* Posts by rh587

384 posts • joined 23 Mar 2011

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BOFH: Thermo-electric funeral

rh587

Re: I need a cooling hammer!

THOSE AREN'T MALLETS THEY ARE HIGH PRECISION COMPUTER ALIGNMENT TOOLS!

That would be what our office refers to as The Universal Adaptor.

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Soyuz to loft Sentinel-1B Earth-watching sat

rh587

Playload

"*The Russian horizontal assembly method - which also includes mounting the playload on the ground - "

I didn't realise Sentinel was being operated by plucky playmonauts!

5
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South Korea to upgrade national stereo defence system for US$16m

rh587

Propaganda

Propaganda. Yes.

I'm sure that if SK ever decided to "go north" a copy of "Ride of the Valkyries" definitely wouldn't find it's way into the broadcast deck... no sir!

0
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Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

rh587

Re: Are we in the end times?

"In fact they describe a scenario where your data is simultaneously secure and available to TLAs everybody via backdoors on the encryption..."

FTFY.

0
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Commentard April Fool decries Blighty's dodecaquid

rh587

Re: A tad (just a tad) harsh

In 2016, the amount of quality journalism around being less than ever means it's impossible to apply critical thinking to every story and work out if it's an April Fools or not.

Which would be an entirely relevant criticism had the article not contained relevant links to both the Royal Mint's press releases and Osborne's guff on gov.uk, as well as links to previous Reg stories on the matter, which demonstrate either that it's a real story, or those previous stories were long, pre-planned setups to a collaborative joke by the Royal Mint, George Osborne and El Reg.

Now which sounds more likely?

13
3

MH-370 search loses sharpest-eyed robot deep beneath the waves

rh587

Re: Waste Of Time

but why would anyone monitor the arse of the earth / the middle of nowhere just because?

You don't get a choice. Any satellite in a polar orbit is going to pass over the arse end of nowhere on a fairly regular basis. You can't just park it permanently over Tehran or Moscow. Orbital mechanics doesn't work like that.

Given the number of spy satellites whizzing round from a variety of nations, odds are that at least one was over the Indian Ocean at the time (plus, it may be ocean, that doesn't mean there might not be objects of interest bobbing around - foreign naval assets, etc). Whether any orbits happened to actually overlap with MH370 and capture anything of use is quite another matter. Releasing that imagery however could reveal information about your secret satellite's imaging capabilities.

8
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Govt: Citizens, we know you want 10Mbps. This is the last broadband scheme for that

rh587

Re: All well and good but....

But if you choose to live in the ass end of no where miles away from the nearest city then you should expect to get poor asdl speeds over your 2 pair copper.

My parents live about a mile out of a decent sized market town which has FTTC. However, they are the last property on their phone line which comes from a village two miles in the other direction. Infinity? Not a chance.

They cannot be defined as "out in the sticks" by any objective or subjective measure you care to define. But because of the quirky and patchwork manner in which the old PSTN network was rolled out over the years, they can't access services from the (much closer) FTTC-enabled cabinet. The only way they're going to get better than 1.5Mb ADSL any time soon is to get a wayleave across some fields and find someone willing to have some private fibre come into their garden and share their Infinity.

6
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Top rocket exec quits after telling the truth about SpaceX price war

rh587

Much as I like SpaceX's innovation and Musk's vision, I think I can relate to how the air force guys must be feeling about this. This is basically like being told by the beancounters that you can't get more of these shiny 100%-reliable Unix/Mac workstations that you are used to, and have to make do with virtualized Windows clients, because while slightly inferior, their three times lower price more than makes up for it.

Welcome to the commodisation of Space.

You might have plug-and-play appliances in your office providing local storage, VPN services or edge filing, you might even get some shiny Apple Macs for specific workloads. But your datacentre is going to be full of disposable whitebox servers because going hyperscale with HPE or Dell isn't necessary or affordable for your run-of-the-mill heavy lifting. It's cheaper to have spare boxes to spin up whilst you repair/replace failed servers than to pay for a branded box with additional redundancy.

Shiny branded boxes with expensive software licenses and lovely management tools become relegated to special workloads which can't be spun out to a cloudy cluster.

And so it is with space. For small satellites, anything that you're serially producing and can afford to stuff "+1" on the end of the production run because you lost a launch, you go with the ludicrously cheap option.

Consider - if you're at NASA building a one-off probe or bespoke bit of kit, you need to know that it's going up because you only get one shot. Likewise if it's a uniquely huge bit of kit that needs a heavy launcher. You pay the premium.

If you're building a dozen identical commsats, a string of common-framework surveillance sats or a global positioning constellation, you've got a production line going, and if you lose a launch, you just get the insurance and add one or two more satellites to your order, which is more than covered by the fact you're paying 1/3 on the launch.

Sure, it's nice to have the fancy workstation, but the world moves on...

0
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rh587

Re: Huh???

He said ULA's forthcoming Vulcan rocket will be much more practical, since the first stage of the rocket will parachute down to earth and be caught mid-air by a helicopter.

Yes. Practical. That was the first word I thought of when I head "First Stage" and "caught mid-air by helicopter" in the same sentence.

EDIT: Appears ULA's idea is to jettison the lower half of the First Stage and snatch the (expensive) engines of out mid-air, letting the fuel tank go. I was wondering how else they'd support that much weight.

So it's significantly more hazardous (regular sorties by heli crews to snag mid-air targets) and doesn't return the entire first stage...

2
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HTTPS is not enough: Boffins fingerprint user environments without cracking crypto

rh587

Re: Side channel attacks

So what happens when you have to address BOTH security AND efficiency at the same time? Say a high-security communique in an area or environment where power and/or bandwidth is at a premium?

Secure. Efficient. Cheap.

Pick two.

8
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Staff 'fury' as penny pinching IBM offers legal minimum redundo payoffs

rh587

Re: Interesting!

"Not planning to get any decent handovers from the staff leaving the building then? Good luck with that."

What handover? You don't make people redundant - you make roles redundant.

If you declare someone redundant, there can be nothing to handover.

My (teacher) mum was declared redundant from one post some years ago on the grounds they were discontinuing the course she taught. They then asked her to "handover" her (apparently redundant/obsolete) course materials to a new member of staff...

After a sit down with the bursar, he chose to enhance her redundancy package in preference to getting a call from her Union's solicitors after she handed over the offending emails.

16
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Everything bad in the world can be traced to crap Wi-Fi

rh587

Re: On the one hand...

Reminds me of our induction/welcome session at university. The library staff had just finished a very flashy powerpoint on all the services they offered (with very limited reference to actual books). They were followed by a chap from IT to give us the low-down on where the help-desk was, accounts, etc, etc. He had the mankiest, most dog-eared acetates you've every laid eyes on, which he duly plopped on the OHP.

He knew exactly how reliable the digital projector and A/V was.

16
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Brit firm unleashes drone-busting net cannon

rh587

"It would most likely fall under a the definition of a prohibited firearm, under the same category as any weapon of whatever description designed or adapted for the discharge of any noxious liquid, gas or other thing."

Eh, no more so than one of these.

One presumes these will not be mail-order and the company will sell it along with training to genuine buyers, in which case the Police would be unlikely to take too great an interest.

2
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rh587

The parachute seems like it would just add to the risk of the entrapped drone floating with the wind - potentially across the runway and towards aircraft awaiting clearance to go (with their engines spinning). On a windy airfield, there seems to be a lot of scope for it to drift some way from it's actual snaring point.

Surely better to dispense with the 'chute and let it fall out of the sky like a brick - presumably the owner isn't getting it back so it's final "landed" condition is not relevant?

0
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BBC telly tax drops onto telly-free households. Cough up, iPlayer fans

rh587

> This also highlights an interesting question, previously it was the ability to receive TV that meant you had to have a license (TV and aerial) so does this mean if you have a computer and the internet you may have to pay it?

The license has only been payable if you watch live TV (whether via broadcast or online simulcast) for quite some time. It is not longer based on whether you have equipment set up to do so.

To that end, this will continue in the same vein - if you watch live TV or catch-up iPlayer then you need a license. Simple possession of an internet connection and device-with-browser would not qualify as requiring a license.

0
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NASA funds new supersonic airliner research

rh587

"My only problem with Elon Musks hyperloop proposal is that they seem to make out it was 'his idea' bull, watch Genesis 2, or read some history books, the idea of running maglev inside a vacuum tube is old..."\

Tubes may be old school, but Hyperloop doesn't propose maglev. It uses air-bearings, which are a novel solution to the difficulty of maintaining a perfect vacuum - and puts errant ingressed air to good use rather than having to punch through it!

1
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Photographer hassled by Port of Tyne for filming a sign on a wall

rh587

Re: Not all security is like that, I'm not

"So, on what legal basis are you operating then?"

I would imagine - since he alludes to working some form of stadium or conference/exhibition centre - that the area/plazas surrounding the building may be private property (rather than public street), in which case they would have a lawful power to ask them to leave - much like a mall cop can require that you leave a shopping centre (because those tend to be private property - as we as being public places).

2
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rh587

Re: Unfortunately... you're wrong

"Theft is theft, there is no time limit or extenuating circumstances such as saying that you were going to return the item eventually."

Yes, you sort of do. With theft you have to show an intent to permanently deprive the owner of their property. It is the precise reason why the motoring offence of "Taking Without Owner's Consent" exists - because it became difficult to prosecute a joyrider for theft when they claimed they intended to return the car once they'd had a drive around - so they made it an offence to take the car in the first place.

In this case, go for Common Assault - use of unlawful force. The Mall Cops had no authority to harass him going about his lawful business on a public highway, nor to prevent him leaving the scene or seizing his property.

18
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Apple must help Feds unlock San Bernardino killer's iPhone – judge

rh587

"This is an absolutely chilling, apalling thing for a court to order."

No it isn't. It's the equivalent of the Feds identifying that the suspect has a safe deposit box, and getting a court order requiring the deposit company to hand it over, and render assistance in opening it (in the absence of the suspect's private key).

For the Feds to go to a court and request this and for the courts to say "Yes, this is reasonable" is exactly how due process is supposed to work! Whether they're getting a court-signed warrant to search your house, a subpoena to compel a witness to appear in court, or a court-order for a telco to disclose your call history.

4
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Ordnance Survey unfolds handy Mars map

rh587

Re: serious question

No. They address this in The Martian. With no satnav either, Mark Watney has to navigate through a combination of dead reckoning, rudimentary astronomy and landmarks/surface features.

4
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rh587

I'm sure it's no coincidence that they chose to map the exact area depicted in Andy Weir's book The Martian, recently filmed with Matt Damon starring.

The Ares 3 base is located in Acidalia Planitia, and he has to journey to the Ares 4 MAV in Schiaparelli Crater. He also goes and scavenges Pathfinder (marked) for it's comms array.

7
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Danish Sith Lord fined in Galactic Republic rumpus

rh587

The Saddometer sounds like a round on HIGNFY - now we come to the Saddometer of News!

0
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Windows 10 will now automatically download and install on PCs

rh587
FAIL

Daleks?

Cybermen surely.

"You will be upgraded. You will become like us. Upgrading is compulsory."

"Delete! Delete! Delete!"

5
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Reg readers battle to claim 'my silicon's older than yours' crown

rh587

"Yes, Pembrokeshire's Crytal Maze was a real thing apparently."

Yes it was, and I was taken there on a rainy day one August when it first opened! 12 year old me thought it was bloody brilliant.

2
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SpaceX breaks capsule 'chute world record

rh587

Re: Retire parachutes?

"Somehow I wouldn't want to sign the order for 'No, we don't need backup 'chutes any more, our retros are 100% reliable."

To be fair, they're not claiming 100% reliability. Which is why Dragon 2 has 8 motors in pairs - a main and a spare at every point.

Of course there's no point taking parachutes to Mars (that being their end-game) because at 0.0006 atmospheres they won't save you if the rockets fail, so the rockets need to be a man-rateable level of safe and reliable.

6
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Land Rover Defender dies: Production finally halted by EU rules

rh587

Re: Why are they ending it now?

"Bear in mind the Defender is basically hand made and so costs a fortune. I've been round the factory. The Range Rover is built by robots that glue and rivet the whole shell together and then some fiddly bits are added manually."

The numbers are staggering.

The Range Rover line produces 320 cars per shift, and their order book is thick enough to run 3 shifts a day.

For the past 12 months the Defender line has been running one shift a day making ~115 units.

So JLR were selling ~8-9 full fat £100k Range Rovers for every Defender, and on a huge margin. Defender is profitable, but not by very much.

3
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rh587

Re: Just

"All they needed to do was put a more modern, emissions compliant drive unit in the thing. There are a lot of them out there, even from their parent company."

It's not emissions. I mean yes, they would have to eventually - but the current unit has been running a lightly modified Puma engine from the Transit. The Transit will need a new engine in 2020, as will lots of other vehicles. Emissions aren't the reason, but they're another embuggerance that has made "now" the time to do it.

The specific reason it is going in January 2016 (and not 2020) is that as of next month new regs come in on airbags and general safety in commercial vehicles - they gave Defender a stay of execution when those regs came in for cars by reclassifying it as a commercial vehicle, but it's caught up with them.

You can fit a Series II door into the Defender frame, which tells you as much as you need to know about how much the bodywork has been updated over the decades and how much thought went into fitting such niceties as airbags (which didn't exist back then!).

They couldn't export to North America, and so the time had come to build from the ground up a new vehicle which could be exported globally and made with modern manufacturing techniques (not 3 guys with rivet guns fabricating the rear tub from a dozen separate panels when a modern design could be stamped in a second by a machine).

13
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Sainsbury's Bank web pages stuck on crappy 20th century crypto

rh587

Just had a look at the RBS site.

Their public site (rbs.co.uk) scores a C thanks to poor protocol support - they don't support better than TLS1.0 (they are at least using SHA256 certificates). This is probably because a quick check of their HTTP headers returns IIS6.0, which infers they're on Server 2003...

Happily, their digital banking site (rbsdigital.com) does much better, scoring an A with SHA256 certs and TLS1.2.

However, checking their headers returns BigIP - the OS for F5's load-balancing/traffic-managing/firewall range. This is not a bad thing in itself, but it makes you wonder whether they've simply stuffed a shiny new appliance in front of a creaking, archaeological dig of an environment to publicly offer good crypto whilst hiding all manner of sins within!

3
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Five technologies you shouldn't bother looking out for in 2016

rh587

Re: Five technologies you shouldn't bother looking out for in 2016

"Me: Ah. Um, basically, 'Linux' isn't just one thing. You see, without going into the politics of how open source development works, the middle bit of the OS is called the Linux Kernel, but lots of people then build their -"

Why would you say that?

Simple response is "Oh, yeah, there are different versions, like there's Windows Home/Premium/Enterprise. Some people even compile their own version for specific jobs. You just need Mint - that's Linux for Windows users".

Don't give them a choice.

27
2

Recall: Bring out yer dead and over-heating Microsoft Surface Pro power cords

rh587
FAIL

Re: Are "electronic" components involved in the failure?

"The amount of power drawn by a Surface will not cause a noticeable temperature rise in the cable. Simple test - next time you're making a cuppa, feel the kettle lead. That's taking 13A - way more than any Surface tablet, and it will be cool to the touch."

My kettle cable is significantly thicker than the cable for my laptop or tablet chargers.

Because it uses a thicker gauge of wire appropriate to it's 13A rating.

Resistance in a wire is inversely-proportional to it's cross section (which is proportional to the square of it's radius). The cross-section of a surface pro cable will likely be less than 10% that of a kettle lead, meaning it will get warm at much lower currents.

In this case of course, it's more likely to be excessively thin insulating sheaths getting damaged and allowing conductors to touch.

0
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PDF redaction is hard, NSW Medical Council finds out - the hard way

rh587
Facepalm

"It is more likely that the user is drawing black rectangles."

Or using the Highlight/Markup tools with the colour set to black, which would look to an inexperienced user like you're blocking over with a digital marker pen, but of course are designed to be whipped out once edits have been completed, and are entirely removeable.

4
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rh587

Re: OOPS

I've also seen it done the other way, where they knew they weren't adept with modern tech, so rather than risk getting it wrong, had printed the document, manually redacted PII and scanned it back in. Unfortunately, they hadn't used a sufficiently dense marker pen and you could still read the names through the black marks...

Me? In the absence of a decent PDF editor that allows permanent edits (obviously the preferred option), I grab the page and put black marks over in MS Paint or Apple Preview, export as a flat jpg and reinsert the page back into the document, or re-export as a new PDF.

Not elegant, but you can be absolutely sure that the PDF software hasn't just applied a layer of black "highlighting" or something - there's no indexing the data back out of a flat jpg (not without OCRing, and that won't work on the black blocks).

6
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BBC risks wrath of android rights activists with Robot Wars reboot

rh587

Re: Big hammer

"Many bots also 'evolved' righting mechanisms that effectively rendered the flipper bots toothless."

That depended on your strategy. Chaos 2 was usually let down by reliability, not the novelty of it's hoofing flipper, which was more than adequate to roll their opponent so they could shunt them in the pit or a patrol zone whilst they were busy righting themselves (Razer's SRiMech for instance was elegant but slow). That's assuming they hadn't flipped them out the arena entirely.

Battle Bots contestants by contrast never really got into flippers because they had an entirely enclosed arena with no way to eject your opponent from proceedings.

0
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Launch embiggens Galileo satnav fleet

rh587

The standard accuracy of GPS was 15m and is now "better than 3.5m".

So the Galileo public signal is good or better. The encrypted signal for commercial users is down to 1cm.

Also, they claim the constellation design gives better precision at higher latitudes than GPS or GLONASS, so even if you're only getting down to 1m on the public signal, you should be able to get that level more consistently in more places.

8
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VDI comes to the Raspberry Pi

rh587

Lots of non-financial reasons.

Anywhere you have remote offices handling personal information, or simply where the physical security is potentially an issue - you can deploy dumb terminals and keep everything in your nice, PCI/DPA-Compliant data centre.

Of course you could deploy cheapy fat clients and XenApp rather than full VDI, although people could still fall into bad habits and store stuff locally unless you go to the effort of fully locking the remote devices down (which then tends to reduce productivity and ends with users finding "creative" workflows).

There can be certain benefits for app-licensing, or significant hardware savings for demanding users - there could be scenarios where you have 3D modellers, CAD jockeys or animators, who need a hefty Quadro card plus a Tesla accelerator. But who only really strain their workstations in occasional bursts.

Virtualise say, two or three of them using nVidia's GRID product onto a single beefy machine which can give each of them the power when they need it, but saves the expense of three full-fat workstations, two of which are probably idling along at any given moment...

It's the same argument as virtualising servers. At any given time, not all your servers or users will be maxing out their machine. Indeed many of them will be hardly touching 10%, so throw them onto shared hardware.

Not suitable for every case, and Windows licensing eats into the potential savings more than a *nix ecosystem would, but suitable for many depending on their precise business and workload.

1
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Are second-hand MoD IPv4 addresses being used in invoice scams?

rh587
Joke

Re: Roll on IPv6

Forever?

"It's an older IP sir, but it checks out."

(Because it's that week!)

15
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Electrician cuts wrong wire and downs 25,000 square foot data centre

rh587

Re: opps

Yup.

Risk = Probability x Impact

When Impact = Total Business Outage, Probability needs to be a damn sight lower than 1%!

7
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'Personalised BBC' can algorithmically pander to your prejudices

rh587

"In a post-Saville world does the BBC HAVE any moral authority?"

The BBC employs over 20,000 people, with tens of thousands more indirectly employed via production companies, as freelance professionals, etc.

You'll forgive me if I decline to lump all of them (along with my uni mate who does incredible things with the Natural History unit) in with the champagne-swilling management of the 1970s-80s who turned a blind eye to god knows what

20
3

Taxi for NASA! SpaceX to fly astronauts to space station

rh587

Re: Boo, hiss

"It's not "making light of", it's saying "WTF are they doing this considering the imperfect safety record!!!". I had assumed that that failure would delay manned flights for many years."

Many years? Both shuttle disasters resulted in Shuttle programme pauses of under 3 years.

Falcon 9 is a much simpler vehicle with far fewer components, and a more vertically integrated supply chain. There's no reason why SpaceX shouldn't be able to investigate the incident, isolate the root causes (both physical and procedural), and return to flight in a much shorter period, especially as the next few flights will be unmanned and they can validate their work before putting meat bags up front.

Moreover, the telemetry showed that the Dragon capsule was responsive until it disappeared over the horizon, which is indicative that in a manned launch, the launch-abort process would have made the entire process survivable (albeit unpleasant). You'd have lost the mission but not the crew.

Dragon remains an inherently safer system than the Shuttle - because you can push a panic button and separate the astronauts from an exploding vehicle very quickly.

3
1

How to build a city fit for 50℃ heatwaves

rh587

We can learn a lot from our ancestors. Current form is to throw technology at the problem, but I'll always remember visiting the Amber Fort in Rajasthan and not being uncomfortably hot at all, despite the fact it was midday.

Why? Well, clever layout of the palace led to differential heating that meant wherever you walked you had a comfortable breeze keeping you cool both inside and out.

One of the Royal Pavilions on the roof also had a couple of big water tanks which would have dripped water down curtains of reeds, with evaporative cooling keeping the space within nice and cool. Clever stuff for the 1590s.

The latter possibly isn't the most efficient system going these days, but there are lots of lessons on building & street layout that could be learned.

0
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Chaos at TalkTalk: Data was 'secure', not all encrypted, we took site down, were DDoSed

rh587

Re: Sustained???

"On another note. How do you DDoS a frikin ISP."

Their applications and services are hosted on servers. Same as the rest of us. You don't have to saturate their network if your attack is designed to bog down their compute resource.

2
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Slander-as-a-service: Peeple app wants people to rate and review you – whether you like it or not

rh587

Re: Wonder what will happen...

"and I give it about 10 seconds live before this will go political. I'm willing to bet that one of the first people to appear on there will be Trump, and I want to watch that when he decides he doesn't like it - he's not exactly known for his gentle, diplomatic touch."

Apparently you add people using their phone number. They get an SMS informing them they have been added and is supposed to ensure that "you can only add and rate people you know".

Clearly the developers have never heard of doxxing. It may be 10 minutes before someone gets Trump on there rather than 10 seconds, but he'll end up there nonetheless.

6
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Blighty's Bloodhound 1,000mph rocket car unveiled ahead of record attempt

rh587

Re: Fantastic engineering

"In that case why not lock it onto rails?"

Because then it would be the world's fastest rail locomotive, not the fastest car.

3
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rh587

Re: "It's unlikely we'll see much return from all this" - WHAT?

"Do they know anything about science...?"

Well judging by the fact that Corbyn has just selected a Vegan as his Shadow Minister for Farming and Rural Affairs, we can surmise that if he wins the 2020 election, his science team will be comprised of people with doctorates in Homeopathy.

2
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rh587

Re: "it's unlikely we'll see much return from all this"

Absolutely. The UK Government's annual expenditure runs north of £500Bn. No problem whatsoever punting a couple of million at blue sky projects "because we can and it's awesome" when such projects offer international bragging rights and serve a reasonable educational purpose (e.g. Bloodhound were at Goodwood FOS this year with the REME doing lots of engineering stuff with the kids, not to mention all their outreach work to schools, etc).

4
1

CHEAT! Volkswagen chief 'deeply sorry' over diesel emission test dodge

rh587

Re: They are in big trouble

"I think the first estimates were around $18bn to rectify the problem, without taking into account fines."

That wasn't to rectify the problem. That was the potential bill if the EPA posted the maximum $36,000 fine per car across all half-a-million cars.

Actually rectifying the problem is on top of that, but the EPA may choose not to levy the full fine available to them (or agree a repayment plan over the next decade or so!).

3
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rh587

Re: Surely this is a form of fraud?

"That's nothing to do with urea injection which reduces nitrogen oxide emissions"

No, they're linked. You either run the engine slightly inefficiently, which produces low NOX and high Particulate Matter (and then deal with the PM via recirculation and DPF), or you run the engine hot which gives a nice clean burn with low PM but high NOX and deal with the NOX via AdBlue/Urea (SCR - Selective Catalytic Reduction).

You pick one strategy or the other, and this is seen especially strongly in off-road plant equipment, which is sold either with DPF (which increases diesel burn but requires no extra work) or SCR (which requires you to stock AdBlue on site as well as diesel).

DPF is favoured for rental fleets since it's often hard enough to get customers to put diesel in the right tank, never mind complicating the issue with Ad Blue! Other buyers go with products that meet emissions by using AdBlue.

AdBlue has not seen great penetration into cars yet (though there are some), because a lot of motorists simply don't want the hassle of filling two tanks and will live with their cars having to undergo a regen cycle now and then.

9
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US gov to Apple: COUGH UP iMessages or FEEL our FEDERAL FROWN

rh587

"* I know Greenland is still a part of Denmark, and taxes are high, but the server farms don't make any money and need to be cool; feel free to reply with improved suggestions TIA!"

Given how much cash Cupertino have parked in Ireland, they could surely just strike a deal with Denmark to buy Greenland and turn it into a tax-free tech-haven? Unlike every other micro-nation attempt, they actually have the resources to have a serious go at making it stick!

High speed connections to both sides of the Atlantic, efficient data centres, under their own jurisdiction?

5
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Drones need their own version of Asimov's laws of robotics – MEPs

rh587

Re: simple rules

"1) all UAV operators must hold a current PPL"

You can fly manned aircraft without needing a PPL. For UAV it's gross overkill and not actually necessarily the most appropriate qualification. Also, are you going to extend that to the diddy indoor rigs people are using for drone racing? Grouping diddy racing drones in the same category as big rigs carrying kilos of camera is downright silly.

It's rather more nuanced than that (you know, the same reason you need different licences to fly helicopters, Cessnas and Learjets).

7
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Anonymous UK 'leader' fined for revealing ID of rape complainant

rh587

Re: Justice

"Unfortunately, though, some guilty people don't get convicted of their crimes, so allowing people accused of rape to be anonymous would prevent women from protecting themselves."

You appear to be saying that if someone is found not guilty by the court, they should be treated as guilty by the rest of society for the rest of their life instead. No smoke without fire eh?

You're wrong, incidentally.

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