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* Posts by eldakka

72 posts • joined 23 Feb 2011

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Jet-powered DRONE-maker slapped for illegal exports

eldakka
Thumb Up

Just had a look at their web site...

...and me wants one (or several).

They look like fun.

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Australia makes pinkie-promise to end Indonesia spying

eldakka

I actually have no problems with spy agencies spying on other nations government officials, politicians, ministers, senior civil-servants etc. I mean, that's mostly whats worth spying on in the first place. Any government minister, PM, president king, departmental secretary etc who DOESN'T think they are a target, if not actively being spied/eavesdropped on, are morons.

What gets me angry tho, is when the spy agencies 'dabble' in law-enforcement, spying on the general populace, and spying on THEIR OWN CITIZENS. That is NOT the job of the spy agencies. They should be concerned with national defense and security, not criminal (i.e. non-terrorist, non-military, non-espionage activities), not 'home-grown' activities that are better left in the hands of local police forces.

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EOS, Lockheed to track space junk from Oz

eldakka
Coat

Re: Stuff that. What about getting *rid* of this space crap?

"Until the bigger stuff gets through and slams into a retirement home/puppy rescue center/Pizza place."

Sounds like a win/win to me.

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FCC not quite sold on Comcast TWC gobble

eldakka

"Weary of the possible antitrust concerns from merging the two largest cable providers in the country, Comcast has proposed a set of deals to.."

While they probably are also weary, I'd say they're actually wary of the possible antitrust problems.

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

eldakka

Re: Copyright aping nature.

The monkey does not have more rights. The monkey has none. Copyrights can only be assigned to "a person", and monkeys are not 'people' for the purposes of the law.

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eldakka

Re: Monkey?

Copyright laws usually use the term "person" as owning a copyright. And under legal definitions a 'person' is either a "natural person", that is a human being, or a corporate identity. Yes, a corporation is "a person" for the purposes of the law. If a law wishes to exclude corporations from something then it usually refers to "natural persons" when excluding corporations.

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eldakka

@Richard Plinston

>> the only reason to claim copyright would be that he owned the camera, which is not a valid one.

> It is a completely valid reason to claim copyright and one that is used continuously by companies that have employees. If the company supplies the equipment and media to employees then the company owns the copyright.

Incorrect.

Most employment contracts have terms in them along the lines of "any work done by the employee is owned by the employer. The employee agrees to assign all copyrights in any work created while an employee to the employer".

If an employment contracts neglects such language, then the employer, even tho owning the equipment and perhaps even directing the creation of the work (take photos at the corporate luncheon), does not own the copyright.

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eldakka

@Richard Plinston

Not true.

If I work for a company, and I do some video shooting with their equipment, even as part of my job specs (say you are hired as a cameraman) _I_ own the copyright UNLESS there is a SPECIFIC, EXPLICIT contractual language that gives the corporation the copyright. The employment contract (if you are an employee) must state explicitly (like many I've seen) that the employer owns any copyrights in work you have done for them. It must be a SIGNED contract.

Say I work as a burger flipper at Bobs' Burgers, and the manager hands me a camera and says "Take some photo's of the staff for the staff newsletter", and i do. If the employment contract doesn't EXPLICITLY state that Bob's Burgers owns the copyright to any creative work I do while employed by them, then _I_ am the copyright owner, no matter who owns the equipment. It is case-law that a work-for-hire, which is what it's called when you employ someone to create something for you but you retain the copyrights, not the actual creator (e.g. working as an artist for an advertising company, or the cameraman for a TV station), must follow some explicit, specific language to be a valid work-for-hire contract that bestows the copyrights on the employer rather than the creator.

Also, it must be noted that in this case, the photographer has admitted that he did not set up the shot, or plan to leave the camera in a location and 'see what happens'. The photographer absent-mindedly left their camera unattended while doing some other task, and in the photographers own words, "the monkey stole the camera", and took the photos.

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Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7

eldakka

Re: Multi-core

You are aware that this is a server-oriented processor are you not?

That You're not likely to care about the performance of a gzip/bzip2/zip whatever?

What you ARE likely to be doing is running 20-30 JVMs of multi-gigabyte heap sizes each handling 100's if not 1000's of user tasks simultaneously.

Or running a whacking-great Database on it (it is from ORACLE now) doing 1000's of simultaneous, independent database queries (selects, inserts, etc).

You don't need to be able to extract instruction-level (or task level) parallelism from a SINGLE process (e.g. transcoding video, compressing) or from single tasks when you are running dozens, hundreds, THOUSANDS of SEPARATE independent processes/tasks simultaneously. As tends to happen on servers, which is what this chip is aimed at.

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Chrome update to raise alarms over deceptive download bundles

eldakka

Re: This is great news

NEVER accept default installation options.

If offered, ALWAYS select 'customize' install, or Advanced install or similar. The screens shown when you select those options is where you'll usually find (if it exists) additional software installed and the option to disable it.

ALWAYS read the text on the installation wizard pages, as they'll often be different to the heading, e.g. the Heading and title on the page in the wizard might say "Chrome Installation", but there might be a license agreement (with the typical scrollbar to read a huge chunck of license text, this u can probably ignore like everyone else does) but then there might be other text just below the license agreement along the lines of "Click Next to accept the license for Ask Toolbar and install it" with 2 buttons, Cancel and Next, in this case you want the CANCEL button, as it's not the Chrome license or installation it's asking about, but the installation of Ask Toolbar. Clicking Cancel will cancel Ask, not Chrome, and it'll take you to another screen where you might be asked the same type of question for another piece of software, or might be the final cancel/next for installing chrome.

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eldakka
Mushroom

Well, since I don't want Google to know every URL I browse to, I turn the Safe Browsing feature off.

And people wonder how/why Google and whoever know their surfing history...well if you turn Safe Browsing on, every URL you ever visit is sent to Google. Whether you are browsing Facebook, your bank, ebay, pr0n, paypal, kmart, walmart or whoever, it'll get sent to Google if you leave Safe Browsing on. Every link you click, every URL that link loads, all sent to Google.

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

eldakka

Re: Encription ? PGP=OS... OK, still don't use it...

They also have physical access to the content of whats being sent. As has been reported previously, the intelligence and criminal law enforcement agencies (e.g. NSA,DEA) can, and do, get USPS to make copies of the external surfaces of the envelope and can obtain warrants that let them open, copy, and forward on, the mail.

In fact, if you send it registered post, they don't even need to copy the external envelope as they already have the FROM and TO information which you provide when you send a parcel registered mail.

And even if you didn't care about that component (having the FROM and TO addresses), you would still, if you wanted it SECURE, have to encrypt the contents of the parcel so that the document is unintelligible text to visual examination.

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eldakka

Re: Not saying PGP is perfect

Could the QR code just contain a (https) URL to download the public key from and the fingerprint of the key?

So the QR code could be used to GET the key and verify the key.

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SpiderOak says you'll know it's secure because a little bird told you

eldakka

Why can't they have 2 'stages' of a canary, both updated daily?

Stage 1, no current warrant has been issued against SpiderOak, sick canary.

Stage 2, no warrant has been ENFORCED against SpiderOak, dead canary.

When a warrant is issued the canary is sick. This covers any period while fighting against a warrant. If all warrants are overturned/denied, the canary gets better. If a warrant is upheld and enforced, the canary denies.

@Yet Another Anonymous coward:

"But if a SWAT team are pointing assault rifles at your head and getting the orange jump suits ready for a long stay in gitmo - you are going to click the everything is OK button."

You obviously didn't read the article.

It takes THREE (3) different people located in 3 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES to ALL 'approve' updating the status of the canary as 'OK'. While it's likely a SWAT team could standover the US member of that team (if there is one), US SWAT teams would have difficulty deploying simultaneously in at least 2 different foreign countries, possibly 3 if none of the people who can sign the canary are located in the US, to standover all 3 signers.

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The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

eldakka

Re: It's really time to stop bitching about IPv6 being different

OK, i've just stared looking at that link, and right at the top I see a red flag already:

"However, NAT and NPTv6 should be avoided, if at all possible, to permit transparent end-to-end connectivity."

Errm, while the USER may want transparent end-to-end connectivity, the network engineer/admin may not want NETWORK level end-to-end connectivity. They may WANT to introduce things like proxy servers, which right there break your transparent end-to-end connectivity. Or how about (as my organisation does) an SSL interceptor that basically does a man-in-the-middle attack on all SSL sessions (with the exception of whitelisted known trusted sites, e.g. banks) to virus scan the stream?

From my reading so far, it looks fairly complicated and would require someone with at least reasonable computer/network knowledge and skills. To set up multi-homed NAT IPv4? Simple, buy dual port router, hook one port to ISP one, hook second port to ISP two, enter ISPs authentication (e.g. if its xDSL), setup complete. Multi-homed failover (or even load balancing if the appropriate check-box is ticked) and you are done.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

eldakka

Re: Oh noes, please don't do that

warning: IANANE (I Am Not A Network Engineer)

But do we have to rely on the loss of TCP packets to tell us this at the end-to-end level? Couldn't a router send back to everyone who's swamping it a 'back-off' message from the router? I thought there was already provision for this, but it's rarely, if ever, used?

In the early days of of the internet when router processor capability was low, and bridging was more common than routing due to not being able to produce sufficiently intelligent silicon for routers at appropriate cost points, TCP-retransmission may have made sense as a congestion management mechanism. For the TCP layer at the receiver end to keep sending re-transmits, thus implicitly telling the sender to back-off due to the number of lost packets.

However these days where routers have, compared to their early predecessors, massive processing capability, either what was not so long ago server grade CPUs or efficient lightning fast ASICs, can't the router's tell senders to back-the-FEC-off rather than relying on the receiver losing packets and telling the sender? In this case (where routers actually tell senders to shut-the-FEC-up) FEC may make more sense.

I could see a case for adaptive choosing also. Low error-rates, TCP might make sense as retransmission packets are rare, and the FEC overhead (more data to contain the ECC) might perform worse. If there are slightly higher error-rates, and routers are smart enough to tell a sender swamping them to back off, FEC may make more sense, a little bit more data for the ECC, but less than the extra data TCP retransmissions would cause.

If there are high error rates, then maybe another change? Maybe neither TCP or FEC?

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Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS

eldakka

Err, because some apps that you install might NEED to check state more often than the default? near-real time systems might want to wake every 4 or 5 ms, or even as google chrome thinks it needs to, every 1ms.

Unless you've loaded a plugin into chrome that for some reason needs frequent wake-ups, then there's no reason for a browser to want to wake up more frequently than the defauly.

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Students hack Tesla Model S, make all its doors pop open IN MOTION

eldakka
Coat

Re: Retaliation!

"Tesla should run a competition to see who can be the first person to hack the Chinese government and run apt-get install democracy."

nah, the democracy app is too immature and buggy. It seems to self-destruct all the time.

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Huawei's turnover rockets upwards. Suck on that, US government

eldakka
Mushroom

Huawei's spying was only theoretical...

...however the NSA's (US's) spying, inserting backdoors into US made kit, is documented.

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You 'posted' a 'letter' with Outlook... No, NO, that's the MONITOR

eldakka

Re: Regarding the terminology problems...

Even worse, when I'm researching a new phone or tablet and ask questions like "How much menory does it have?" I get answers like:"32GB of memory", "64GB of memory", "128GB of memory".

No, if I wanted to know how much STORAGE or NAND or SSD or eMMC it had, that would be the correct answer. I want to know whether it has 1GB, 1.5GB, 2GB, 3GB etc of MEMORY.

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eldakka

Re: Regarding the terminology problems...

Actually, 3.5" disks ARE floppy.

It's the external casing of the disk that isn't floppy.

Break the rigid external casing of the 3.5" disk, and inside is the component that actually stores the data and it is, well, a disk that is floppy.

If you break the rigid external casing of a Hard Disk Drive, inside is the component that actually stores the data, and it is, well, a disk that is RIGID, non-floppy, i.e. HARD.

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eldakka

Re: Computers are not white goods

"Um....You can't buy children."

Want to make a bet?

What do you thing a "sponsored adoption" is? Or a surrogate mother?

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eldakka
Alert

Re: Been there with my own Dad.

"No she wasn't browsing Pron sites, she is 92 for heavens sake."

What's age got to do with browsing porn? You saying a 92 year old doesn't get horny and want to have sex and/or beat off because can't find someone to have sex with?

If you think that, then here's something that'll shock you to your core. Your parents had sex at least once (assuming you aren't a IVF child)

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You are ALL Americans now: Europeans offered same rights as US folks in data slurp leaks

eldakka

"Such a deal would at least provide Europeans a forum for addressing their grievances in the courts when they feel personal information has been mishandled or abused by authorities."

Ahh, so Europeans will have the same standing as US citizens in addressing their grievances before US courts? i.e. go to court, US gov says all discovery/information is top secret because terrorism, therefore can't be used in the case, judge dismisses due to lack of evidence of wrongdoing.

So awesome news!

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27 Data-Slurping Facts BuzzFeed Doesn't Want You To Know!

eldakka

or use a plugin like Ghostery which blocks known tracker sites and has a regularly updated blacklist so I don't have to maintain a hosts file across many different systems (Android phones, Android and windows tablets, windows laptops etc).

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SHOCK HORROR: Oz's biggest govt agencies to miss infosec deadline

eldakka
WTF?

2 days? Tell them they're dreaming.

"mandate application and operating system patching

within two days of an update release"

2 days?

How are you expected to do the following in 2 days:

1) Download patch(es);

2) Deploy the patches to an RnD environment to see how the patch process runs, whether it can be automated or requires a GUI and clicking on 'next' buttons;

3) Package/otherwise automate the patch for easy deployment to 100's of servers;

4) arrange downtime for the dev environment to deploy the patch and any restarts that are required;

5) install patch, perform any necessary restarts;

6) Get signoff that the patch hasn't broken anything in dev and can proceed to the next environment;

7) arrange downtime for the integration environment to apply the patch;

8) install patch, perform any necessary restarts;

9) get integration testing team signoff that the patch hasn't broken anything;

10) arrange downtime in the system/performace testing environment to apply patches;

11) apply patches in the system/performance testing environment and perform any necessary restarts;

12) get signoff from testing team that patch doesn't break anything/cause performance issues;

13) arrange downtime for production, including notifying external agencies that depend on your systems, informing other national governments that you have MOUs with stating 10-day notification of any outages to critical systems that they interface with;

14) apply patch and perform any restarts that are necessary;

15) cross fingers and hope no backout is required of the patch thats just been rushed through with limited verification testing.

16) retrofit patch to other non-critical path environemnts - training, other dev/integration environments that are being used for future releases (can have up to 3 streams running simultaneously, current prod, next release, release after next release...)

Multiply this by 100's of servers that an O/S patch may have to be applied to, and fight for outage windows and testing resources in environments that are fully booked for testing of the next LEGISLATIVE release that has to BY LAW go in in anywhere from 24 hours to 3 months away who (as usual) is running behind schedule..

Sounds like they need to be hit with the reality stick.

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Higgs boson even MORE likely to actually be Higgs boson - boffins

eldakka

Re: so

You're overestimating the cost by a couple orders of magnitude...

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Judge could bin $325m wage-fixing settlement in Silicon Valley

eldakka

How big is the class?

Whats the potential size of the class here?

Assuming attorneys fees are 33%, that brings the settlement dow to about $213m.

If the class was only 1k people, thats an impressive $213k each they'd get.

But isn't the potential class ALL the IT employess of those companies in Silicon valley? If that was only 10k affected workers, its a lot less but still respectable $21.3k each.

But are there only 10k workers? Whats a more reasonable number for IT employess of Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe in California (or is it just Silicon Valley?) 100k? more ? less? if we take the 100k figure, thats only $2130 each for several years of wage fixing ...

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Appeal to again seek code for Australia's secret election software

eldakka
FAIL

Pozible a bit dodgy?

I just pledged through poizable, however that site seems to have some privacy issues that make me a bit wary of using them:

1) When paying, a message on the payment page states "Pozible does not store your payment information.", yet my pyament details from the only previous transaction I had using Pozible showed up, Payment Name, Country, Phone number, CC number (masked), expiry date. I had the option to edit those details, but I can find nowhere to delete them from the site. So SOMEONE is storing my payment details... I'd like to delete the stored payment information and have it require me to provide those details each time I make a pledge. What do they think it is, eBay where I might make many payments a week rather than once in a blue moon?

2) I didn't initially notice, but Pozible automatically provides my telephone number to the supported project. It is an OPT OUT box on the payment page, whereas providing my email address is a setting I can turn off in my profile, but not for telephone number. I'd much rather give my email than my number to the project. I should be able to disable providing my number as a default setting.

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

eldakka

Re: Sloppiness or malice?

If I was the coder, i'd be pointing my finger at the NSA and saying "they made me do it."

Everyone would believe that, and who could prove otherwise? Who'd BELIEVE any proof the NSA provided that they weren't responsible?

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

eldakka

Re: @nevets23 -- Odd timing

@Someone Else

nevets23 post was directed at Reg users who are not "in the know" of the Linux Kernel/Systemd development. I.e. outsiders.

Torvalds rant was not "public", it was directed at those "in the know", i.e. insiders, who would understand the context. Therefore for his target audience, it was appropriate. Just like nevets23's post was appropraite for his target audience.

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eldakka

Re: coding

Is stupid a good lay?

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WTF is … the multiverse?

eldakka
FAIL

Re: You've done my brain in

"providing any kind of rationisation of why we're here and what the point of us is."

Why do you care? You exist because you do. "I think, therefore I am".

Its up to you to choose what you do with your existence. It's up to you to define the why of your own existance. To party and have fun? To better the world? To better humankind? To save the world from humankind? To kill as many people as you can? To leave a legacy to the world? To spread your genetic makeup (i.e. have kids)? To drift through life aimlessly? To hear voices from a god? Only you can define that for yourself. And only you care, noone else cares why YOU exist.

" Earth as a piece of hardened mucus flying out from some 13 billion year old sneeze, isn't a concept I find very motivating."

If you need science or philosophy to motivate you as to your existance, you don't need a scientist or a philosopher, you need a mirror and a psychologist to find out why you need that.

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Apple beats off troll in German patent fracas

eldakka

Re: "Apple beats off troll"

Yeah I read that and thought "Actually, sounds like the troll won"

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Climate change will 'CAUSE huge increase in MURDER, ROBBERY and RAPE'

eldakka

Re: Time to get the calculator out

Burglary and Robbery are 2 different offences.

Burglary is the intent to break into a building without consent with the intent of committing a crime inside (including theft).

Robbery requires both theft and a form of violence or threat of violence used to deprive someone of their property.

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Developers: Behold the bug NOBODY can fix

eldakka
Coat

Re: You can fix that bug...

Maybe the "Golden Cock" and the "ARSE" camera are designed to go together...

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Facebook debunks Princeton's STUDY OF DOOM in epic comeback

eldakka
Coat

The 'other' Justin, Bieber that is.

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4K-ing hell! Will your shiny new Ultra HD TV actually display HD telly?

eldakka

15Mbps streaming over the internet?

Hmm, I pay $60/month for 150GB month quota.

hours/month = (quota (MB) / rate (MB/s))/ seconds in an hour

= (150GB*1000) / (15Mbps/8) / 3600

= 22.22 hours

So I can get 22.22 hours of 4K TV for my $60/month.

Of course, I ALREADY use up all my quota each month on SD TV shows and the odd 720p/1080p movie plus game downloads/patches.

Yeah not gonna happen.

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PGP wiz Phil Zimmermann and pals tout anti-snoop mobe – the Blackphone

eldakka

Re: Potential Legal Problems

The GSM standard includes encryption, see the A5/1, A5/2, A5/3 ciphers. Therefore that would make all telco's that support the GSM standard criminals?

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Apple fails to shake antitrust watchdog loose, receives judge slapdown

eldakka

Perhaps if they co-operated with the watchdog he wouldn't have to spend so much time trying to investigate/interview staff members which is probably what's driving up his hours.

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Virgin Galactic's supersonic space ship in 71,000-ft record smash

eldakka

Re: Research

"if they could have one of the crew twiddle some of the knobs as well"

Ahh, so they want to enter the mile-high (maybe now it's the 100-mile high) club?

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Take off, nuke 'em from orbit: Kill patent trolls NOW, says FTC bigwig

eldakka

Re: Nice thought, logical ideology, BUT...

The inventors of a patent are listed on the patent itself.

If no named inventor is part of a lawsuit involving the patent, that's a good indicator (but only AN indicator) that the scenario you've presented is not applicable.

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Bay Area plots Googlebus tax after local residents riot

eldakka

So they make a profit...

Quote: "If the city was charging prices equivalent to local Bay Area Rapid Transportation system then that would yield a revenue of around $18.2m per year, compared with the $1.5m or so the City is claiming it will make out of this scheme."

Why yes, they would make $18.2m in revenue, but how much would it cost the city to provide those services for 9.1m rides? $20m? More? So in effect they are making $1.5m profit rather than the loss they'd be making if they ran it themselves.

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HTC: Shipping Android updates is harder than you think – here's why

eldakka

at least 2 steps are problems of their own making

1) They don't need to provide their own customized (Sense) UI. They could use the stock android UI and hence skip this step entirely. If they really have a hardon for their (unnecessary) customized UI, make it an optional component and provide it as a separate package. That way they can release a stock version sooner with a Sense UI update later and give customers the choice of stock android or waiting for the Sense UI version to be available.

2) Carrier requirements? huh? This sounds like a chipset provider problem, i.e. provide the correct drivers/firmware for that android version that corresponds to the appropriate GSM/UMTS standards etc for the included chipsets. Any 'carrier specific' customizations like specific software should be the carriers problem and just like with the Sense UI just provide stock android ASAP and provide carrier/UI customizations later.

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Mixed bag of motors lifts India's budget Mars shot

eldakka

Re: But...

Nuclear power is a RESULT of nuclear weapons research.

The Governement didn't go "Hey cool concept, generate electricity from a nuclear reactor". They went "let's make a big bomb. What? to get better, more effective fissile material to make 'bigger' bombs smaller we need to build a nuclar reactor to refine the material to a more effective level? That's gonna be expensive, but look, as a byproduct of making nuclear weapons material we can also generate electricity!"

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AMD will fling radical 'Kaveri' chips onto streets in January

eldakka
Coat

Not quite true

"it will have four CPU cores running at 3.7GHz, and eight GPU cores running at 720MHz each with 512 processing units."

It will have 4 CPU cores running at 3.7GHz. Correct.

It will have 8 GPU cores running at 720MHz. Correct.

Each GPU core has 512 processing units. INcorrect.

Each GPU core has 64 processing units (SIMDs). 8x64 =512.

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Why a Robin Hood tax on filthy rich City types is the very LAST thing needed

eldakka

I can't reconcile these 2 statments.

With respect to this Nobel:

Quote: "The award of a Nobel is as close as we get to an affirmation that this is the scientific consensus."

With this statement:

Quote: "The Nobel Prize in Economics isn't quite a Nobel as it's awarded by the Swedish Central Bank"

How is an award from A, one, singular, central bank of A, one, singular, coutry, a scientific concensus?

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Why Teflon Ballmer had to go: He couldn't shift crud from Windows 8, Surface

eldakka

Re: Hehe.

QUOTE: "replacing Win7 on your desktop is "the right choice" with "one UI for all"."

Sorry, I prefer "the right UI for the job" rather than the "1 UI for all" when that UI is inadequate for all tasks.

How stupid do you have to be that you can't adapt to 2 or 3 different, regularly used, UIs?

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Google Chromecast: Here's why it's the most important smart TV tech ever

eldakka

Re: Damn

Hmm, just out of curiosity, wouldn't this break HDCP?

I thought the whole point of HDCP was so that the video/audio stream COULDN'T be interefered with in any way, no copying, no modifying, etc.

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Boffins FREEZE PHONES to crack Android on-device crypto

eldakka

Re: capacitor-based overwrite

The zeroing of RAM wouldn't be the CPUs responsibility.

It should be lower level than that. Ideally it'd be on the RAM packaging itself, or directly on the memory bus.

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