* Posts by eldakka

127 posts • joined 23 Feb 2011

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Q: How many guns to arm nine coachloads of terrorists?

eldakka
Coat

What? So preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse is now illegal?

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Yahoo! is! up! for! sale! – so! how! much! will! you! bid!?

eldakka
Coat

New reg unit

Instead of using $ for share prices, maybe a new reg unit, the Yahoo.

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Boffins: There's a ninth planet out there – now we just need to find it

eldakka
Alien

This explains a lot

So we have an planet on a very elliptical orbit of a period of around 20k years.

This explains where Atlantis and the Greek Gods came from!

Since the orbit is highly elliptical, for most of it's 20k year orbit it's way, way out there. But, at its closest approach to the sun, for a period of 1k or 2k years, it's close enough for the advanced civilizations on it to travel to earth in their space ships.

I hypothesize that the last time this happened around 4,000BC to about 2,000BC. And this is where our legends of Atlantis and the Greek and other Gods come from. They were visitors from this planet, and as we know, any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. And these being wowed our ancestors and had a bit of fun, pretending to be Gods and whatnot.

And in earlier visitations, they seeded the Earth, so we are in fact their descendants, which is why they look like us.

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Aircraft now so automated pilots have forgotten how to fly

eldakka

Re: ...how many landings are fully automatic...

"in the case of elderly people or people with physical (and even mental) disabilities who would gain independence without endangering themselves or other road users."

Umm, no.

That's what:

- buses/trains/public transport;

- taxi's;

- uber and other ride-share's;

- friends/relatives;

are for.

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Boffins baffled by record-smashing supernova that shouldn't exist

eldakka

"or alien pressing the wrong button?" or alien pressing the RIGHT button ...

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Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

eldakka

Re: Moral police

"Hell, I often drive on one road while the GPS puts me on a parallel road a (narrow) block away."

I doubt the GPS puts you there. The Satnav interpreting the GPS location badly interprets the GPS-supplied co-ordinates and it puts you there.

If the GPS co-ordinates put you 1 meter away from where you actually are, and that 1-meter error puts you in a place you couldn't be (car inside a building for example), the logic in the satnav may be bad and rather than putting you on the correct road, increases that error and puts you an an adjacent road that is 20 meters away. Thats a satnav code logic error, not a GPS error.

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eldakka

Re: Moral police

Since when is visiting a strip-club a risky behaviour?

It's a time-honoured tradition for special events like bucks and hens parties.

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eldakka
Pint

Re: Moral police

"Nope. It doesn't even matter what you eat."

Or who.

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eldakka

Re: Moral police

I wouldn't care if someone was a serial killer in their off-hours. When it comes to work, all I care about is if they perform their work duties skillfully and honestly.

Just because someone lies/cheats in their personal lives does not mean they will lie/cheat in their professional lives. The two are separate.

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eldakka

Re: Moral police

Since when is undertaking a completely legal activity a security risk with respect to blackmail? Some of my best friends have been or are currently strippers.

I could understand if he went to a cock-fight (not the type you'd find at a legal strip club ;) ) or a crack-house.

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Trend Micro AV gave any website command-line access to Windows PCs

eldakka
Pint

Nice zinger

Telling a professional security company that: "they need to hire a professional security consultant to audit it urgently." hahaha.

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Wanted man sends selfie to replace 'terrible' police mug shot

eldakka

Re: Win-win.

You seem to have missed:

-not have anything covering your face

Your face and your head are not the same thing.

Even if your head is covered, your face MUST BE exposed. e.g. wearing a hat covers the head but does not cover the face. If wearing a burka, the part covering the face must be removed/pulled aside to show the face, but the part covering the head (i.e. your hairline) may remain.

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Fortinet tries to explain weird SSH 'backdoor' discovered in firewalls

eldakka

Re: Time to update contract language?

As official representatives of the company, any contract they enter into on behalf of the company is legally binding.

A company is a thing, an entity unto itself, a person under the law. As that person cannot personally sign contracts and so on, the employees of that entity sign contracts on behalf of that entity. In which case, irrespective of the employees actual role within the company, "the company" is now aware of that contract.

If that was not the case, VW would be able to avoid all liability by saying (and "finding" the evidence supporting) that it was done by a few specific low-level individuals. That may protect the management from CRIMINAL prosecution, but it won't save "the company" from civil, tort/contractual penalties, fines and so on. As it doesn't matter WHO in the company does something, if it's something done by ANYONE in the company then "the company" is "aware" of that. You often see in the charges or pleadings words along the lines of "did know or SHOULD have known that...". As an act taken by any employee of a company, the company itself knows and the management SHOULD know of the act and is thus responsible for it at least at a tort level.

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One Ring to pwn them all: IoT doorbell can reveal your Wi-Fi key

eldakka
WTF?

wait, what?

"Every time Ring is activated, whether with motion or a doorbell ring, it automatically searches for available firmware updates."

Umm, what? It phones home every time it's activated? So the company can have a complete log of all physical access to your premesis? What else does it send back to big brother? A photo of each activation showing WHO has visited? Talk about creepy.

Was starting to sound interesting (with additional physical security DIY modifications to fix it's physical vulnerabilities), but now it's off my shopping lost.

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You want to migrate how much data?

eldakka

This could be a use-case scenario for RFC2549.

You could tape a lot of 200GB mSD cards to a pigeons leg.

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eldakka

If you have business critical, live applications that use databases with large amounts of data change getting up into the TB range, why the firetruck would you put that into a public cloud? I'd shoot any IT Architect or CIO who was even rumoured to be considering that.

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Comcast's Xfinity home alarms can be disabled by wireless jammers

eldakka

You get what you pay for

As has been noted (Will Godfrey) there are better cabled systems that have sophisticated detection mechanisms that alert when it thinks it's being interfered with. But these systems cost lots of money. Even excluding the cost of the actual devices, there's the cost of running cable, which is often the most expensive part. Sure, lots of us who read this site would probably run the cables ourselves, thus saving bucketloads of money. But 99% of the people out there who get a security system would hire someone to do it for them.

So, the alternative to spending a couple grand on getting cables run all over the place is wireless. The people who are installing wireless security, which is much easier to do and hence can be done by more people (as opposed to hiring someone to install it), are already looking to save a buck. Therefore a lot of wireless kit is aimed at these DIYers, but not DIYer enough to go running cable through walls.

And the people who want a bit of security but who don't want to spend much money on it are people who are looking to deter minor criminals. Opportunistic criminals who are looking for a quick and easy buck. They wander the streets looking for premises that have no security, are unlocked so they don't even have to break a window or pick a lock. All locked up? move onto the next house. ANY signs of security, don't even bother looking for unlocked access, move onto the next place right away. This is the profile of over 95% of house burglaries. Your junkies looking for a quick fix, loose cash or some DVDs they can sell at a used DVD store or similar, nothing complicated. Nothing that requires fences (as in people who dispose of stolen goods) and so on. This is the level of security that the wireless security systems are aimed at.

Then you have a higher level of crims. The ones who actually pick targets based on other criteria. Affluence, types of goods they can steal and so on. These guys are going to have jammers, and be able to defeat the cheaper security systems. But these account for a tiny % of breakins. If you have enough valuables to think that you might actually be targeted, then you've probably got the money to spend on a higher grade of security system. The sort that makes these higher level crims decide to move on to easier pickings.

Then you have a nigher level above this, businesses or people who will actively be targets. Pharmacies, shops that have a lot of cash on-hand, rich people, people doing the dodgy and might come under investigation from the police (i.e. crims themselves, drug dealers and whatnot). So they ratchet up security on these locations. Everything cabled, back-to-base security (maybe not for the drug dealers ;) ), panic-button alarms and so on. More likely to be specifically targeted, better, more expensive security.

Then there is a category above this, banks, diamond merchants, even better security systems to the extent that they may have onsite security guards/teams. And this is without even considering military/national security/industrial espionage and so on.

Furthermore, the point of security is not to a 100% (or even 10%) guarantee no-one can break in. It's to make it harder, such that there are easier pickings out there. You have a crap home with not much in it, but put up a couple cheap-arse, low-quality wifi cameras, and the junkie after enough money for a hit is going to break into the next door neighbours house who doesn't have any cameras.

If you're a fat rich bastard who has a house that's got an art wing, a theatre, a vault, a panic room, a garage with rare cars, then you are going to spend hundreds of thousands on a security system that has random security drive-bys, back-to-base alarm with motion and heat sensors.

You decide what category you are (no-one with nothing special, got a bit of stuff, got something significant worth protecting etc), and the type of crim you want to dissuade, and the amount of money you want to spend, and buy the security system that intersects as much of those needs as possible.

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After eight years, NASA's Dawn probe brings Ceres into closest focus

eldakka

Re: Elon Musk...

"we already have part of the answer to the space debris - the returnable rocket. "

The returning of the first stage has nothing to do with space debris. Prior to this (and Bezos' earlier equivalent - but much smaller scale, sorta like getting the scooter to come back vs the Heavy Truck of Space X) feat, the first stage did not become space debris. It became ocean (or in the case of Russia/Soviets Siberian) debris. The first stage of a multi-stage to orbit rocket would never reach space. It would splash down in the Atlantic Ocean and (mostly) break up and sink to the ocean floor.

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Password-less database 'open-sources' 191m US voter records on the web

eldakka
Facepalm

A little Identity Theft anyone?

If you forget your password/PIN, most financial/telecommunications/utility institutions are happy to provide information or connection/disconnection/transfer/PIN change/password change services over the phone once the caller identifies themselves by providing information that is known only to the customer, name, Date of Birth, Address and telephone number. All nicely parceled up for 191million Americans....

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Cisco probes self for Juniper-style backdoors, silently mouths: 'We're doing this for yooou'

eldakka
FAIL

"These include, but are not limited to undisclosed device access methods or 'backdoors', hardcoded or undocumented account credentials, covert communication channels, or undocumented traffic diversion."

So, as long as it's a documented backdoor, covert communication channel or traffic diversion process it's ok?

So it could be a secret document, not available to customers, not even to their staff generally but restricted to a few key senior management and developers, and that's ok?

What about "PUBLICALLY (or at least customer) documented ....."

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The ball's in your court, Bezos: Falcon 9 lands after launching satellites

eldakka
Coat

Re: but how much re-use can you get?

"And how exactly do you scrub a rocket anyway?"

Isn't that what interns are for? Supply them with some overalls, long/extensible handled brooms, buckets, couple firehoses, and bob's your uncle.

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Scandal-hit Toshiba cutting 7,000 jobs, heads for $4.5bn loss

eldakka

Re: This Ain't The First Scandal...

" Toshiba was found to have sold VERY high-tech milling machines to the Russians,..."

Did they make or lose money on the deal? If they made a profit, I don't see the problem.

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Bigger than Higgs? Boffins see hints of bulbous new Boson

eldakka

Re: @ Pompous Git

"Worse, every ten minutes, there was a five minute summary of what had been presented so far! "

God a hate that.

Seems that US Doco's seem to do that a lot, constantly repeat and summarize what was shown 5 minutes ago. It's especially irritating when you download and watch a doco ad free. OMG the repetition.... Seems a 42 minute runtime doco has 20 minutes of information, and 22 minutes of repetition of that information.

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Mozilla looses Firefox 43, including Windows 64-bit variant

eldakka

Re: Firefox 64-bit STILL needs COMCTL32.DLL

Maybe use some loctite or some other sealant if it keeps getting loose like that?

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Hollywood given two months to get real about the price of piracy

eldakka

Re: Out on a limb here

You are going out on a limb, because I think you are thinking about it in the wrong vein.

The issue is way more fundamental.

GOVERNMENTS have tried to make what is naturally, inherently, a non-exclusive, non-defniitive CONCEPT, something that is fundamentally a 'public' good (a thought, an idea, a view, a landscape, scenery, knowledge) into something analagous to a naturally-exclusive, unique 'thing' (a plot of land, a watch, car, TV, an orange, a cow, a steak), and then treat it the same way.

By 'using' someone else's idea, the person who had the original idea STILL HAS THAT IDEA. I have NOT 'taken' it by also using it. I have not deprived them of the idea, they still have it and can still use it. ALL I have deprived them of is their DESIRE (not right, their wish) for it to be EXCLUSIVE to them.

This is the world of copyright and patents.

Taking something that is naturally a shared resource, something that cannot be TAKEN from someone else, and treating it like a physical object that CAN be TAKEN from someone else. Artificially granting 'manufactured' rights to it as opposed to natural rights.

Therefore, since nothing has been taken from the plaintiff, in an ideal world, they WOULD have to show an actual 'loss' for which to be compensated.

You stole my $2m Bugatti (I wish ...), therefore my harm is that that thing I paid $2m is no longer in my garage, I no longer have possession of it, I can't drive it.

Or, you stole that CD (is that even possible anymore? Does anyone actually sell those things?) off the shelf of my store, I no longer have that CD to sell and get those $30, that's $30 I've just lost.

Vs

I download a copy of the CD. I haven't deprived anyone of anything they had before the copy was made. They still have the CD in their hand. They can still sell it for $30. Or break it. Or use it as a coaster, they STILL HAVE IT.

Therefore the plaintiff has to prove some sort of actual loss. They still have the CD on the shelf. It still works when they put it in the CD player. What have they lost? Nothing.

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Are you the keymaster? Alternatives in a LogMeIn/LastPass universe

eldakka
Alert

Re: @RIBrsiq

Even that is insufficient to demonstrate a machine is not compromised.

There are firmware viruses that reside in BIOS and HDD (and other devices) firmware.

Virus scanners can only detect KNOWN viruses. Therefore even if you have a virus scanner sophisticated enough to also scan the firmware of the devices and the computer itself, it cannot detect a new, unknown 0-day virus.

And, even if it CAN scan the computer's firmware, since the computer's firmware has already loaded, any virus inside that firmware could present phoney firmware to the virus scanner, as it has to use that firmware to scan the firmware. The only way to get around this would be to pull the firmware chip out of the computer and scan it from another computer/device that has the necessary accessories to read the stand-alone firmware chip pulled from the other computer. But then, is the device you are doing the scanning from secure? Is the firmware chip pulled the real firmware in the computer? What about the firmware in other on-board components? PCI bridge chips. Accessory chips like the ASMedia ASM1142 or Intel Alpine Ridge controllers that provide USB3.1/C support on motherboards? They all have firmware embedded in them as well which could conceal viruses that could infect an otherwise clean system.

It is simply not possible to prove a computer is not affected by some sort of virus/malware unless you personally created every chip, every trace, wrote every line of code (including that of the compilers and libraries) that is or will ever be run on that computer.

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All hail Firefox Dev Edition 44 – animations, memory and all

eldakka

Re: It's great but...

or tree style tab: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/tree-style-tab/

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LHC records biggest bang ever with 1 Peta-electron-volt jolt

eldakka
Coat

Re: Hot density rocks

Star Destroyers? Pfft, they are from a galaxy far far away.

I'm more concerned about those Vogons and their construction ships. They're local.

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HTTPSohopeless: 26,000 Telstra Cisco boxen open to device hijacking

eldakka
Holmes

This is not a bug.

NSL's and FISA warrants probably compelled Cisco to embed the common SSL certs and give a copy to the NSA.

They didn't want to have to manage device-specific certs, millions of them, so they just dumped a couple hundred into devices so the NSA only has to check against a small database of possible certs to use for espionage purposes (where espionage has been re-defined to mean mass surveillance on everyone irrespective of suspicion).

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Apple's design 'drives up support costs, makes gadgets harder to use'

eldakka
Happy

Re: hardware designer Jony Ive?

OMG who downvoted that? It's pure gold, hilarious.

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Lawyers use anti-piracy law to get website blocked over corporate ID brouhaha

eldakka

The site is not hosted within Australia, therefore the site is not subject to Australian Law.

If the site is not subject to Australian law, then by definition it cannot be in breach of any Australian law (copyright included).

If it is not in breach of any Australian law, then they can't block it on the grounds of it breaching some Australian law.

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MPs to assess tech feasibility of requirements under draft surveillance laws

eldakka
Holmes

"What I don't really understand is why they feel the need to record the communication records of everyone."

It's called Network Analytics.

You can use it to draw links between everyone. Who know's whom. Who is friendly (frequent contact) vs just vaguely adjacent (one-off contact). Who shops where, so if you know person A B and C frequently go to the same Haridresser, with appointments at the same time, they probably know each other. Same doctors.

Say a newspaper publishes a story, a leak (or say just a personally embarrassing story about an MP screwing a cleaner on their desk). Great, newspaper Tablods'R'Us published the story. Cool lets go check all the telephone records of anyone who's ever worked at the newspaper. And their spouses records. Childrens. Friends. Siblings. The team-mates of their siblings. Hey wow, Joe who works for the MP concerned, and 6 months before the story was published (which was 2 years after the actual desk-screwing incident) he called his stepbrother who soon after called his ex-girlfriend who called her mistress who called her father who called his footy teammate who works with a guy that called his lawyer who called his Gentlemen's Club sponsor who called the secretary of the brother of the reporter who wrote the story.

That's why they want to record it all.

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Game of Photons: Boffins make ICE with FIRE

eldakka
Mushroom

Flcik switch up

to freeze, flick switch down to burn.

Multi-pirpose 'ray gun, freezeray and burnray in one!

I see much rejoicing from the evil super-villains who can't decide whether it's more cool to be Mr Freeze or Mr Burn (or torch?), they can be both without having to carry around 2 guns.

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CloudFlare CEO blasts Anonymous claims of ISIS terrorist support

eldakka
Pint

I say

Good play that man. What?

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Brit cops accused of abusing anti-terror laws to hunt colleague

eldakka
Angel

The picture associated with Brit police stories...

would be better server by being a Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean) Thin Blue Line image I feel.

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Victorian government teacher-laptop scheme illegal, says judge

eldakka

Re: Not a surprise

Open up the laptop, unplug a few fans, seal it back up, viola new laptop (would cost them more to send it out for repair then to buy a new one).

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eldakka

Re: Will the teachers get refunds?

"That means that to plan periods, you have to use the computer-based systems; "

I didn't realize periods needed planning, I thought nature had been taking care of that?

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eldakka

Re: Apple tax

"The additional money goes to the lease company, who only provides hardware and an insurance package."

Maybe the insurance rate for Macs is huge? Do they have a higher theft rate?

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Stoned train in multi-million-dollar wreck

eldakka

Mandatory drug testing of trains

If they are gonna get so stoned they cause $2m damage, then they should start mandatory drug testing!

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iiNet warns NBN circuits too expensive in the Netflix era

eldakka

Re: Who knew media would be delivered digitally?

Providing entertainment is a business. Therefore using the NBN for entertainment == using the NBN for business.

Also, education, medicine and business can all also be entertainment. And education can also be business (businesses provide education). Medicine is also business. And so on.

The only accurate way to describe the usage of the NBN (or any network) is "for data communications".

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Dev to Mozilla: Please dump ancient Windows install processes

eldakka

Doesn't this require you to have some sort of an account with Microsoft? A store account or an MS account or something? Something I don't have and never want to have?

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Software update borked radar, delayed hundreds of flights, says US FAA

eldakka

I assume the 12-30% were the cancelled flights mentioned in the opening paragraphs.

But ti's still concerning they don't know the EXACT number, was it 70% or was it 88%? Surely "scheduled flights - actual flights" are 2 known, discrete numbers that can produce a known discrete number as a solution rather than a range?

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eldakka

That's a rather convoluted way...

...of saying the application has a memory leak.

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Australian court slaps down Hollywood's speculative invoices

eldakka

Re: if you got one of these letters, how do you defend the claim?

" I dont think I could prove that I had not downloaded..."

I don't think you understand how the law works...

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Ethernet patents claim smacked down by US judge

eldakka

The coverage of this seems pretty dismal in general, I had to read the full ruling (http://ia600503.us.archive.org/4/items/gov.uscourts.cand.231088/gov.uscourts.cand.231088.1289.0.pdf) to find the invalidated patents:

"Accordingly, the Court grants Defendants’ motion for summary

adjudication that SONIC anticipates the asserted claims of the

‘872 and ‘094 patents. "

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Net neutrality, Verizon, open internet ... How can we solve this mess?

eldakka

WTF are you on about?

"An internet connection, a modern-day communications system, is vastly more sophisticated, allowing people to store, transfer, process, retrieve and use the data sent across through the connection."

Huh?

'The internet' does the same things as the 1934 telephone network.

In 1934 I (well, the notional I, I'm not that old) could hook up a recorder to the phone line and record (store) the conversation.

In 1934 I could play the recording back down the phone line and listen to it at the other end, 'retrieving' it, and if I had a recorder at that end, i'd be storing it again, processing and using it.

Hell, BEFORE 1934 this could be done. When it was the telegraph this could be done. Telegraph operators would receive morse code and 'store' it by writing it down on a piece of paper or other writing material. They'd then 'process' it (or perhaps process it BEFORE storing it) by converting the morse code to the relevant spoken language. Depending on the requirements of the message, they may 'process' it again and send it in morse code along to the next operator.

In the 60's, 70's and 80's I could connect a modem to the telephone system and transfer digital data by having it modulated/demodulated. I could store, retrieve what have you.

Neither 'The internet' or 'the phone system' allows you to store, retrieve or process data. It's the devices that are connected to the internet that do all that. The internet, just like the phone system, is merely a way of transmitting information. The old phone system had low bandwidth, high latency, and was analog. The internet is merely a faster, digital version that does the same thing - transfers information.

Everything else (storing, processing, 'using') is done by devices at the ends of the connections, and was done using the phone system pre-internet.

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eldakka

"All "conversations" on the Internet are not equal in cost. Your ISP has to pay more to transit Netflix than a Google docs session. So it actually costs cable companies - ISPs in this case - hard cash to let you use a competing service."

Not correct.

It costs the ISP the same for me to download a 1MB document from netflix as it costs to download a 1MB document from Google.

If costs the same for an ISP for me to stream a 100MB video from youtube as it costs to stream it from netflix.

It costs the same for an ISP for me to download a 100MB document from google docs as it would to download a 100MB document from netflix.

The type or source of data is irrelevant, it's the SIZE that matters.

1MB is 1MB whether it's a .doc, .jpg., .mp4, .mkv etc, whether it's from Netflix, Amazon, youtube, facebook, my work's VPN.

1GB is 1GB whether it's a .doc, .jpg. .mp4, .mkv etc, whether it's from Netflix, Amazon, youtube, facebook, my work's VPN.

Downloading a 1GB file should be the same 'cost' no matter where it's sourced from.

If I have 500GB/month, then I should get 500GB/month irrespective of the source of the data.

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Patch Windows boxes NOW – unless you want to be owned by a web page or network packet

eldakka

Right, I'll wait until at least Friday next week (1 1/2 weeks after release) before patching to make sure it hasn't introduced critical issues like the last couple of patch Tuesdays...

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GOD particle MAY NOT BE GOD particle: Scientists in shock claim

eldakka

Then it'd long and thin and full of seamen....

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eldakka

Re: do the Danes want a bigger and better LHC

It'd be a once in a lifetime experience...*splat*

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