* Posts by DougS

5793 posts • joined 12 Feb 2011

Cock fight? Not half. Microsoft beats down Apple in Q1

DougS
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Re: We're past peak APPL

A lot of people said we hit peak Apple back in fall 2012, when the price dropped almost 45% in the following nine months. But then it gained it all back and last summer peaked over 30% higher than the 2012 peak. The drop from that new peak of 132 to its low of 90 a couple weeks back is almost identical to the previous 45% drop. Given its very low P/E versus the rest of the tech world there's plenty of room to grow - it is certainly possible it might peak even higher someday.

So far we've had exactly one quarter where iPhones sales dropped year over year. Assuming that holds true for this quarter and the next, all that says is that there was a ton of pent up demand for a larger iPhone that caused a big spike in sales for the 6 that they may never be able to match unless a similar "must have" feature is added. There's no indication that year over year sales drops will become a regular thing, more that they're leveling off at a pace a little slower than the red hot sales pace of the 6.

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Facebook's turbo-charged Instant Articles: Another brick in the wall

DougS
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What about ads?

If they are tossing out the ads that's great for readers but why would the publishers be interested? Or does it allow some ads, just (hopefully) not the annoying types? Or does Facebook insert its own ads, and give the publisher a cut?

What they really need is a system that prevents the type of stupid "articles" that are basically showing you one picture and paragraph per page. I guess some people are willing to sit through that, but between the annoyance and how slowly they load I avoid those like the plague. I suppose they might suck less if each one loaded quickly, but I'd still probably avoid them.

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Modular phone Ara to finally launch

DougS
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Re: So much pessimism?

You can think of a list of niche things, but modules for them would never be made unless the phone sold in iPhone, or at least Galaxy S, volumes.

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DougS
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Re: So much pessimism?

Because the pessimism is justified. Assuming it actually reaches market at all, it will quickly sink without a trace. You can't make individual modules in low quantities cheaper than an integrated phone that would be produced in higher quantities. Especially now that you can buy quality Android phones for under $200.

There are so many Android phones out there you can get pretty much anything you want. If there were rapid improvements in technology to where you might say "boy I sure wish I could upgrade the camera in my two year old phone" then maybe it would have a future, but the improvements are very small year to year these days and have been for several years already.

It is a fantasy to think someone is going to create say a DSLR camera module for this, if they do it will cost a fortune because they'll be lucky to sell a thousand of them.

This is the epitome of what Google's dorky PhD engineers would come up with - something only a dorky engineer could ever love or want.

There will be serious problems with the pieces staying together when dropped, or they'll be difficult to pull apart/put together, or there will be strange errors because the pins don't fit together perfectly. Look at how many people drop their phones and see the battery and/or back cover go flying. Those are a lot easier to make sturdy than something with a bunch of delicate electrical connections between modules!

Something will go wrong, there will be a lot of bad publicity and initial promises from Google to fix it, and then it will sink from sight. Though again, that's if it ever comes to market at all. The fact it was announced three years ago and it still is at least a year away from reaching the hands of consumers tells me it is more likely than not this gets pushed back further and further until it sinks without a trace when sanity prevails somewhere at Google that this is something with such a tiny potential audience there will never be a thriving market for modules that they promise.

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India roasts as mercury hits 51°C

DougS
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Re: Meanwhile, in Mongolia

The global warming effect of 8 million carcasses is nil. CO2 only matters to the extent that are you digging up carbon that had been sequestered underground for millions of years and are releasing it into the atmosphere today. We could burn down all the forests and kill all the animals and the effect on global warming would be a rounding error compared to the release of who knows how many years of stored carbon in the century or so we've been actively burning fossil fuels.

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DougS
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Re: Isn't it obvious?

Perhaps because he disagrees with more than because they doubt his credentials. If the others in the forum have served in the military as he did, what makes them more of an expert than him? More years in the service? Different branch? Having worked in the MoD?

I find on a lot of forums where so-called "experts" are discussing things, the disagreements are often petty personal conflicts. There is one such forum I participate in regularly, and anytime I post in a thread where a certain other guy is reading/posting, he will go after my statements. Doesn't matter what I've said, even if it is something clearly indisputable, he simply decided at some point that he doesn't like me. There are a few others he goes after as well. We'd complain to the moderators, but unfortunately he IS one!

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Three UK: Our MMS prices are up. Get around us with WhatsApp or Skype

DougS
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Re: Wow, first Canada has worse internet now the UK has worse cellular

I wasn't saying that US broadband/cellular were better than everywhere, just better than the UK and Canada in at least some respects which I've learned to my surprise in the past few days.

As for getting billed for incoming calls, since almost all cellular plans have a crazy number of minutes or unlimited minutes, that no longer matters. I'd much rather have incoming calls charged against my minutes than pay 40 cents per MMS, that's for damn sure!

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DougS
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Wow, first Canada has worse internet now the UK has worse cellular

Maybe us yanks aren't so bad off as we think!

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Google still faces legal spat with SEO biz that claimed it was wiped from web

DougS
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Re: SEO - The lottery that you can't win

It was a solved problem (or closer to solved) before it became worth something to be ranked higher. Now it is a problem that even with of all Google's resources they can't do a good job with, which is why I am with you in often finding better results trying alternate search engines that the SEOs aren't trying to game.

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Hack probing poodle sacrifice cuffed for public crap

DougS
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@MonkeyCee - imbecile breeding program in the UK

Isn't that what the titled class is for?

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Photoplethysmography up

DougS
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@Cynical Observer

Sure, you'd want an alarm sooner, and it would be foolish not to have a carbon monoxide detector in your house, but not everywhere you go (such as your car) has such a detector in place. Better to be alerted in the last minute, than not at all.

Well, that's providing the optical sensor can detect carbon monoxide since there seems to be some skepticism. I don't know enough to say one way or another.

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DougS
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Re: Why?

I suppose it would be useful as an alarm in case you had restricted oxygen due to a carbon monoxide getting into the passenger cabin of your car, because you won't know it until you lose consciousness. But yeah, it isn't like its useful for workouts in the way tracking heart rate is.

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A UK digital driving licence: What could possibly go wrong?

DougS
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Re: You've all missed the best part

Even if the problem is solved for Apple, there are a lot of Android phones running a lot of different versions of Android with different vendor customizations. You going to throw them to the wolves?

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Cars to run ... on Android

DougS
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Having "no" security is actually a good thing

Or could be. It forces you to have the smarts only interface with the convenience features like the stereo, so the worst that can happen is someone can unlock your car and steal what's inside - which is already so easy to do in most cars being able to do it electronically isn't really reducing security.

In reality they don't always properly firewall between the infotainment and critical systems, but that's a FAR easier problem to solve than having a completely secure user-facing infotainment/convenience system. As Windows, Android, iOS and on and on demonstrate, security is a goal not a state, there will always be many many undiscovered bugs in any complex system. If the worst that happens with a bug is they can steal your Facebook password you may not care too much, if they can cause you to accelerate before you enter a tight curve you will care because it could cost you your life.

If you put in a new platform that the floggers (i.e. Google in this case) claims is secure, then the temptation to interface it with safety critical CAN bus features like braking, acceleration, steering (in steer by wire cars) increases exponentially. After all, Google will assure automakers, Android is very secure and we release patches when exploits are found, so it is safe to interface with every aspect of the car.

So yes, having Android is much worse for a car's security than having the current infotainment systems that do not have any security at all.

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World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

DougS
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Re: "SIM free" ?

What the hell are people doing with their phones that they can't get through a day on battery? I don't talk on my phone nearly as much as I used to (thanks to Lync/Skype meetings replacing the need to dial in to conference calls, and text/email displacing some social calls) so maybe that's the difference, but I'm using it probably two hours a day for apps/browsing - mostly while I'm watching TV so I'm kind of absent minded doing both.

I charge it every other day, occasionally I get three days out of a charge, with an iPhone 6S plus. I am in disbelief that anyone would seriously suggest trying to sell people TWO phones, so one can be charging. I hope that was in jest. Otherwise, this person clearly needs 1) a phone with a swappable battery or 2) to add a "battery case" to the phone that gives it an extra 5000 mAh of battery life. If you still can't get by with that, you need to buy a better phone, because battery life isn't your problem but your phone's shitty battery consumption.

There is no market for people having two phones so one can be charging while the other is in use, nor should there ever be.

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Inside Project Loon – Google's megaplan to build a global internet

DougS
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"Doesn't give Google much of a payback"?

Driving traffic to their search engine so they can shift ads to them and collect data on them to sell is their entire business model. They wouldn't be doing this if they didn't think it was going to pay for itself eventually.

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Pandora investor: Sell this company sooner rather than later

DougS
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Now that they're going up against Apple and Google

Suddenly they aren't the tech industry's darling anymore. Is anyone surprised by that? I guess these investors were!

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Google asks the public to name the forthcoming Android N operating system

DougS
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Droidy McDroidface

Or maybe Phoney McPhoneface

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Boffins achieve 'breakthrough' in random number generation

DougS
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Sure this may have been "common wisdom"

But until it was mathematically proven, it wasn't something the paranoid were going to want to rely upon for security.

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Google slaps Siri with Assistant and Amazon with Home device

DougS
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Trollface

Re: 20% of mobile searches are voice?

Its because if you try to voice search you have to say it four times before it gets it right, but the stats count all the times you searched for "bib breasted women" and "hot milks"

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Hold the DRAM phone: IBM claims phase-change breakthrough

DougS
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Still a lot slower than DRAM

I could see using a smaller amount of DRAM and paging from a phase change backing store, thereby saving power. The performance cost would only be noticeable if you were switching apps constantly, or expecting them all to stay active with a lot of wired memory even when they weren't in the foreground.

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SHOCK: GM crops are good for you and the planet, reckon boffins

DougS
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They are nothing alike

Modifying a few genes in an existing organism is NOTHING like introducing an entirely new organism that has its own behavior. You might as well try advocating for banning the import of iPhones into Australia based on the cane toad experience.

When Monsanto created RoundUp ready crops by splicing in a gene that allowing putting pesticides on a corn plant without killing it they weren't doing anything they couldn't have done naturally. They could have grown a bunch of plants, put just enough RoundUp on them to kill 99% of them, saved the seeds from the survivors and lather rinse repeat until you end up with plants able to survive enough RoundUp to kill the weeds. It would just take a lot longer to get there that way - a decade or two, perhaps. In fact this is already happening in nature with weeds becoming more and more resistant to RoundUp through this exact same process!

If they used this "natural" method to create RoundUp resistant crops, they'd end up with some other traits that might be less desirable, since they would select on just that one but others would happen as well. Maybe they'd have corn that didn't taste as good, or survived drought less well, or the stalks would have a substance in them that made crop rotation less successful - they'd be relying on random mutations after all. By splicing in a specific gene they were able to change the one thing they wanted without getting any "bonus" traits to come along for the ride.

Which do you think would have the greater chance for "cane toad" like problems, natural seeds that had acquired their desired traits through random mutations via selective breeding, meaning they not only had the desired traits but acquired a lot of other traits as well (whether those are desirable or undesirable) or GM seeds where a single trait was spliced in but everything else was left alone and unchanged?

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DougS
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@d3vy

Regardless of what they're doing with the GM seeds to avoid their reuse, nearby farmers sometimes end up with the special properties of the GM seeds getting bred into their seeds.

There was a famous case in Canada where a farmer who lived next to a farmer using Monsanto GM seeds that were RoundUp (herbicide) resistant blew onto his field or managed to pass that trait to some of his normal seeds. He noticed this and collected those seeds and bred them through traditional methods, and Monsanto sued. Their argument was that it wasn't that he accidentally got the RoundUp resistance trait in a few of his plants, but that he specifically collected the seeds that had acquired that trait and bred for it to get their patented capability for free.

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DougS
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It is a double edged sword

I recently saw a documentary on PBS (in the US) that was based on a story originally written by a 16 year old female budding journalist in India, whose father had committed suicide because he couldn't pay back what he'd borrowed to buy GM seeds. She wanted to answer these very questions of why they were using these expensive seeds when there were more and more who lost their farms and committed suicide every year.

The reason they are buying the GM seeds is because they are improving yields. That's great, except the larger supply is driving down the price they can get for their crop, so they feel they have no choice but to use them because traditional seeds make less money now. The problem is that they cost a lot more, and while they are more resistant to drought and pests there is only so much they can do. If you have good season you can make money, maybe more than you used to be able to. If you have bad weather you may not be able to pay back the loan you took out for your crops, and if you can't you might lose your land. Some might be able to survive one bad season, but sometimes you have several bad seasons in a row.

This is really something the government would need to regulate in India. Not to ban GM crops, but to fund development of "public domain" GM crops that have the yield benefit but have seeds that can be reused. That would require a government with a lot of backbone to fight big agribusiness, and likely pressure from the US created by all the lobbying money Monsanto spends buying US politicians. This is the kind of thing that secret sections in trade deals like the TPP seek to make illegal, and are the reason why they keep them secret so they can be passed before people realize what they've given up.

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New solar cell breaks efficiency records, turns 34% of light into 'leccy

DougS
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Re: Watts per Dollar is the only efficiency that actually matters

Efficiency = watts per square meter.

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DougS
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Re: Watts per Dollar is the only efficiency that actually matters

In the long run watts per dollar is the most important metric, but showing a way to do 34% at all is a lot more important than you make it out to be. This is a science problem, figuring out a way to manufacture it efficiently is an engineering problem. Ball's in their court now.

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Microsoft shifts Windows 7 and 8.1 fixes to 'rollup' bundles

DougS
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Re: Will the rollup silently include KB3035583 and (unwanted) telemetry?

Well we can always download the rollup, and then wait for reports on whether it screws us. Or try it first in a VM that can be easily rolled back.

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The Windows 10 future: Imagine a boot stamping on an upgrade treadmill forever

DougS
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Re: 80% will be on Windows 10 by end of 2018??

I forgot all about that prediction. Thanks for the reminder and the laugh!

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DougS
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80% will be on Windows 10 by end of 2018??

What a laugh, Gartner is on drugs as usual. Even after the extension in its lifetime I think we didn't see the 80% threshold for being off XP crossed until less than six months before the drop dead date for XP going off support. They will similarly wait until the last minute to go to Windows 10, because there's no reason and no incentive to move until the last minute - and I imagine there will be a lot of pressure on Microsoft to push out the end of support date for Windows 7 past the 2020 deadline.

I wonder if the rumors about Microsoft offering a Windows 10.1 this fall are to shrink the support deadline for Windows 10. That's the reason why there was never a SP2 for Windows 7 because they didn't want to extend its date beyond 2020. By dropping service packs and moving to "different" OS versions, they can avoid pushing out the end of support date for Windows 10 and try to keep people on the upgrade treadmill longer.

If they had the best interest of customers in mind they would have released a Windows 7 SP2 and maybe SP3, given the majority of customers are running it. Instead they are doing everything they can to push people off it onto Windows 10. If I were in charge of enterprise licensing, I'd take a real close look at the fine print in the license terms and what has changed between the Windows 7 days and today. I suspect they are trying to sneak a few fast ones there to screw customers and squeeze even more money out of them.

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Nokia offers up 10 Gbps HFC demo

DougS
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Re: "Symmetrical"

OK thanks, I'm interested to see it! Everyone always complains about the state of broadband in the US, and obviously it isn't without its problems (particularly cost in areas with low competition) and some countries are a lot better off but mostly those that have density on another level compared to the US. It is hardly shocking that Singapore is much better off when you compare its density with that of the US or anywhere in the US for that matter other than maybe Manhattan and SF.

Canada, of course, is on a whole other level of low density even compared to the US, especially outside the cities and more than 50 miles north of the border. Probably comparable to the Australian outback in a lot of ways - another country that seems to have broadband issues, at least if the number of Reg articles written around people complaining about the state of Australian broadband is anything to go by.

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DougS
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Re: "Symmetrical"

Where do you live that you have such crappy service? You mention Canada, are they really worse than the US? I've been able to get 40/20 VDSL2 (unbonded, uncapped) here for almost a decade now, and my cable company now offers speeds of up to 150/20. A lot of people won't have my DSL speeds, but I'm sure a majority in the US can get as fast or faster speeds from their cable provider. What's the holdup in Canada?

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DougS
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Re: "Symmetrical"

They won't offer it because consumers aren't demanding it. But if you get 1 gigabit down and 100 Mb up that's better than 100 Mb symmetrical so I don't see the problem. Even those of us who work from home and occasionally need to do big uploads likely download a lot more data than they upload...

They aren't going to replace all the splitters, taps and amps just to squeeze more bandwidth out of the plant when they can get more than they need out of the current HFC plant. Nokia's demo is interesting, but irrelevant. No consumer needs or will in my lifetime need 10 gigabit service (note to anyone who thinks I'm wrong and are ready to quote "640K is enough for anyone" at me: tell me the use case for even 1 gigabit service at home)

The only market for 10 gigabit service is businesses, but I think the cable company can be bothered to extend their fiber line that last 200 meters for a business willing to pay for 10 gigabit symmetric service and shouldn't be using DOCSIS 3.1.

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5% of drivers want Nigel Farage to be their in-car robo butler

DougS
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Donald Trump?

At the intersection, take a yuuuuge right turn, your destination is on your left. And let me tell you, it is a terrific destination, the best there is!

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Politician claims porn tabs a malware experiment, then finds God

DougS
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Re: I don't see the problem

The problem is that he's one of those holier than thou Christian conservatives who think they should be allowed to regulate what others do according to their own morality.

It is because he's a hypocrite who was caught looking at porn when he'd probably vote to ban online porn if he had a chance (which he probably won't get now) not because he was simply caught looking at porn.

The fact he's tying himself into verbal knots trying to explain this away with several different stories just makes it all the more newsworthy. Sort of a Streisand Effect via verbal diarrhea! I doubt it would have registered (sorry) on the Reg's radar or even got much notice outside the state of Virginia if he'd simply said "I apologize to my supporters for that, I experienced a moment of weakness and will pray for the strength to do better" and left it at that.

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First ATM malware is back and badder than ever

DougS
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Re: Diebold ATMs are the least secure

Security is the least of the problems with Diebold voting machines. It is more the lack of any audit trail to allow recounts and reduce the ability to commit fraud (not just Diebold, but any electronic only voting machine suffers from this)

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Got $130,000 down the back of the sofa? Great. Grab an HP 3D printer

DougS
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Re: "The market is forecast to rise from $4.1bn in 2015 to $16.2bn by 2020"

HP has claimed they are going to be able to revolutionize the market by bringing the quality and speed of the $50,000 3D printers to a consumer / small business price point, similar to what happened with laser printers over time.

With such a small number of units sold, it isn't that hard to quadruple the market revenue in four years regardless of whether you are selling at $500 or $120,000.

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Manchester cops to strap on 3K bodycams

DougS
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They need good accountability laws

Otherwise these will be used only to clear the cop of wrongdoing, but anytime the cop is suspected of wrongdoing the coverage will be missing due to an "unexplained malfunction" or because the cop "forgot to turn it on", and the police will stonewall any attempts by the press or courts to release any video that can be proven to exist.

In an ideal world, there would be some sort of citizen accountability board that would have access to all footage, and they would review any footage that the public asked for to insure it doesn't compromise anyone's privacy or endanger informants, etc. but otherwise the default would be to release anything requested. They'd also randomly audit footage versus police reports to insure cops are turning it on when they were supposed to...at least most of the time, anyone can forget sometimes.

It would be better if it was always on, and just recorded video at a really slow frame rate if the cop is in the police car, or not moving. It is when he starts moving quickly / running that you really want it to be recording, and in an emergency situation that's not going to be top of his list of things to do. It really needs to be motion activated to insure it is always on when you really need it to be.

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DougS
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Don't try that in the US, you'll get shot in the back eight times like Walter Scott and the officer will claim "he feared for his life", and it will take a bystander with a camera to prove the cop was a lying coward.

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One (storage) protocol to rule them all?

DougS
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The problem with FCoE

Was mainly that it doesn't fit the 'tower' model of modern system administration. Either the network team needs to learn zoning so they can manage the converged ethernet/FCoE switches, or you need two teams with administrative access and authority to make changes to the same equipment. Inevitably this sort of thing will lead to turf wars and finger pointing.

That's why FCoE has been mainly used in hyperconverged environments like vBlock where the lines have to blur anyway and there is less need for post-install switch configuration like zoning in the first place.

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Apple's iOS updates brick iPads

DougS
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I doubt this is a problem with 9.3.2 specifically

There seem to be scattered reports of problems with just about every update - there's no way they could have issues with each one. I think it is more likely a bug in the update process that causes it not to complete properly or something along those lines. People who have a problem are going to take to the forums and start a thread, and even if only 50 people have a problem and post about it, The Reg is going to write an article about it and make it seem like some huge problem affecting millions.

One thing I've always done because of my past as a sysadmin is to insure the update always starts from a clean state - I close all apps, shut down my phone, restart it, then update. Sure, it should work without doing that, and maybe that doesn't do anything. But I'll continue to do it anyway, call it superstition if you like, but I recall issues with patching OSes back in the day were far less if you did a clean reboot before you patch. So I always do that now, Linux, Windows, iOS doesn't matter. Can't hurt and I'm going to be rebooting anyway so what's the difference if I reboot twice?

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EU mulls €3bn fine for Google

DougS
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Re: itunes

The important thing is that iTunes isn't a monopoly. It doesn't have even half the market, what with Google Play, Amazon, and the many streaming alternatives.

Why is it whenever there is an article about the EU dinging Google some idiot has to come along and complain about Apple over the iPhone and iTunes. What part of about "dominant market" do you guys not understand being required for abuse of a dominant market position. Apple has a minority share of phones and less than a majority share of music (bought or streamed)

Just because you don't like the way the law is being applied (against Google but not against Apple) doesn't mean it is being wrongly applied. You can take issue with the law and say you don't think Google has a dominant market position, but it is hard to argue for Apple facing any punishment under current EU competition law other than "because I don't like them".

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China's new rules may break the internet warns US government

DougS
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Are they just talking about .cn domain names?

If so, I don't see any reason why that's a problem. Aren't countries supposed to be able to manage those as they see fit? If they want real names, fingerprints and a blood sample that's for them to decide.

If the worries about them blocking is that they'd block all domains except those ending in .cn, that would simplify the great firewall pretty nicely. Then any IP address it sees, if it doesn't reverse map to a .cn name it gets blocked. That's not great for the freedom of their citizens, but I don't think the US would want China telling us what our laws should be, so I don't see why we should tell them what theirs should be (aside from my country's belief that everyone should be subject to our laws, and we should be subject to no one's but our own)

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Google tries social again

DougS
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Google should concede they can't do everything

They are becoming a pathetic one trick pony that reminds one more and more of Microsoft - they have a terrific cash cow core market, but when they stray from it and try to compete outside their sphere (Windows/Office for Microsoft, advertising for Google) they fail miserably and waste billions.

Google doesn't yet have the long track record of failure that Microsoft does, but there is nothing about the way they have been and still are incompetently flailing about in the social media market that makes one think they're headed in a trajectory different from Microsoft's.

Say what you want about Apple, but at least it only took them one failure (Ping) to realize they don't understand social media at all and should leave it to those who do.

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Apple posts patches

DougS
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Yet another trouble free update

Thanks for letting me know before my phone did - though I'd guess the iOS automatic notification is staged over a few days to avoid having a half billion iPhones DoS apple.com trying to download it five minutes after release :)

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Smut apps infecting Androids with long-gestation nasties

DougS
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Re: "plunder older Android devices through infected porn apps"

I've always heard pirate sites for movie/software downloads were the most malware infected. I doubt there have been any studies, so it is all probably anecdotal.

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DougS
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They don't need to be foolproof to be successful

Like those web sites that try to trap you on their page claiming you have been infecting with malware or that they're the FBI and have detected child porn on your PC. You can't get off them by closing the tab or whatever, but you can if you simply close your browser and uncheck that page when restarting it, or restart without your old tabs. Not everyone knows to do that though, and such pages wouldn't exist if they weren't successful in fooling some people.

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Warren Buffett picks Apple

DougS
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Amazing the effect he can have on the market

Apple shares are up 3.5% in a flat market, so that move can be accounted for almost entirely on the news Buffett was buying Apple stock. If he had those holdings at the end of the first quarter, no doubt he has been loading up further since then. Apple's dividend yield is in the range he likes, and he obviously believed it is undervalued at Q1 price, and it is even lower now thanks to the proof iPhone sales have finally peaked people have been expecting and pushing back since 2012.

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Inside Electric Mountain: Britain's biggest rechargeable battery

DougS
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Some breaks are even longer than that

I recently recorded a couple movies on BET, and there were a few breaks that required, I shit you not, 22 presses of the 30 second skip to get by. I can't fathom anyone sitting through an entire movie if they didn't have a DVR, you could make a quick run to the grocery store in that amount of time!

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Sysadmin paid a month's salary for one day of nothing

DougS
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Wow

I've heard of time and a half for overtime, and double and in a few cases triple pay for holidays. But a month's pay for a night's work is like 20x! Surprised they didn't have a line of volunteers a lot longer than the number of slots they wanted to fill. Sounds like the CIO promised a trouble free Y2K and had a bonus based on that large enough that he was willing to spend almost anything to insure it.

I had a (mostly) memorable night in the largest crowd Bourbon Street had ever seen that night, in retrospect I'm glad I have those memories rather than the extra month's pay.

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FBI director claims that videoing police is causing crime uptick

DougS
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Re: Just another election year here in the USA

Those aren't businesses, they are lobbyists. You can raise money and lobby for anything you want, and the NRA which lobbies for the opposite is far larger and employs a lot more people. They exploit shootings for their goals too, arguing that if more bystanders were armed all the time they couldn't have taken place.

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