* Posts by Vector

381 posts • joined 21 Feb 2011

Page:

How much of ONE YEAR's Californian energy use would WIPE OUT the DROUGHT?

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Small issue of infrastructure @ AC

"Also not included is that with proper waste water treatment you can use the same water several times over..."

Actually, as the extent of the drought began to take hold in the press, "toilet to tap" was getting quite a bit of coverage, particularly for the "eww" factor. I found it pretty funny since, in reality, most water was waste water at some point. It just gets cleaned up by the environment most of the time. Short cutting that process sounds perfectly reasonable to me with the right controls in place.

As to the rest of the conversation: typical. "It'll never happen because politics!" So let's all just bury our heads because we can't do nuthin.

I've always found talk of water shortages silly because, as pointed out in the article, there's plenty of water around, it just needs a little processing to be usable. So let's put our techno-industrial minds to work and get it done.

12
0

Windows 10 marks the end of 'pay once, use forever' software

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: 'Pay once, use forever'...?

"Just look at Photoshop and you're looking at the future, bleak as it is."

That might work for Adobe, but I suspect Microsoft will find it tougher going. Why? Because Operating Systems are passe and there are options out there to get around the subscription model (see above regarding Linux distros). If MS tries subscriptions and gets it wrong, they'll see their market collapse as the world moves on to other options.

11
0

Wanted: beta testers for El Reg’s Android app

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: this isn't for the likes of you

"Mobile doesn't show icons, doesn't let you put an icon on your post, and doesn't let you edit..."

That would be a deficiency in the coding of the mobile website, not a requirement for developing an app.

I'm with the many other voices here; dump the mobile apps and concentrate on the mobile website. If people want offline reading, I suspect a little thought could make that possible from the mobile website (it is all just data, ya know).

2
0

Will the PC glory days ever return, WD asks as its finances slip

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Density play only

Spinning rust does have the reliability edge still, but if this new technology from Intel/Micron lives up to the hype, then that goes out the door too once the technology scales and the price falls (as is inevitable).

Personally, I just don't see an uptick in consumer desktop sales left. With "good enough" laptops in the $300-$400 range, there's just not that much impetus left to get a desktop system. They're probably about to be relegated to the enterprise desktop until mobile devices become flexible enough to make that pointless as well.

0
0

Alien dwarf 'star' flashes her dazzling brown rear at stunned space boffins

Vector
Bronze badge

"flashes her dazzling brown rear..."

So...just how do you tell a star's rear from the rest of it?

0
0

Got an Android phone? SMASH IT with a hammer – and do it NOW

Vector
Bronze badge

I wondering what legal remedies might be available. Since you bought the phone with a tacit understanding that it would be functional for some period of time, and this vulnerability could compromise your financial information, if nothing else (certainly your personal information), failure to correct it might leave manufacturers/carriers liable. But, of course, IANAL. Any IAAL's want to chime in?

0
0

Take off, eh, you Uber: Ontario lobs $300m lawsuit at cab app biz

Vector
Bronze badge
FAIL

Re: Taxi laws are a

"There is NOTHING different between the functionality of any ride sharing app and putting a sign on a company bulletin board asking for riders; besides the form of communications being used."

Yes, there is. In a word: payment!

The moment you start accepting payment, you become a commercial service. When you engage in commerce in a regulated industry while disregarding the regulations, then you are operating illegally.

As I've said before, the regulations governing cars-for-hire (as well as other industries affected by the sharing economy) are probably in need of review and revision. That doesn't give companies like Uber a free hand to just do as they please. Not all those regulations are protectionist of the incumbents in the industry.

19
3

NASA: 'Closest thing yet to ANOTHER EARTH' - FOUND

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Jinxed

Yeah, we'd need more than "a new form of propulsion" to get to it. It'd have to be more like a wormhole or some Stargate-y portal thing.

4
0

Robot surgeons kill 144 patients, hurt 1,391, malfunction 8,061 times

Vector
Bronze badge
WTF?

There is so much wrong with this article! It's a real headline grabber, but do the numbers really hold up? It quotes the study as saying "a non-negligible number of technical difficulties and complications are still being experienced during procedures" yet 10 deaths and 100 injuries in about 288000 surgeries sound like fairly low numbers. How does this compare with humans performing the same procedures? Yes, some of the issues seem astoundingly stupid, but then, so does leaving surgical instruments in patients and that seems to happen as well.

...And, no, I don't want to be the one under the knife when something goes wrong, but then, I also don't want to be in the car when the brakes fail, but I still drive.

15
0

Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

Vector
Bronze badge
Joke

Oh! Is that why I can't understand Neil Young when he sings?

1
0

Google says its AI will jetwash all traces of malodorous spam from your box

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Meh

"Do you have something else, more meaningful, to add to your critique..."

I don't believe much more is necessary. Your description of how easy is was for you to setup the server ignores the fact that the average person can barely register a domain, much less find StackOverflow and know what questions to ask and know how to interpret the answers.

As to "financials," yes, £35 per month sounds like a fair bit of disposable income to lay out for email. I'm sure in your case, the outlay covers more than that, but most people aren't running websites or have any other need for the infrastructure required to have their own little pocket email server.

You are living in the ivory tower of technology because you, as most of the readers here (including myself), love it and use it on a daily basis. The vast majority of the rest of the world has other interests on which to spend their time and money.

I once had a colleague who was up in arms because his users just didn't care enough about their computers. I asked him how he felt about his chair. He responded that it was just a chair. I told him that to an ergonomics specialist, that chair was a finely tuned tool that should be carefully adjusted to maximize health and efficiency. We know and love computers, but to everyone else, they're just another tool.

6
1
Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Meh

"I do not understand why people are downvoting this comment."

OK, I'll tell you why I downvoted it: the smug attitude.

It all very nice that Ms. Smythe has the technical wherewithal to create such a robust solution, but the rest of the world needs email as well and while Gmail is far from perfect (personally, not a big fan, but I use it for a few things, mainly, as a spam bucket, but, then, I have my own domain(s) as well), this is at least an attempt to ameliorate the monster that spam has become. Most people don't have the technical skills and/or financial means to setup and, more importantly, maintain their own email server.

6
1

AWS opens gate to fondleslabs-as-a-service farm

Vector
Bronze badge

Already been done (and done and...)

The only thing that's new in this article is that AWS is offering it. Their pricing isn't even particularly attractive. Cloud testing farms have been around for Android (and iOS, as well) practically since the introduction of Android smartphones.

0
0

PC sales go OFF A CLIFF to under 300 million a year

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Gartner Prognostication

"People are finally giving up on the PC."

I don't know that they're giving up exactly. More like they just don't need to get a new machine. We spent years chasing after more power, but now we've reached the point where the vast majority of users have more than enough power to do everything they want to do, so there's just no incentive to go shopping for a new PC. Besides, those computer things sit at home for the most part, so it's hard to constantly throw your extravagance in your friends' faces. That's why everyone likes smartphones these days!

13
0

Oi, idiot fanbois. DON'T buy this gun-shaped iPhone case, mmkay?

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Not good

"Do your research and you'll find this to be true..."

Actually, in looking into this, I found the studies to be decidedly mixed with the results canted heavily based on agenda (conservatives prove they help, liberals prove they hurt). My sense was that the conservative studies tended more towards anecdotal evidence than liberal studies but, I'll admit, that's probably my own bias weighing in.

On your point about "rapist taking gun" not being in the news, well, of course not. That's not news worthy. There's nothing compelling in that story. Victim wards off attacker, on the other hand, is very compelling.

0
1
Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Not good

"Unless you're one of those who think a 103 pound woman can fend off a 250 pound rapist by pissing herself."

I find this argument to be highly specious as well. The odds of a gun making any positive difference in your rape scenario are extremely low and highly dependent on a series of fortunate coincidences. The most likely outcome is that the gun will be taken from the 103 pound woman and used to force her to comply

2
3
Vector
Bronze badge

@sisk & codejunky Re: Not good

Here's the biggest difference between a knife and a gun: If I see someone coming at me with a knife, I can run, which significantly improves my chance of survival compared to running if I see someone coming at me with a gun. Granted, several factors come into play, such as seeing the weapon and my ability to out run the attacker, but, overall, I still think the odds improve greatly.

5
1

In your face, US citizens! Govt can’t save you from corporate eyes

Vector
Bronze badge

USA!

Championing Democracy (as run by economists)

0
0

Uber execs charged, will stand trial in France

Vector
Bronze badge

“We are keen to continue talking to the French government about the regulatory framework for services like Uber"

Meanwhile, we'll just do whatever we damn well please regardless of the framework currently in place.

4
0

'This ruling does nothing to change the facts' thunders Apple in latest price-fix appeal blow

Vector
Bronze badge

"Apple told The Reg in an emailed statement..."

Who are you people!? This can't be El Reg!

22
0

Q: What's black and white and read all over? A: E-reader displays

Vector
Bronze badge

RGB?

I don't understand why most of these color e-paper technologies are described as using RGB elements. Since they are, by and large, intended to be lit reflectively, I would think CMY(K) would be a better choice for the same reasons that CMYK is the palette used for printing.

0
0

BOFH: Don't go changing on Friday evenings, I don't wanna work that hard

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Its a small change!

You get to wait until Monday?

Lucky Bastard!

4
0

Humongous headsets and virtual insanity

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Best group VR experience?

So what you'd really like to have is a Holodeck. And there are some experiments going on with that kind of notion (projection-wise, at least), but the experience is limited to a single person because the system has to map all the projections to a single point of view.

Disney has taken advantage of one of the limitations of projected 3D in a couple of their theme park attractions. Basically, one of the characters pokes their head way out of the screen and says something to the effect of "I just talking to you!" Because there is only one viewpoint in projected 3D, it appears to every member of the audience that they are being singled out. Kids love it, but it doesn't truly make for a shared VR experience (unless you consider occupying the same body a shared experience).

In order to have the freedom of a true VR experience, you have to have your own headset. Ignoring expense, this doesn't preclude a shared experience. You can still interact with the others people in the room virtually in VR and visually in AR. You can still all be in the same environment.

That all being said, it is still very early days for this technology. We've really only cracked one or two of the five senses, so there's still much to do. Will we have VR or AR headsets in every home in ten years? Probably. That's a long time to drive the price of the technology down, possibly to the point where you can stop in at the local drug store and get a throwaway if you left you're really nice headset at home.

1
0

BlackBerry boss vows to keep making phones

Vector
Bronze badge
Coat

"this horse isn't dead yet"

Yes, it is. Chen's just kicking it.

0
9

Germany says no steamy ebooks until die Kinder have gone to bed

Vector
Bronze badge
Coat

Re: More proof, as if it were needed, that politicians are idiots.

What? To prove politicians are idiots?

0
0

Verizon promised to wire up NYC with fiber... and failed miserably – audit

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Blame the Unions

Yeah! And how dare they delay the completion by a year+ as a negotiating tactic!!!

5
0

Unlucky, Palmer: Facebook's going to BAN Oculus pr0n apps

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: How does it affect exisiting software?

"I'm wondering what this new walled garden approach means to applications which have been under development for years..."

I suspect very little. Mainly, that they won't get listed on Oculus's store. That's not the death knell that being shut out of the Apple Store would be for iOS developers.

The Rift is a peripheral. The computer to which it's connected is the arbiter of what software is allowed. Unless Oculus has gone to some extreme lengths to limit what it will display (which I think they would regret in the long term), you'll still be able to buy (or sell, as the case may be) whatever you like for it. You just may not be able to do it through Facebook. And that might just be a good thing.

4
0

Google – you DO control your search results, thunders Canadian court

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: No sovereignty here

"... and there is no matter here."

Aside from a bit of hardware whose design was purloined from a competitor which is being flogged from a moving truck throwing websites out left and right.

By that theory, all marketing should be exempt from law. Sure, cyberspace was once a lovely place. Then the rest of the real world moved in. Now, it's just another place.

7
0

Top Eurocop: People are OK with us snooping on their phone calls

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: At what point will the public feel safe?

"So what's a civilization to do when people demand the impossible from its government and will accept no less?"

You could start by implementing sane and reasonable policies that might actually accomplish the task.

Let's assume, for the sake of argument, that he's granted his wish and they get access to all telecommunications, phone and internet. What would the result be? Could it possibly be that the criminals and terrorists they are seeking would evolve other ways to communicate, including the open air encryption of code words and such? The end result would be no better policing and far worse privacy.

I always assume that if a system can be abused, it eventually will be. In this case, that means a whole lot of innocent people being swept up because their views don't comport with some megalomaniac's version of society. The best way to avoid this is to keep a lid on how much of our personal communications get out there in the first place.

7
0

The thing about Apple's 'one MORE thing'? It's a streaming music thing

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Version for Android coming up?

Why, yes. It'll integrate very nicely with the "Move to iOS" app they'll be releasing soon.

"Are you sure you wouldn't rather have an iPhone...Dave?"

0
0

New US bill aims to zap patent trolls with transparency demands

Vector
Bronze badge
FAIL

Re: Or...

" It's in their best interest to consider and award as many patents as possible."

Try again. Having been through the patent process, I can assure you that there is a strong incentive in the patent office to deny patent applications (and, yes, the fees for application are non-refundable, so they get paid whether they grant or not).

The real problem is the rules the office operates under. The system has gone downhill ever since the idea that "business processes" could be patented was adopted.

11
0

We stand on the brink of global cyber war, warns encryption guru

Vector
Bronze badge

Tag line (and possibly understatement of the year):

"...things will get out of hand"

1
0

T-Mobile has a network, Dish has spectrum it can't use. Oh, HELLO

Vector
Bronze badge

Not much of a quad-play...

...when you consider that neither company has a wired internet offering.

Going forward, quad-play is pointless anyway. Television and Telephone services are already in migration to the internet, so it's really about becoming a viable network services company since that's all that's going to be left for all the cable/satellite/telecom companies in 10 years.

2
1

Smartwatch biz Pebble says smartwatch biz Apple won't approve its new app – surprise

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Same old Apple

Personally, I find stories like this yet another incentive to stay away from the fruity walled garden. If you create something that hits with success, there's always the chance that Apple will decide it's so neat, they should incorporate it into the core of their system and then dismiss your "competing" app. IP rights might mitigate things somewhat, but there are often ways to work around those that big companies have the deep pockets to pursue.

13
2

IT-savvy US congressmen to Feds: End your crypto-backdoor crusade

Vector
Bronze badge
WTF?

Re: There's a simple way to explain it to them... @ Charles 9

"ALL Politicians are by definition, uneducated fools and idiots."

And that's why I'm shocked that these two congressmen made such a logical, sensible argument.

1
0

Secure web? That'll cost you, thanks to Mozilla's HTTPS plan

Vector
Bronze badge

"if your developer can't set up a simple redirect..."

One of my first thoughts is: How many redirects on sites run by less sophisticated folk are going to be co-opted by less savory crew?

0
0

Hardcore creationist finds 60-million-year-old fossils in backyard ... 'No, it hasn’t changed my mind about the Bible'

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Evidence.

"Genesis has an account of the creation of the universe as given to Moses..."

Actually, Genesis has 2 creation stories: The seven days story in chapter 1 and the story of the Garden of Eden that carries forward from chapter 2.

The discerning mind will note that the sequence of events in these two stories are in direct conflict.

35
2

Windows 10 won't help. The PC biz is doomed, DOOMED, I TELL YOU

Vector
Bronze badge

@jnemesh Re: too late, I'm already gone...

"The difference is, I actually trust Google not to abuse my data that they collect, I dont trust MS."

I think both your distrust of MS and your trust in Google are a bit overblown.

3
0

CBS boss says he'll show off his crown jewels on Apple TV – for a large enough check

Vector
Bronze badge

Keep Dreaming Les

This may explain why CBS has been such a prig on the internet. They were late to join the Hulu fray and it appears, even now, that the crown jewels are reserved for their own overpriced digital service.

He can continue to think this way and drive his network slowly into the dust as TV moves onto the internet and content competition starts coming out of the woodwork.

3
0

Zuck can EFF off: Internet.org is SO NOT the INTERNET

Vector
Bronze badge

Beware of geeks bearing gifts.

"I still struggle to see what facebook get out of this..."

It's very much akin to Apple's early strategy of lowball targeting to the educational market. Basically: "If they learn about it through our stuff, they'll want to use more of our stuff because it's familiar."

In Apple's case, it was hardware. In Farcebook's case, it's services.

1
1

Jeb Bush: Repeal Obamacare and replace it with APPLE WATCHES

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: What he meant to say ...

Yes, but without Obamacare (or something like it), soon only those who can afford the stupidly expensive a-Watch will be able to afford healthcare.

We should have a single-payer system like the rest of the civilized world, but the insurance lobby around here is far too strong. The ACA, for all it's flaws (and they are legion), is at least a step in the right direction.

5
1

Jamie Oliver's ministry of malware served slops AGAIN

Vector
Bronze badge
Coat

"Chef cooks up evil code for the third time this year"

He didn't really cook it up, more like he reheated it.

0
0

Mildly successful flying car crashes - in mildly successful test flight

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: The thing is

As I've said before, this thing is not a flying car. It's a drivable airplane.

In my mind, in order to qualify as a flying car it would have to:

A) be authorized to take off and land almost any place an automobile can be driven (there are exceptions: one probably wouldn't want to take off or land in a tunnel, for example).

B) be safely operable with the same qualifications currently required to obtain a driver's license.

2
0

Burger me! Microsoft's chainsaw rampage through sacred cow herd

Vector
Bronze badge

"The interesting bit will be whether he can get beyond the Gates era"

He, and Microsoft, don't have any choice. It's fast becoming sink or swim time.

As you can see reading up this thread, people are starting to realize that their mobile device could become their only computing device. More properly, folks in first world countries are coming to this conclusion since it's been the primary choice in emerging markets for a while now.

Since Microsoft doesn't have a strong presence in this new market, they can no longer expect the industry to camp out on their doorstep. They still have a bit of time since they haven't been dislodged from the enterprise yet, but I believe Nadella can see the writing on the wall.

9
0

WHY can't Silicon Valley create breakable non-breakable encryption, cry US politicians

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: What about current crypto?

"And even if they do find this Holey Grail (misspelling intentional), what are they going to do about all the current crypto systems that they can't crack? Make them illegal?"

Sadly, with the government mindset outlined in the article, here's how it may well play out:

1) TLA's continue their search for this "Holey Grail"

2) Some charlatan comes along with a system that appears to fit the bill and works passably well without close scrutiny.

3) TLA's lobby congress to make this the only legal encryption system or, barring that, the system required for any government contractor.

4) Hacker's get their hands on the keys.

5) We're all pwned.

I guess the silver lining in this thundercloud is that those politicians and TLA's would be among the first to get their boxers aired.

0
0

Money-for-mods-gate: Valve gives masterclass in how to lose gamers and alienate people

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: why

"Valve and Bethesda getting 75% of sales, with Valve taking the lion's share"

Hmm. Maybe they should try getting into the music business.

5
0

Looking for laxatives, miss? Shoppers stalked via smartphone Wi-Fi

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Opt Opt Opt

Two differences with this Nomi thing:

1) Hiring enough "researchers" to track people across security feeds would be prohibitively expensive and hugely error prone, possibly to the point of making the data useless in addition to the expense.

2) Such a program would only provide a profile from your company's stores not the multi-client profile I suspect Nomi is providing.

Funny thing about all this: The FTC didn't do a damn thing about the privacy invasion. They just made Nomi stop claiming that an opt-out was available. whee. Way to have our backs, guys!

12
0

Graphic designs: Six speedy 17-inch gaming laptops

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: Clevo laptops

I just recently picked up a Clevo w230ss and, so far, it's been quite nice. It's little (13.3 inch, I'd been looking for a small gaming rig) yet still packs gaming laptop specs (core i7, Geforce 860, FHD screen, couple of mSata slots) all for about US$1000. It runs a little hot (not much space in the case for airflow) but not unbearable.

I certainly won't own another ASUS rig for the forseeable future. Nice specs, nice price, horrible quality control. I had a G53sx that I had to crack open and re-paste the entire GPU board. Then the center pin of the power port broke off (had that happen on 2 different ASUS machines). Finally gave up when the GPU shot craps.

1
1

Mega fatcat Kim Dotcom in deportation drama over SPEEDING ticket

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: What are the odds

Damn! Beat me to it!

0
1

LA schools want multi-million Apple refund after kids hack iPads

Vector
Bronze badge

Re: "We used to dream of a mac"

"You 'ad GOLD screens? In our day oll we 'ad wus green.

An' macs wus fer th' ritch kids."

Luxury!

We had 3 keypunch machines at the back of the class that we took turns using to punch cards that went into a batch box that got run that night at the administrative offices.

0
0

Page:

Forums