* Posts by pixl97

272 posts • joined 2 Mar 2011

Page:

Soz, switch-fondlers: Doesn't look like 2013 is 10Gb Ethernet's year

pixl97

TCP Incast

I read this article on Erlang and TCPincast and imagine application issues like this will cause the migration to 10G-E sooner then many people will think.

http://www.snookles.com/slf-blog/2012/01/05/tcp-incast-what-is-it/

This page is even better at describing the issue. http://www.pdl.cmu.edu/Incast/

Sometimes it's easier to throw more hardware at the problem then fix the nature of the problem.

0
0

Hm, nice idea that. But somebody's already doing it less well

pixl97
Boffin

Environmental/Energy?

Could the increased cost of energy extraction and waste disposal be consuming our growth?

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/energy/story/2011-12-13/electric-bills/51840042/1

Without a significant decrease in energy costs any growth will be consumed by increased extraction costs. We've mined all the cheap and easy stuff and are digging deeper and farther out then ever. Solar, Wind, and other renewables are more expensive then their non-renewable counterparts and economies based on them will see a larger piece of their economic output used to support them. On the other side of the same coin we're globally *trying* to limit pollution, where once pollution costs were externalized (by dumping it where ever), now it's a cost of doing business.

2
0

Yes, hundreds upon hundreds of websites CAN all be wrong

pixl97

Re: ’Scuse Me While I Kiss This Guy'

Kinda like when people actually figure out the words to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lola_%28song%29

My rather conservative nephew was singing the song with the lyrics all wrong and was rather redfaced when I told him to go look them up. I still get a chuckle out of that.

0
0
pixl97

Re: Not just lyrics

There are many times finding the misattributed song has lead me to the actual artist. At least the internet makes it easily searchable when you have incorrect information and are trying to find what you are looking for. It was a real pain in the ass back in the day trying to sing to someone else to see if they could figure out the song you were talking about.

Oh, and my favorite "There's a bathroom on the right" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Moon_Rising_(song)

1
0

Craptastic analysis turns 2.8 zettabytes of Big Data into 2.8 ZB of FAIL

pixl97

Re: loads of crap data...

Why would you want a duplicate checker to check a whole file? In theory you'd only check files of the same size then check the file up to the first difference (which may be the entire file up to the last byte).

Now, if you wanted to check against any future duplicates you'd select a hashing system that makes sense for the number and size of files you will have (CRC may be fine, or SHA-512 if you want to reduce the chance of collisions), then hash the file as it comes in to your system since that should be the cheapest time to do it. You could then save this info to a database that could handle the comparisons quickly. Just make sure you figure a way to handle deletions and moves correctly.

0
0

Review: Kingston Hyper-X 3K 240GB SSD

pixl97

Re: Never again

The first SSD I bought was an Intel, it's been running over 2 years now. I've bought a few Intel and 8 Samsung since then and none of them have failed.

3
1

Forget value-added broker jokes: Could YOU shift nuclear plant scrap?

pixl97
Holmes

>I have no way of putting them back in the pool... at any price!

If someone wants them, there will be a price for them. If no one wants them but you, the price is determined by how long the person that has them wants to sit on them vs how much you are willing to pay.

If someone wants them, but not 19/20 of them, ebay, or whatever industry related site them off. May take a while though.

1
1

El Reg man: Too bad, China - I was RIGHT about hoarding rare earths

pixl97
Boffin

Monopoly on cheap?

The author didn't state something here...

Reuters "Lanthanum, used in rechargeable batteries for hybrid autos and in night-vision goggles, rocketed 26-fold from $5.15 a kg in January 2010 to a peak of $140 in June 2011. Although it has slid to $20.50, the price is still well above earlier lows."

Even though they don't have a monopoly on light rares, they managed to make 28x what they were for a while, and the market is still 4x over what it was. Assuming the base mining costs are the same, they have compressed many years of profits in to one. Also, it is very likely the mines from the Americas are going to produce a more expensive product simply because of environmental regulations. What may cause the bigger problem is all the new mines coming on line and crashing the prices, then going out of business, meanwhile the rare earth mines in China fund themselves off the heavy rares they produce.

"Analyst Edward Otto at Cormark Securities forecasts the long-term price of cerium oxide to settle eventually at 50 cents a kg and lanthanum oxide at $1.00 per kg, down from $20.50/kg currently."

0
0

Wikipedia doesn't need your money - so why does it keep pestering you?

pixl97

Re: Deletion obsession

Is history not old news? I agree not everything should be put in an article, but to focus on the limitations of a dead tree format when dealing with practically unlimited storage does seem backwards at times.

0
0
pixl97

Maybe now...

Maybe now they have enough money they can buy more servers so they don't have to delete so many articles.

0
0

Outlook 2013 spurns your old Word and Excel documents

pixl97

Outlook kitchensink. Also, Question S/MIME

Support for legacy documents sounds like a good thing to remove. Just another place for a bug to creep in and exploit the program.

I'm trialing Outlook 2013 currently and having a problem with S/MIME

I have a .pfx key that works fine on my iphone for signing messages, but when I setup Outlook to use it, the program locks up when I try to send a signed message. So far I've not seen anything else on google about this.

0
0

PGP, TrueCrypt-encrypted files CRACKED by £300 tool

pixl97

Re: You might get lucky,

Which is why you should use full disk encryption or set your truecrypt drives to unmount themselves after some time of inactivity. When you unmount a drive Truecrypt actively erases they key from memory. Truecrypt also tries to make sure master keys don't hit the page file.

http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/unencrypted-data-in-ram

4
0
pixl97

Re: Hibernation?

If anyone has ever read the Truecrypt site and forums they would already know 2 things.

Hibernation and encryption don't work securely together. and,

Disk encryption doesn't protect an open encrypted volume.

Only a system that is designed to clear the encryption key out of memory at hibernation and ask for it again when waking up is secure to go to sleep. Other then that, turn it off. I need to to experiment with SSDs using full disk encryption to see what the performance is like for full shutdowns and startups. Oh, and if you ever use a SSD on for an encrypted disk and want to change your key, move all your data off and do a factory wipe on it.

12
0

Apache plug-in doles out Zeus attack

pixl97

Detection

Is there anywhere that has information on how to detect this module on a server? The articles didn't seem to contain that information.

0
0

After Sandy Hook, Senator calls for violent video game probe

pixl97

Re: How many people...

Does this count?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2175410/Teenager-dies-playing-game-40-HOURS-straight-eating.html

4
0
pixl97

Re: Re: Re:

Yes, guns are the easy way to commit a mass murder. Take away the guns and you are still going to have a higher number of mass murders in America then other places. There is a cultural need to solve problems with violence here.

Also, Austraila has a gun ban, but it didn't stop this

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childers_Palace_Fire

4
11
pixl97

Re:

>It's time for the US government to grow some balls and do what's needed rather than just pretend to do something,

In theory the government is the people, and the people are deeply divided on guns. We shot up the king of England's boys a long time ago when he thought it was a good idea to do what he needed to do.

Just trying to blame guns alone doesn't make sense, Canada has had a much lower rate of mass murders then the U.S. per capita even before guns were banned in most cases there. I'm assuming that this has a historical basis of gaining independence via violence and surviving a very violent civil war. It becomes ingrained in the American ideal that violence is a solution that has worked in the past. Also add in the teaching that American freedom and independence helped saved the world both in WWI and WWII.

9
16
pixl97

Can they explain.

Can violence because of video games explain mass murders before the days of video games? There were plenty of them before 1980 or so.

Video games are much easier to blame then the rest of our culture.

12
1

Baby got .BAT: Old-school malware terrifies Iran with del *.*

pixl97

BAT2EXE

Heh, I remember making (playful/malicious) bat files in to exe files when I was still a teenager. Good to see the Iranian hacker is only 20 years behind the curve.

3
1

Search engines we have known ... before Google crushed them

pixl97

BLINK tag.. it was bad, but all the blinking gif images. I can't even find that image of the needle that had a blinking head that was so very common back in those day.

3
0

Seagate slips out super-silent 2.5in video hard drive

pixl97

Re: I dunno

I'm assuming that these products are being designed for next generation product lines. The 2.5 format would allow the design of a much thinner end product. Add the quite and low power factor in and you can end up with a device that doesn't heat your room, stays silent about that fact, and might not look like an eyesore.

1
0
pixl97

Re: typo

Most of the platter is empty, but the part that isn't is extremely information dense. The random seek times are what kills you though.

0
0

Chinese spacecraft JUUUUST avoids smashing into Toutatis

pixl97

Re: Very nice but...

What do you think that artist does for a day job. It's a good long time between events in space and he has to feed his family.

2
0

Ocean seeding a dead duck as carbon solution

pixl97

Re: "Environmental Impact "

Turtle, adding on to my post. Yes, it has an environmental impact, some negative, but it would be like your MPs arguing about the impact of your neighbor Mrs Tuttleworth burning her rubbish bin while the entirety of London was a burning inferno year after year.

0
0
pixl97

Re: "Environmental Impact "

>Well what kind of negative environmental impact could that possibly have, eh?

Lets say it acts like a fertilizer, which it's trying to in this case. It could cause low oxygen levels in the water by causing a growth bloom. That's about all. If you're worried about the environmental impact, you'd be far more worried (at least in the U.S. case) that we put 3,000,000,000 pounds of nitrogen a year in the Gulf, from just one river. Who knows how much phosphorus. All concentrated close to the shore where it kills everything off. The place where most sea life lives.

Vast portions of the oceans are desserts. http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/08/27/oecan-deserts.html Huge portions of the oceans don't have much life in them all all, mostly bound the the lack of iron. Dumping iron there is analog to watering the desserts on earth.

1
0

'Metadatagate' fails to bring down Oz pollie

pixl97

Time Legacy.

Think of how much effort would be saved if the world moved away from time zones and daylight savings times. Yes, it would be quite odd not to call the time when the sun is directly overhead 12, but instead noon could happen at what ever local hour it happened to fall at. It would be 14 o'clock in London, Chicago, and Hong Kong at the same time. We'd still have the same problem of knowing weather people are awake in that part of the world at the time, but knowing that the U.S. is dark from around 20 to 6 would mean the same thing for everybody.

1
3

Microsoft: IE mouse tracking vuln no big deal. Sort of...

pixl97

Re:

I'm negative and cynical about everything without the Reg communities help, thank you.

And I will keep the flame to EVERY software providers feet on keeping their products patched. Open Source, Commercial, Freeware, and locked down and private. Remember Microsoft responds to security threats these days pretty well, because in the past they did not. Microsoft addresses security issues relatively responsibly because sitting on the problem and hiding it or going after the researchers ended up with the bugs hitting full disclosure lists and turning in to 0-day exploits.

9
0
pixl97
FAIL

Microsoft's answer:

"Bla bla, no current threat, bla bla hypothetical, bla bla hard to exploit, bla bla."

The correct answer:

"Oops, our mistake, we'll fix that."

13
5

'It’s called capitalism. We are proudly capitalistic. I’m not confused about this'

pixl97

Re: In other news...

Right with you. People can argue the moral argument all day, but at the end of the day it's the legal one that rules out. Honestly ask your lawmakers when they wrote this law that they couldn't see this happening. Hell, your lawmakers probably designed it this way to help move their and their buddies money in to tax shelters. Now their antics have come to bite the economy as a whole.

1
0

Windows 8: At least it's better than ‘not very good’

pixl97
Go

Start 'button' on Win 8

I recreated a start 'button' on 8 without using any addons.

Just create a folder somewhere on your computer. I named mine 'Start' for easy identification.

Right click on the task bar and go to Toolbars > New Toolbar

Choose your 'Start' folder.

If you set your 'start' folder to have as little room as possible it has a >> symbol on it, clicking that works like the start button.

Now in your start folder put shortcuts to everything you Want to access easy. Subfolders work just like you'd expect them too on the old 'XP' style start menu.

I'm pretty sure this works on 7 and XP too, I've just never needed to do that on those operating systems.

1
1

Microsoft licence cops kick in TWICE as many customers' doors as rivals

pixl97
Mushroom

Re: we were audited this year

Maybe if enough people document this behavior the DOJ can bring a RICO suit against the bastards.

1
0
pixl97

Re: How does this "audit" even work...?

It works like the movies. Some big guys in suits come in your business looking all scary with weapony looking lumps under their suits. They tell you that you have a really nice looking business and it would be a shame if anything 'happened' to it. If you cough up some cash then you'll continue to be safe until the next time they come around.

Microsoft, partying like it's 1929!

3
1

Samba 4 arrives with full Active Directory support

pixl97

Re: What a waste of time

I'm excited about the prospect of using it for the home network. All my windows copies are Pro, and an AD network is a whole lot easier to maintain then standalone boxes. That, and I'm the Unix guru too.

For businesses I see your point.

5
0
pixl97

Re: Amazing news...

The latest Linux kernel, released today comes with experimental SMB2, so it might be a while before we see v3. I'm guessing most Samab4 installs aren't going to see that kind of hardware, and instead will more in the SME that doesn't have volume license agreements.

1
0

Are you ready for the 40-zettabyte year?

pixl97

Re: Re: 33%?

Most businesses would spend more time and money trying to figure out which was the valuable 33% then it would cost just to expand the storage network.

0
0
pixl97

> massively over-duplicated shite

In theory if your storage de-duplicates all your VDIs , then that doesn't really matter how many of the same copies you have.

0
0

MySQL gains new batch of vulns

pixl97

File System Permissions

If you've given users the ability to write to your mysql database directory, you've already pissed up. A sane setup should be protected from that by default. Never write anything in to the same directory that someone else can, too many opportunities for race conditions and other timing attacks.

The heap and stack attack look like they could be kind of dangerous, hack in a poorly protected site on your server, get credentials to your sql server, then dump password tables for other sites. Could see a few more big sites password lists get in the wild from this.

4
0

Antivirus biz's founder unmasked as noted Chinese hacker

pixl97
Joke

McAfee's not too bad...

Unless your a computer or his neighbor.

0
0

New Tosh drive can wipe out 4TB 'near instantaneously'

pixl97

Re: Dunno about this.

Why can't you boot from it properly? That said, I always create a smaller /boot GPT partition so if I have to boot off a tools cd it doesn't freak out.

Do enterprises just spend a lot of money on stuff like small 15k drives and raid cards and drive bays if they're making bulk disk storage that's not accessed often? Or do you just commonly fill up the $250k san with long term files? Have you priced 1TB of RAID1 enterprise SSD storage?

Raid cards with support exist, don't piecemeal crap together. A set of 4TB disk can saturate older sata standards on streaming reads, so it's likely that most people will be putting disks this large in new systems.

Data alignment is an issue with 512b sectors, not just 4k sectors, get used to it when dealing with raids.

http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2011/06/09/aligning-io-on-a-hard-disk-raid-the-theory/

0
0

MIDI: 30 years old... almost

pixl97

Re: Don't forget the playing (on a PC) of MIDI files

Since I don't have a musical bone in my body, this is the mid I remember. I remember how many crappy geocities pages attempted to embed and auto play them. Even a 100k file was painful on dailup, and mp3s were just starting to show up. Always fun when 2 windows decided to play at the same time.

0
0

Windows 8 launch outdoes Windows 7's, says Microsoft bigwig

pixl97

Re: Lee Downing

>the MS store keeps giving me some ridiculous prices to upgrade this Windows 7 Home Premium to Windows 7 Pro, for example

Ever since 8 has come out, the Anytime Upgrade feature has not worked for me. I've tried to upgrade two different W7 home edition computers to pro for my clients at different times, so it appears they are pushing everyone to 8 in that feature. Had to buy licenses from a different source and upgrade that way.

4
0
pixl97

Re: "Sold"? Not quite

If any sizable percent of these were cheap upgrades to the pro edition then that number represents a considerable loss compared if they were sold to the customer as an upgrade edition or OEM disk. Of course Microsoft makes most their money selling to OEMs and businesses, but it reminds me of Vista where cheap/free upgrades where easy to get, yet it didn't gain much traction in market.

Of course Microsoft is going to try and spin this in any good way possible in an attempt to get someone to develop for the TIFKAM on all the devices it's pushing out.

5
0

85% of Windows 8 users wield the desktop on day one

pixl97

Re: Learning it's ways without frustration...

Same here. I messed with a Leveno (thinksmart maybe?) that was windows 8, touch screen and convertible. It felt like I kept entering deeper in to the metro interface and getting stuck so I had to hit the button that took me to the main screen. No amount of poking at the interface would send me one screen back in different places. I've been using 8 on a K & M setup as a desktop for a while now so it's just not that I'm totally new to the interface either. It just doesn't feel like lines of thought on now the touch interface should work in places where allowed to complete, I guess at some point they had to push the product out the door.

0
1

Samsung SSD 840 series storage review

pixl97

Re: The Thing They Never Tell You

The IBM DeathStar, just applied the other way, Or the WDC 4 and 8GB drives from way back in the day. I've had very good luck so far, but I only buy Intel and Samsung SSDs. Everything else seems to be a crapshoot.

0
0

No Choice but Windows 8?

pixl97

Re: No Choice but Windows 8?

Don't go to the 'home' site, go to Small Business. Every desktop I've looked at in the business section has W7 on it.

3
0

Texan schoolgirl expelled for refusing to wear RFID tag

pixl97

Re: Good for us!

WRONG. Everything you just posted is incorrect.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_school

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_school_district

An independent school and independent school district are two totally different things. Don't bring confusion to the issue.

0
0

Google, Apple, eBay shouldn't pay taxes - people should pay taxes

pixl97

Exactly.

Trying to envision a system that requires cooperation of the majority of the players to succeed without understanding this...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_theory

is an effort in futility, ignorance, and ultimately failure.

0
0

Hexing MAC address reveals Wifi passwords

pixl97

Re: I suppose you would rather use NetGear

I would rather use D-Link or NetGear then the total POS Belkin is. They are professionals at making gear that sucks. I have a DWL3200 AP that's served me well for years. Only real issue I've had with them is if they get too hot they lose their NVRAM settings.

0
0
pixl97

Re: Verzion routers same

>Wireless or Fixed? If it is wireless they this is a serious security flaw. If it is a the fixed Ethernet MAC on the home side its impact is nearly zero.

A significant number of devices have only a single digit difference between wireless and ethernet interface. The AP I use (not a belkin), uses the same MAC for the wireless and ethernet interfaces. Only secondary (VLAN) wireless IDs have a totally different MAC assigned.

0
0

The early days of PCs as seen through DEAD TREES

pixl97

Re: BYTE

>Three words: "IS UNIX DEAD?!??!" (extra punctuation added by me)

Linux was still a newborn at that time, and The BSDs had just overcome a huge legal battle. The commercial UNIXes were all proprietary and considerably expensive. It wasn't out of the question at the time that MS was going to kill UNIX as it was (and it did). BYTE at the time followed MS since that's where the money was. Even back then they realized that IBM/OS2 wasn't going to dominate the market. Between 86 and 97 Apple management turned gold in to poo.

In hindsight Microsoft did kill UNIX at the time, with lower hardware costs, cheaper licensing, and letting a large amount of piracy occur. They didn't win by making more reliable software, that's for sure. It wasn't Linux became popular that Microsoft considered any of the Unixlike operating systems a serious threat.

5
0

Page:

Forums