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* Posts by rh587

229 posts • joined 23 Mar 2011

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Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov

rh587
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Re: Plenty of sites warn you

Not quite. Most sites don't claim uploaded photos are exempt from copyright, but by using their service you grant the service provider a non-exclusive license to pilfer what they like.

So if I post a photo to Facebook, FB are within their rights to use that photo for their own purposes, including commercial and advertising. That still doesn't mean someone else has the right to pilfer it however.

Though as FB's minions strip all the metadata out of uploaded content, it potentially becomes difficult to trace origin once a photo has been saved and taken out of the context of FB.

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UK government officially adopts Open Document Format

rh587
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"Wonder if the EU will follow now."

They'll probably go the other way now Cameron's upset them, mandate .pages and .numbers and spend our taxes refitting the entire EU with Apple hardware.

Except for any British staff who will be issued Win95 boxes with MS Works.

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Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax

rh587
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What TRT said.

A 13-inch Macbook is indeed:

£1499 on the UK store

$1799 on the US store, which equates to £1054 today on xe.com.

However, that £1054 is sans-tax. After normalising it with UK VAT, that £1054 becomes £1265. So there's still a £250 (16%) premium for living in blessed Blighty, but one does need to be careful whether you're comparing against America's tax-free online sales, or against local sales tax, which in most states is less than 10%, compared to our VAT rate of 20%.

I did once hear the UK referred to as "Treasure Island" by someone working for a US consumer electronics company. We're known for apparently being prepared to pony up premium prices.

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Motorist 'thought car had caught fire' as Adele track came on stereo

rh587
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Re: Red X

"Though I do understand your irritation at apparently pointless lane closures"

That and generally inappropriate usage of matrix signs. Whoever controls the M4 signage West of the Severn is a cretinous, unimaginative moron. The number of times I have been driving back to merry England in poor weather and been greeted with "Caution: Poor Driving Conditions"

Yes. I know. I can hardly read the matrix through the driving rain. But actually I'd quite like to know if the M50 is closed*, or what the traffic is like over the Severn Bridge. You know, useful and pertinent information that I can't glean by simply looking at the road ahead.

*It was. I chanced it and ended up being taken round a circuitous diversion. Trundling across the Severn Bridge and turning left would have been quicker. Thanks for nothing. Whoever does the M6 signage does a much better job of picking out the important nuggets, though I'm sure they'll also get in the habit of leaving the shiny new managed speed limits on far longer than is strictly necessary.

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SpaceX FINALLY lobs six sats into orbit (don't mention the landing)

rh587
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Re: Trailblazer or also ran

Noone is suggesting SpaceX are technically superior to anyone in particular in NASA, current or historical. They're certainly organisationally superior to many established players in the fact they have no associated baggage or legacy, which makes them nimble and agile.

You don't have to be doing things new to be impressive. Lots of people died trying to go to the South Pole. Once it had been done, noone set foot again at the South Pole again for decades (though people visited the continent), by which time they'd worked out how to do things reasonably safely, and they went with aircraft delivered by the commercial aviation industry. These days, most people who go to Antarctica don't die, despite it remaining a hazardous and hostile environment.

Similarly, NASA did amazing things with a blank cheque in the 60s. Since then it has slowed, working out how to do those things - and more - without killing their astronauts in the process. The level of risk they were prepared to accept dropped after they had proved it could be done at all.

So what that kerosene rockets are an established technology? Internal Combustion engines are old hat, that doesn't mean a new Ford EcoBoost is comparable to a 2hp unit from 1902 or that the engineers are any less skilled in their trade. Similarly SpaceX will employ plenty of people the intellectual equal to the early space cadre engineers. Doesn't mean they're better, but it's also not ass backward - they're not inferior either just because (by chance of birth) they weren't first or because they don't have to do it with a slide rule and test their theories by putting a physical rocket on the pad - they can blow shit up in computers before they have to spend money on fabricating something which could kill the person strapped to the top of it.

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Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

rh587
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Re: What happened to the right to remain silent? @John G Imrie

Indeed. The right to remain silent is in place, and as worthless as ever. Silence means nothing.

The bit worth having (which is frequently referred to as the right to remain silent) is the right not to incriminate yourself.

However, that no longer exists. If you don't know who was driving your car when it got speed-gunned, the Police will assume it was the registered keeper despite the fact a rear-facing gatso will provide no conclusive evidence of who was driving.

Likewise a Judge no longer instructs juries that they may not infer anything from a refusal to answer a question.

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PANDA chomps through Spotify's DRM

rh587
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Re: Use spotify myself

For Spotify, it doesn't matter - it's a streaming service. You are paying a monthly access fee. If Spotify disappears then you move to another service.

The problem comes with things like iTunes (although iTunes specifically doesn't DRM anymore), where you are licensing the music in perpetuity (what we used to call "buying" - though you were only ever buying the vinyl, and licensing in perpetuity a domestic use license for the IP contained on it).

Unfortunately there is no guarantee of the Rights Manager existing in perpetuity. If they go bump, so does your music unless they release a tool to unlock everything as their dying act.

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You 'posted' a 'letter' with Outlook... No, NO, that's the MONITOR

rh587
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Re: But these are actually intelligent people ....

The best/worst one I had was with a laptop. I asked the owner "what's wrong with it"?

The answer I got was "your the computer expert, you tell me..."

I shoot target rifle in my spare time, and do a spot of coaching. I have a carefully crafted look for individuals who come off the range, put a target in front of me that looks like it's been peppered with a shotgun rather than carefully shot at with a rifle and ask

"So what happened there then?".

To which the simple reply is

"You didn't point the rifle at the middle when you squeezed the trigger".

The simplicity of this entirely accurate statement is not usually appreciated. However, since these are usually the same people who you can spend three hours coaching, and then forget it all by next week, I just smile, turn away and go coach someone who wants to learn.

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LONGER flights burning MORE fuel can CUT planes' climate impact

rh587
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Re: stupid question...

"yeah, planting trees doesn't actually trap CO2."

Yes. And no.

If you have a deforested area that you plant up, it will become a carbon store. Sure, individual trees will rot and cycle, but a forest ties up a lot more carbon compared to an open grassy plain or arable field.

Additionally, if you harvest it for building, furniture, etc, that carbon won't rot - in the case of hardwood it could last centuries if it's part of a decent building or worthwhile furniture (my parent's house contains 300 year old beams). In the case of wood getting mulched for engineered beams, those sorts of buildings don't tend to last as long before the next fad, but it still keeps the carbon locked up for a few decades longer than it otherwise would have, lengthening the cycle. It's not permanent storage (nothing is), nor does it put it back into the oil-bearing strata from whence it came, but it lengthens the cycle.

Of course offsetting for building usage assumes it's replacing something dirtier (in terms of embodied energy/carbon) like replacing a steel framework with wood or something.

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rh587
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Re: Reducing emissions

They already do. You can book a flight from Chicago to Winnipeg with about 3 different airlines. However, when you get to the gate, you're all getting on the same service regardless of who's logo is printed on your ticket or painted on the side of the plane.

That's why the likes of Star Alliance exist.

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How practical is an electric car in London?

rh587
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Re: On Street Parking

""spell the end of the ICE". Err, right. Not everyone lives in cities, you know. And some people even live near to power stations, which is simply where your pollution (in fact, a great deal more - given the inherently wasteful nature of electric generation and motive power) gets pushed.

I've an idea: re-build Battersea Power Station for the exclusive use of electric vehicles. Then London would see EXACTLY the consequences of all this "free, clean" electricity."

Mr Gray, a large gas plant with in-situ scrubbing and filtration would probably be a whole lot cleaner than the sort of catalytic converters you can sensibly squeeze onto a small vehicle. So yes, going to electric from ICE is a sensible idea, provided your stations are equitably located so as not to incur horrendous transmission losses.

And, you know, get the flock on and build the Gen IV nuke stations that should have been greenlit during Premier Blair's reign if our politicians weren't so utterly spineless when it comes to energy security.

Clean, safe, low carbon, can be turned on and off at will instead of (literally) going with the wind. Ensure at least one utilises a fuel cycle conducive to recycling our existing waste stocks, and sort out the boneheaded rules of what classes as "hazardous". Putting a watch with tritium elements into a drum of soil does not render that soil irradiated or hazardous in any sane sense of the term. Landfill the stuff that's less harmful than coal ash, recycle the good stuff and bury the vitrified remains of the relatively small remainder that are no good.

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AV for Mac

rh587
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Didn't know Sophos had a Mac offering.

Avast! have a free Mac offering for Home usage, and I've used ClamXAV as well in the past, though Avast! is probably more Mother-In-Law friendly.

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Tom Hanks NICKED my COPYRIGHTED PIC, claims Brit photog

rh587
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Re: Humbug

As Random Handle states, medals worn on behalf of someone should worn on the right. You wear your own medals on the left.

This is what Beckham got called out for at the Royal Wedding - he'd wore his OBE on his right, incorrectly as it was his.

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Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

rh587
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Re: Lower CO2 emissions maybe

"Anyway, I can't believe those figures. You could chop down a bunch of the vegetation if it's that bad. But the methane cost is a one-off. Once you've built a hydro-electric dam you've basically got carbon free electricity for ever. Sure you may have to keep repairing the dam, and buy new generators and impellors, but that's never going to have the same cost in methane."

It's not quite one-off. Due to seasonal changes in water level plant life can encroach on areas of the reservoir bed which are then re-flooded in winter. How bad this is varies from project to project - if you're flooding a deep rock-sided fjord or steep valley with a small surface area, then not very. If your reservoir is relatively shallow and wide, then a drop of a few metres can uncover hundreds/thousands of acres of land which can harbour plant life through the summer before being inundated again.

However, a lot of the statistics also only count the first 10 years of a reservoir's life, which is indeed bollocks when a well placed and constructed dam could easily serve duty for over a century, which will easily outstrip a fossil-plant unless it's exceptionally shallow and seasonal, in which case don't bother.

In this case, methane/CO2 arguments aside, this project was managing to hit pretty much every sore spot as (according to Wikipedia), it was liable to impact six national parks, eleven national reserves and twenty-six conservation priority sites, which is a stonking good effort by anyone's reckoning.

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World first: ANIMATED GIF of Mercurian SUN ZOOM from MARS

rh587
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I recall the 2004 transit better. Was at home, supposedly revising for exams, but as I had a few days till the next one and it was a gloriously sunny spell, opted to spend a happy few hours pointing a small telescope at the sun and plotting the transit across the piece of card that the telescope projected onto.

Dad had also thoughtfully provisioned a couple of layers of glass from a welding visor bonded together so you could safely observe it directly. Happy days.

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Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

rh587
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Re: arehole

"I've worked with computers for over 30 years but my daughter has no interest in them, my wife is more interested in them than my daughter and my wife is a nursery school teacher. My daughter wants to be a theatre set designer, something none of us expected with me and my wife being techies. My daughter is very comfortable using computers, knows a little BASIC programming, understands enough to see technology as a tool and nothing more and I'm happy with that."

I think this is an important point. Programming isn't just about writing kernels and drivers. If you get into theatre or stage stuff, then you may well end up getting into lighting routines, which may involve a level of programming at professional production level.

Likewise a teenage artist who decides they want to get into animation is going to find the ability to program Blender with Python plugins rather useful.

Similarly developing Photoshop add-ons, etc. Programming is becoming ubiquitous not just in actual application programming but as a supporting tool for other hobbies, interests and careers.

They don't need to learn all this in school, but they need to learn enough that they can dip further into it if they want to, and the idea of programming isn't scary and perceived to be at the top of an ivory tower.

The little bit of BASIC I did with an enlightened IT teacher at school certainly made life easier when I had to learn MATLAB and some R at university (the teacher's view was that teaching people to use Word or Excel was the job of English and Maths staff as they are effectively tools to extend the content of those subjects. In his mind teaching IT did not constitute how to use a specific productivity package, which was good because it meant he used his lesson time to actually teach us a bit about how computers worked, why they tended to break (user error), etc).

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UK govt 'tearing up road laws' for Google's self-driving cars: THE TRUTH

rh587
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Re: Driverless car

Although to be fair the DLR rarely reaches any speed worth worrying about since stations are barely 500m apart. There are 3 serving the Excel centre alone, and 4 in the square mile to spare the poor commuters having to walk all of 200metres in the morning.

First time I rode it I kept thinking "We're slowing down again? Back of the train's barely left the last station."

The western end is okay (at least 1km between stops), but if you're trying to get out East you're better on the Tube or going Overground by the time you've sat through the ExCel and London Airport stops and treat them as an express service compared to the "local DLR stopping service".

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The Strippers, Unicorn Computers and Martian Watches of Computex

rh587
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Re: Depressing marketing non-science

Whilst MaH is fairly unforgivable, the usage of mAh in itself is a matter of context.

Whilst 3000mAh is indeed 3Ah, it's at the top end of capacity within it's category, and when you're comparing it against smaller batteries, as small say as 800mAh, then it's appropriate to continue with the same notation, even if it's a little clunky.

If you were comparing car or leisure batteries by contrast, you would never use mAh because no such battery has a capacity of less than 1Ah.

By way of example, lets say you had a bunch of products differentiated by length. Most were between 200mm and 900mm, but a few at the top end a few stretched out to 1500mm.

You wouldn't use metres for all of them, because 0.295m is unwieldy - you'd just say 295mm.

Equally however, it would be silly to have half your product line marketed in metres and the other half in millimetres.

Yes, people would understand if you said "this is our 900mm product, and here is the 1.2m version" but it's ungainly - you'd say "here the 900 and the 1200 options".

And so it is with mobile tech batteries which have developed from hundreds of mAh (where it's perfectly sensible to use that notation), through to predominantly thousands of mAh, but the notation has stuck for the sake of (now) bottom end products.

Also, fundamentally, it's what's printed on the side of the product. It could be considered remiss in some journalistic circles to paraphrase the manufacturer's description of the product.

Is it really a problem? No. Not really. Not until phones start regularly hitting 10000mAh levels at which point pretty much everything below it will probably be at least 1000mAh and it becomes a lot more wieldy to use Ah as the frequency of products less than 1 will be small.

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Queen's Speech: Computer Misuse Act to be amended, tougher sentences planned

rh587
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Re: Shark Jumped!

The BBC have used the wording "written paedophilia".

So better burn those copies of Lolita now. Surely written paedophilia (assuming it is entirely fictional) is the very definition of a victimless crime, however distasteful it may be. In any case, the Head of the British Library can look forward to a lengthy stretch inside unless they burn a sizeable chunk of their Victorian literature.

Seems like just the sort of laws the Police love - it can mean pretty much whatever they want it to mean, giving grounds for arrest and thus grounds to search for "other evidence". In other words, a charter to go fishing.

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About to make a big bet? Don't crash out, cash in with the power of maths

rh587
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Interesting, so it appears my first Python script was a Monte Carlo Simulation, and I didn't even realise! Go me!

After an evening of imbibing some years back, some smartarse posed the Monty Hall Problem to the table. The next day, after much discussion, I wrote a little script to play the game a million times. Turns out you are indeed better off changing your door.

Of course the Monty Hall Problem is not especially difficult to solve deterministically - though it is a bit counter-intuitive, but a nice example to get your head around :)

Also a nice problem to pose to Python beginners on a 101 course - call the rand module, use it to set a couple of variables, simple While loop (n<1000000) and If-Else block and a couple of variables to count win/lose. Doesn't need many lines of code, but there's a few different elements in there to make them think, and they learn a bit of probability at the same time.

For bonus points ask for user input at the start for number of repetitions and whether the player changes their choice or not (rather than hard-coding the logic).

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Windows XP fixes flaws for free if you turn PCs into CASH REGISTERS

rh587
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@Pascal Monnett

"The proper lifecycle of a product is that it is retired when its market share becomes negligeable. Millions of customers are not negligeable. Software, as it has been said, has no date limit, so Microsoft should continue and support its product until at least 90% of XP users have switched to something else."

Would that be until 90% of the current users have moved to something different, or until 90% of the people who used XP in 2005 have moved to something different?

90% of people still using it is somewhat of a moving target!

- XP market share is down to between 8-20% depending on who you believe and how those stats are collected.

- Given that a proportion of those are either:

> Pirate copies (80+% of XP machines in China are on pirate copies)

> Embedded XP (which is still officially supported for most of this decade)

> Desktop XP being supported past EOL by the NHS et al paying M$ many dollars

(None of which count for the purposes of this discussion since freetards get what they deserve and the other two are supported).

It is entirely reasonable to suggest that actual legitimate desktop XP share is well below 10% as people have moved to Linux, OSX, or their laptops have died - whether by baking, battery dying or hinges cracking off and have been replaced with Vista, 7 or 8.

Therefore by your own criteria, MS are well within their rights to drop it as usage is below 90%.

It's no surprise that the big holdout for IE6 usage is China, still running hooky XP with the original browser and no updates.

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Space hackers prepare to reactivate antiquated spacecraft

rh587
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Pint

Re: Very nice

It's certainly one of mankind's most notable spacecraft, but probably not "famous", except in space circles amongst people who know about these things. The "most famous" plaudits probably go to the ISS, Mir, the Shuttle, Eagle Lander, the Millennium Falcon and the Enterprise - the one with photon torpedos, not the original Shuttle frame. Sadly, a lot won't have heard of ISEE-3, despite it's significant achievements.

Nevertheless, picking over a phrase is not the point.

A pint to the team for getting this far, in an endeavour best summed up as 'kin awesome.

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Graphics pros left hanging as Adobe Creative Cloud outage nears 24 hours

rh587
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Re: Cloud

Which is fine if you only need RGB support for digital/web media or desktop printing. Show me the industry-standard Open Source CMYK solutions for commercial print.

No one in Open Source land has got around to cracking CMYK yet (there's Separate+, but if CMYK matters that much to you, then it's not up to snuff - yet), and until they do Adobe will retain their strange hold on the industry

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Get cracking on STARTTLS says Facebook

rh587
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Re: Hmm

Yes... and no...

Clearly encrypting client to client is preferable for those who actually use desktop clients, or a webmail service that supports PGP/public-private key encryption. But sadly the general public are not up to maintaining their own PGP keys and doing that. They just want to fire off a barbeque invite quickly and easily.

However, for those using exclusively the likes of Hotmail, gMail, etc, encrypting in transit makes life that bit harder for spooks - they can't just dragnet them on the wire (as easily), they physically have to hack the mail server or get a warrant to access the messages at the provider (and unless you run your own mail server, no provider is immune to warrants and court orders, short of burning all the data like Lavabit chose to).

You're not wrong, in that end-to-end is far superior, but as most people don't actually store their email locally, it's a moot point. The data is no more secure than the SSL connection to the webmail interface they use to read and write their emails, thus an SSL-alike level of encryption in transit is appropriate.

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ULA says to BLAME SPACEX for Ruski rocket rebuff

rh587
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Re: Sad indictment

"Yes it is about making money, but it seems that in this case SpaceX have been concerned about how that money is made."

If by that you mean they are concerned that the money is not being made by them, then you'd be correct.

SpaceX want in on the government launch contracts. Have for a while, which is why they've been working towards certification and approval for those jobs. The recent politics offer an opportunity for them to dig the knife in and play the "Jobs for 'Mericans" card that the DoD can't be seen to ignore, and leverage it against the ULA monopoly.

Supply issues aren't really the issue. If ULA genuinely runs out of RD-180s they can deploy the All-American Delta in place of Atlas, they'd just prefer not to. It's more a case of embarrassing ULA and twisting the DoD's arm to review the incumbent arrangements.

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Mozilla axes HATED Firefox-ad-tab plan ... but will try again

rh587
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Re: Sounds to me like...

Ironically of course, Mozilla is funded in no small part from the many millions Google pay them to be the default engine in the search bar (which incidentally is why a search engine is no longer my home page, because why default to search when I have a search bar permanently available?).

I'm not sure why people should be so conflicted with a few ads or sponsored add-ons here and there - provided they are not overly intrusive, and respectful of DNT settings, etc.

Firefox is already funded from sponsorship, ironically from their biggest competitor, which is why I'm sure they're keen to diversify their income stream.

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Spy sat launch wannabe SpaceX fails to stop rival gobbling Russki rockets

rh587
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"“Sadly, SpaceX’s frivolous lawsuit caused unnecessary distraction of the executive and judicial branch and increased tensions with Russia during a sensitive national security crisis,” the alliance said."

Yes, frivolous, I can see exactly how the awarding of a 36 core contract (which at the claimed $400m/launch amounts to $14.4bn) could be described as "frivolous".

But it's certainly not frivolous for SpaceX's bottom line, not frivolous for the US taxpayer, and definitely not frivolous for the bottom line of a bloated whale of a corporation who will struggle enormously in a free market where SpaceX can undercut them by up to 75% (and where Virgin LauncherOne may drop the price even further for small payloads in very low orbits, which fits the bill rather well for some of the short-lived, very-high-res spysats that noone knows about, especially as WhiteKnightTwo-alike craft can operate from any old airfield that offers an optimal launch profile).

Much cheaper to laugh them off as boisterous kids and pay the right people to make sure the "grown up" supplier gets the grown up contracts.

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Cold War spy aircraft CRASHED Los Angeles' air traffic control

rh587
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Re: If you only knew how old that gear is

Talking to a controller at NATS a few years back when they were introducing their electronic system, I gathered it also made the handling of a lot of the US-bound transit traffic from Eurocontrol through to the Atlantic a lot simpler as that traffic was already at cruising altitude and didn't usually need a lot doing to it, so the system could accept the "digital strips", effectively doing the paperwork and just let the controller keep an eye on it, focussing on sorting out those flights that actually needed at ascend/descend from/to airports or lower flight levels.

As he said though, it's nice, but when you have a problem, like an erroneous number on a strip, you can't physically throw it at an ATC assistant and have them figure it out, you've got to work out what's wrong, and manually correct it yourself, which distracts you from the rest of your airspace.

That said, errors shouldn't occur (as often) because the data transfer is automated, so no mistaking what the lovely Belgian controller said through their accent, and there were obviously failsafes that flagged for attention if you were asking an aircraft to achieve orbit or go Mach 7.

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HALF of London has outdated Wi-Fi security, says roving World of War, er, BIKER

rh587
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"I would imagine a large amount of unencrypted access points are "guest APs", where you log in with a username and password after connecting, or perhaps no authentication at all (by design)."

That and decade old domestic broadband routers that have sat on the phone stand since they were delivered, only being replaced if the owner moved house and was sent a new router for their new line, or if it went on the fritz. My parent's Orange Livebox went on 5 years before a thunderstorm spiked the phone line and the router with it, and it's replacement has been going for the best part of a decade.

No reason they will replace it unless it dies or they get sent a shiny new box for a fibre connection, which won't happen because fibre isn't coming to their rural backwater. Ever.

On the plus side their old farmhouse has "proper" walls built of stone and brick, not plasterboard and wood, so the wifi barely makes it downstairs, much less outside the house or the mile to their nearest neighbour (who has no line of sight in any case). The odds of anyone sniffing that access point are somewhere approaching nil.

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PEAK APPLE: Mystery upstart to hurl iLord from its throne 'by 2020'

rh587
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Re: Apple don't have anything in the cloud? Don't think about data?

"Like everything Apple has, Google has already done it, and it's better/cheaper/more comprehensive."

iTunes Store:

- Launched April 28, 2003

- 26 million songs

- 190,000 TV episodes

- 45,000 films

Google Music:

- Launched November 16, 2011

- 18 million songs

So Google has managed to "already do it" 8.5 years behind their biggest rival, with a 2/3 catalogue offering.

Price or user-friendliness notwithstanding (UI being in the eye of the beholder, and pricing no doubt varying label-to-label), remind us again how Google beat them to the punch with a more comprehensive solution?

Google do lots of things better than Apple. That doesn't mean they beat them to the punch every time. Nor that Apple don't have the edge in their own niches. They have a formidable wealth of experience and IP which is why they are where they are.

Remind me how old Sergei Brin was when Apple was developing the Newton arm-in-arm-with-ARM? Google didn't get there first now did they?

That said, Google was founded in 1998 and was a formidable force in search by 2003. It's not impossible that a disruptive start-up could be a household name in 5 years. If it replaced Apple though it would only because one of the other big players had toppled Apple with some game-changer.

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Yosemite National Park bans drones

rh587
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Re: Not much lighter...

As you say, I'm sure you can get permits - there is no way the State Tourism Board won't continue to use the likes of the Copter Kids or heliguy for stunning aerial video, even if they do use a nasty petrol drone to loft their Red Epic skywards (granted those drones are not exactly in the same league as iPhone-controlled hexacopters).

That said, people need to share and share alike. Some people enjoy hiking, some people enjoy taking on the Rubicon Trail in their 4x4. Of course the British Ramblers would have anything that isn't a pair of legs banned from the countryside, whether it be 4x4 offroading, dirt biking, clay pigeon shooting or anything else, and I'm sure similar lobby groups exist in the US.

Introducing a permitting system is reasonably sensible for freelancers or private individuals pursuing their hobby, but I equally don't see why that should exclude the use of drones at all, whether privately or for organised drone weekends, photography contests, etc, etc. Using drones to get photos you can't be bothered to climb a hill for is just idleness worthy of a good slapping, but equally they offer opportunities that are physically impossible without an aerial platform of some description.

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The Reg Quid-a-Day Nosh challenge: What's the point, exactly?

rh587
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Indeed. There's a list of biggest causes of death, split out to Developed/Undeveloped Countries on Wikipedia, derived from WHO figures.

Malaria is well below HIV/AIDS and various non-communicable conditions, although the list is also a bit squiffy with such groupings as "Childhood Diseases" and "Diarrhea", which can be caused by anything from diet to a range of diseases and parasites.

So it does no favours to wing round inaccuracies like "most prolific killer" and the rest, but it's certainly a shockingly awful way to go and worthy of following the Dodo and Smallpox into the choir invisible.

Happily GSK have a vaccine which has been trialled, seems to work reasonably well and is now going through regulatory approval. Better yet it's been developed in association with a non-profit and with support from the Gates foundation, and should be available reasonably cheaply for routine usage, rather than as a hugely expensive branded product. Of course you still need to nail the parasite unless you want to vaccinate in perpetuity.

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Titsup UK Border IT causes CHAOS at air and seaports in Blighty

rh587
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Re: Lack of customer service...

I've always wondered why it is that when I land in Manchester there is without fail a huge queue for a single manned border desk, until about 20 minutes later when a handful of stragglers wander up and start processing people. They know when the plane is going to land, and they know it's capacity. They know broadly how many people will be pitching up at Immigration in each terminal at any given time. Now if it was once or twice you could assume they perhaps were haring over from another terminal which had suffered a late landing and so they'd been delayed waiting for those passengers to come through before coming across.

The consistency however suggests Border Patrol staff deployments are run by the same bod who did the Olympic Games staffing rotas for G4S...

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DreamWorks CEO: Movie downloaders should pay by screen size

rh587
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Re: Dear Mr. Katzenberg

"From the same people who think putting the "you wouldn't steal a car" ad on a DVD (unskippable) that someone just bought is a good idea."

Featuring background music that they themselves had stolen no less.

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Amazon veep: We tweak our cloud code every 16 seconds – and you?

rh587
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Re: To make it even simpler.

Yup. Your home rolled system may be two years behind the curve but if it's stable, secure (relatively speaking) and in your own building, then the NSA either has to hack it or come and physically seize your hardware.

If you're in the UK/France/Germany you're subject to British/French/German jurisdiction and only that jurisdiction. Not automatically subject to American jurisdiction via Amazon/Google/Microsoft/cloud of choice.

The Americans can ask but will have to pitch up to a local court like everybody else (or break in and extraordinarily render your gear. And BOFHs have ways to deal with pesky people like that *kzzrt* ).

If you're on AWS they'll get, regardless of what a British/French/German court has to say about it.

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Why two-player games > online gaming: See your pal's shock as you bag a last-second victory

rh587
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Worms - many a lost hour! Got Armageddon on iOS and regularly play online against old school friends for the nostalgia even though we've gone our separate ways geographically. Still not the same as the mandatory "hotseat" game whenever we meet up, which offers much mirth over a beer.

And there's not much that can beat GoldenEye and MarioKart 64 split 4-ways.

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

rh587
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Re: Odd timing

"If the kernel can't protect itself against bugs in user-space programs, it isn't a very good kernel. Linus is free to have as low an opinion as he likes of the systemd people concerned, but he does need to change his kernel to address this. It's a DOS attack vector and if it was in Windows then we'd be queueing up to explain how it proves Microsoft's inherent shit-ness."

That. Even if you accept the argument that systemd is special, and should therefore be held to a higher standard in return for privileges, the fact that the system can be DOSed by the absence of any sort of flood control isn't good. systemd needed the fix, but so does the kernel.

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

rh587
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Re: Animals

"If such a person were promoted to CEO of an organisation and you were a woman/Jew/black person/non bigot would you want him as your boss? If you were a customer would you want to give "him" money? If you were a stakeholder, would you want to build add-ons or supporting tech that enhanced the prospects of his company?"

It's funny, OKCupid were quite happy to throw popups at firefox users, but I don't see them putting their money where their mouth is and stripping out any and all JavaScript from their site and embracing alternative client-side technologies. If they're opposed to any technology Eich is associated that would be a key port of call.

But that costs time and money, whereas an hour embedding a browser detect and pop-up telling users to change browser doesn't really.

Okay, he made a contribution to a campaign that many people considered to be narrow minded and unjust 6 years ago. His statements since suggest a change of heart though only he knows if he's sincere or not.

I do however find it a bit hypocritical to campaign against his appointment as a company CEO when you're quite happy to build your company on the strength of his other works.

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Driver drama delays deep desert XP upgrade

rh587
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Brings back memories of confusion when I built my current desktop. Fired up, installed W7, no ethernet.

WTF? Mid-range Gigabyte gaming board - nothing especially exotic and it can't find the ethernet?

Remind me how many Mobos come without an ethernet port? I'd foolishly assumed that sort of thing would be fairly standardised...

Have to say I've always been reasonably impressed with edimax kit - cheap and feature rich, although their product numbering conventions are fairly horrific. Sure there's a system in there somewhere but blow me if I can figure it out although something along the lines off "bigger = better" seems to predominate - doesn't tell you anything about the kit though.

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iFixit boss: Apple has 'done everything it can to put repair guys out of business'

rh587
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Re: plus ca change c'est la meme chose

"Apple have always done whatever they can to keep repairs and maintenance in house, through strictly limited spares availability to legal means. Ever since the original Macs and maybe even before."

I wouldn't go that far. Mac Pros were obviously just regular desktops, and the original aluminium unibody Macbook has a simple catch to get to the hard drive and battery without the use of tools, and the rest of the mainboard is a couple of screws away. Getting into the screen needs a heat gun to get the glass off but that's the worst of it. As a whole an absolute delight to get into - HDD, battery and mainboard replacements are easier than most laptops of any make.

The iMacs were also not too bad with magnets holding the glass on until they went over to glue. Worst part was lifting the 27" panels out which gave me the fear, and then trying to get the glass back on dust-free.

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The Reg's desert XP-ocalypse aversion plan revealed

rh587
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Re: PDF

SumatraPDF surely? Or Foxit Reader at a push - less lean than Sumatra but the download package and install footprint are both smaller than Adobe, and Foxit doesn't nag you constantly to update thanks to the bloody update processes it runs in the background "for your convenience", which on older hardware is going to compromise performance unnecessarily.

If you are going to inflict something Adobe-based on them then be sure to clean out the update processes that sit in the background consuming CPU cycles, RAM and bandwidth, and just add checking for updates to the admin's weekly maintenance list along with running CCleaner and the like.

And a vote for LibreOffice over OpenOffice.

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Boffins working on debris float models to track MH370 wreckage

rh587
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Re: Looking for what isn't there?

"Even if the only bits of data they were transmitting was the current location of the black box, that would be a vast improvement. Can anyone count how many times they have had these desperate (and expensive) searches for the black boxes?"

The black box does contain a radio beacon.

On land this works great (unless they ditch into a narrow valley that blocks the signal, but generally they don't).

Under even a couple of hundred feet of water (much less than the thousands it could have sunk to by now), radio does not work terribly well. Sonar transponders do exist but are bulky compared to the size of the black box itself and you still need to be within a few kilometres to pick them up unless you attach a hefty power source, in which case you're into such a large device that it likely won't survive impact (or if you've reinforced it sufficiently it'll weigh so much as to eat into the cargo allowance which airlines will only accept up to a point).

The idea of carrying a 3 or 6 cheap EPIRBS on the basis one of them would make it out is not a bad one, and would give the point of impact for sunken wreckage, as well as drifting with floating wreckage until it's battery died. Looking at the Wikipedia page for Emergency Distress Beacons, a water-activated class of aircraft transponder does exist, but perhaps isn't a standard fit for civil aircraft - more for naval SAR usage, recovering ditched fighter and helicopter crews or something?

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Google grabs Gmail-using HTTPS refuseniks and coats them with SSL

rh587
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"So they encrypt them in transit so 'other people' cannot snoop (as easily) but assume that does nothing for THEM mining your data for profit or giving government agencies access via a court order etc.?"

No, but that's the choice you make when you select a service to to use rather than a home email server.

At least they're trying to protect us from the numpties who use their email and the like over coffee shop wifi and make it less trivial to snoop on their traffic. Doesn't matter how careful we are if at the other end it's being beamed across Starbucks unencrypted.

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Oxfam, you're full of FAIL. Leave economics to sensible bods

rh587
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Re: Erm... really?

Hmm, downvote. Guess someone from the NUS reads El Reg.

What's wrong? Still smarting from Southampton telling you to bog off. Again. In 2012?

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rh587
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Re: Erm... really?

"Why does a "feed the hungry" charity need to have a position on the Israel/Palestine question?"

Pretty much exactly why a bunch of Student Unions broke away from the NUS over the past 15 years. Their reps got bored of going to the Annual Conference and sitting through days of debates on what the NUS position should be on Israel/Palestine, arms dealing, or other matters broadly irrelevant to students, and only of interest to the few political activists who were practising for a career in national politics.

And paying affiliation north of £60k/yr for the privilege.

They saved their money and poured it into the media departments, sports union, bars and cafe - things that directly improved the facilities available to the students.

The NUS, seeing affiliations dropping are starting to reform before they go bust, but there's a fair few Unions - Southampton at the head of them - who don't see much reason to go back unless it's going to pay for itself (which at the last referendum on rejoining was somewhere to the order of £80k/yr).

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MPs urge UK.gov to use 1950s obscenity law to stifle online stiffies

rh587
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Re: So...

Such a hardware firewall is also trivial to bypass by yanking the main network uplink and plugging it direct into the router, unless your system is playing the role of broadband modem as well.

Of course most people rolling their own today are technical enough that they'll notice the log goes dead about 90 seconds after they popped out to the shops and starts showing traffic again around the time they were expected back.

Average Joe won't know that if it's supposed to be a plug, play and forget solution.

I recall a guy on Dragon's Den touting a slot machine that killed an HDMI connection when it ran out - you gave your kids a weekly "gaming allowance", and the system cut the feed after x-minutes. You could set what a token was worth, etc.

From a technical standpoint I couldn't see how that wouldn't prevent a kid just plugging the cable direct into the TV when their parents were out, or obtaining their own cable from Tesco if you had a retention device on the timer (because the console and TV wouldn't have retention at their ends), or you could just use a component/composite connection or whatever was offered on the back of the console rather than HDMI!

Noticing that the system was being circumvented would require "parenting" to take place, and if you're going to take an interest in your kids like that then you can just tell them to turn it off and go play outside, which is far cheaper and easier as Duncan Bannatyne put in rather more curt terms!

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Help a hack: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit?

rh587
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Re: What's in your ultimate Windows XP migration toolkit ? @ AC

"Anyway, until there was a budget for MS Office of some more recent generation, the new machines all got LibreOffice in hopes it would cover most needs. It turned out to be a huge pain as they had a bunch of frequently used documents that LibreOffice doesn't render correctly. These users are mostly nurses and have very little interest in learning any new software. Free is nice, except when it doesn't work correctly and is confusing to those used to other products."

Fair point, but reading the original article the centre only opened in 2013, and the machines are running XP, which surely means second hand, so there's the assumption the spec is known and they'll all actually run W7. It's a bit astonishing that an AU$3m centre didn't include budget for a half dozen new boxes, which in April 2013 would have been W7/8.

Also from the original article there's a mixed ecosystem of XP and Mac (again, vintage unknown), and a bunch of locals come in to charge their iPads and the like, so although the locals are perhaps naive of the nastier corners of the web they're not stupid, just uneducated and can learn alternative packages.

If the Win boxes are hand-me-downs, we don't know whether they're all identical - some might take W7 and others not. Indeed, if they are second hand, do they have the original XP install media - if the W7 install goes bad can they roll it back, or might Linux be the next move to unbrick it?

It's certainly worth taking a couple of linux flavours, something live for troubleshooting (GParted, memtest, etc) and also to leave there if any boxes aren't playing nice with W7, either as a desktop or relegated as a firewall/network cache box.

Also, I know the article is aimed at the PCs, but if the Macs are a newer vintage, take a copy of Mavericks, if they haven't already dragged it down over the web...

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Shuttleworth: Firmware is the universal Trojan

rh587
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Re: He's right... and wrong!

"How about replacing a camera's firmware to make it a standard UVC device or to make the LED always come on when it is recording?"

My first thought was the Magic Lantern firmware add-on for Canon cameras to provide a whole host of improved functionality for videographers such as being able to turn off the Automatic Gain Control and a bunch of video stuff which for obvious reasons is generally a poor cousin to the stills functionality.

It's entirely proprietary and undocumented - Canon would really rather you didn't, and bought a nice expensive video camera off them as well, so the guys behind it reverse engineered the DIGIC processor by literally just putting an LED on the board and reverse engineering it from the hardware up. Quite a feat of brain power and logic!

If man can make it, man can break it...

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Straight to 8: London's Met Police hatches Win XP escape plan

rh587
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Re: How about ....

The bluff has more credibility since Munich went FOSS. Though they took the best part of a decade to fully switch, and XP support runs out this year next month.

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