* Posts by dajames

414 posts • joined 20 Mar 2011

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Cambridge boffins: STOP the rush to 5G. We just don't need it

dajames

Re: Why can't we have both?

As soon as 5G turns up, 5G phones will be on the market within minutes. The Sheep will go "ooooo, must have new shiny" and want one...

Yes, the sheep will do that, while those of us who've seen this all happen before will say "I'm not buying a 5G phone until there's actually a 5G network I can use, and I can tell which of the handet manufacturers implemented 5G correctly/implemented the correct flavour of 5G.

If there's ever going to be a need for 5G it would be helpful to have the standard(s) hammered out well in advance, though, otherwise some foolish manufacturer will start making handsets that implement some draft that turns out to be incompatible with the final standard.

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Microsoft releases free Office apps for half of all Android phones

dajames

Tail?

There will be a sting in the tail, nothing is ever free from Microsoft.

If it is indeed true that MS make more money in licensing from every Android sale than from every WinPhone sale, then I can see why they might be very keen to encourage Android sales by offering free software.

Of course, the thought of (still) being able to lock users into (some version(s) of) their own office applications must have some appeal as well.

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Samsung caught disabling Windows Update to run its own bloatware

dajames

"... it isn't as egregious as the Lenovo Superfish debacle"

Isn't it?

It's pretty damn close.

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dajames

Re: Windows Update is a nightmare

I set Windows Update to notify, then I make sure the damn thing isn't trying to install Bing desktop or some equally stupid nonsense, download updates at a time of day when my internet bandwidth is cheap, and install at my convenience.

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Foxconn's going to 'exploit' Indian labour? SCORE! Bye, poverty

dajames

Re: It;s almost like they do it on purpose...

I think it was Tony Benn who opined, "if we could have full employment killing Germans (during the war), why can't we have full employment teaching/healing/mending roads etc., etc."

Why not indeed?

Which shows just what a monumental cretin Tony Benn was.

I think you're failing to recognize a rehetorical question.

The point Benn was making was that if it is possible in wartime to engage the population and persuade them to dedicate everything to the (destructive) task of killing Germans, then it should be possible to persuade them in peacetime to dedicate themselves to the (constructive) tasks of teaching, healing, road-mending, etc., which are as necessary to our continued well-being.

I think this shows two things: On the one hand it is always easier to destroy than to build, and on the other hand it is always easier to motivate people when there is a clear and present danger to their well-being. Getting people to respond to a threat they cannot perceive has never been easy, and that is one of the tragedies of modern society.

Tony Benn was actually a very intelligent man, but one who was monumentally bad at getting others to see the point he was trying to make.

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JavaScript creator Eich's latest project: KILL JAVASCRIPT

dajames

Re: Kill JavaScript?

JS code can and should be beautiful, expressive and elegant, but it will happily offer you enough rope to hang yourself. Sure it might be different rope to that of C, but nonetheless it will gladly hand you the rope if you ask for it.

That, surely, is why JavaScript IS the problem (or part of it, anyway).

A safer language would be beautiful, expressive, and elegant without going around handing out unwanted ropes to all an sundry. Given that half the programmers in the world are of no better than average ability (for some definition of average) we should surely strive to ensure that they use only languages that keep their ropes to themselves.

Snobbery and jealousy have long played a part in the JS world, after all - we all know it's not a "real language" don't we?

Snobbery and jealousy have nothing to do with it. JS is a language that is easy to use badly and difficult to use well.

They say that a bad workman blames his tools -- but the truth is that a good workman knows to choose good tools, and to care well for them. In this case JS is the only tool available, and while a good workman might prefer to avoid it he has little choice. It is a tragedy that such an unsafe tool has become the de facto language for web programming.

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Testing Windows 10 on Surface 3: Perfect combo or buggy embuggerance?

dajames

Re: I almost feel sorry for Microsoft

Yes, exactly, and ...

Visibility (don't hide the buttons)

... or the menus, or the keyboard shortcuts.

Affordability (make the buttons look like buttons)

... make sure that the keyboard shortcuts are obvious (mnemonic).

Hiding the keyboard shortcuts is excusable only when there is no keyboard.

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Remake, remodel: Toshiba Chromebook 2

dajames

Re: Please have mercy...

These machines were quite successful - to the extent that Microsoft decided that they were a threat to them. I may have the precise facts wrong here - let someone who knows better correct me - but my understanding was that they enabled a very basic version of Windows 7 to be installed on similar machines at a very low price. This meant that people were able to get Windows boxes at a similar price level - normally with larger, non-SSD boxes.

Yeah, more-or-less right.

The original netbooks had barely enough storage to run the Linux distro with which they were supplied, and it was hard to squeeze Windows on at all, but various people did manage to trim XP to fit, usually without buying a licence, and Microsoft noticed. Later netbooks had more flash storage -- or even a hard drive -- and Microsoft started to offer very low cost OEM licences for XP for these machines.

Some netbooks of the XP vintage were nice little machines, and although it was hard to find one for sale with anything other than Windows the "Microsoft Tax" on them was very small, and they made very nice portable and cost-effective Linux laptops for those that wanted them. I still have Ubuntu (14.04 -- the latest LTS) on my Acer AO751h.

Microsoft later released the "Starter" edition of Windows 7 for netbooks. This was basically a customized Windows 7 Home that was limited to handling a maximum of 2GB of RAM and a 1024x600 pixel display. This is what really killed the netbook -- too little RAM and a crappy display resolution.

I doubt that Microsoft imposed the limits specifically to kill the netbook, I suspect they did it so that people who wanted a "normal" home PC or laptop would have to pay more for at least Win7 Home ... but the effect was to ensure that all netbook hardware was limited to the Win7 Starter hardware spec. -- it was that or suffer a ~£70 (at retail) price hike.

The manufacturers turned their attention to Ultrabooks -- MUCH higher spec hardware, and price tag in which the cost of the Windows licence could more easily be lost.

Like it or not, Linux has too small a share of the market for it to have been worth the manufacturers' while to make higher-spec netbooks just for the Linux market.

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Screw you, Apple! We're still making phones no one wants – Samsung

dajames

Re: No Removable battery and no Micro SD card slot

... the non-replaceable battery and no SD slot are going to be necessary to make a sealed robust housing.

You might think so ... but Samsung managed to put an SD card slot and a removable battery into the standard S5 and the ruggedized S5 Activ, both of which have almost the same IP rating.

S5 on GSM Arena

S5 Activ on GSM Arena

Samsung claim that the S6 Activ is IP68 rather than IP67, but an IP68 rating is supposed to mean that a device is proof against "continuous immersion" in water to a depth defined by the manufactuerer but "generally up to 3m".

See Wikipedia

Samsung's claim that the S6 Activ is proof against immersion for up to 30 minutes at a depth of 1.5m is a little better than the minimum for IP67 but it is NOT IP68.

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UK safety app keeping lorries on the right side of cyclists

dajames

Re: Cyclists take note lorries don't see you.

It doesn't matter what the rights and wrongs are. If you cycle up the side of a lorry, the driver can't see you. If you are in front of him, unless you are a long way in front of him, he can't see you.

The rights and wrongs DO matter. What you've highlighted here is that HGV cabs do not afford enough visibility to enable them to be driven safely on public roads. They have the WRONG design.

That cyclists do not appreciate this, and therefore behave inappropriately when in close proximity to an HGV is a secondary, not a primary, cause of accidents.

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Samsung's bend blame blast: We DEMAND a Galaxy S6 Edge do-over

dajames
Devil

Re: "You mean the watch pocket?"

... since the wristwatch rendered the pocket watch obsolete ...

What? When did that happen?

I demand a pocket smartwatch! (I could, maybe, use it as a phone ...)

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Got an Android mobe with a virus? Congrats, you're The One Per Cent

dajames

Re: Google can rest easy then

The old UK billion (i.e. a million squared) is known as a 'billiard'.

You've missed your cue!

Er, no. The old UK billion is known by the modern crowd (those who use the term "billion" to mean 10^9) as a "trillion".

Those of us who still use the term "milliard" for a thousand million know that "billiard" is the term for a thousand billion (that is 10^15).

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Siri, you're fired: Microsoft Cortana's elbows into iOS, Android

dajames

Re: When do we see an Windows phone with Android?

The hysteria about Secure Boot was massively overblown and a lot of people fell victim to FUD about it.

Quite. Secure Boot is a bit of a PITA, but all well-implemented security measures have to be if they're not to be trivial to circumvent.

The biggest "problem" with it is that the UEFI foundation itself did not (was not empowered to) set up a vendor-neutral Certification Authority to issue boot key certificates ... so when boards started to ship with Secure Boot enabled the only keys available for them to ship with were Microsoft's keys. Fortunately Microsoft have been quite decent about signing others' code and in mandating that Secure Boot must be able to be disabled (at least on x86).

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Vodafone: Can't make calls on our network? Use Wi-Fi

dajames

Re: Its a shop, not a phone mast

Mobile phone shops in areas with poor coverage employ femtocells to provide some coverage within the shop ... so, yes, it's a Vodafone shop therefore it is a phone mast.

It's only a femtocell, though, and 50m away is probably too far.

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Android SDK nonce flaw lets hackers fiddle with your Dropbox privates

dajames
WTF?

Android SDK nonce flaw?

Shirley, you mean Dropbox SDK for Android nonce flaw?

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dajames
Headmaster

Re: Dont use third parties

... those that are making money from selling broken systems don't really give a shit providing the lawyers draft a EULA that admonishes them of responsibility

I think perhaps the word you were scrabbling for is "absolves"?

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The Revenue achieved RECORD numbers of e-tax returns ... by NOT shifting to GOV.UK

dajames

Re: Did they hire the Barclay's designers?

Looks like they hired the muppets who have made Barclay's online banking so slow and barely usable.

No, the gov.uk site looks as though it's been designed to make Barclays look good by comparison. At least the Barclays site contains the services I need to use and I can find them with only moderate unnecessary faffing around amongst the draff.

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Thecus N4310 4-bay: A NAS-ty beast for the budget-conscious

dajames

Re: Drive trays?

problem is drives aren't a standard size they come in loads of different thicknesses.

These are 3.5" SATA hard drives. There is a standard size and although there are now some thinner versions in lower capacities any drive worth putting in a NAS is typically going to be high-capacity and so the full 1" thickness.

There *are* caddy-less drive receptacles for SATA drives, and they do work very well in practice. I just haven't seen one in a NAS.

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dajames

RAID6

It supports RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 and 10 and JBOD arrays.

Got any timings for RAID6 mode?

I wouldn't say that this thing really has enough bays for RAID6 -- especially not with a hot spare -- but it'd still be nice to know how fast it is.

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dajames

Drive trays?

Do I read that right ... there are removable drive trays into which the disks must be installed (screwed in?) before they can be inserted?

It's not beyond the wit of man to build drive bays that accept bare drives, and they would probably be cheaper as well as more convenient for the user.

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Ofcom can prise my telly spectrum from my COLD, DEAD... er, aerial

dajames

Re: "Broadcast is efficient"

Yep, broadcast is efficient given one important caveat: that there is a large number of people who want to receive the same thing at the same time.

Not necessarily "at the same time". I, at least, record most of my TV and watch it later when it suits me. The broadcasters may not like the fact that that enables me to skip the advertising (but it's surprising how much of an advert one takes in at x3 speed).

I wonder how many of the DTV channels are actually watched by a "large number" of people? Does anyone watch the "shopping and fucking" (or, indeed, "mass debating") channels? My possibly misplaced faith in human nature leads me to suspect that at least half the spectrum could easily be reclaimed without inconveniencing anyone who cares.

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RIP Windows RT: Microsoft murders ARM Surface, Nokia tablets

dajames

Re: hmm

If you use the new Windows Runtime APIs ...

But why would you? Why would anyone?

If you're porting an existing desktop application changing the underlying API set is a major piece of work. Is (was) the RT marketplace big enough to justify doing that? Dunno, wait and see ... nope, doesn't like it.

If you're writing a new application from scratch you want it to have the largest possible market, so you write it to use the most widely supported APIs ... that means Win32 (or the 64-bit incarnation thereof) or maybe some cross-platform toolkit that targets Mac and Linux as well. You won't target the newcomer API unless and until it actually has some users.

At least there's now something to which the "burning platform" monicker really applies.

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

dajames

Links

A couple of things:

1. There used to be a red vulture link at the bottom of a page (in the forums, at least) that led straight back to the homepage without having to either scroll back to the top of the page or use a browser bookmark. I miss that.

2. I've sometimes found a desire for a link from the "Post Comment" page back to the article -- useful to right-click and "open in new window" to check again what the piece actually said. Could we have one of those, please?

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Why Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi 2? Upton: 'I drank the Kool-Aid'

dajames

Re: You're a real PC if you run Windows.

AIUI, this Win10 is the IoT version, so command line kernel stuff only, no desktop.

No, AIUI it will be graphical ... but probably Metro and store apps rather than a desktop.

As it says in the article:

Although the desktop might not be available, the Windows build will support visual applications. “It is a headed device, HDMI primarily at the moment but then LCD panels in due course".

So, still not really Windows as most users understand it, then.

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dajames

Netbooks (Was: Embrace. Extend. Extinguish)

Netbooks and ultra books are at opposite ends of the market, and do not compete.

That's what the marketing people keep telling us, but most people just see a notebook that is smaller and more portable than other notebooks. Those who can afford an ultrabook buy one, everyone else just bemoans the demise of the netbook (and probably buys a cheap tablet).

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DAMN YOU! Microsoft blasts Google over zero-day blabgasm

dajames

Take security seriously

I can understand Microsoft wanting to wait for a convenient date on which a batch of fixes can be released as a single set of updates. No doubt this reduces the cost of production, management and testing of the patches ... and for minor bugs and shortcomings such an approach will be acceptable to most users.

Security issues are different, and deserve to be treated differently. The patches should be produced and released as quickly as possible, and should be independent of (i.e. not held up by) the scheduling of run-of-the-mill bugfixes. Yes, it costs more to do it that way ... but allowing security fixes to go unfixed for longer than is necessary is unforgivable.

90 days sounds an awfully long time to wait for a security fix ... and we should remember that if Google can discover the bug, so can other people. There was no guarantee that the bug would remain unexploited until Google published details. The correct time to release the patch was "ASAP" not "in 90 days".

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TCL confirms plans to 'bring back' Palm – provided you tell it how

dajames

No going back ...

Palm devices were good - I used a couple of them between retiring my Psion 3c and getting my first smartphone - but I can now do so much more with my phone that going back to what Palm devices were in the day seems likely not to be a successful move.

I'm sure there's a market for a modern PDA that isn't also a phone, and is more pocketable than a 7" tablet ... but I don't know how big that market is. I suspect that if the new Palm is to be a success it needs to be a phone, and that brings it directly into competition with Android, IOS, and Blackberry.

I mention Blackberry in particular because they illustrate one of the problems that new-Palm will face: They have a solution that is in many respects technically superior to their competition, but a very small markety share because they keep getting dismissed by the press for non-technical reasons. It's a tough market.

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Microsoft kills its Euro pane in the a**: The 'would you prefer Chrome?' window

dajames

Re: choice . . .

I never quite understood the issue.

I've never thought the EU quite understood it, either.

If IE were "just" another bit of bundled software that came free with Windows (like notepad, as others have said), and one could remove it and install something else in its place and the rest of Windows would still chug happily along there would be no problem. The trouble with IE is that it has its hooks deeply embedded into various Windows system functions -- Windows Update, for example, requires IE to be present and uses IE's code (even if you install another browser).

What the EU legislated for was a tool to help users install another browser in addition to IE, but what I think they wanted MS to provide was a way to install an alternative browser instead of IE.

That, of course, would have forced Microsoft to re-engineer most of Windows's handling of internet connectivity, which I can't see them being happy to do. It might have led to a better-engineered and more modular Windows, though.

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Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority

dajames
Black Helicopters

Re: So how will this work?

It doesn't really matter if the feds have the CA's private key. They still will not have *your* private key, so long as you are able to keep it private.

... but if the feds have the CA's private key they can generate a new keyset and issue a verifiable but bogus certificate that associates it with your identity.

Then they can impersonate you, and ask your friends and associates to send them encrypted data using the public key in the bogus certifiacte -- and they will be able to read the data (but you won't, because you haven't got the relevant key).

Then they can accuse you of collaborating with $TERRORIST and demand that you hand over your keys so that they can read your data and you won't be able to, because you haven't got the relevant key ... and they will lock you up and throw away the, er, key.

Of course, the CA will know that they didn't issue the certificate ... but if they admit it they will be admitting that their root key is compromised, so they may choose not to.

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Samsung to boot out Shin after Galaxy S5 tanks – report

dajames
Holmes

I was looking ...

... at the S5 -- I wanted waterproof, removable battery, and SD card.

Then I realized that the S5 doesn't have an FM radio ... WTF?

In the end I got a Sony Z1 Compact because while I think a user-replaceable battery is important, I've never actually changed the battery in a smartphone ... but I have listened to FM radio on both my previous phones (HTC and (older) Samsung). It was £200 cheaper than an S5, too.

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'Regin': The 'New Stuxnet' spook-grade SOFTWARE WEAPON described

dajames
Trollface

Strange PDF ...

The letters u, v, w, x, y, and z seem to be displayed in a larger font than the rest of the alphabet throughout the text of the report.

I don't suppose that could possibly be caused by a payload (an experimental one, prehaps) of a Regin infection on the researchers' machines?

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DEATH fails to end mobile contract: Widow forced to take HUBBY's ASHES into shop

dajames
Trollface

@Anonymous John

It's quite clear here that the direct debits had ceased and Vodafone sent in the bailiffs.

So ... Vodafone called in the bailiffs on T-Mobile's behalf ... presumably to embarass them?

I like your thinking!

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Simon's says quantum computing will work

dajames
Holmes

It's harder than it looks

Quantum computing is certainly an interesting field, but it's a long way from being able to solve the sorts of real-world problems that it is supposed to be able to make trivial -- such as the factorization of RSA moduli.

There are three big problems: construction of a system with enough qbits to be useful, working out how to present the problem, and working out what the hell the output means.

This, for example:

http://phys.org/news/2012-04-largest-factored-quantum-algorithm.html

shows that progress is being made on at least the second of those problems, but systems with (say) 2048 qbits are still comfortingly (for those of us who would like RSA to continue to be worth using) far away!

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LARGE, ROUND and FEELS SO GOOD in your hand: Yes! It's a Nexus 6

dajames

External battery packs?

I wonder how well most of the battery-powered external USB charger thingies currently available would actually work with the N6, given its high charge rate which must correspond to a high current draw.

I have a Sony Experia Z1 Compact, which charges remarkably quickly but at the expense of needing a high-current charger. I plugged it into the USB wall-wart by my bed -- one that came with some older piece of kit (the charger, not the bed) -- and it steadfastly refused to charge at all; 700mA was apparently not enough. Most of the USB chargers I've seen only boast of providing 500mA, or don't provide that information at all.

Can anyone provide any practical experience of charging a modern fast-charging phone from a USB battery pack?

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The last PC replacement cycle is about to start turning

dajames

Re: it's optional

1366x768 panels will hopefully die out.

A man can dream ...

I suspect the 1366x768 panel will be with us until Microsoft or someone equally influential in the marketplace publishes a PC specification that calls for 1920x1080 panels as a minimum, or that prominently attaches the label "Low Definition" to 1366x768 panels.

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dajames

But why?

The difference is productivity. On a desktop with a mouse and a full numeric keypad I can fill out a spreadsheet with data from three different sources, draw a chart, copy it into a document, format it nicely, and email it to twenty recipients. All within five minutes.

Maybe ... but how many of those twenty actually read the thing?

If the report is actually useful and necessary it would be more efficient for to automate its production rather than messing around with spreadsheets; if it isn't then it would be more efficient not to produce it at all.

I don't see any clear argument for a desktop PC here (though you will have to prise mine away from my cold dead fingers).

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

dajames

Re: Utopian drivel

... not voting is a valid choice ...

You're right ... and yet you're wrong.

It is certainly important that one should have some way of expressing a preference for "none of the above", but there is a danger that if one is allowed to express that by simply not voting one's choice will be mistaken for apathy.

Everyone elegible to vote should be required to present themselves (physically or virtually) to make their mark -- this is a civic duty -- but the ballot paper should allow the opportunity for deliberate abstension.

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Influential scribe Charles Petzold: How I figured out the Windows API

dajames

Re: Borland's OWL was a much sensible approach than MFC

I evaluated both OWL and MFC at the time, and OWL was clearly designed by someone who understood OOD, while MFC didn't seem to grasp the concept.

What you're missing is that MFC wasn't trying to grasp that concept.

MFC was not so much an attempt to build a good OO framework for C++ as a pragmatic approach to providing a framework that could straddle the gap between 16-bit Windows (and Microsoft's 16-bit C++ compiler that no support for exceptions or templates) and Win 32 (and their new 32-bit compilers that at least paid lip-service to some newer language features).

It wasn't lovely, but it was effective.

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Intel bods to detail RSA birko crypto man-in-the-middle diddle

dajames
WTF?

So?

So ... there's a bug in NSS ... and it's already been patched. There's no need to make it sound as though there's anything wrong with the standard that that part of NSS implements (which there isn't).

It's good to have a heads-up about this, but it would be much more interesting to know HOW the explot works, and why NSS's less-than-rigorous parsing of ASN.1 leads to a vulnerability in the first place.

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EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else

dajames

All or nothing

"Also of the binary blob that Google wants people to implement? Why not have that in open source format?"

Security for one, exposing the authentication systems contained within might put customers at risk perhaps.

Not a valid reason. "Security through Obscurity" is no security at all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_through_obscurity

Also (and this is more likely) the DRM systems for apps and music/video content, compromising that would negatively affect their relationship with rights holders thus making it harder to licence content for streaming/download.

Yes, that is a bit more likely. Any DRM in a software-only system is itself no better than security by obscurity -- DRM just doesn't work -- but the copyright holders are grasping at straws.

I suspect that the real reason why Google wouldn't want to Open Source their blob is that it would make it easier for OEMs to pick and choose which bits they bundled. The blob is indivisible (and terms won't allow reverse engineering it)

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Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?

dajames
Childcatcher

Re: I don't get Britain these days

I reckon if Teresa May ...

It's quite instructive to look at

http://www.tmay.co.uk/

and then (but not while at work) at

http://www.officialteresamay.com/

I wonder whether you can spot the difference?

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Apple iPhone 6: Looking good, slim. AW... your battery died

dajames
Facepalm

Kies? Does anyone actually use that?

... as for that unblievably kludged mess of garbage they call "Kies", the less said the better ...

The only thing to be said for Kies, as far as I can see, is that it's very slightly less unpleasant to use than iTunes on a PC. Fortunately you can use a Samsung phone without ever having to touch Kies, and once I discovered that I got rid of it (Kies, not the phone) as quickly as possible!

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Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets

dajames

Banks ...

These things need to be run by banks, not by mobile operators, and not by equipment manufacturers.

It's not that we trust banks any more than we trust the others, just that the banks already have our identities and our money and we're not going to be losing any more privacy or suffering any more risk by using a payment system they operate.

I do think a single bonk should not be regarded as sufficient authorisation to make a payment, though, even for trivial amounts. I'd like to see a PIN or a biometric required as a secon factor in all cases. Anything less will only encourage misuse.

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'Speargun' program is fantasy, says cable operator

dajames
Holmes

Logic dictates ...

"It is a physical impossibility to do it without us knowing . . ."

Fair enough - no argument there, but that hardly proves it didn't happen, only that you weren't ignorant of it if it did.

No, no ... if it's a physical impossibility to do it without their knowing then either it wasn't done, or it was done and they know about it but aren't telling ... but they could be wrong about the physical impossibility bit.

So, actually, all this tells us precisely nothing.

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Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars

dajames

Re: And I say there screwed by Symbian

... the full C++ extension semantics ...

... C++ exception semantics ...

(that's what I get for posting late at night).

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dajames

Re: And I say there screwed by Symbian

A bit harsh. At the time EPOC32 was conceived, they had no choice but to use some kind of Embedded C++.

They had choices ...

Psion's previous OS attempt was SIBO, the OS of the Series 3 series, in which they had had great success interfacing to their ROM code using the TopSpeed C compiler, which supported pragmas that allowed them to specify the passing of function arguments in particular registers, ready for the ROM call. This led to very efficient calls into the ROM from C.

When they came to write EPOC they tried the same game, but this time they specified that the ROM entry points should have the same ABI as the g++ of the day, to make it easy and efficient to call into the ROM from C++. That would have worked well if the g++ ABI had not changed, but the 9.1 binary break -- when the ABI was changed to enable stack cleanup after an exception -- destroyed that easy compatibility between the compiler ABI and the ROM..

Psion must have seen that coming -- they must have realized that the g++ they were working with could not be updated to support the full C++ extension semantics without an ABI change. It appears that it was more important to them to get something working, albeit with a bodged error-handling mechanism, than to get support for development on their platform using a standard language. As C++ moved forward they were left behind with a ROM that could only be interfaced with by an obsolete toolchain, and they lost the support and sympathy of developers. That was their tragedy.

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Behold our SPINNING DATA GRAVE: WD carts out 6.3TB cold storage drive

dajames

Re: Short warranty for Archive drive?

Sounds odd giving a 3 year warranty for a drive aimed at archiving. If they sold an archive drive with a 10+ year warranty, that'd be more like it.

You can get optical media with a 100-year warranty ... for all the good that does. If you find the disk isn't readable after 99 years they're hardly going to hop into the Tardis and go back and make another copy!

The point of a warranty in these cases is to give you some feeling for the manufacturer's confidence (or their insurers' confidence) in the longevity of the product. The fact that hard drives are available with 5-year warranties doesn't encourage me to choose a drive with only a 3-year warranty for long-term storage.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

dajames
Meh

NFC?

I'd also love to know why people are downvoting me ...

I didn't downvote you, but had I done so it would have been because you're going on about NFC as though it was something to get excited about.

If I want to buy a coffee I'll dig into my pocket for some small change rather than waving several hundred pounds-worth of phone around for all to see, thanks all the same.

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