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* Posts by badger31

68 posts • joined 29 Jan 2011

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BEHOLD Apple's BENEVOLENCE! iMessage txt BLACK HOLE finally fixed

badger31

F#ck me!

They've only just fixed this? They took their sweet time over that one.

A couple of years ago I ditched (well, gave to the missus) my iphone 4 for an android phone. Thankfully I had long ago turned iMessage off, on the grounds that it was shit. Back then, at least, it would spend about an hour trying to send a message as an iMessage before giving up and sending it as a text message. SMS is and should be basically instant. Maybe if you have limited SMSs on your contract/PAYG iMessage would be tempting, but considering how much a contract on an iphone is already, a huge bundle of SMSs is practically nothing on top. I bet it wouldn't be hard, if not already done, to forward any SMSs to your other apple devices as an iMessage, if that's what you want.

And yet despite all this, every now and then, I'm actually tempted by the iPhone 6. I went to look at one in an Apple store and it was very nice. They have finally made it rounded again, so it would no longer cut holes in all my trouser pockets. I can't see Steve Jobs letting them get away with a sticky out camera, though, that's far from perfect. Maybe the iPhone 6s ...

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Microsoft's TV product placement horror: CNN mistakes Surface tabs for iPAD STANDS

badger31

Re: Prius?

<rant>

Because so many people get all wet in the pants about the prius, as if they are saving the fucking planet. They are far worse for the environment to produce than most cars, due to their complexity; they are not well built, causing multiple deaths [http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2013/01/18/toyota-settles-first-hundreds-wrongful-death-suits-involving-unintended/] and at least one massive recall [http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-26148711]; and they are not even fuel economical when you get out of a thirty zone.

OK, so battery powered cars are not yet ready for mainstream use, by quite a long way, but if you have an electrically driven car with a relatively small battery (mostly for accelerating and kinetic energy recovery) kept topped up by an efficient internal combustion engine (running at an RPM that is not directly tied to the speed of the car) you have the best of both worlds: maximum torque at 0 RMP, no clutch, regenerative breaking and the power density of petrol/diesel.

The Prius marketing is all about its green credentials, and they are mostly bullshit. Every time I see a Prius, I assume the driver is more concerned about looking like they care about the environment than actually caring about the environment. Or they are an idiot. Or both.

</rant>

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UK.gov mulls what to do about digital currencies

badger31

FFS

You can't regulate all crypto-currencies. If you crippled Bitcoin, Litecoin would take over, then dogecoin ... etc. And as with a lot of new regulation, you're only going to end up criminalising otherwise honest people; said drug dealers and terrorists are already breaking existing laws, so adding 'using unregistered crypto-currency' to the rap sheet isn't going to worry them too much.

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Trolls pop malformed heads above bridge to sling abuse at Tim Cook

badger31

The squeaky wheel wants to be greased.

And that's where the real fear in homophobe comes from.

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You! AT&T! The only thing 'unlimited' about you is your CHEEK, growl feds

badger31
WTF?

What I still don't understand

is why any telco can call their data plan 'unlimited' when it has limitations. I ditched O2 because their 'unlimited' data plan didn't allow tethering (that's a limitation, by the way) and they re-compressed images to the point of being unable to tell what the picture used to be. I'm pretty sure they had an (un)fair use policy, as well. All this bullshit can be called 'unlimited', but redbull get sued for jokingly suggesting that their fizzy drink gives you wings.

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You get what you pay for: Kingston's SSDNow V310 960GB whopper

badger31

Re: Where are the 2TB SSD's?

Buy two 1TB SSDs.

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FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for

badger31

Relevant results?

IE11 for Windows 8.1 is the most relevant result for 'weather' on a Mac? Apple must really hate Google.

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ISPs handbagged: BLOCK knock-off sites, rules beak

badger31

Blocks are ineffective against VPN users.

They're next.

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WAITER! There's a Flappy Bird in my Lollipop!

badger31
Thumb Down

I can't let this one go. Java is just fine - and I program in several languages of various paradigms. Don't blame the language for shitty programming.

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Want a customer's call records Mr Plod? No probs

badger31

Re: Backslash, Backlash!

Bollocks! The problem is the law, not the telcos. How are the telcos supposed to 'validate' the requests, if not automatically? Who's going to pay for it? The telcos have no power to refuse these requests, so why bother? If I were a telco, I know I'd be doing this automatically. I would also log each and every request, looking for evidence of abuse of power.

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Sir Tim Berners-Lee defends decision not to bake security into www

badger31

I agree. Always on security just means people (Internet users, that is) will just get used to the idea of accepting self-signed certificates. Very dangerous, indeed. At least HTTP isn't pretending to be secure.

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badger31

Re: HTTP or HTML?

It was HTTP - effectively he invented the World Wide Web, which runs on the Internet. As for email, it did what it was designed to do AT THE TIME. How could anyone involved in creating the protocols know what the situation would be in 2014? Hindsight is much clearer that foresight.

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Hot DRAM! Samsung splurges $15 BILLION on Korean chip fab

badger31
Thumb Up

$15bn

Now THAT'S walking around money!

(We need a 'Mom' icon)

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Dear Reg readers. I want Metro tiles to replace ALL ICONS in Windows. Is this a good idea?

badger31

Re: There are lies ...

Speaking of fruit based statistics, here's my favourite:

93% of people would put someone's genitals in their mouth, but only 6% would eat a brown banana.

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Netflix bullish after six-country European INVASION

badger31

Dr_N is right about the VPN

Netflix is at its best when connected through a VPN. This now means that (English speaking) people living in these new countries can sign up, connect through a VPN to USA (for the biggest selection). My wife an I ditched Sky TV (£21 - £71 pcm + adverts + contract) in favour of Netflix (watch what you want, when you want with no adverts - just so long as they have it - for £6 pcm with no adverts or contract). For the difference in price, you could go ahead and get Amazon Prime as well (also £6 pcm) and still come out way ahead. With Sky, you are paying to watch adverts. Screw that!

Oh, and if you are worried about watching it on your big screen telly, get a chromecast or better still something like a Sony BDP-S1200 (although a doubt the sony has an option to connect to a VPN).

And on the subject of VPNs, if you are not scared of a Linux terminal shell you can (like me) get a VPS in the USA for $13.50 per YEAR (http://lowendbox.com/tag/fliphost-net/). For that you get 500GB of data pcm - plenty. Just install Ubuntu Server, ask nicely to have ppp enabled and install pptpd (plenty of online guides for this). I haven't tried watching Amazon Prime through the VPN, so I can't comment on that, but Netflix works a charm.

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SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk

badger31

Re: Prototype rocket explodes

Exactly. If it didn't explode, they would not have been pushing hard enough. How and why they rockets could explode is very valuable information.

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Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

badger31

Re: Password fields need to be bigger.

<rant>

I've always had a problem with the maths of that particular cartoon. It treats each word as a series of characters (plus common substitutions), be he actually states that passphrase be FOUR COMMON WORDS. Even if you tried all combinations of the top 2000 words, thats only 2000^4 = 1.6e+13 combinations. OK, thats only a smidge less than his 2^44 (1.8e+13), but I could easily prune that search tree with simple heuristics and word ordering. (I'm actually tempted to try this!). If the password is 8 random visible characters, thats 95^8 (6.6e+16).

I type in login many, many times a day, so it needs to be as quick to type as to remember. No way I'm having a 25 digit password no matter how easy to remember. The only use for this I can think of is that 'verified by visa' bollocks, which won't allow it anyway. Every time I need to use that, I can't remember my password, and every possible variation of my memorable passwords has already been used, apparently, leaving me with no choice but to set a new password every time, with even less likelihood of me remembering it. And all that is needed to change the password is my card details and my DoB, so some thief with my wallet would have no problem.

Anyway, my main point is that a sufficiently random 8 digit password will be hard to crack, and if you use it enough, your fingers will remember it, even if you don't.

Oh, and password managers are just a pointless single point of failure (that could go 'tits-up' [http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/12/lastpass_outage/]), and if someone hacks that password, they own you, bitch.

And besides, who the fuck cares what your facebook or twitter password is? Generally speaking, the login password is not the weak link; unless you're a moron with a password like 'password1'

I could go on, but ...

</rant>

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Brits STUNG for up to £625 when they try to cancel broadband

badger31

Rubbish

There's nothing wrong with getting a bargain deal with a lengthy contract, if you know you'll need the service for at least the contract length. The problem is that you should be able to get out of the contract if the ISP, or whoever, is not providing the service they should.

I am currently going through this process with a client whose internet is dog-slow or none existent, despite having an excellent DSL link to the local exchange. His ISP claims they are not in breach of contract as they are making efforts to rectify the situation. They want £185 for early termination. Bastards. At least BT Business have a reasonable SLA to go with their unreasonable prices. Seriously, £19pm just for line rental. FFS.

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Running Cisco's VoIP manager? Four words you don't want to hear: 'Backdoor SSH root key'

badger31

Wow.

I thought all that secret backdoor stuff was just in the movies.

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El Reg posse prepares for quid-a-day nosh challenge

badger31

I was on the dole once.

I was told by the job centre words to this effect:

"The government has calculated you need £35 per week to survive. We are going to give you £27." WTF?

I only survived because a friend worked the night shift at a local petrol station. He gave me all the food that went out of date at midnight.

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Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

badger31

How do they clean their equipment?

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IBM PCjr STRIPPED BARE: We tear down the machine Big Blue would rather you forgot

badger31

@Franklin

I feel the same way whenever I see a Nissan Juke.

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Update your iThings NOW: Apple splats scary SSL snooping bug in iOS

badger31

Re: Utter f*cking idiots. Re. iOS 6.1.6

"yep, loads of people are still on iOS 6 on there phones because they don't want iOS 7"

Yep. My wife really doesn't want ios7, so she's going to be really upset when I tell her. Sorry dear, you need to update to that pig-ugly ios7 because Apple didn't implement a security protocol correctly. Yes, they fixed it in ios6 also, but you can't have it. She, like many others, will have no idea how important it is.

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Silk Road reboot claims: Hacker STOLE all our Bitcoin funds

badger31

Re: Words

My understanding of it is that most of the BTC are stored in offline wallets, but the admins were about to make some changes to the server and expected the vendors to withdraw their funds. This required the BTC to be made available to the vendors by putting them in an online wallet.

At that exact moment, one of the vendors apparently used the malleability trick to syphon off the entire wallet. So despite the fact that they knew about the vuln, the admins went ahead and put every BTC they held online. Hmm. Sounds a bit fishy to me. The admins are either lying thieves or monumentally stupid.

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Gamers in a flap as Vietnamese dev pulls Flappy Bird

badger31

He coded it in a couple of days.

What took him so long?

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IBM to invest $100m and a decade into using Watson in Africa

badger31
Coat

They called it the prayer,

It's answer was law.

It's logic stopped war,

Gave them food.

How they adored,

'Til it cried in it's bordom ...

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Woz he talking about? Apple co-founder wants iPhones to run Android

badger31

Re: Shock horror!

I think they did pretty much exactly that with the original X3.

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MANIC MINERS: Ten Bitcoin generating machines

badger31

Leaves

Alan G

No. The problem with the leaves was that they were abundant and easy to obtain. The problem with Bitcoin mining is that it is hard and getting harder all the time. If the price of Bitcoins increases in line with the increased difficulty, the miners will be quids in. If it doesn't, they (I) will be boned. It's a gamble.

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We flew our man Jack Clark into Facebook's desert DATA TOMB. This is what he saw

badger31

I believe DNA is the big hope for super-duper long term storage, that stuff holds for millions of years.

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Bitcoin mining rig firm claims $3m revenue in just FOUR DAYS

badger31

Re: I really don’t understand?????

@BongoJoe

"Only in the sense that they lost and, therefore, they were the Bad Guys."

Really? Only that?

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'Only NUCLEAR power can SAVE HUMANITY', say Global Warming high priests

badger31

Amen

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Shadowy drug fans threaten FBI agents, vow to 'avenge' Silk Road shutdown

badger31

Sounds like they are just venting steam.

It's a shame about the silk road, but now that the FBI have made it clear just how amazingly profitable it was there will be many more popping up soon.

Everyone should have the right to get high now and again - what harm does it cause (other than the harm caused by it being illegal)?

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FLABBER-JASTED: It's 'jif', NOT '.gif', says man who should know

badger31
Happy

Re: giga

Like one point twenty-one jigger watts?

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Operators look on in horror as Facebook takes mobe users Home

badger31

Why would anyone want this?

I'm seriously, you guys. Why?

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The ten SEXIEST computers of ALL TIME

badger31
Joke

Re: I seem to recall..

Wow! The Apricot F1 had a HUGE keyboard :-)

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Texas judge sends Uniloc packing in Rackspace patent suit

badger31

"many of the fundamental operations of a computer are pure mathematics and are not patentable subject matter. "

May I suggest that ALL of the fundamental operations of a computer are pure mathematics and are not patentable subject matter.

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Not got 4G? There's a reason we aren't called 'Four', sniffs Three

badger31

Should have stopped at 'Dyson.'

None of the rest of the article made any sense.

I agree with the ridiculousness of EE's pricing. Their cheapest sim-only contract is £21pm, and that;s with just 500mb data allowance. I pay £15pm with 3 for unlimited data. Even if my phone was 4G capable, there's no way I'd be moving to EE.

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BT's 'six-month free broadband' offer is a big fat FIB - ads watchdog

badger31

Re: why is line-rental mandatory?

I'm with you on that one. They put up the line rental saying "Ooh! Free calls!" Free? They're not free if you are charging extra for them. Also, I get my calls and broadband from Sky; it is IMPOSSIBLE for me to use those free calls you are forcing me to buy. Basically, BT got pissed off with people using them for line rental only, so they simply stopped offering line rental only. I now get my line rental from Sky, too. Screw BT.

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Sheffield ISP: You don't need a whole IPv4 address to yourself, right?

badger31

Can they still call this The Internet?

It sounds to me like they are providing access to the World Wide Web, and little else. ISPs calling this service 'The Internet' would be like calling a broadband connection with a download cap 'unlimited', and they would never get away with that. Oh, wait ... they did, and they probably will.

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Facebook testing $100 fee to mail Mark Zuckerberg

badger31
Thumb Down

Re: Biz model

They aren't the fist with this business model - this is what 0845 numbers are for.

Some years ago I moved house. I spent an hour and a half on hold to cancel my NTL only to get cut off as soon as someone answered. I called back on the sales line and was answered in two seconds, but obviously they couldn't help me. Back on hold for another hour and a half, but what choice did I have?

I knew someone who worked in a call centre that serviced some telco or other. He told me that the call centre had target MINIMUM times to keep people on hold; the telco got really pissed off if they answered too quickly.

Apologies for the off-topic rant.

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badger31

Re: Is there

They truly are the Ryan Air of the internet.

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Instagram back-pedals in face of user outrage

badger31

Third time's the charm.

Facebook did almost exactly this, not that long ago. They changed the TOS to say something like leaving Facebook handed ownership of all your photos to Facebook. There was outcry and a fair amount of back-peddling, so that's twice they have tried and failed. Like I say -- third time's the charm. They'll definitely give it another go, soon enough.

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Apple TV demand may drive Samsung-sapping sales

badger31
Meh

I can see them making this.

And then selling/renting films and TV series through iTunes. My question is will they allow watching your own video collection via USB? I wouldn't be surprised if the answer was no. You always get great stuff with Apple products, but there's too much stuff you don't get just because Apple choose no to let you have it(FLAC playback for iPods, for example). They just expect you to suck it up, and lots of people do.

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Copying Wikipedia's lies is not just for hacks, right Lord Leveson?

badger31
Happy

But this is why I love Wikipedia

I remember during my college years researching a dreary assignment on wide area networks. I looked at the wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_area_network to discover that wide area networks were invented in 1976 by Gok Wan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gok_Wan). Made my day, that did.

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Who's using 'password' as a password? TOO MANY OF YOU

badger31
Happy

Re: Double Fail

@JDX

So write it down, then. Just don't write it on a post-it note and stick it to your monitor.

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Scientists build largest ever computerized brain

This post has been deleted by a moderator

The Terminator, coming to a reality near you

badger31
WTF?

overcome a fundamental problem in the creation of “bio-hybrid” robot

Phew! For a while there I thought we'd never have bio-hybrid robots. I'll sleep better tonight.

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Hitachi buys Horizon to save UK's nuclear future

badger31

Re: Re While some will no doubt point to Fukushima as a sign

I agree. If it wasn't for the fact the backup diesel generators were located below the water line, my understanding is that there wouldn't have been a problem at all. The building survived and the reactors shut down as they should, but the cooling system failed. Seems a bit knee-jerk to do away with all nuclear power because some prat put the diesel generators in the basement.

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Apple appeals Samsung patent getaway in Tokyo

badger31
Thumb Up

+1 for Sam-a-rama ding-dong!

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Übertroll firm bags DRM patent for 3D printing

badger31
Headmaster

Aaaactually ...

As an aside, a generation lasts 25 years, the chances of you and your brother being different generations is highly unlikely - generation X is generally used to denote those born in the 70's and 80's, generation Y starts some time in the 90's.

His brother could be just one year younger and still be in a different generation. That doesn't seem too unlikely.

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