* Posts by GrumpyOldBloke

127 posts • joined 5 Mar 2011

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Australia to get spooks charter at cost of at least AU$188m

GrumpyOldBloke

Australia's opposition doesn't oppose national security measures in order to avoid being made to look disinterested in the nation's defence.

No, Australia's opposition doesn't oppose national security measures because influential foreign governments have as much dirt on them as they do on the neo-nuts. No one has forgotten the lessons of the Whitlam government. Combine this obscene legislation with the data sharing legislation passed during the Rudd era all tied up with with warrantless access and we have high treason out of Canberra, again. Have to wonder if ASIO/AFP haven't completely lost the plot as they appear to be a far greater threat to Australia than the cartoon villains the US keeps creating. This trove of data will expose friend and foe alike.

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Australian ISPs agree to three-strikes-plus-court-order anti-piracy plan

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Three strikes is a joke

Few societies have been as enthusiastic about eating their own young as Japan. Their rapidly declining population is evidence of the wisdom of their decisions. If the remaining otaku or emerging low waged underclass don't consume enough magical fighting school girl anime from Sony Entertainment and its ilk then the solution is obviously to lock em all up. As with much of Asia, nothing of consequence can ever be discussed because such topics are sensitive issues that go against the grain of social cohesion and conformity. Making people uncomfortable is impolite. Japan's hell bent desire for national seppuku rather than facing up to the failings of its elders is perhaps not the best model for anyone else to follow. Many studies have shown a relationship between piracy and paid for media consumption. If nothing else piracy demonstrates and area of demand that can be exploited - assuming your company is not so far up its own backside prattling on about business is war that it can see an opportunity. While it is not like Sony to completely fail to read a market these harsh laws against sharing have perhaps dealt it and other corporate sponsors of fascist stupidity a blow. Not that that is entirely a bad thing.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: If only....

The media companies are in this for the long game, total control of all content just like the old days. If ISP's wont host content that hasn't been sanctioned by big media then the only channel for artists is big media. We already have a view of this in youtube where you don't even need to own the rights to content to have it withdrawn under a DMCA notice. If all content is scanned for any infringing words or melody from the last 150 years - you aint singing unless you're signing. Unfortunately their push for control has coincided with a lull in societies acceptance of eugenics and the promotion to positions of power of some truly worthless individuals.

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Hello Barbie: Hang on, this Wi-Fi doll records your child's voice?

GrumpyOldBloke

What if the earth had legs?

How many legs?

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Telstra copper at crisis point, endangers NBN, says union

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: How did this happen?

Telstra has been outsourcing pit and pipe work for a very long time to companies like Transfield and Silcar. Each in turn bid low to get the contract and each then struggled to find subcontractors who would work for the rates they offered at the speed they required and at a quality that was good enough to avoid incurring penalties from Telstra. I understand that Telstra is now bringing some of it back in house as NBN has changed contractors to competitors.

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Ubuntu smartphone to go on sale: It'll be harder to get than a new iPhone

GrumpyOldBloke

SUDO: command not found

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LICKED: Behold my TOAD-PROOF ERECTION, boasts Aussie boffin

GrumpyOldBloke

Very few rabbits escape from Australia.

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Untangling .NET Core: Open source for Windows, Mac, Linux

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: You like MS Products

>Their Trojan Horse, Elop. MS is the reason we lost a decent, independent brand doing interesting things.

Nokia was on the way out before Elop. Nokia had Android before Android but borked it. Stuck on an obsolete platform, behind the innovation curve, chasing the low end of the market and led by people who were great in their own eyes. Microsoft did Nokia a favour by taking that basket case off its hands. Nokia did Microsoft a favour by allowing so much value to be destroyed under Elop before they settled on a price. Win-Win. Pity about the shareholders but theirs was never going to be a happy lot anyway.

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SURPRISE: Oz gov gives itself room to NEVER finish the NBN

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: I'd suggest selling off our Government.

I think our government has already been bought. The price it seems was remarkably low.

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Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

GrumpyOldBloke

Go to judge, display probable cause, argue for judicial warrant to conduct search and seizure. I love a story with a happy ending.

The problem is that this will become set in precedent and will become a defacto blanket authorisation. A bit like the responses you see in Oz where the most corrupt, ignorant and inept politicians on the planet award their secret police forces blanket authorisation over the entire internet with a single warrant.

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

GrumpyOldBloke

By fast they were looking at cloud fast whereby virtual servers are stood up and torn down on demand. As you have discovered though the cost of parsing init scripts is not that high and certainly not enough of a problem to justify systemd as a solution. Most of your boot time (apart from the splash screen) will probably reflect the time it takes to detect and init hardware and get a few hundred MBs of stuff off the disk and into RAM.

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The gender imbalance in IT is real, ongoing and ridiculous

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Gender Imbalance

Who cares? The war mongers and the bankers that's who! We can't send the men off to fight for some bankers profit or some politicians glory if industry immediately grinds to a halt because all the specialists were male. Similarly we can't just keep paying males to do stuff and not capitalise on the negative wage pressures that are possible from doubling the list of potential candidates. What do we do next? Despite the massive distortions that we have engineered through much of society to advantage females and discard the energy, risk taking and initiative of our young males we still cannot overcome psychology and biology for this glorious future of an xx slave labour force managed by right thought.

Mark Pesce - if you want to lead the charge go for it. Give up your employment on the understanding that your position will be given to a women. Spend the rest of your days in righteous poverty knowing that you did your bit for the new world order. Please keep writing for the Reg to let us know how you are getting on and be sure to record that moment when the warm fuzzy feeling wears off and you realise you have been had.

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Microsoft .NET released from its Windows chains... but what ABOUT MONO?

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Giving away their competitive advantage?

why would I buy Windows et. al.?

For the same reason you buy windows to get the latest features in office even though Microsoft have a version for MAC's. I have no doubt that Microsoft will be happy to let you play in C# but will do everything it can to encourage you back to a windows server for the production build. Systemd and the loss of a securable linux might just be the icing on their cake.

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Australia's going to need a standalone metadata retention bureau

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Not Amazon but ASIO

The sharing it with all and sundry legislation was passed in the 2nd term of the Rudd government (enthusiastically supported by the not so liberal national party) and thanks to Mr Snowden we now know why. Any central metadata retention bureau would really be about hiding how many surveillance requests were being made by the treasonous mob in canberra.

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Damage control (noun): When Microsoft's CEO kickstarts diversity plan after women pay gaffe

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: The unpopular viewpoint...

>some misguided diversity goal

The diversity goal is very guided. In a complex layered economy it is difficult to send the men off to war to die for some bankers bonus if the economy then immediately grinds to a halt. Part of gender equity and diversity is about ensuring that your value as a cog in the machine is not greater than your value as a member of the knights temporary for the new world order. Diversity encompasses population control - working women tend to have less children - and wage suppression. Diversity is also a mechanism for neutering whole societies and cultures by attacking the male role and the institution of the family thereby creating dependencies on the state.

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FBI boss: We don't want a backdoor, we want the front door to phones

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Nope

These are the preliminary steps of the cross border copyright / IP enforcement regime under the guise of keeping us safe. Still, it wouldn't be Australia if we didn't bend over backwards in our efforts to bend over forwards.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Barking @Yet Another Anonymous Coward

Australia proudly has an abomination of a voting system. If you vote it is very difficult not to have your vote counted towards the established duopoly. However, according to the AEC site: Informal votes are not counted towards any candidate but are set aside.

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Australia's Digital Tech curriculum looks to be shelved for another year

GrumpyOldBloke

Doesn't cover the cost of their education.

Why teach kids science when you can just steal the secrets behind the stuff the science is supposed to be about. The money to teach science and technology is now in the hands of our security and policing agencies as part of the governments increased spending on industrial espionage. Go Team Australia! Of course the US will steal if from us before we have even had a chance to give it to them but for a moment there we will be on the ladder.

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iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Security so good ...

Fear not James, it will be fixed. After the underpant bomber was escorted through security at Amsterdam airport our erstwhile political elite announced that we would be purchasing the full body male sterilisation machines from the same MI complex that had just failed in the Netherlands. Recently when a terrorist, or at least someone of the same skin tone as one, passed through Sydney airport on his brother's passport our current political elite announced BIO Id to be deployed in airports. Now that this fiendishly clever young man who is not of Middle Eastern appearance and does not look up to trigger the facial recognition scanners has revealed a hitherto unthought of attack vector - wander through an unlocked door - we can expect our chicken hawk PM to come down on us with some serious inconvenience to once again cover for the ineptitude of the public sector in this country and the lies which comprise the official narrative of the resource wars.

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Chinese city creates footpath for smartphone addicts

GrumpyOldBloke

Might teach you some bloody sense

Mmmm, must buy waterproof phone.

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Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: 129 per cent

> how that is for "technical people only".

But how do you know about Pebble? How do you know you want one?

And there's the trick.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: 129 per cent

At Mage, the market is tiny at the moment because there isn't really a compelling use case for the devices and because they have been marketed at the more technically orientated in our society. The watches don't do voice control and most people don't need biometric checks. However, as AC pointed out there is a potentially huge market of non-technical people who have their hands full and are looking for a new kind of tool. Just as Apple advanced many of the ideas behind the smart phone (advanced not invented) they may also be the ones to bring wearable computing to the masses. Perhaps not with this model but once they see what ordinary people want from a wristputer and how it ties into the Apple ecosystem then they could be onto something. But Samsung, Sony and LG are already there - yeah about their software. What about Google - I am an android user myself but we have to admit that Google is about evolution not revolution. If I want a half finished product on my wrist that is more about tracking and advertising than assisting me then Google is my first choice. Pebble - technical people only. Sorry but that leaves Apple to bring the product to the masses.

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MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Whipcrack sound

That is not the fun bit. Living as an all female community (most of the time) their cycles may have synced. You wouldn't want to be the token male within weapons range that week! Such a community might even need to advertise for males from time to time in order to replace the poor souls who didn't make it.

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Get ready: The top-bracket young coders of the 2020s will be mostly GIRLS

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Good

Yes, we can all look forward to the estrogen driven one-upwomenship and backstabbing.

Be careful what you wish for.

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How to promote CSIRO's ICT in Schools in your community

GrumpyOldBloke

In addition to RealFred's points: the motivation to learn comes from some future perspective or an unmet need. A barrier to participation in IT is that kids now have few unmet technology needs. Can't be bothered even breaking wind; there's an app for that. Have a great idea for a game; organising or shooting? Robotics; cost versus benefit and industrial robotics already do it better and faster. All this before we get to the 457's and the patent trolls. Gone are the days when 10 Print "Hello World", 20 GOTO 10 was the leading edge. This was the mistake the Raspberry Pi team made. Teaching more kids programming / IT was not about accessibility, it was about needs.

To get kids doing IT you either make them do it (a need to pass a test) which will kill any future interest or you find a genuine unmet need and encourage the kids to solve it before every man and his dog writes an app and patents the idea or governments decide it is a threat to mass surveillance and control. To make it accessible to the many the need must be able to be constructed lego block like - ie at a high enough level of abstraction that you are back to teaching applications, configurations and themes not programming per se and it must be on a relevant device, their smart phone. The completion of the need must also convey a sense of ownership and empowerment therefore you are talking open source, possibly client and private server (role for the Raspberry Pi?) and definitely networking, encryption, certificates, revocation and stenography.

Perhaps coming up with engaging lesson plans and the research of unmet technology needs in teens is an area where the CSIRO could spend its time and money. Though I suspect that the organisation has become so politicised and politically correct after a decade of global warming theology that it would struggle with this task.

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Revealed ... GCHQ's incredible hacking tool to sweep net for vulnerabilities: Nmap

GrumpyOldBloke

Beat them to it

I don't need no stinking GCHQ malware. I've got adobe flash installed!

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Poll: Australians hate government data retention plan

GrumpyOldBloke

Distinction between Data and Metadata

The distinction between data and metadata is quite clear. The confusion stems from who is talking about it.

metadata = what the puppets think they can get away with today without loosing too much skin.

metadata = what the puppet masters really want and what they will attain once they can get their foot in the door. Also referred to as data.

We are still in the early part of pass the parcel. The tech titans in Canberra who represent us are still trying to define metadata as a publicly acceptable entity rather than a technical concept. Like being strip searched and sterilised at airports or touching a print scanner along with thousands of your fellow travelers now that Ebola is spreading and transmissible through secretions. Under no circumstances should they be assisted in this pursuit. Let them enjoy their moral and intellectual superiority without turncoats - I am looking at you Malcolm - assisting them by offering mechanisms or excuses to climb in yet another window.

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Tim Cook on pale, male Apple: 'As CEO, I'm NOT satisfied'

GrumpyOldBloke

Walk the Walk

Carly Fiorina is available and has experience in the tech industry. Do your bit for diversity Tim and step down. Feed your family at night with stories of leading from the front.

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Spooks, cops, say Oz metadata push is for consistency, not data grab

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: re: Oz metadata push is for consistency

See, consistency!

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NSA leaker Thomas Drake says Oz security reforms are 'scary'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: What if...

Per the recent CIA revelations I think it is fair to say that that is exactly what is happening. Granting of massive powers that exist without any further parliamentary or judicial oversight must call into question any future acts of parliament or claims by politicians. 5+1 eyes and the mass collection of local data that is then forwarded to foreign jurisdictions makes any thought of a member parliament actually representing its nation farcical. On the positive side we now know National Security == Government acting illegally.

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Turnbull to Big Content: Let your movies RUN FREE ... for a fair price

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Content Availability

Lets not forget the classification scam the government runs in order to keep us all safe and thinking good thoughts. While big content has many problems universal and timely access is not as simple as Turnbull would have us believe. Like so many other problems in Australia, federal government ticket clippers are right there in the middle of it.

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Forrester says Australia, not China, is next boom market for cloud

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Room for more? Maybe smaller players...

5 eyes - already here

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Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Turnbull has been dining with the Devil,

Thanks Khaptain

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Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

GrumpyOldBloke

When the parents got home and raised the possibility of filtering I bet their kids gave them a good talking to hence the lack of follow through. This optional phase is temporary anyway in order to work out the bugs and soften up the electorate. Pretty soon we will begin to hear of 'demands' to make filtering mandatory, perhaps underscored by an expert or some otherwise avoidable crime but all the 'authorities' were on leave that day. Then some brave MP will stand up for the bankers and the war mongers (== ?) and make Britain great again. 2 minutes later the Australian public service will try and get it implemented here.

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Australia gets spooks' charter, new leak penalties

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Disconcerting

You are being a little unfair. Think of poor Mr Irvine's embarrassment! With all the powers granted to police and intelligence officers since 9/11 they forgot to consider the case of potentially angry people or people with alternate viewpoints entering the country. [Citing the fear that jihadists returning to Australia from Syria pose a threat to the country, Irvine said “it is a significant issue” and citing that threat as part of his case for data retention]. I would remind Mr Irvine of Benjamin Franklin's quote: those who give up essential libraries to effectuate a little insecurity observe neither.

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Voteware source code review 'could lead to hacking'

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Once a trouble maker always...

Basic principles of security are that you do not rely on obfuscation. Basic principles of democracy were once similar if my memory serves me correctly. If I am helping to foot the bill for our governments endless stupidity (esp at the federal level) then I want to be sure that the government we have is actually the government we voted for. The concept of odious debt suggests that the money lenders should share similar concerns. Nothing to hide, nothing to fear, right!

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Data retention saves Australia from TERROR says Labor MP

GrumpyOldBloke

Authoritarians seek more authority for themselves

Yup pretty much sums it up. I guess if a threat is imminent and seemingly unavoidable then all the security to date is exposed as the theater it really is. Perhaps the spooks could start doing their jobs with the extensive powers they have already stolen from us or at least publicly admit that terrorism is low level warfare waged by sovereign states - like our friends across the pacific - for economic gain. Not quite as scary as bearded devils who hate us for our freedoms but admitting you have a problem is the first step in solving it.

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Bloodied Samsung's profits down 25% as it clings to mobe crown

GrumpyOldBloke

A segment crying out for a proper operating system, cheaper peripherals (tablets:keyboards) and the ability to remove vendor crapware (esp Samsung).

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Surrender your crypto keys or you're off to chokey, says Australia

GrumpyOldBloke

Increasingly opaque public service demands ever greater transparency from the serfs. The Snowden revelations mentioned instructions from the US to its sycophants to view their citizens as the enemy. Do our public servants loose face before other public servants if they can't sell out their own populations or demonstrate their influence over the elected fools and cowards?

Perhaps the AG's department could occupy themselves, while waiting for the Australian public to see things their way, by following up on those WMD's that we went to war for. A million dead Iraqis. Who knew it was all lies and when? Another good one might be why the legislation governing the full body scanners at the Oz international airports mentions nothing about the need for the devices to be effective or safe. What or who was the real driver behind the rollout of these devices, why don't they need to be safe and whose decision was that. Is it a criminal matter?

Maybe ask ASIO why the spying on East Timor seemed to be more about corporate advantage than national security. Could it be the same story when we used a warship to intimidate the Solomon Islands and accused their leader of child porn/abuse offences? Does Bougainville have our sticky fingerprints on it as well?

There is a whole bunch of useful things the AG's office could be doing in their own backyard before straying even further into ours. That is of course if the law means anything to them other than as a tool of empire. Though whose empire might be another interesting question if they have a moment.

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My work-from-home setup's better than the office. It's GLORIOUS

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: 1920x1200

Dell and Samsung do 27" 2560*1440 at a reasonable price point while you wait for 4K

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Big Content wants Aussies blocked from Netflix

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: If only there was a legitimate alternative...

there's no benefit to anyone ... especially since it's been so widely adopted.

There is huge benefit to politicians allowing problems to fester until such time as the aggrieved party is prepared to pony up the dollars to get it fixed. Public comments by politicians that reflect a strong position but no actual action are a guide to said party that the donations are heading in the right direction but just a little bit more is required to get it over the line.

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Microsoft's JavaScript challenger nears 1.0, wins Visual Studio love

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: @GrumpyOldBloke

An article published in the register not so long mentioned new Javascript engines that run code about as fast as C# engines so we can conclude that the runtime inefficiencies are not so great. Direct indexing of memory; with just about everything living on the heap and being accessed through indirection there is probably not much difference between the C#/Java versus Javascript approaches anymore. So we are left with arguments about type as a code management issue and not a compute issue. My question is - is type the best way to solve code management issues. Counter intuitively strongly typed languages may actually be better in smaller projects. In larger projects the proliferation of types to keep the compiler happy creates a significant code design and code management overhead. We will see how the future pans out, with age comes dementia but also the recognition that many things that were once held dear pass their best by date. Abandoning strongly typed languages opens up a much more natural expression of interconnectedness in code and does away with a lot of the abstraction demanded by types. Does this require new ways to manage code - absolutely. Is a reversion to types the answer - I don't think so.

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GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Can't see the point myself.

Because people have forgotten that types largely existed in the old days to solve a compute problem.They cling to typed languages today in an attempt to solve a management problem. Unfortunately types are not great at this role despite an oft quoted belief that typed languages afford scale and banish bugs, ignoring the myriad number of types and bugs that appear in any large project and the often haphazard way they are brought into existence. Management problems need to be solved with management tools. Types in modern managed code are now little more than a feel good overhead. Prayer beads would probably work as well.

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Steelie Neelie 'shocked' that EU tourists turn mobes off when abroad

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: How can she be shocked?

She is shocked because without your phone it is more difficult for the 'authorities' to track you.

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SA Plods plonk boots on privacy principles with fingerprint scanners

GrumpyOldBloke

Not really an election issue. Standard procedure is to accidentally release a violent crim and oh-no the resultant carnage could have been avoided by solution looking for a problem product X. The petting zoo will knee jerk to avoid ministerial embarrassment and presto - new police powers! Next thing that will happen is VIC will introduce the policy to bring it into line with SA. From there it will spread to the other disease centres in the country and another civil liberty bites the dust for the greater good.

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Dart 1.1 bullseyes JavaScript performance in latest benchmarks

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: JS is the new ASM?

Things are never that strongly typed anymore. Interfaces, abstract functions, virtual functions, void pointers and unions (good old days) mean that we mostly don't really care what type something is. If the purpose of type is just to keep the IDE happy so you can have intellisense or to save a few clock cycles by allowing early binding then good riddance. Once we abandon strong types then we start to free ourselves of rigid class hierarchies and refactoring and regression problems when trying to describe completely new stories.

For example LegoBlock does not implement iFood but instances can be swallowed. Where should the new ChokingException be thrown from? It is only at run time that we find that this item does not support the EatMe method. While you could claim that this is an argument for strong types known at compile time that is not the way the new story played out. If you subsequently attempted to model this scenario you would have to refactor existing objects to implement iChewable or abandon type and pass Object references – either way it is ugly and it gets worse as new stories are created over time. Do we later need an iKissable or do we modify iChewable with a bite force or boolean sevearble attribute?

While there are currently program and programmer management issues associated with loosely typed languages like Javascript there are also huge advantages in abandoning a rigid type system and treating objects as a blob with discoverable properties and methods – just like every living thing does in everyday life. It will change the way software is written just like OO did before it.

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Microsoft to RIP THE SHEETS off Windows 9 aka 'Threshold' in April

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: Save billions on marketing

By giving people what they WANT.

Not so simple. MS office is one of the planets biggest time wasters. Familiar OS paradigms are already feeling clunky as the accessibility of stuff is falling well behind its quantity. Sharepoint is not a great solution to corporate information overload. UI designers are struggling to give form to the next great leap forward. If MS give people what they want now by looking back it is doomed. The danger (hope) is that it will become irrelevant before any intelligent and creative forms survive its political sewer and its outsourced battery farms. Metro is obviously the wrong path, we evolved to recognise signposts by their contextual and spatial relationships - a bunch of disembodied tiles and a god awful ribbon isn't it. So what are they to do, they are no Google?

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TPP treaty nearly ready to roll over us, says Oz minister

GrumpyOldBloke

Our tin soldier in chief has already bravely stated that we can see it when it is signed.

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US Department of Justice details Kim Dotcom evidence

GrumpyOldBloke

Re: US$ 150,000,000.00

No, wont fly because this is not about monetizing todays content it is about future control of all content. By seeing pirates everywhere you can get stupid, stupid, stupid public servants and our dim witted representatives to pass legislation offering draconian penalties for trivial infractions of work that was done up to ~120 years ago. Armed with this the RIAA, MPAA and other bastions of godly virtue will shake down any new content producer or distributor. There is bound to be something in new work that is derivative from something created over the last 120 years - just let us scan your stuff against our archive, shouldn't take a minute. Even if there isn't there is no penalty for claiming there is and getting it taken down. This is why you can never settle with these parasites, never propose a sensible alternative, never reach consensus. It is not about protecting the world from Adam Sandler and Lady Gaga. It is about protecting established monopolies from Joe down the road who comes up with the next South Park and wants to sell it himself over the internet.

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