes the seat already has a g-meter to deal with such potential variation in ejection conditions, and the weight switch would inform it whether the pilot is lighter than the cut-off at a given g-rating.

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'Hey, Elon? You broke it, you bought it' says owner of SpaceX's satellite cinder

rh587

Re: Going nowhere

I'm having a hard time imagining that liability isn't strictly determined by the contract, especially in a business as inherently expensive and risky as launching satellites

I read elsewhere that in these sorts of complex contracts (especially where you have multiple underwriters and the like), it's actually part of the contract to lodge a lawsuit early to head off other lawsuits down the road - it's basically a de rigeur part of the claim process. You've clearly got the claim down and there can't be quibbling down the road because a court has seen the initial claim.

IANAL, and I have not seen SpaceCom's insurance policy, but it seemed this was a standard move - of course a bit of public posturing is never a bad thing, but I wouldn't expect to pay for a flight if the operator set it on fire before launch - either get me a new rocket or give me a refund.

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UK nuke warhead builders shift IT gear into public cloud

rh587

Re: Unwise

I say "unwise" with the trepidation of knowing that some of the smartest people on Earth will have considered this decision: who am I to gainsay them?

Not quite. The HR Department that manages the payroll for some of the smartest people on Earth (and handles PII regarding their job role, security clearance, home address, etc!) has considered this decision... that's a very different thing!

You may keep your physics at home; but would you really want to provide enemies with the opportunity to learn about who works at AWE, and where they live, or what their NI numbers are (for example)? Beware of non-obvious routes into your citadel of secrets.

Exactly this. Putting the PII of workers is as risky as putting classified data in the cloud - because the workers can get their arms twisted, be blackmailed, coerced, etc into giving you that data (and the really secret stuff they didn't put in the cloud).

If you're not happy to put your crown jewels in the cloud, then you probably shouldn't put the PII of people who have access to your crown jewels in the cloud either!

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Newest Royal Navy warship weighs as much as 120 London buses

rh587

Re: So, what's it for?

Although it says "offshore", it's basically a coastal patrol vessel (for patrolling our territorial waters).

They'll spend a lot of time hosting on-board guests from Customs and DEFRA, assisting them in Customs/anti-smuggling operations and fisheries protection.

Additionally, having a few smaller vessels knocking around is good for training.

After the last time they grounded a frigate it was suggested that there was a bit of a training gap - once upon a time we had lots of small coastal vessels, and young officers would get the opportunity to cut their teeth commanding a small vessel, before moving up to this sort of offshore vessel before they got a sniff at getting on the bridge of a larger frigate, destroyer or carrier.

More recently we've moved to having fewer coastal vessels, whose operations are directed by aircraft and satellite intelligence, which operationally is all around more efficient - an aircraft can cover a much larger area than a ship and since most of it is empty, you're better off doing aerial surveillance and just having one ship which is sent where it needs to be (instead of lots of ships covering the area).

The downside is fewer small ships gives you fewer places to post up-and-coming young officers for their first experience of command.

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Labour's Jeremy Corbyn wants high speed broadband for all. Wow, original idea there

rh587

Re: You have a choice where you live

I am not interested in paying in the form of tax for people who live in a area with poor broadband speeds

Fair enough, you'd best address your complaints to DEFRA - who are the ones increasingly making their extensive collection of paperwork only available online and insisting that various annual returns be done online.

So, either they need to go back to paper-only, or they can fund the roll-out of infrastructure... from your taxes!

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rh587

Re: Why ?

I personally think about 30Mb/s, so around 4MB/s, is easily enough for almost everybody right now, and perhaps we should be looking at getting more people onto 30Mb/s rather than upgrading my broadband speed in Birmingham *again* (with concomitant price increases, naturally) to something like 100Mb/s (I just tested and get 76Mb/s on WiFi, never mind wired).

See, I don't entirely disagree. 30Mb/s is enough for most people right now.

The problem is that it ignores the reality of the network.

The places who struggle to get infinity now are people like my parents - who actually aren't really rural at all, but their phone line doesn't come from the nearest village - it comes from the wrong direction, meaning they're a couple of miles from the cabinet - never mind the exchange!

In principle it's very reasonable to suggest that we should get basic 30Mb Infinity rolled out to everyone before we worry about punting 300Mb/s G.Fast to the cities, but the problem is that even if you upgraded their cabinet to infinity, the "final mile"(s) would be the choke point - they're not going to sync more than 1.5Mb/s on a good day over the dodgy copper, regardless of how much fibrey goodness you stuff into the cabinet, and BT simply aren't interested in FTTH. Hell - they're still installing copper phone lines into new-build estates. I get that upgrading and overbuilding their existing network is expensive, but if you're fitting a brand new line into a new-build house, why the fuck would you install copper instead of FTTH as default? It's utter madness.

The only real solution is to bite the bullet and start rolling FTTH, and if you're doing that, you might as well run it as gigabit - there's no technical reason you wouldn't. Of course business considerations demand that you choke it down to 10Mb/s and charge through the nose for the "upgrade" to 70Mb/s on a line which could trivially link at gigabit, but that's by the by. The only sane upgrade that leaves you overhead for tomorrow's demands is fibre - and you're going to run fibre at gigabit as a baseline.

So my main concern is not the actual bit-rate you're getting and the growing gulg between town and country - towns will always get faster speeds just due to density, but the fact that the technology BT is chasing (squeezing every last bit out of copper) simply does not apply to much of the rural community, and is ultimately running into diminishing returns, whereas fibre can simply run at gigabit today (it could even run at 10G if you wanted to pay for it) and doesn't need touching for another couple of decades, by which time smart WDM optics will be capable of shovelling ever increasing quantities of data down each strand.

Yeah, gigabit is waaay more than you need, but the cost differential between 100Mb/s and gigabit optics is negligible and the extra upload speed actually is useful for things like overnight backups and file transfers (about the only time you'll ever actually flat-line a network connection, even if you'd struggle to hit 100Mb/s with multiple HD streams and a few OS/App updates downloading).

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rh587
Headmaster

Re: Why ?

Lies. The Bitrate alone for 480p would exceed what 1.7 MB/s can deliver (If you're streaming), and if you're torrenting then its even worse (on average).

Well, technically HD streaming needs ~8Mb/s, and 1.7MB/s equates to ~13.6Mb/s, so Bahboh should comfortably be able to stream HD to their heart's content.

Of course that's not what Bahboh means, because Bahboh is the sort of awful human being who mixes their units and smashes interplanetary probes into the planets they're supposed to be orbiting.

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You shrunk the database into a .gz and the app won't work? Sigh

rh587

Pah! I worked with someone who went to the wrong African COUNTRY on a support call.

Pah. Just him, not anyone else?

I know someone who sent a shipment of 300 new cars to Sweden instead of a Swindon dealer (large dealer, it was the order for the new plates, huge turnover in a couple of weeks).

I wish I were joking... it shouldn't even be possible, but he managed to bork the paperwork sufficiently that the error wasn't uncovered until his Swedish importer called asking why the port was pestering him over 300 cars on their quayside with his name on that he hadn't ordered...

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Drone bloke cuffed after gizmo stops firemen tackling forest inferno

rh587

Re: Sounds like nonsense to me

Since when does a 500g cause aircraft to drop out of the sky? And remember that the pilots are also equiped with eyes. And how was one aircraft, drone or otherwise, blocking the entire area?

It could easily down a helicopter with a rotor strike.

Fixed wing is less likely to down it (unless it went through an engine whilst the aircraft was fully laden. Air tankers are massively overpowered once empty but underpowered when full), but even if you only caused minor fuselage/wing damage and didn't ruin an engine, that's going to be enough to render the aircraft U/S once it lands, removing it from operations for 24+ hours when it should be flying.

Also, the firefighting community is particularly tetchy about air tankers because they've had a few too many of these types of incidents in the past 20 years or so.

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You can’t sit there, my IoT desk tells me

rh587

I thought "Oh neat, a folding desk. Not a bad idea for pop up locations".

Then I saw the price. US$250 !!!??? WTF? For a bit of cardboard?

My boss is, right at this minute using one of these as a riser to stand at his desk. Took 3 minutes assemble, and another 3 minutes to shuffle his crap and sort his cables out.

That is all you need to spend.

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Philando Castile death-by-cop vid mysteriously vanishes from Facebook

rh587

Re: He is the 506th person to die in a police shooting this year in the Land of the FreeTM

Policing can be nasty and dangerous work. They tend not to interact much with the top 99% of orderly and civilized people, and the bottom 1% can be random, unpredictable and dangerous.

It can be indeed.

In this case you have someone declaring ahead of time that they have a Concealed Carry Firearm in the vehicle. You hopefully knew this already because you'd run the license plates through your data terminal before you even got out your cruiser.

The combination of knowing this person has a CCW license, and them freely declaring it to you tells you they are a fundamentally law-abiding individual, and moreover, if they had any intention of shooting you, they'd have likely already done it.

We have now had multiple cases where US LE Officers have requested a driver produce their license and have opened fire as they reached for it - in one case shooting an individual in the back as they reached into their car (Tony Martin got murder for that. Someone with their back to you is not a threat. They can become a threat very quickly, but if you're shooting someone in the back then you need an exceptional reason why).

This smacks of Scenario Fulfilment, which is a symptom of poor quality training. The officer has identified that they might be reaching for a firearm and in every such training simulation has ended up having to discharge their firearm, thus they get tunnel vision and start playing out their training even when reality diverges from training.

All that said, I do find it odd that in a country with such an apparent problem with firearm violence that most Police Uniforms do not include some level of body armour as standard. In the UK, the Met Vest provides protection from stabbing and limited ballistic protection even for non-Firearm Officers. Perhaps officers would be a little less trigger-happy if they were a little less exposed (either with a uniform met-vest or an under-shirt covert vest).

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rh587

Re: Uninitialised memory referenced during execution

For fucks sake - how can these police officers have been so badly trained.

Well therein lies the issue. What is a "Police Officer"? Unlike the UK where we have one main layer of law enforcement, the term has no useful meaning in the US. It could be FBI, State Troopers, County Sheriffs or local town/city PD.

Naturally, the smaller PDs generally do much less training than your average FBI agent. Due to limited resource/funding, the (re)training programme of a small town PD is likely much less robust than say Chicago PD - for instance, they might spend lots of time on the range learning to shoot accurately and proficiently, but at the cost of role-play and realistic simulation.

I spent a couple of hours watching Thames Valley Armed Response doing drills - they only (blank) fired once in all that period. Most of the scenarios resulted in a de-escalation and non-fatal arrest.

I suspect some of the less robust US training programmes inadvertently reinforce "Scenario Fulfilment" where officers start down a path of force (draw side-arm, prepare for use of force) and all their training has resulted in them finally using force, so they're mentally set on a path which doesn't end with de-escalation and get subconsciously tunnel-visioned towards firing their weapon.

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Detroit Rock(et Fiber) City: Startup brings 10Gb service to Motown

rh587

Re: 10 Gb/s is all well and good

But what kind of capacity does their network have out to the wider internet?

Much like corporate networks, I doubt that this system would have the backbone connection to actually support more than a small handful of users going full-tilt at 10 Gb/s. Hell, I doubt that they could support more than a dozen users at 1 Gb...

True, but it depends on who they're peering with and whether they collaborate and get hold of a Netflix OpenConnect Appliance, etc. If they're able to peer with a few big CDNs and get a few appliances/servers internal to their network, their actual (paid for) Tier 1 network connectivity can be kept quite manageable.

B4RN in the UK runs a 20Gbps backbone out of each 192-user node (all on 1Gbps connections), so that's a node contention rate of ~10-1. Overnight, you might actually get 1Gbps, but even if everyone is hammering away you should still get 100Mbps, which is 30% faster than the theoretical maximum of 76Mbps for BT's Infinity 2 product (and I'd bet BT's infinity cabinets are running on a damn sight higher contention than 10-1).

B4RN's fibre link to the IXP runs DWDM, so from memory, they can theoretically scale it to ~36 channels of 10Gbps - which would give ~360Gbps, which maintains the 10-1 contention for the ~3000 properties they designed the network for.

However, despite that 10-1 contention rate in the network, as far as the outbound connectivity goes though, they only have a single 10Gbps connection to a Tier 1 provider. Manchester has a good datacentre community so they've got excellent settlement-free peering opportunities to the BBC (iPlayer), Amazon, Netflix, Apple, MS, etc, etc which is where the other few hundred Gbps goes.

By the looks of it, Detroit-IX has Akamai and Google, which is a damn good start (although curiously Rocket Fibre aren't on their peering list?).

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rh587

I'd like to know how they can provide cost-effective competitive broadband AND that level of service AND still turn a profit.

Probably something to do with containing their initial effort in a 3-square mile area, meaning they're never more than a couple of minutes from an issue with no distant customers and don't need any particularly esoteric optics.

Throw in the usage of cheaper enterprise-grade hardware rather than telco grade (I don't know if they do, but it would make sense - worked for B4RN) and Bob's your mother's brother.

Whilst telcos like BT are burning millions on (genuinely clever research) trying to work out how to squeeze 300Mbps down 20 metres of phone wire, the fibre startups are just cutting to the chase, accepting the CAPEX of laying fibre onto the premises which can then be upgraded from 1Gb to 10Gb, to more (with xWDM) simply through a change in existing, off-the-shelf optics, giving them a negligible $/Mb cost.

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Alleged Brit hacker Lauri Love bailed amid US extradition battle lull

rh587

Maybe he spent ten or so years working before university

Or did a Bachelors, went to work and came back to do a Masters or PhD.

In this case I think he's still on a bachelor's having dropped out before a stint in the (Finnish) Army and doing "stuff" before signing back up into academia.

As you say, there are lots of reasons why people might be a "student" at 31, both Under-grad and post-grad.

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Lightning strikes: Britain's first F-35B supersonic fighter lands

rh587

Re: "supersonic fighter"

The Harriers weren't supersonic.

Technically they weren't fighters either. Our fighters have indeed been supersonic for decades.

The Harrier was an air interdiction/close air support strike platform, hence it's GR5/7/9 designations (Ground attack and Reconnaissance). As it happens it performed quite well air-to-air against Argentine fighters as well, being highly manoeuvrable with it's vectored thrust and strongly anhedral wings. But that wasn't it's design role.

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Thunder struck: Apple kills off display line

rh587

The Cupertino idiot tax racket says...

...but they rarely respond to our requests for comment.

Funny that!

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

rh587

Re: Reboot Europe?

If you must reboot Europe, do it when Europe can cope - right now it cannot.

So, in like 30 years? Greece is in a positive-feedback loop of debt. Simply punting them €100Bn every 18 months isn't going to fix it (obviously we're not paying that directly - it's mostly Germany and France - but it's dragging the entire region down with it). The EU needs a shake-up and the leadership appears to be totally disinterested in doing so. Certain countries need throwing out to their own currency until their economies are managed to a state where they can coexist under the same fiscal policy as countries like Germany and France.

The EU is stagnant, lurching from one bail-out to another. The growth markets are BRIC (maybe not so much Russia at the moment).

The EU has had years and is sitting on it's hands because they're all too embarrassed to admit they grew too big too fast and need to prune their ambitions for the good of everybody. I'd say this is the perfect time to walk away before it falls over on it's own.

We can leave a note saying "See? I warned you - and here's the email trail - that you needed redundancy and a proper backup solution. I tried. I did. But you just weren't interested. You didn't want the redundant PSU or the second array to failover to. Now you get to start again."

I'm not even entirely convinced by my own argument. But sometimes people won't be helped and you walk away before you get sucked into an even bigger mess. This might be one of those times. The EU needs to boot Greece and a couple of others out of the Euro. Not the common market or EU, but out the Euro. The fact they have not been willing to do so tells you that they are bull-headed and unwilling to accept the truth in front of them. Which means we should leave them to it and watch from a safe distance.

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rh587

Re: Dear Andrew

and because virtually everyone except Mrs Thatcher's second favourite economist says that there would be one,

Yeah, but all those people - the IMF, ECB, etc all failed to see the 2008 Crash coming, failed to properly regulate the securities market, and the ECB failed to properly vet and regulate the nations being admitted to the Eurozone, with the result they let basket cases like Greece come and play in a common currency with Germany, with a result that was obvious to anyone who knows their Cold War history and the events leading to the financial split of west and east Germany when maintaining a common Reichsmark became untenable.

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rh587

Peace for the past 70 years.

One of the most odious lies. Syria and Iraq you mention. Closer to home, the EU did little good in Northern Ireland, Kosovo or Bosnia. I guess the Srebrenica Massacre didn't happen?

Of course the EU didn't exist 70 years ago. Or even 25 years ago. Attributing "70 years of peace" to the EU is ludicrous. Certain of their constituent bodies such as the WEU (who have merged into the EU) have contributed to a relatively stable Western Europe, but no more.

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rh587

Re: So where is the post to balance this out?

Margallo (Spanish foreign minister) let slip something last week... he's sure that in the end there'd be a bilateral trade agreement between EU countries and the UK without any tariffs.

Course they will. Tourism is responsible for 10.5% of Spain's GDP and 12% of employment, and 25% of visitors are British.

If the EU did anything stupid to stop the millions of sleazyjet vacationers piling in, Spain's GDP would literally tumble 2.5% overnight, and GDP is going to have enough on it's plate without having to finance an ECB bailout of Spain.

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rh587

Re: So where is the post to balance this out?

But don't put it past the EU to get all sinffy about a leave vote and decide those agreements are null and void. What then eh?

Well BMW, Mercedes and Volkswagen Group will all start laying off German workers for one - 20% of cars made in Germany are sold into the UK.

Yes, we rely on European markets. 50% of our exports go to the EU, compared with 15% of Continental Europe's exports coming to us. But although we arguably have more to lose, the pain for the EU if they decided to be punitive would be immense.

Let's not be alarmist here - if we leave, we will take two years to do it and there will be a raft of agreements in place. And they won't be terrible. I note with interest that although many people have bemoaned "the Norway solution" as encumbering us with EU laws which we have no power over, it can't be that awful - Norway is a stable economy which would easily qualify for entry to both EU and Eurozone, but they choose not to. Interesting.

I'm still on the fence. Andrew's notes about Africa and the EU's negative impact on developing nations are well-expressed points that I've not seen raised by anyone in the last few months and are tugging me that way. A 100million person EEA could be hold good clout as a trade movement minus the politics.

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Hey cloud lawyer: Can I take my client list with me?

rh587

Re: Linkedin?

Once stored, however, they are not company property - they are your personal property so the company cannot force you to erase them or unlearn them. It can however using standard non-compete and non-solicitation clauses force the issue for you not to be able to use any of them.

See, this is the bit where it seems to be a bit grey. If you're hired from Company A to Competitor B, then even if you hand all your stuff in and don't take stuff with you, you still know your customers. When you pitch for them to switch to your new employer, that relationship still exists, you know what they paid last time and you likely have a fair idea what they're being quoted by your previous employer. It's basically insider knowledge, but short of moving to an entirely new industry, it's broadly impossible to not use your experience to your advantage. You can not take that a physical list of contacts, but if it's all up in your head then where are you going to start when you start compiling a pitch-list of prospective clients?

Obviously taking lists of sales, confidential pricing data, etc is all way out of line, but if you've memorised all that stuff, you're going to use it. It's called experience, and it's what you've been hired for!

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Cork data centre will offer super-speedy US to Europe data times

rh587

Re: Confused (again)

1. Co-location of servers for your US customers, in which case (if latency is that critical) why not co-lo in a US data centre?

Regulatory reasons? I'm thinking US-based access to data which - for regulatory reasons - has to be geographically located in the EU?

I'm not sure what, but as data sovereignty becomes increasingly important, I'm sure M$/Google/Faceache/Apple/someone has some data they need to store in the EU but which they want to be able to access/process/analyse from the Americas.

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Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

rh587

Re: According to Mr. Orlowski

How exactly hard it is for you to grasp difference between using and reimplementing API ?

Exactly this.

I like to think of this in actual book terms.

There is literally nothing stopping you from use the line "Harry stood on the platform at King's Cross" in a book, or writing a story about a boy wizard, or even writing a story about a student at a Scottish wizarding school who has to face a dark wizard.

But if you lift text directly from a Harry Potter book, then you're in for a bad time. Individual words, elements or lines are not copyrighted. The work as a whole however is.

A re-write or re-implementation of code is one thing. Copy-pasta including errata is quite another.

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rh587

Re: The code is trivial

The code is utterly trivial, and obvious to anyone with any insight into what its doing.

Whether something is trivial or (non-obvious) would be relevant in a patent dispute. This is a copyright dispute, and the question is whether Google copy-pasta'd Java's code wholesale.

They did, thus it is an infringement of the copyright. QED.

Moreover, even if it were relevant, "trivial" is a contextual term. An if-loop is a trivial statement. Any given line of code can be deemed trivial in isolation. 11,000 lines of individually trivial statements that implement some complex piece of logic stops being trivial.

Google's claims of Fair Use are then a separate discussion down the line once it has been established that copying has taken place, which is why they do not belong in the upfront discussion.

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Judge torpedoes 'Tor pedo' torpedo evidence

rh587

Good. It is not sufficient to state

"Our black box says x. Therefore they are guilty."

Guess what, my black box says the FBI is full of child-molesting lizard people. No, I don't have to show my working. You should just trust me. That's how it works right?

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PLA sys admin gets six months house arrest for yanking US Army docs

rh587

Re: Duh.

Secret is a very low level of security clearance. Maybe the lowest?

Don't know about the US.

In the UK we had UNCLAS < PROTECT < RESTRICTED < CONFIDENTIAL < SECRET < TOP SECRET

They streamlined that to OFFICIAL < SECRET < TOP SECRET, all of which can be sub-marked as "UK EYES ONLY" or CAUKUS ONLY or AUSCANZUKUS ONLY for stuff shared to Five Eyes.

There also exists the STRAP system. Anything properly interesting is often marked with varying levels of STRAP. STRAP is need-to-know system, so you need TOP SECRET (DV) clearance, but also need to know about that specific project or operation as opposed to more "widely" distributed material available to all TOP SECRET personnel.

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rh587

Re: Six months only? House arrest, no jail?

Most classified material is stunningly unimportant.

Indeed. All the aircraft recognition stuff we were given in cadets was marked "Restricted", which was the lowest level of classification at the time. It basically meant they didn't put it on the internet. Every nation on Earth had it (and more no doubt) by virtue of buying a copy of Janes.

We did see some "confidential" marked slides at one stage on a summer camp, but it was fairly dry stuff on the first evening about camp standing orders/operating procedure, location of guard houses/security stuff, etc which I guess would be useful if you were planning a raid on the base, but stunningly boring otherwise (and much of it inferable from Google Earth if you looked closely enough).

Moreover, if it is prefixed "NATO" then everything moves down the scale.

You can assume that everyone including the PLA and Russians have had eyes on anything lower than "NATO Secret", just by virtue of it's wide distribution, there is going to be someone in one of NATO's 28 nations who is working for the other side.

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Watch it again: SpaceX's boomerang rocket lands on robo-sea-barge

rh587

Re: Much better view here

The bit I still can't quite get over is the full HD live (FFS, LIVE!!!) coverage of the entire launch all the way to the "top". With the Apollo and earlier craft we got to see sometimes poor coverage of the launch and then nothing else until, maybe, there might some grainy black & white coverage from orbit.

This. I am very much not old enough to remember Apollo (my mum was in her last year at primary school, which bought it's first television especially for the kids - and the rest of the village - to view the Apollo 11 Landing).

Nevertheless, I got chills during Tim Peake's docking. I watched the launch at work, and later was sat watching a Soyuz capsule docking with a space station in orbit in real-time on my phone pulled up in a car park. That was fucking cool.

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Researcher arrested after reporting pwnage hole in elections site

rh587

Re: Which bit of this do you lot not understand?

The article's got that bit wrong - the guy in the video is a candidate for Supervisor (which is an elected position). There seems to be some politics here where he told a candidate before he told the actual office.

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rh587

Re: Vengeful Bureaucrat?

It's seems Dan Sinclair is a candidate for the Election Supervisor gig. It may well be the incumbent (one Sharon Harrington) who has pushed for the arrest.

She is likely hacked off that:

1. He put it on YouTube before he told her department.

2. He did it whilst sat on a couch with someone who is running for her job.

Additionally, he didn't just discover the SQL Injection flaw and let them know - he exploited it, extracted data, used that data (logging in), etc which goes beyond just telling someone their window is open, into the realms of climbing in and going through their stuff. Though in his defence, they'd basically left a big neon sign next to their open window saying "free stuff here" and it you'd have to think it's unlikely he was the first in. Without intrusion detection, all elections since that system was installed are suspect.

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BOFH: Thermo-electric funeral

rh587

Re: I need a cooling hammer!

THOSE AREN'T MALLETS THEY ARE HIGH PRECISION COMPUTER ALIGNMENT TOOLS!

That would be what our office refers to as The Universal Adaptor.

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Soyuz to loft Sentinel-1B Earth-watching sat

rh587

Playload

"*The Russian horizontal assembly method - which also includes mounting the playload on the ground - "

I didn't realise Sentinel was being operated by plucky playmonauts!

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South Korea to upgrade national stereo defence system for US$16m

rh587

Propaganda

Propaganda. Yes.

I'm sure that if SK ever decided to "go north" a copy of "Ride of the Valkyries" definitely wouldn't find it's way into the broadcast deck... no sir!

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Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

rh587

Re: Are we in the end times?

"In fact they describe a scenario where your data is simultaneously secure and available to TLAs everybody via backdoors on the encryption..."

FTFY.

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Commentard April Fool decries Blighty's dodecaquid

rh587

Re: A tad (just a tad) harsh

In 2016, the amount of quality journalism around being less than ever means it's impossible to apply critical thinking to every story and work out if it's an April Fools or not.

Which would be an entirely relevant criticism had the article not contained relevant links to both the Royal Mint's press releases and Osborne's guff on gov.uk, as well as links to previous Reg stories on the matter, which demonstrate either that it's a real story, or those previous stories were long, pre-planned setups to a collaborative joke by the Royal Mint, George Osborne and El Reg.

Now which sounds more likely?

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MH-370 search loses sharpest-eyed robot deep beneath the waves

rh587

Re: Waste Of Time

but why would anyone monitor the arse of the earth / the middle of nowhere just because?

You don't get a choice. Any satellite in a polar orbit is going to pass over the arse end of nowhere on a fairly regular basis. You can't just park it permanently over Tehran or Moscow. Orbital mechanics doesn't work like that.

Given the number of spy satellites whizzing round from a variety of nations, odds are that at least one was over the Indian Ocean at the time (plus, it may be ocean, that doesn't mean there might not be objects of interest bobbing around - foreign naval assets, etc). Whether any orbits happened to actually overlap with MH370 and capture anything of use is quite another matter. Releasing that imagery however could reveal information about your secret satellite's imaging capabilities.

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Govt: Citizens, we know you want 10Mbps. This is the last broadband scheme for that

rh587

Re: All well and good but....

But if you choose to live in the ass end of no where miles away from the nearest city then you should expect to get poor asdl speeds over your 2 pair copper.

My parents live about a mile out of a decent sized market town which has FTTC. However, they are the last property on their phone line which comes from a village two miles in the other direction. Infinity? Not a chance.

They cannot be defined as "out in the sticks" by any objective or subjective measure you care to define. But because of the quirky and patchwork manner in which the old PSTN network was rolled out over the years, they can't access services from the (much closer) FTTC-enabled cabinet. The only way they're going to get better than 1.5Mb ADSL any time soon is to get a wayleave across some fields and find someone willing to have some private fibre come into their garden and share their Infinity.

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Top rocket exec quits after telling the truth about SpaceX price war

rh587

Much as I like SpaceX's innovation and Musk's vision, I think I can relate to how the air force guys must be feeling about this. This is basically like being told by the beancounters that you can't get more of these shiny 100%-reliable Unix/Mac workstations that you are used to, and have to make do with virtualized Windows clients, because while slightly inferior, their three times lower price more than makes up for it.

Welcome to the commodisation of Space.

You might have plug-and-play appliances in your office providing local storage, VPN services or edge filing, you might even get some shiny Apple Macs for specific workloads. But your datacentre is going to be full of disposable whitebox servers because going hyperscale with HPE or Dell isn't necessary or affordable for your run-of-the-mill heavy lifting. It's cheaper to have spare boxes to spin up whilst you repair/replace failed servers than to pay for a branded box with additional redundancy.

Shiny branded boxes with expensive software licenses and lovely management tools become relegated to special workloads which can't be spun out to a cloudy cluster.

And so it is with space. For small satellites, anything that you're serially producing and can afford to stuff "+1" on the end of the production run because you lost a launch, you go with the ludicrously cheap option.

Consider - if you're at NASA building a one-off probe or bespoke bit of kit, you need to know that it's going up because you only get one shot. Likewise if it's a uniquely huge bit of kit that needs a heavy launcher. You pay the premium.

If you're building a dozen identical commsats, a string of common-framework surveillance sats or a global positioning constellation, you've got a production line going, and if you lose a launch, you just get the insurance and add one or two more satellites to your order, which is more than covered by the fact you're paying 1/3 on the launch.

Sure, it's nice to have the fancy workstation, but the world moves on...

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rh587

Re: Huh???

He said ULA's forthcoming Vulcan rocket will be much more practical, since the first stage of the rocket will parachute down to earth and be caught mid-air by a helicopter.

Yes. Practical. That was the first word I thought of when I head "First Stage" and "caught mid-air by helicopter" in the same sentence.

EDIT: Appears ULA's idea is to jettison the lower half of the First Stage and snatch the (expensive) engines of out mid-air, letting the fuel tank go. I was wondering how else they'd support that much weight.

So it's significantly more hazardous (regular sorties by heli crews to snag mid-air targets) and doesn't return the entire first stage...

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HTTPS is not enough: Boffins fingerprint user environments without cracking crypto

rh587

Re: Side channel attacks

So what happens when you have to address BOTH security AND efficiency at the same time? Say a high-security communique in an area or environment where power and/or bandwidth is at a premium?

Secure. Efficient. Cheap.

Pick two.

8
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Staff 'fury' as penny pinching IBM offers legal minimum redundo payoffs

rh587

Re: Interesting!

"Not planning to get any decent handovers from the staff leaving the building then? Good luck with that."

What handover? You don't make people redundant - you make roles redundant.

If you declare someone redundant, there can be nothing to handover.

My (teacher) mum was declared redundant from one post some years ago on the grounds they were discontinuing the course she taught. They then asked her to "handover" her (apparently redundant/obsolete) course materials to a new member of staff...

After a sit down with the bursar, he chose to enhance her redundancy package in preference to getting a call from her Union's solicitors after she handed over the offending emails.

16
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Everything bad in the world can be traced to crap Wi-Fi

rh587

Re: On the one hand...

Reminds me of our induction/welcome session at university. The library staff had just finished a very flashy powerpoint on all the services they offered (with very limited reference to actual books). They were followed by a chap from IT to give us the low-down on where the help-desk was, accounts, etc, etc. He had the mankiest, most dog-eared acetates you've every laid eyes on, which he duly plopped on the OHP.

He knew exactly how reliable the digital projector and A/V was.

16
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Brit firm unleashes drone-busting net cannon

rh587

"It would most likely fall under a the definition of a prohibited firearm, under the same category as any weapon of whatever description designed or adapted for the discharge of any noxious liquid, gas or other thing."

Eh, no more so than one of these.

One presumes these will not be mail-order and the company will sell it along with training to genuine buyers, in which case the Police would be unlikely to take too great an interest.

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rh587

The parachute seems like it would just add to the risk of the entrapped drone floating with the wind - potentially across the runway and towards aircraft awaiting clearance to go (with their engines spinning). On a windy airfield, there seems to be a lot of scope for it to drift some way from it's actual snaring point.

Surely better to dispense with the 'chute and let it fall out of the sky like a brick - presumably the owner isn't getting it back so it's final "landed" condition is not relevant?

0
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BBC telly tax drops onto telly-free households. Cough up, iPlayer fans

rh587

> This also highlights an interesting question, previously it was the ability to receive TV that meant you had to have a license (TV and aerial) so does this mean if you have a computer and the internet you may have to pay it?

The license has only been payable if you watch live TV (whether via broadcast or online simulcast) for quite some time. It is not longer based on whether you have equipment set up to do so.

To that end, this will continue in the same vein - if you watch live TV or catch-up iPlayer then you need a license. Simple possession of an internet connection and device-with-browser would not qualify as requiring a license.

0
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NASA funds new supersonic airliner research

rh587

"My only problem with Elon Musks hyperloop proposal is that they seem to make out it was 'his idea' bull, watch Genesis 2, or read some history books, the idea of running maglev inside a vacuum tube is old..."\

Tubes may be old school, but Hyperloop doesn't propose maglev. It uses air-bearings, which are a novel solution to the difficulty of maintaining a perfect vacuum - and puts errant ingressed air to good use rather than having to punch through it!

1
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Photographer hassled by Port of Tyne for filming a sign on a wall

rh587

Re: Not all security is like that, I'm not

"So, on what legal basis are you operating then?"

I would imagine - since he alludes to working some form of stadium or conference/exhibition centre - that the area/plazas surrounding the building may be private property (rather than public street), in which case they would have a lawful power to ask them to leave - much like a mall cop can require that you leave a shopping centre (because those tend to be private property - as we as being public places).

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rh587

Re: Unfortunately... you're wrong

"Theft is theft, there is no time limit or extenuating circumstances such as saying that you were going to return the item eventually."

Yes, you sort of do. With theft you have to show an intent to permanently deprive the owner of their property. It is the precise reason why the motoring offence of "Taking Without Owner's Consent" exists - because it became difficult to prosecute a joyrider for theft when they claimed they intended to return the car once they'd had a drive around - so they made it an offence to take the car in the first place.

In this case, go for Common Assault - use of unlawful force. The Mall Cops had no authority to harass him going about his lawful business on a public highway, nor to prevent him leaving the scene or seizing his property.

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