* Posts by GrumpyOldBloke

179 posts • joined 5 Mar 2011

Page:

Printer drivers ate our homework, says NSW Dept of Education

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: the giant SAP rollout

To be fair to the minister, no one ever knows in advance what a giant SAP rollout will cost. Much Much more than your organisation can afford seems to be a good starting figure.

4
0

Samsung emits Galaxy S6 Edge+ 'inboxing' video

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: (non) Sticky situation

That wouldn't work either. A step back is a phone with no compelling story or reason to purchase over the previous model. Android is currently dead in the water while Google focuses on bland power efficient software designs rather than compelling high end features. Samsung are left with gimmicky tricks - like thin phones with small batteries - or genuine innovation just as soon as someone else does it. Part of the problem is (as another recent article about Steve Jobs and market segmentation) pointed out is what does each type of customer want to do with the device. I want an Ubuntu Edge so why not shove Android and ChromeOS into the one device. Others may want a faster more intuitive work space for their common tasks rather than a gesture every which way and blocky icons. Dust and water proofing, improved drop protection, dual screens, tighter whats-app integration, open standards rather than Samsung proprietary everything etc. Who exactly is the customer for these phones, people who are a bit posh but don't like Apple? Are there enough of them to turn a profit?

0
0

FBI probed SciFi author Ray Bradbury for plot to glum-down America

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Multiple think

Sadly they haven't got any better

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_City_Seven

or the big one

http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=91651

0
0

Researcher says Australian parliaments have failed to protect privacy for 14 years

GrumpyOldBloke

While I can appreciate the neutral tone taken by Mr Clarke I think we need to stop assuming that governments are benign entities that are somehow led astray by one or two rotten apples. Australian governments have not ignored the privacy implications of their work, the destruction of privacy is by design. Australian governments are driven by a sociopathic belief that they are at the top of the tree and as goalers have a right to manage the inmates in their care. Orders (such as bombing Syria or ever expanding surveillance powers) should not be subject to question. If these beliefs coincide with the beliefs of their donors (mandatory data retention and internet censorship) or the beliefs of their idols (the US/UK alphabet soup agencies) then that is understood as a mandate. Voter polling suggests that about 75% of Australian's are comfortable with this process (ALP or LNP first party preferences). Sadly demographics (boomers) suggest that this situation will not change for at least another couple of decades though the planned bank bail ins (robbing from the young to prop up the housing speculation of the old) might advance it slightly.

4
0

Canadians taking to spying on their spies

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Meanwhile in the US, voters are getting stupider all the time

> so they can be transferred to the real Republican candidate

They tried that with Ron Paul - didn't go so well for them. Ron's voting base couldn’t stomach the ordained stooge and went home. After Obama's performance the republican hope is that they are now the least worst choice even with a corporate / Israeli approved leader. But everyone can see the US is in trouble, Trump has outlined a number of problems and set expectations. These problems having been aired will not now magically disappear from the minds of voters, especially republican voters.

1
0

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge+: 4K-positive fun for ... vloggers?!

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: We're losing market what are we going to do?

> Android is crap, touchwiz is just utterly dire.

With 4GB of RAM touchwiz should just about be perfomant. Have to agree with your comment on Android. Lollipop was a disappointment and that is ignoring the security issues. The OS seems to be on a devolution path from OK > adequate > uninspiring > OMG please give me a 1st world alternative. Google and the head up butt phone vendors at their finest.

1
1

HTC shedding 15 per cent of workforce in 'strategic realignment'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Bye bye HTC

> esp battery and camera: No it's much more than that, hitting a plateau and dying is a common thread in businesses from populous nations. When you have 100 million people walking past your shop front, repeat business becomes less important than new business. Old Chinese proverb, you can only cut a person once. The lack of updates, bug fixes, concern, migration or support plans for existing customers condemns a business to death in a shallow grave no matter what its past performance may have been. Exhibit A. Sony. Samsung and LG are also on this path. It is the difference between landfill Android and Apple. HTC like many businesses spent too much time worrying about the comfort of their CEO's and insufficient time worrying about their existing customers.

2
0

Oracle pulls CSO's BONKERS anti-bug bounty and infosec rant

GrumpyOldBloke

The sentence should read; why would I throw a lot of money at 3% of your problem.

That clarifies the economic argument.

0
0

W is for WTF: Google CEO quits, new biz Alphabet takes over

GrumpyOldBloke

Foreign governments can keep their god damm stinking paws off of us. Transfer pricing, licence fees, research fees, ip fees, consulting fees and company dividends here we come.

2
0

Secret US-Pacific trade pact leak exposes power of the copyright lobby

GrumpyOldBloke

The farmers in NZ were doing quite well, especially the dairy farmers. Now up to their eyeballs in debt and facing a commodity crash.

www.macrobusiness.com.au/2015/08/nz-commodities-crash-goes-from-bad-to-worse/

0
0

New South Wales to create Ministry of Truth

GrumpyOldBloke

Translation...

Data is one of the greatest weapons held by government ... without an effective whole-of-government data sharing platform unburdened by issues of civilian privacy, proportional and targeted due process or a bill of rights ... figuring out just what the centre will do, how the data will be linked with the federal grubyments metadata abomination and how to protect the centre's operations from FOI requests.

Additional Info

Industry advisory body will assist in guiding its ongoing work - pork, overreach and more pork. How government agencies will interface with the centre? From the federal grubyments example we can assume wide open and warrantless. How the central bureau might address privacy - like they did with opal.

Will the specialist government steering committee consider whether the task is worth doing at all and what specific and measurable benefits they hope to achieve - like a business plan and a cost benefit analysis per the ones released for West Connex.

1
1

Australia to tax ALL international online purchases

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: This will make life interesting...

Won't worry them in the slightest. They were prepared to go against the whole country with mandatory data retention, GST on imports is a comparative non-issue. Tony and Bill are there to wave through a whole bunch of destructive legislation culminating in the TPP. When their job is done then we can expect the mea culpa's and the shuffling of seats but not so much on the back peddling. There is no mechanism for political parties to refund *donations*, there probably isn't even a word for it.

1
0

Australia to run first robo-car trials in sleepy Adelaide

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Safe place to test?

As population increased and cars got better Australian governments had a choice, keep things moving with higher driving standards or lower speeds and a focus on revenue collection / bogus safety messages. Consistent with the prison guard mentality that still infests the public sector in Oz they chose the later. Driving standards in most of the country are appalling and per our anonymous coward above, attempting to defend driving slowly in the right hand lane, there is no hope on the horizon just a sad geriatric led decline into immobility. A tragedy of the commons par excellence.

3
0

Sod the law! We'll crack on with our metadata witchhunts, growl cops

GrumpyOldBloke

That is because everything the police do is legal - in time. A little preemption can't hurt.

0
0

Citizenfour director Laura Poitras sues US for years of border security harassment

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Stupid and obvious reason

I didn't notice any special media probing of the $1T the DOD couldn't account for announced on 8/11, why Bush's handlers didn't move him to a safe location on 9/11 when the US was under attack, the war against Afghanistan, the redacted or non-investigated parts of 9/11, the weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, Abu Ghraib or the Patriot Act under a Republican president. It was hands on hearts and with us or against us! US media ownership, like much of the free west, is concentrated in a few wealthy corporations who know how the game is played. Issues, right thought, consensus and fitting in or belonging are sold to you like any other product. The liberal bias is as bogus as the two party democracy or the illusion of choice. It translates in the political sphere to scratch my back and I won't scratch yours.

3
2

Brandis' metadata retention recipe doesn't prohibit USB drives stored in a garden shed

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Did I miss it?

Malcolm is on record as saying that there is no requirement for the data to be held onshore. Encryption was a late amendment requested by the ALP and the Greens, it was not in the original bill. To open up such a large attack surface with no safeguards or even a clue suggests that this is more about cowering the population and forcing self censorship than any effective mechanism for law enforcement or national security.

0
0

Oz Defence Dept 'not punitive' with crypto export controls

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: It's still a mess

Yup, still looks like a *crap what have we done* moment.

Bouncy Castle will have to stuff around with the bureaucracy in Canberra for the temporary period for which it is closed source. Why bother, get that bit done and merged with your code off shore.

Australian teachers educating overseas students on cryptography will not be subject to the Act because the material is in the public domain. Unless the students start doing pure research for their thesis etc in which case they may well come under the act. Again, why bother. Do that bit offshore.

Defence is focused on building "appropriate" licences and "clear and concise guidance" for businesses and open source contributors. Which under the neo nuts ideology will be user pays. Given what it costs to recover information under FOI laws. What will the recovery costs be for a bunch of no doubt senior signals bods to review your machine. All for the privilege of giving your IP to our 5 eyes + 1 friends that have already done so much damage to our democracy.

From a national security point of view, if your legal system creates an environment where it is impossible for anyone in the area to work in your country, people will stop. Yup. Risk 10 years jail to educate yourself and an unknown amount of money to commercialise or discuss anything so that you can ultimately end up in Canberra paying off a $1 to $2 million dollar mortgage helping the clown in chief lie about weapons of mass destruction and death cults to your children.

2
0

The slow strangulation of telework in Australia

GrumpyOldBloke

Under Ziggy Telstra was investigating fibre to the home, later downgraded to fibre to the node under Sol. The stumbling block was the ACCC not entertaining a request by Telstra for preferential treatment on regulated access. Telstra took it's bat and ball and headed to the mobile space where Telstra's Next-G was born to enduring applause from shareholders. The NBN was a dummy spit by Kevin to Sol's intransigence. That clash of egos has crippled the fixed line telecommunications space for the last decade and probably for the next.

The regulatory environment seems a bit poxy: this is the crux of the problem. While our feral wing nuts are running around trying to scare their voting base with tales of terrorists under the beds and the intelligence community bans branches of mathematics in order to stay one step ahead of the enemy the country goes to hell in a handbasket with no reform anywhere it is needed. For the next 10 or 20 years the demographics will work against any real progress in Australia. Sit back, enjoy the sunshine and marvel at how a country - even one led by the best of British talent - can get it so wrong.

6
0

Feds count Cryptowall cost: $18 million says FBI

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: So, where are the Boys?

The scuzz-buckets behind cryptowall might just be the government and law enforcement agencies. Given the millions killed by the good old USA and its allies protecting their corporate interests around the world over the last few decades, encrypting someone's PC seems fairly tame. Proxy armies rampaging through Northern Europe, the Middle East and Africa don't fund themselves and what better way to raise money for off-the-books operations than tapping the vast number of saps on the internet.

4
1

MOUNTAIN of unsold retail PCs piling up in Blighty: Situation 'serious'

GrumpyOldBloke

Sanctions?

Inventory may also be stock that was bound for Russia but has been diverted due to US sanctions.

0
0

Australian Govt to launch cyber sec sharing strategy

GrumpyOldBloke

I hope their cyber security strategy is better than any of their economic strategies that have emerged over the last couple of decades or the quality of their intelligence services that involved us in at least 3 wars of aggression of dubious legality. Hopefully better than their national infrastructure strategies or their tax reform initiatives or their aged care plans or the lets all be rich by loading up on debt and buying expensive houses strategy.

I will assume they are operating in good faith and help them out. Let's reduce the cyber attack surface by not storing everyone’s telecommunications data for an indeterminate period of time in various bespoke solutions around the world. Minimising the damage of a leak by embracing anonymity in our day to day and online lives. Withdrawing from the extremely damaging 5-eyes +1 industrial espionage alliance to help protect our people and industries from actors unknown in foreign jurisdictions. Implementing an if you don't need it don't store it requirement for businesses. Investing in the development of local IT talent and encouraging best practice security standards - resources available at cost. Encourage research and collaboration in mathematics and engineering at all levels so that best practice supportable local products can replace key foreign products of unknown integrity. Requiring all SOHO routers / modems sold here be supported with timely updates for (say) a 5 year period as a fit for purpose test. Revisiting the case for half baked solutions like smart electricity meters. Banning foreign donations to Australian political parties so that they are not tempted to weaken Australia's security and integrity at the behest of foreign miscreants. Not an exhaustive list but it might be a start.

0
0

Trans-Pacific Partnership stalled says Australian trade minister

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: "The need for secrecy tells us all we need to know about its intent."

1% - luxury! I used to dream of having trans fat labelling at 1%.

From the Australian abc news 2015-02-27...

[Health experts have criticised Australia's decision not to label food products containing trans fats, after health ministers recently accepted the recommendation by Australia's food safety regulator to reject compulsory labelling.]

From news-medical.net, last updated 2015-06-14

[In 2007, the federal assistant health minister at that time, Chistopher Pyne...if the industry did not make the necessary changes of their own accord, mandatory labeling and other regulative methods would be introduced ... However, consumption of trans fat in Australia is lower than of other countries and is within the standards set by the World Health Organization.]

The lower consumption referred to in the reference above was based upon some traditional average diet and is not indicative of consumptions in poor diets, or poor peoples' diets, that are higher in fast or processed foods.

0
0
GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Why?

Enabling legislation has already been passed by both the left and right wings of Team Australia including increased police powers, data retention, internet censorship, mandatory vaccinations - for poor people's kids and from the previous bending over - extension of IP protections. Our food labelling laws are already a joke so there should be no issue there. The Korean trade agreement had IP and ISD provisions and the Japanese agreement may also have had them so we will have to construct these in law. By the time TPP gets here the captain will stand proudly on the poop deck and tell us, as his predecessor did, that the treaty will require no changes to Australian law.

If the TPP stalls it will be about timing not overreach. The political classes in the target Western countries are already sold. The Asians may put up a bit more of a fight but they can be told stories of big bad China, have their aircraft hijacked or industry destroyed to ensure they fall in to line. Shortly after the US puppet show on 8/11 we will get back to signing over our sovereignty to the corporations and the global banking cabals. By then the TPP will be yesterdays news, the stuff of conspiracy theorists.

4
1

Australia needs MOAR L33T WHITE HATZ, says Federal Police

GrumpyOldBloke

It is amazing to see the quality of thought available in Canberra and the obvious dead-ends that are being engineered. In their zeal for total state supremacy they have forgotten or are too important to remember that it is the free exchange of ideas that underpins economies not jacked up public servants and their dreams of nirvana. No free exchange of ideas - well just keeping digging up those rocks boys. Perhaps ASIO, the AFP and the AG's office could have their own come to Jesus moment and realise that they are the problem not the solution and that the current government of neo-nuts and their foreign donors and handlers represent a far greater threat to Australia's future security and prosperity than Whitlam ever was. Another decade of non-investment in science and non-interest in maths and lets see how the information capabilities out of Canberra are looking. Perhaps they could outsource defence to India or China or employ 457's like everyone else. Alternately they could pray that someone with some common sense unwinds the dogs breakfast which is the feral government and gets the bureaucracy pointing forwards again.

4
0

Cortana threatens to blow away ESC key

GrumpyOldBloke

Fn key where the ctrl key should be - wasn't that Lenovo?

Toshiba were reported as dumbasses that supported SOPA

1
0

ISIS command post obliterated after 'moron' jihadi snaps a selfie, says US Air Force

GrumpyOldBloke

At last a win

Important strike against proxy army USA created, funded and continues to support by turning small piece of desert into desert at a strike cost of $M's. Claims bearded dudes were the foolish ones in this charade. No proof of event but world cheers the good guys. In other news, reports that the USA has been at war for 222 out of its 239 years means world hates freedoms. Western governments doing their best to respond.

11
7

'I thought we were pals!' Belgium, Netherlands demand answers from Germany in spy bust-up

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Even the 1% are no longer immune

That is why the conversation has shifted to the 0.1%. With the decimation of the middle class and most of the *free* world dangerously close to recession or stagflation the rich have started eating their own. Privately issued debt based fiat money won't repay itself - but that was always the plan.

0
1

NSA eggheads tried to bork Nork nukes with Stuxnet. It failed – report

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Let me see

Spook nirvana North Korea, secure and controlled access to everything. It appears to be the model the Australian grubyment is leaning towards. Unfortunately the parasitical public sector rarely seem to see the link between funding for their paranoia and delusions, a successful private sector and the free exchange of ideas. North Korea, no USB keys and nothing to eat. Australia, total mandatory surveillance and coal is the future - yum.

7
4

'The Google execs, the journalists, plus Brit and US spybosses in a cosy mansion confab'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: apple and google...

Ironically in that meeting it is only the Apple and Google execs with their shareholders who can publicly disclose who they are actually working for.

2
0

Pandora ordered to pay up extra royalties in BMI row

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: 20 years later

The value in the music business is created by the distribution industry not the studios'. The studio's job is to churn out endless product in various flavours by anyone willing to be an indentured servant. Have a dream, sign the contract, hire the facilities and maybe we can both make a dollar. It is the distribution industry that filters the dross and markets a select few titles at a time to their end user segments as culture, something desirable to be part of and to own. The moment the studio's start their own web site and bypass the distribution networks is the moment our highly paid stars go back to an honest days pay for an honest days work. The problem with all you can eat services like Pandora with little overt promotion and custom playlists is that they are no longer fulfilling the traditional role of the distribution network. They are therefore being asked to pay more to the studios' to offset this value being lost.

0
1

Mad Max: Fury Road – two hours of nonstop, utterly insane fantasy action

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Sounds like mindless drivel

Ah but mindless drivel with a serious message. Each dollar collected from the punters will be a dollar the studios and distributors have to lobby for TPP / TIPP type abominations, internet censorship / site blocking, perpetual copyright and mass surveillance in order to protect their *art*. Subscribe to the Mad Max dystopian future today and the corporates will do their very best to bring it about tomorrow.

6
4

Australian opposition floats startups-and-STEM stimulus plan

GrumpyOldBloke

Fortunately we know Bill's not serious. The ALP opened the door to widespread use of 457's. The NLP found that the door could not be opened any wider so they knocked down the wall. Two parties of petty tyrants whose only worry is there might not be enough people to rent their investment properties and pay their parliamentary super. Neither party can answer the question of why you would start a high tech business in Oz with its high input costs, unfavourable tax regime, woeful internet services, craven 5-eyes membership, mass surveillance and mandatory airport strip searches. Any intellectual property the business developed would be stolen by one of our 4 eyed friends before the first code review.

A key problem for Australia and much of the free world is that STEM is being transformed from a driver of innovation and wealth to an overhead needed for surveillance, data mining and revenue protection. Under Bill's plan we will spend a lot of money to try and protect the boomers' legacy rather than moving forward and burying the bastards.

0
0

Metadata scope creep sees Border Force ask for access

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Scope Creep

> some of them realise how much they have betrayed their own people

Not a chance. They are public servants that have been given supra legal powers and exist without oversight - that is not the realm of conscience but of nirvana. Like the oxymoron which is police culture, you have to be crazy or they wouldn't let you in.

A note to the other's about generating noise. The Oz plan is surveillance 2.0, the telco's pay for the data retention and pass the costs onto the end users allowing the government to keep the true cost of this treason off the books. An increase in noise represents an increase in end user costs with very little pain to the grubyment. The US is now looking at this model in order to shift the costs of NSA surveillance off the federal books while claiming a Chinese wall protects privacy. The only ways to fight this are going dark, community routing / tunnelling, encryption or the ballot box.

0
0

Putin's lapdog? Zuckerberg questioned over quisling claims

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Ukrainian speeker here

The first casualty of war is facebook.

1
1

Get paid (airline) peanuts with United's new bug bounty program

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Its a good job all the bad guys live in America

The land of the free home of the braid will place you on the no-fly list for looking foreign, for not looking foreign enough or for having some un'merican consonants in your name. Owning up to hacking airline web sites in order to win air miles appears to be an oxymoron.

1
0

Canada passes controversial spook-powers law

GrumpyOldBloke

You can't really be surprised about Harper! He has been progressing down his little totalitarian path for a long time. You would think one of the world's top financial families calling Harper a slave would have given the game way, but no. An aging and enfeebled population who cannot distinguish between reality and government propaganda is the real threat to a nation. The old, the prejudiced and the dementia ridden are the fuel which burns for fascism and with the demographics in most Western nations, it is a fuel that burns bright. Make sure the young people take their anti-depressants and we can be awash with violent events and the subsequent demands for a government response. If there aren't any real terrorists then we can just make some up and pretend there was explosives in their shoes or their underpants or something equally as ridiculous. Harper knows that he doesn't have to care about a campaigning public as long as he can keep the old folks awake at night.

2
0

Oz media belatedly realises 'spook's charter' is bad (for) news

GrumpyOldBloke

Make a fuss? Lose the advertising payback for towing the government line? Mea culpa much. With subscription numbers trending down and profitability in the official story business a distant memory it is only the government playing favourites that is keeping these great houses of *quality journalism* alive. A few recent examples of scratch my back...

SMH 22 Jan 15. The Abbott government plans to spend almost $15 million on its taxpayer-funded higher education advertising campaign

ABC 17 Apr 15 [domestic violence] support for the co-funded $30 million awareness campaign

SMH 28 Apr 15. [$1.75M campaign for] Intergenerational Report escaped independent vetting

This is not just an Abbott government issue, the last mob were just as bad and the states do it as well. We do not expect the media chiefs to act independently when the government is their best customer. The alternative news sites - including this one - had no problems identifying problems in the legislation.

4
0

The big boys made us do it: US used German spooks to snoop on EU defence industry

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: In Germany, we have this thing called "treason"

New Zealand might have this thing called treason as well. Their spooks and the NSA have recently been outed as trying to spy on the Chinese embassy. China is one of the countries largest trading partners and responsible for its continued good fortune despite the quality of New Zealand's political and management classes. The US of course contributes very little to New Zealand except costs. It is no longer clear that the spooks anywhere in the Western half of the free world are working in the best interests of their respective countries or even who exactly they are working for. Colour me shocked that you take a group of people, exempt them from oversight and the rule of law and they start going off the rails.

7
0

Microsoft to offer special Surface 3 for schools

GrumpyOldBloke

My kid lugged a laptop to high school for a couple years under the schools new and exciting BYOD policy. Smart phones were bad, laptops were good. The school issued requirements and arranged special deals but had not stated what the educational outcomes might be. Laptops are now banned in most classes because the teachers, being on the wrong side of the screens, could not monitor their use (mostly game playing). Kids now use their smart phones to do research in class and sanity has prevailed. I do wonder how more Microsoft based ewaste might empower kids in schools - what are the educational outcomes that could not be achieved more cost effectively by other means? Is there an advantage in giving kids a god awful office suite so that they can cut and paste nicely formatted crap immediately or would it be better to give them non linear tools like pencil and paper and give them time and techniques to complete a task?

5
0

Android mobe biz OnePlus goes to the dogs - or maybe cats

GrumpyOldBloke

The invitation strategy worked so well for their 1+1 product, sold a handful of phones with a commodity operating system, I can't see why it wouldn't work just as well for the 1+2. This time 2017 they might be up to 1400 people supporting 2 million phones. A problem for manufacturers selling high end products, even the ones that don't play silly games, is that the development of the android operating system has all but stagnated. Google is struggling to get a simple lollipop makeover out the door and working properly let alone Ubuntu-edge type use cases that would justify higher end hardware. Might be time for a new mobile OS.

0
1

White House cyber-general says US must be able to cyber-nuke the worst of the cyber-worst

GrumpyOldBloke

Michael Daniel is the unintended consequence. A general concern for the well being of the nation devolves into a catchall for every nut job who likes pulling the legs off frogs and sharing other peoples nuddie picks. Michael has not even constrained himself to national security or the law but uses the suitably oblique - America's interests. Anyone who demands more power based upon the worst-of-the-worst argument should also be barred from office as we all know where that foot in the door strategy leads - and there it is; "the goal is to create 'norms of behavior'".

On the plus side his analogy with Underwriters Laboratories and pooling resources to improve products is sound. I would like to see the tech world pool resources to help improve government. Perhaps by employing strong encryption in all communications products and storage assemblies, fixing vulnerable hardware interfaces like USB and having OS's report on unexpected changes in hardware and software configuration. Ethics and a reluctance to support projects which are clearly unconstitutional or not in America's interests would also be a positive step.

16
0

US Navy's LOCUST DRONE CANNON is like death SWARMED up

GrumpyOldBloke

Anyone fortunate enough to live in areas slated to be part of the new infidel century might start investigating low cost directed energy welcomers. Maybe wide beam x-ray or gamma ray welcomers pointing towards your liberators and their technology. Can't be much room on a micro drone for hardening and any shielding on larger objects detracts from payload - so win win.

4
1

Oz energy company AGL promises to decarbonise by 2050

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: carbon capture

Sounds like corporate speak to position AGL at the head of the queue for the feral governments $2.55B direct action reverse auction which started on the 15th of April. If AGL can use CO2 absorbing invisible pink unicorns at a lower price per tonne than other suppliers then it stands a good chance of receiving unto itself tax payer largesse. See also...

theconversation.com/explainer-how-does-todays-direct-action-reverse-auction-work-40152

Given AGL's attempt to get rid of CSG waste water by using it to irrigate farmland (how did that ever get approved) and the surprise result that salts and heavy metals built up in the soil, I shudder to think what their approach to CO2 management might be. If it is invisible pink unicorns then we will have gotten off lightly.

1
0

US govt bans Intel from selling chips to China's supercomputer boffins

GrumpyOldBloke

Control over the world's banking system

> The rest of the world needs to pull their head out of their ass and fix that.

Already in play: BRICS New Development Bank. Islam also has an alternative banking model, one that does not levy compounding interest on loans. What in the West is often framed as a clash of cultures is really a war about the right to create money and levy a never ending burden of compounding interest on its use. We send our young men off with patriotic fervour to fight for our enslavement and the enslavement of future generations to a handful of wealthy banking families in Europe and the US. The US is as much a victim of privately issued debt based fiat money as the rest of us and its schizophrenic actions are not only those of a global thug but also the desperate flailing about of a drowning person attempting to find anything they can to pay off one more days debt and avoid foreclosure.

8
0

Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

GrumpyOldBloke

The difference in focus is easily explained. I heard from someone - can't remember the name, might have been some mentally challenged homeless guy selling big issue - that coal is the future! That is where we are headed and I can't wait to reach our future of dark satanic mills powered by the latest coal and infra red on water technology staffed by servants indentured to the banks for millions just to cover the cost of basic housing, gruel and transport.

There was another quote from a much more learned chap many decades ago explaining the curse of being an oil rich country but it holds true for minerals and any other rent seeking economy. The business of the country is government.

Welcome to Oz, can we take you coat and check your phone!

4
0

Liberal MP threatens journo with metadata probe

GrumpyOldBloke

Confirms that these idiots have no idea what they have done and how serious the breach of trust has been. Lets hope that by their metadata we shall come to know them.

11
0

Feds ponder jamming journo comms in Australian Parliament

GrumpyOldBloke

Mental Illness

What we are seeing in Canberra is evidence of a serious mental illness. It is not just the data retention and the intimidatory tactics of placing armed guards behind the journalists but also Abbott’s fence around the hill and now talk of fitting the place with bullet proof windows at great expense. What is the man so afraid of? Is it a rational, irrational or medication induced fear? Perhaps the journalists will grow a pair and start holding the federal aviary to account now that they have been dumped in with the general population as the enemy.

6
1

Encryption is the REAL threat – Head Europlod

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: What did they do before the internet?

What they always do - play both sides to advantage themselves and their handlers.

0
0

Page:

Forums