* Posts by Vector

486 posts • joined 21 Feb 2011

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Russia tells Google to cough up some loose change in Android monopoly probe

Vector

Freudian Slip?

"We are confident that the requirements pursuant will provide an opportunity for the development of competition in the mobile software market in Russia, which will benefit our customers."

Shouldn't that be consumers?

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Hackers unleash smart Twitter phishing tool that snags two in three users

Vector

Re: Responsibility to train users

Here's your training in a nutshell:

Just. Don't. Click. On. Dodgy. ShortURLs. People.

URL's can be difficult for the average person to parse, but at least a full URL can be semi-reliably vetted by the domain. ShortURLs could lead anywhere.

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Fun fact of the day: Network routers are illegal in Japan

Vector

Re: First Rate!

it "violates the law, but seems not illegal."

So...it's a quantum law?

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Stop us if you've heard this one before: Telcos try to kill net neutrality

Vector

Re: Those poor innocent profits..

"Based on that, it's just not possible for Americans to have nice things."

We can have nice things. We just have to pay a not-so-nice price for them.

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Huawei P9 Plus: Leica-toting flagship gets a big brother

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Bought a GTX 970? Congrats, Nvidia owes you thirty bucks

Vector

Re: Fucking lawyers:

Yeah, I hate these!

"We didn't do anything wrong, but have 30 bucks..."

I know, I know, no merit and too expensive to defend an' all, but it's become the standard corporate CYA. No big company seems to do anything wrong these days.

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What's losing steam at Apple? Pretty much everything

Vector

"They want to lure us into "the cloud". Partly because it's all the rage right now, partly as a hedge against the slowing down of the hardware market. Lock in the existing customers even tighter. Offer more products "as a service", switch to subsrcription models. You may still own your device, but in order to make good use of it, you must use their services on their server farms."

I suspect it's far simpler than that. I think it's more a case of the Silicon Valley ivory tower. Around there, broadband internet is ubiquitous, so they forget it's not across many parts of the rest of the world. I've said before that all SV developers should be dropped into the middle of the Mojave desert on an annual basis to remind them what the "unconnected" world is like. I guess we need to load up the designers too!

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Fear not, humanity – Saint Elon has finished part two of his world-saving 'master plan'

Vector

Re: Well, here's your problem

"So you don't understand the benefit of ABS, traction control, cruise control (regular or adaptive), automatic emergency braking, automatic headlights and wipers etc.?"

All of these are assistive systems, not autonomous. They help you with the task of driving instead of doing the driving for you.

The problem with partial systems, such as the one being beta tested in Tesla models, is that they give a false sense of security. The theory is that, even though the car is doing the driving, you will still be attentive to the task, but the fact is even the best of us will have a hard time maintaining that focus with no active involvement particularly over long periods.

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Vector

Re: Well, here's your problem

In a world where people will drive into a canal because the GPS told them to, "partial autonomy" scares the crap outta me!

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Star Trek Beyond: An unwatchable steaming pile of tribble dung

Vector

I'd probably have been fine with that movie if they had called it anything except "I, Robot." Although the movie was ok, I seethed my way through it because it had nothing (and I do mean absolutely nothing) to do with Asimov's fine collection. Good or bad (and much as I enjoy Will Smith's performances), I refuse to ever watch it again.

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Boffins unveil 500TB/in2 disk. Yeah, it's made of chlorine. -196˚C, why?

Vector

Re: -196˚C ?

"...world’s smallest hard disk..."

...and world's largest hard-drive cooler...

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Google's Nexii stand tall among Android's insecure swill

Vector
Facepalm

@Adam 1

I'm not crying, I'm laughing so hard it just looks that way!

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Smartphones aren't tiny PCs, but that's how we use them in the West

Vector

Re: QR Codes are still around....

"...every reader I've used shows the data before letting the user decide what to do"

Which, often as not returns some shortened URL that's useless as a determining factor, so we're back to trust being an issue.

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Tupperware vehemently denies any link to storage containerisation

Vector

@Symon Re: Tsk

"No, you don't have to defend it no matter what."

But you do have to defend against generic use, which is the case here. The reg article was using the trademarked Tupperware name as a reference to generic plastic storage boxes. Allowing that can lead to losing your trademark. The eff article referenced is a completely different case where the defendant was speaking specifically about the trademarked product.

You can see a list of common terms which were formerly trademarks here:

Wikipedia: List of generic and genericized trademarks

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Samsung deals out microSD-crushing faster fingernail flash cards

Vector

Re: urrrr.

Yeah, and not that I've looked at the engineering specs or possibly would understand them even if I did, but this still seems like a massive fail for consumers. I would surmise that a little thought could have produced a physical format that was backwards compatible with microSD much as USB 3 managed to maintain compatibility with USB 2 by locating the additional pins required elsewhere in the shell.

Of course, that would mean consumers wouldn't have to rush out and get new devices...

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Amazon slashes mobe prices to get more eyes on lockscreen ads

Vector

Re: Who's going to bother with that?

"...people who sign up for Pandora for free and take the ads..."

I don't mind Pandora's ads since I start the app and put it in the background (bye bye ads!). As to notification ads, see my post above. Pandora is one of the apps that doesn't get to display notifications on my phone.

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Vector

Re: Lockscreen ads / Notification ads = Pox on Android

My policy is as soon as an app pops a notification that I consider inappropriate, that app loses notification privileges. It started with games ("come back and play me!"), then media apps started chiming in ("We've got a new show you simply must see!"). All of them have been notification silenced on my devices.

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Bacon is not my vodka friend

Vector
WTF?

Say wha...huh?

"Okie" was the derogatory term used during the dustbowl for migrants from Oklahoma to California. Folks there might like to be called Sooners, but they're far more likely to be called Okies.

The only term I've ever heard for folks from the Ozark Mountains (and I grew up 'round there) is "hillbilly."

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Admins in outcry as Microsoft fix borks Group Policy

Vector

Re: Testing?

"Was this patch even tested?"

Yes.

In the field.

By the users.

It failed.

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Vector

Re: Thanks for the heads up

I've just changed my policy to only install critical security updates from MS. If it says "critical" but doesn't say "security," it doesn't get installed. So far, that's saved me from the escalating Win 10 push.

I'm sure at some point MS will decide that the Win 10 upgrade is a security issue and I'll be borked.

(note that I'm only talking about my personal laptop. I'd be checking a bit further for business systems)

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France POPs €800k fine on 'illegal taxi service' Uber's windshield

Vector

Re: How's that for "disruptive" ?

...in other times, would have been part of the Corleone family.

Naw, they'd just be peddling patent medicines.

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Vector

Re: A piddling little fine?

A fine example of why corporations are not people (as the US Supreme Court wants to establish). You can't throw a corporation in jail when it breaks the law. You can only increase it's CoDB.

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US computer-science classes churn out cut-n-paste slackers – and yes, that's a bad thing

Vector

Re: First learn the basics...

I think what the Think Tank is saying is that too many High Schools, in particular, are focused on teaching their students how to use Word instead of how to create Word, or any application.

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World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

Vector

Re: You've got it backwards

I think it's more like: Crap customer service? who cares? The phone is a third of the price of the big boys.

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Spying on you using fake social media profiles: One Scots council could

Vector
Headmaster

Re: and people ask why I'm not on any (anti-)social media site?

"That's because I'm a competent at security."

Grammar...not so much...

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Lyft, Uber throw Texas-sized tantrum over Austin driver law

Vector

Re: Texas

We should have both, but background checks seem to be a Sisyphean task.

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Official: Microsoft's 'Get Windows 10' nagware to vanish from PCs in July

Vector

That needs some editing...

Should read:

... the Get Windows 10 app that facilitates the easy tries to force the upgrade to Windows 10 will be disabled...

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Microsoft: Why we tore handy Store block out of Windows 10 Pro PCs

Vector

Re: Same old, same old.

Oh, Heavens! No!

They can't be trusted with such power.

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Vector

Re: Same old, same old.

"After all, it is the "proper" Windows to be using for a big(gish) company that wants total control over its Windows installations."

Yeah, because SMB's don't need control over their workstations. Perish the thought!

I 'spect the only reason it's staying in the enterprise edition is that otherwise big business might find the cash to migrate away from Windows.

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Xiaomi takes aim at Apple, Qualcomm

Vector

Sounds like Newton vs Palm Pilot all over again

"...down from 63 per cent last year to 52 per cent this year"

I believe if Jobs were still around, he'd do to the Apple Watch what he did to the Newton shortly after his return. Namely, kill it, because it's under-baked.

The Newton was a pretty nifty device for its time; elegant user interface and competent recognition considering the tiny processors available then. The Palm Pilot, however, was smaller, cheaper and could do all the things early adopters wanted in a handheld device. Then, all the WinCE devices started coming out and the Newton got swamped. None of these devices were as well designed as the Newton, but they were designed well enough and were either far cheaper or had features (like color) that were not available on the Newton.

A lot of the same issues seem to plague the Watch. Devices like the Fitbit aren't as pretty but they do most of what the early adopters want at a third of the price (at minimum).

I hear that a lot of Newton technology made it into the iPhone, so the experiment was not a complete loss, but it should probably have stayed in the lab for another decade.

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If you're appy and you know it, say five Hail Marys – cyber-Pope

Vector

...after his mom tells him to straighten his Pope Hat.

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Oof! Acer suffers 25 per cent hit to PC sales in turbulent Q1

Vector
Facepalm

Sorry, should have referred back. Was speaking to Gis Bun's comment about Acer.

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Vector

Sorry, but I've had far more trouble with ASUS products over the last 5 years than Acer. I've had 2 ASUS laptops (one a high end ROG system) that had bad power ports. The ROG laptop fried it's video card and the other laptop fried it's motherboard. I also had a Nexus 2012 tablet that wouldn't do an OTA system update and ASUS tech support was clueless (didn't buy it from Google so was forced to go to ASUS for support). The few Acer systems I've had to deal with, OTOH, have been fine middle of the road laptops, albeit with a bit of crapware that had to be eliminated.

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PC market shambling towards an unquiet grave

Vector

Re: crying wolf

"The reality is that not so many are being sold lately and likely things are just levelling off."

No, the reality is they are being replaced. As productivity apps mature in the mobile space along with accessories such as bluetooth input devices and various display interfaces to make productivity possible, more and more people will find that their phone will do everything they need and abandon the traditional PC market altogether. This will take a bit longer in the business space, but they too will follow eventually and the PC will go the way of the VCR into antiquity.

I know many people refuse to believe it, but this is coming sooner rather than later.

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Zombie SCO rises from the grave again

Vector
Facepalm

Re: Wish I could give you more upvotes

"This is like some bad horror movie where the monster just WON'T DIE"

It's not like a horror movie. Monsters in horror movies are scary. This is more like "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes."

Maybe someone should walk into SCO's offices with a copy of Puberty Love.

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Sick to death of mighty rocket launches? Avoid these dates

Vector

Re: Oh to live in such a time.

Exactly! I don't find the public disdain for launches sad at all! We need these launches to be as ho-hum as a day at the airport if we're going to advance our presence in space. Those of us who are still fascinated can watch streams online or, better yet, someday, head down to the local spaceport for a day of rocket spotting.

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T-Mobile US finally lets websites escape Binge On's web vid crusher

Vector

@paulf Re: Mixed messages from the Chocolate factory

The article fails to mention that Google Play and Youtube have signed on. Now that the opt-out is available, they seem to have buried the hatchet.

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Apple engineers rebel, refuse to work on iOS amid FBI iPhone battle

Vector
Happy

@gollux Re: How unAmerican ...

Foxconn might be based in Taiwan, but the factories that produce iPhones and iPads are in Mainland China (Zhengzhou and Chengdu respectively), so I stand by my original statement.

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Vector

Re: How unAmerican ...

Ummm...don't the people who build iPhones live in a communist country?

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Apple hasn't announced the new iPhone 5SE and pundits already hate it

Vector

Re: It's not meant to be a review

Yeah, here's the FTFY on the headline:

"Apple hasn't announced the new iPhone 5SE and pundits this guy already hate[s] it"

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Feds spank Asus with 20-year audit probe for router security blunder

Vector

Sorry, but in this case, at least from what I can see in the article, the "interference" should be welcomed. It's about time to hold manufacturers' feet to the fire on security since the average user isn't going to be sophisticated enough to properly secure something like a router on their own and that failure could lead to a world of hurt. And since virtually everyone in the first world has one these days, that's a lot of hurt to spread around.

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Backdoors are bad, Euro security wonks ENISA tell governments

Vector
Trollface

Besides, most of us like to actually do things so, personally, I worry.

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1Gbps quad-antenna mobile broadband chip dives off Qualcomm's drawing board

Vector

Re: Call Me A Crumugeon

"Why does anyone need 1Gb/s..."

You might not need it today. You might not even need it tomorrow. I suspect, however, that we'll all find a use for it in the not to distant future.

Being an old curmudgeon myself, I remember when 10Mb was blazing fast for a wired line! You get that speed today, you're moderately satisfied with your service (and possibly grumping about how it will barely suffice).

Besides, are the telcos and modem manufacturers supposed to just sit back because we have enough bandwidth today?

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Let Europeans sue America for slurping their data – US Senate

Vector

Re: I am more than a little pessimistic about this

Yeah, ask US citizens how well their attempts to sue the government over online privacy have gone. First, you have to prove that you have been targeted, but all the spy programs are covered by top secret classification, so you can't perform discovery on the information required for the basis of your suit.

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T-Mobile USA’s BingeOn is a smash hit. So what now?

Vector

"YouTube owner Google has grumbled about being optimised down to 480 pixels"

Now, granted, my eyes are not what they once were, but fer gawd's sake, 480p on a 4 or 5 inch screen is easily good enough to watch video. I even happily watch at that resolution on my 10 inch tablet. It's not like T-Mo users have no choice; they can turn off Binge-On and get whatever resolution they like (while sucking their data allocation dry [in about 4 hours]). The reality is that minimally acceptable resolution at a drastically reduced bit-rate is a big win on a metered connection. That some of that video doesn't count against the meter is a bonus.

Give it a rest Google.

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I love you. I will kill you! I want to make love to you: The evolution of AI in pop culture

Vector

Re: An opinion

Have an upvote!

I think that line should have been:

I, Robot the Will Smith film based on that uses the same title as the Asimov book produced 54 years before it

That movie really annoys me for the reason you state plus the fact that they threw out the spirit of the book (an exploration of how humans and robots might co-exist) along with all the material.

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It's 2016 and idiots still use '123456' as their password

Vector

Re: Nothing wrong with insecure passwords

I think, reading the tea leaves in this article, the real issue is that passwords (by themselves, at least) are just about obsolete as an effective security measure.

First, the people using the passwords have to actually understand and care about the importance of protecting the information behind a password protected wall.

Next, they have to do this for more and more locations (work network, websites, mobile apps, etc...).

As the strength of crackers increases, complexity rises, but the ability to retain the highly complex passwords, across dozens of locations, falters.

So we turn to password safes, but then you're borked if you don't happen to have the device with the safe app on it (And truly F*CKED if you lose it after forgetting to make a backup).

OH! but the cloud! Now you can access your safe from any device! But then, so can everyone else. And by cracking one password (that can't be so complex as to be unrememberable[sic?]), they can now access all your passwords.

Even with all this, since cracking power increases at least geometrically (and quite possibly exponentially) while our ability to remember passwords increases incrementally at best (and then decreases with age), we're fast approaching the time when all reasonable complexity will make no difference to anyone willing to put in the least of efforts.

It's time for a new way to secure things.

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Crummy Samsung gear no one wants, now no one can get – well done, Apple

Vector
Headmaster

FTFY

"Though the victory is seen as largely symbolic pyrrhic..."

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200 experts line up to tell governments to get stuffed over encryption

Vector

Horses in Barns

The interesting "Streisand Effect" of this debate is that it has highlighted the importance of encryption to the very people that all the security agencies deem most dangerous and in the most need of surveillance. The net result is that regardless of whether those agencies get their backdoors or not, the people they most want to spy on will now find the resources to encrypt for themselves even if Silicon Valley caves to the demands. So the rest of us will end up less secure for little gain (ie, the stupidest of criminals).

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The new Huawei is the world's fastest phone

Vector

Re: Decent overview...

I'm afraid these days you can assume no SD/removable battery, so if there's no mention of either, they're not there.

Shame really.

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