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* Posts by pixl97

255 posts • joined 2 Mar 2011

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Java malware spotted using stolen certificate

pixl97
FAIL

Other Java Issues.

Off on a tanget to the article, but

The Java installer sucks (yes we already knew that with the Ask toolbar)

Resets Java update settings. Set java to download before installing and set it to daily. Install new update. It's now reset to monthly and warn before downloading.

I've had to reinstall J7v17 twice on many systems as it doesn't install the browser plug-in to IE or Firefox correctly. These days I'd consider this a benefit other then the computers really needed it for apps to work.

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IT'S HERE: Seagate ships 'affordable' desktop hybrid drive

pixl97

Re:

The manufactures bios choices and hardware drivers can make a significant difference at boot up, I swear some of it has lines like this

#Wait 5 seconds on firmware load to make sure crappy hardware interface has actually loaded

init_wireless_device_firmware ( wait 5);

Also, add Windows Pro to a domain server and you'll find on the average AD setup the majority of your boot time ends up waiting on the network.

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pixl97

Re: Too small

If you are looking for huge amounts of storage, this is not the drive you are looking for, you want a 4TB drive.

If you are looking for super fast access, you are looking for an SSD.

If you are looking a trade off between both, this is the drive you are looking for.

I've used the XTs in notebooks and so far I've been impressed. I do wish the large desktop drives came with 16GB of flash, that fits my common 'working set' of data better. For the vast majority of office workers the 8GB does just fine. I've put a number of XTs in Core2 type laptops that have plenty of CPU and ram, but the manufactures disk that shipped with it was dog crap, and it makes all the difference in the world. The end users stop looking at buying new laptops because now the machine is more then 'fast enough' for their daily tasks.

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Banged-up Brit hacker hacks into his OWN PRISON'S 'MAINFRAME'

pixl97
FAIL

Re: Elmer Phud

My mom has worked for the county jail for close to 20 years now, the stories about mistakes in the paper shuffle would blow your mind.

Once recent case involved a guy my sister went to school with. He committed an armed robbery in Austin, was arrested in Dallas, but was shipped to the county of his residence which my mom happens to work at. Dallas county didn't send the felony arrest paperwork with him, he just just had a traffic warrant at the county here. The officer in charge was getting the court paperwork ready for the traffic ticket (in which he would have likely been bonded out the same day) when my mom recognized him and looked at the paperwork and noticed the serious problem. She quickly got the original warrant from the NCIS and reclassified him as a high risk inmate. Had it been her day off, or she was on vacation, the guy would have walked (which he was a flight risk because of an attempt to flee to Mexico).

Events like this are pretty common. : (

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Seagate takes 7.2k notebook drives out back - and shoots them

pixl97

Re:

HP laptops normally come with the crappiest HDDs ever. The IO performance is unbelievably bad.

That said, I ordered a 17" HP a while back and it came with one of the XT's with 8GB of flash, it outperformed any non-SSD hard drive I've had in a notebook before. The clients loved the upgrade in speed, and the huge amount of space.

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pixl97

Re: I have momentus XTs

I've used a number of the XTs with 8GB Flash and they are much faster with Windows 7. In notebooks the difference seems (and feels) pretty large. XTs are great for single use clients. Multi-client/Server installs are looking for a different solution.

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Health pros: Alcohol is EVIL – raise its price, ban its ads

pixl97

Re: In the UK in the 1960s 2/3 of adults smoked. Today it is 1/3. This applies that idea to alcohol.

>Ban advertising of alcohol

You might take it out of the mags, papers, and bus stops, but what about the internet? You think that facebook accounts telling you about $ewer_brew of the week won't try to fill the vacuum?

Also, if you raise the cost of alcohol above the cost to make it illegally you create a black market, then you have to factor in the law enforcement costs of said black market. The enforcement costs are significant, possibly more then the tax income you raise.

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pixl97

Re: Advertising - Internet age

How are they going to 'ban' internet advertizing? None on sites with a .co.uk? What counts as an ad? My blog where I talk about the newest swill released on the market? If they can't stop the ads or 'false' ads on the internet expect the billion dollar ad industry to go on the internet in one way or the other.

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Yet another Java zero-day vuln is being exploited

pixl97

Re: Die, Java. Die.

In Firefox 19 at least it had notified me that 7r15 was vulnerable even before I read it online. Quick moving on the Mozilla team.

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pixl97

Re: Non-admin accounts, Software Restriction Policies, etc etc etc etc

Non-admin accounts are a good start, but can still be an issue if the 'virus' is persistent and updates from a server. The next local privilege exploit can then be used to fully own the machine.

Software restriction has worked great for me in larger businesses with AD and well defined use policies, but outside of that in the small business arena and standalone computer market it doesn't really exist in an easy to manage fashion.

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Sinkholes reveal more Chinese-hacked biz - and piggybacking crims

pixl97

Re: Title is too long

>when they start to inconvenience someone important the rules can be thrown out of the window.

We need to publish lists of these someone importants on the internet so sustained attacks can be commissioned against just them until the time that they figure out not being a twat when it comes to policy is necessary.

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Prepare for 'post-crypto world', warns godfather of encryption

pixl97
Joke

Already exists.

"I want the secret of the Coca-Cola company not to be kept in a tiny file of 1KB, which can be exfiltrated easily by an APT," Shamir said. "I want that file to be 1TB, which can not be exfiltrated. I want many other ideas to be exploited to prevent an APT from operating efficiently.

MIcrosoft made this years ago by allowing you to embed flash in a .doc file.

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Drilling into a half-decent gigabit small-biz switch... from D-Link

pixl97

Re: RE: Or more simply, why does being small mean you have to be cheap?

I had a client pulling that same thing with a 100MBps switch, so I brought in a loaner GB switch for a day. They ordered a new switch the same day.

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Microsoft's own code should prevent an Azure SSL fail: So what went wrong?

pixl97

Re: easy failure - designed to fail.

Designed to fail, because it's a single point of failure. I bet about everything else with the system is redundant.

The entire cert system needs to be ran off 2 different CA's, the entire system can run off one, but has a total fit about it (leading a person to correct the problem). Oh, and make sure the CA's expriy dates are significantly different.

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Microsoft brings Azure back online

pixl97

Failure at point of no redundancy.

Redundant Hardware: Check.

Redundant Network: Check.

Redundant DNS: Check.

Redundant Services: Check.

Single point of failure at certificate services: Check, wait not FAIL, crap ARRAHHH.

Design tip for next time, find a way for your services to use two different set of certificates from two different providers. Make sure the expiry dates differ. Have stuff warn, but not fail if there is a problem with one.

I'd like my consulting fee now.

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Official: Cloud computing invented by two technophobic old geezers

pixl97

Re: Hopelesslly deluded...

Ugh, it's because the word cloud is used in places it shouldn't be.

It's not the WAN, it's the VM. Cloud isn't about the end user, it's all internet to them. It's about the server room. Cloud is not co-location, it's closer to no-location. Go back 10 years, ask your co-location service to have 150 servers up and running for you in 2 hours and then take them down 10 hours later. I think the words they would use is 'FAT FUCKING CHANCE' as they hung up. I see cloud as the abstraction of the server room. Apps have always had some abstraction when they used DNS to contact a server, now because of VMs I can push that same server to US, EU, or Asia in almost no time, depending on what I needed to serve. And then, I can take it all back down quickly.

Reality is, since running on VMs has become almost universal, that clouds will be here to stay.

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pixl97

Re:

Being a server guy I see the 'cloud' as a hardware abstraction layer for software that has rapidly changing demands. If I need extra 'burst' processing capability for rare events, I can have a number of VM images on the cloud provider of the day ready to go at a moments notice. I don't have to have $x extra servers taking up space and power sitting unused 95% of the time.

I tend to think of my server room as baseline power, a nuclear power plant. I have a lot of power available, but it is inflexible if large, short endurance spikes of demand (it would take days to add new servers, even after I got purchase authorization). The cloud works like natural gas generators for me. They are more expensive to use, but they can be fired up quickly when needed and then shut down.

If it doesn't feel like a quantum leap in technology, maybe you aren't using it. VM/VDI has made deployment, management, and backup of servers click and drool easy. People where time sharing in the 60's because computers were expensive. I time share (VM) servers because they fast and cheap, so fast that without VMs you'd have to put a lot of services on one box, which in the Windows world is a great way to have things go bad.

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Bundestag holds 'unusual' hearing on German Copyright Act

pixl97

Re: robots.txt is bollocks

Just have your webserver block anything that says it's from GoogleBot.

http://www.thesitewizard.com/apache/block-bots-with-htaccess.shtml

Easy enough with apache.

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Curiosity Mars rover flashes pics of GREY drilled powder sample

pixl97

Re: Can this be?

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-09/ancient-mariner-style-knots-tie-down-mars-rover-curiositys-cables-knot-fans-delight

A little more high tech then you make it out to be.

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pixl97

Re: Lee D

>Please summarise all science learned from the Mars missions so far, plus the cost of obtaining it

Mars is not made from gold and unobtanium. Oh, and we've learned how to send bots to other planets where the speed of light makes significant communications delays run around and do stuff, so lets say if in the future we want to mine rocks from there.

Real science isn't like the movies. Oh, and space is big and boring, pretty much the only place with interesting things occurring in real-time (on the human scale) is earth.

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Perfect sex minx calculated from 'deep' probe of X-rated flicks

pixl97

Re: the perfectly average

You do realize when you mix white and black people together, you don't get grey people. As much as the women tan around here it would seem that closer to a light brown is pretty popular.

Anyway, if the porn sites are giving me accurate statistics, all the black men are having sex with white women that have a very large derriere.

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Is it a bird? Is it a cloud? No! It's just a new Seagate biz NAS box

pixl97
Flame

Re: Blackarmor

>Data transfer errors with SMB or FTP? Maybe the next fw update will fix it. (never did)

Our Linux router shows some interesting logs from one of these BlackArmors

'martian destination 127.0.0.1 from 192.168.10.143, dev eth2'

(.143 is the BA unit)

WTF, who fucked up the network stack in these units. How do 127 packets even leave the device?!?

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VMTurbo 'invisible hand' control freak grabs more virty servers

pixl97

Re: VC - Virtual Cloud

Please explain why VM is the worst thing to happen to computing again? Why at some point in the future am I going to regret it, hell I regret not going to it sooner. Or is this just mixing VM and cloud together? Since I run my own VM servers I can balance out the need for IO and CPU, this has lead to far fewer servers and great cost reductions in the amount of systems I need. Instant snapshots (and the ability to back them up easily) has made system administration far easier. Being able to move guests easily or spinning up a second copy from a snapshot is something I only dreamed about 10 years ago.

That said I don't do much cloud stuff, but.. If I need a lot of extra capacity very quickly it is extremely easy to start up a number of instances and then shut them down again. There are a number of things I don't put in the could though to avoid HIPAA and other regulations.

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Own a drone: Fine. But fly a drone with a cam: Year in the clink

pixl97

Re: Drones don't take pictures

>If I shoot you with a gun, it's pretty obvious it was me. If I shoot you with a remote controlled drone, it's not?

It's probably easier to train with a scoped rifle and hit someone then try to hit someone with a gun on a 'reasonably affordable' drone. You can hit someone with a scoped rifle from quite a distance, we tend to call the people who do it regularly snipers.

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Heroku tech change leaves customer with bill-shock

pixl97
Linux

Lesson.

Lesson 1. Never believe the performance metrics giving to you from the people you pay. They will only show themselves in the best possible light.

Solution for lesson 1. Monitor your sites performance from different 3rd party locations, preferably from locations across the world where you have concentrations of customers.

Lesson 2. Proprietary software locks you in to a provider. Even though in the beginning the software sounds like the sweetest thing since sugar and is completely buzzword compliant, Even a simple change by the provider can send costs skyrocketing.

Solution for lesson 2. Standards compliant and/or open source software. Do not tie your data to one program. Look at your software/platform as an investment. If it has no liquidity or fungibility you are stuck with the pricing of one company rather than an entire market. Monopolies rarely treat their customers fairly.

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Any storm in a port

pixl97
Devil

Re: this is a manufacturing fault: Dell

Most desktop towers are built with the mainboard mounted on in inside right of the case (if you are looking at it from the front). Dell likes to build any number of units internally reversed, so not only are the connectors on the other side of the rear of the case, you have to flip the connector for it to go in.

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Oracle blocks security hole with quick, hot 'n' premature Java update

pixl97

Re: Anyone else get a 'invalid certificate' fail on trying to install this update?

Make sure your date and time are correct.

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Obama calls for study into games ‘n’ guns link

pixl97
Joke

Re: how about another study

I was going to go beat a hooker to death last night, but I stayed home and played GTA instead.

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Fusion-io touts cheap-as-chips flash to Apple, Facebook and chums

pixl97

Re: not rust

Because saying colbalt monoxide just doesn't sound as cool, and most laypeople associate rust with any type of metal corrosion and not just that of iron.

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Unbelievably vast quasar cluster forces universe-sized rethink

pixl97
Boffin

Re: "to have width you need an edge..."

>...and what happens when the knot at the end comes undone and the universe flies around the room making a 'pbltltttbhbbbttttt!' sound?

Quite possibly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology_of_the_universe#Vacuum_metastability_event

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_vacuum

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pixl97
Boffin

Re: crowded

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

'The region visible from Earth (the observable Universe) is a sphere with a radius of about 47 billion light years,['

Perhaps when talking about the size of the universe, one should say 'observable universe', because the unobservable universe is much bigger, possible infinite.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comoving_distance

Comoving distance makes trying to figure out where something would be now interesting, since 'the universe' is expanding equally (apparently) in all directions.

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Red Hat Linux: Now with Microsoft's Hyper-V drive

pixl97

Re: Arse about face

Yes, most of the time I run Windows on Xen or something like that, but I do have a few instances of the other way around.

In once case I run a small CentOS instance in Hyper-V on a 2008 Domain Controller. It runs a few scripts like MRTG, RRDTool, Smokeping, and some other SNMP stuff monitoring network metrics and performance. It was easier for me to set up Linux then try to have the commands work in Windows.

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Minicam movie pirate gets record-breaking five years in prison

pixl97

costs

It's between $50 and $60 a day in the U.S., $15k doesn't even cover 1 year. His prison time alone will cost over $100,000, that's not counting the costs of the trial.

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Soz, switch-fondlers: Doesn't look like 2013 is 10Gb Ethernet's year

pixl97

TCP Incast

I read this article on Erlang and TCPincast and imagine application issues like this will cause the migration to 10G-E sooner then many people will think.

http://www.snookles.com/slf-blog/2012/01/05/tcp-incast-what-is-it/

This page is even better at describing the issue. http://www.pdl.cmu.edu/Incast/

Sometimes it's easier to throw more hardware at the problem then fix the nature of the problem.

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Hm, nice idea that. But somebody's already doing it less well

pixl97
Boffin

Environmental/Energy?

Could the increased cost of energy extraction and waste disposal be consuming our growth?

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/energy/story/2011-12-13/electric-bills/51840042/1

Without a significant decrease in energy costs any growth will be consumed by increased extraction costs. We've mined all the cheap and easy stuff and are digging deeper and farther out then ever. Solar, Wind, and other renewables are more expensive then their non-renewable counterparts and economies based on them will see a larger piece of their economic output used to support them. On the other side of the same coin we're globally *trying* to limit pollution, where once pollution costs were externalized (by dumping it where ever), now it's a cost of doing business.

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Yes, hundreds upon hundreds of websites CAN all be wrong

pixl97

Re: ’Scuse Me While I Kiss This Guy'

Kinda like when people actually figure out the words to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lola_%28song%29

My rather conservative nephew was singing the song with the lyrics all wrong and was rather redfaced when I told him to go look them up. I still get a chuckle out of that.

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pixl97

Re: Not just lyrics

There are many times finding the misattributed song has lead me to the actual artist. At least the internet makes it easily searchable when you have incorrect information and are trying to find what you are looking for. It was a real pain in the ass back in the day trying to sing to someone else to see if they could figure out the song you were talking about.

Oh, and my favorite "There's a bathroom on the right" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Moon_Rising_(song)

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Craptastic analysis turns 2.8 zettabytes of Big Data into 2.8 ZB of FAIL

pixl97

Re: loads of crap data...

Why would you want a duplicate checker to check a whole file? In theory you'd only check files of the same size then check the file up to the first difference (which may be the entire file up to the last byte).

Now, if you wanted to check against any future duplicates you'd select a hashing system that makes sense for the number and size of files you will have (CRC may be fine, or SHA-512 if you want to reduce the chance of collisions), then hash the file as it comes in to your system since that should be the cheapest time to do it. You could then save this info to a database that could handle the comparisons quickly. Just make sure you figure a way to handle deletions and moves correctly.

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Review: Kingston Hyper-X 3K 240GB SSD

pixl97

Re: Never again

The first SSD I bought was an Intel, it's been running over 2 years now. I've bought a few Intel and 8 Samsung since then and none of them have failed.

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Forget value-added broker jokes: Could YOU shift nuclear plant scrap?

pixl97
Holmes

>I have no way of putting them back in the pool... at any price!

If someone wants them, there will be a price for them. If no one wants them but you, the price is determined by how long the person that has them wants to sit on them vs how much you are willing to pay.

If someone wants them, but not 19/20 of them, ebay, or whatever industry related site them off. May take a while though.

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El Reg man: Too bad, China - I was RIGHT about hoarding rare earths

pixl97
Boffin

Monopoly on cheap?

The author didn't state something here...

Reuters "Lanthanum, used in rechargeable batteries for hybrid autos and in night-vision goggles, rocketed 26-fold from $5.15 a kg in January 2010 to a peak of $140 in June 2011. Although it has slid to $20.50, the price is still well above earlier lows."

Even though they don't have a monopoly on light rares, they managed to make 28x what they were for a while, and the market is still 4x over what it was. Assuming the base mining costs are the same, they have compressed many years of profits in to one. Also, it is very likely the mines from the Americas are going to produce a more expensive product simply because of environmental regulations. What may cause the bigger problem is all the new mines coming on line and crashing the prices, then going out of business, meanwhile the rare earth mines in China fund themselves off the heavy rares they produce.

"Analyst Edward Otto at Cormark Securities forecasts the long-term price of cerium oxide to settle eventually at 50 cents a kg and lanthanum oxide at $1.00 per kg, down from $20.50/kg currently."

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Wikipedia doesn't need your money - so why does it keep pestering you?

pixl97

Re: Deletion obsession

Is history not old news? I agree not everything should be put in an article, but to focus on the limitations of a dead tree format when dealing with practically unlimited storage does seem backwards at times.

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pixl97

Maybe now...

Maybe now they have enough money they can buy more servers so they don't have to delete so many articles.

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Outlook 2013 spurns your old Word and Excel documents

pixl97

Outlook kitchensink. Also, Question S/MIME

Support for legacy documents sounds like a good thing to remove. Just another place for a bug to creep in and exploit the program.

I'm trialing Outlook 2013 currently and having a problem with S/MIME

I have a .pfx key that works fine on my iphone for signing messages, but when I setup Outlook to use it, the program locks up when I try to send a signed message. So far I've not seen anything else on google about this.

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PGP, TrueCrypt-encrypted files CRACKED by £300 tool

pixl97

Re: You might get lucky,

Which is why you should use full disk encryption or set your truecrypt drives to unmount themselves after some time of inactivity. When you unmount a drive Truecrypt actively erases they key from memory. Truecrypt also tries to make sure master keys don't hit the page file.

http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/unencrypted-data-in-ram

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pixl97

Re: Hibernation?

If anyone has ever read the Truecrypt site and forums they would already know 2 things.

Hibernation and encryption don't work securely together. and,

Disk encryption doesn't protect an open encrypted volume.

Only a system that is designed to clear the encryption key out of memory at hibernation and ask for it again when waking up is secure to go to sleep. Other then that, turn it off. I need to to experiment with SSDs using full disk encryption to see what the performance is like for full shutdowns and startups. Oh, and if you ever use a SSD on for an encrypted disk and want to change your key, move all your data off and do a factory wipe on it.

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Apache plug-in doles out Zeus attack

pixl97

Detection

Is there anywhere that has information on how to detect this module on a server? The articles didn't seem to contain that information.

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After Sandy Hook, Senator calls for violent video game probe

pixl97

Re: How many people...

Does this count?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2175410/Teenager-dies-playing-game-40-HOURS-straight-eating.html

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pixl97

Re: Re: Re:

Yes, guns are the easy way to commit a mass murder. Take away the guns and you are still going to have a higher number of mass murders in America then other places. There is a cultural need to solve problems with violence here.

Also, Austraila has a gun ban, but it didn't stop this

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childers_Palace_Fire

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pixl97

Re:

>It's time for the US government to grow some balls and do what's needed rather than just pretend to do something,

In theory the government is the people, and the people are deeply divided on guns. We shot up the king of England's boys a long time ago when he thought it was a good idea to do what he needed to do.

Just trying to blame guns alone doesn't make sense, Canada has had a much lower rate of mass murders then the U.S. per capita even before guns were banned in most cases there. I'm assuming that this has a historical basis of gaining independence via violence and surviving a very violent civil war. It becomes ingrained in the American ideal that violence is a solution that has worked in the past. Also add in the teaching that American freedom and independence helped saved the world both in WWI and WWII.

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