* Posts by FrankAlphaXII

614 posts • joined 12 Jan 2011

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Forget viruses: Evil USB drive 'fries laptops with a power surge'

FrankAlphaXII
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>>Not sure if devil icon, flames, troll, coat or nuke icon.

All of the above? It sounds like it would be fun (to watch) anyway.

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Google chips at Amazon's Glacier with Cloud Storage Nearline

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: oooh oooh!

>>I guess someone doesn't understand encryption. :)

I was going to say exactly the same thing.

You could encrypt it with a decently difficult key and a difficult passphrase, or if you're really paranoid, throw whatever you're sending to them into like five encrypted containers with progressively longer and harder key lengths and passphrases to the point where a bruteforce attack would take longer than the age of the universe. Its not hard or even all that time consuming to do.

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Nothing says 'Taliban' quite like net neutrality, eh, EU Digi Commish?

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Sack this man

Agreed. Except that Helmand's far too nice of a place for him.

Send his ass to the Korangal Valley in Kunar. It looks like less of a hell-scape, but looks can be very deceiving. Its actually much worse, at least in regard to psycho locals.

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Chewier than a slice of Pi: MIPS Creator CI20 development board

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: And if you want to get really down-and-dirty, try NetBSD-Current.

Sounds like fun actually, maybe I'm a masochist.

I'd prefer any of the BSDs over what I've taken to calling the circus kernel for many reasons though, so I'm glad someone's working on it. I wonder if FreeBSD's MIPS port would work as well. Sounds like it'd be fun to try out, if I had one of these things anyway.

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Grab your pitchforks: Ubuntu to switch to systemd on Monday

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: read around...

Good way of putting it without any of the evangelical bullshit that both the pro and anti systemd camps put out.

Personally, I stopped using Linux about a year ago in favor of *BSD for my UNIX-like environments, but systemd wasn't the reason. Hell, I liked systemd (as much as one can like an init system anyway), at least the way that Fedora had it implemented worked well and was easy to fix when something went stupid.

I never understood the irrational hatred for it except that it always seemed to be coming from bitter old neckbeards who are still debating emacs vs vi, still think Hurd will eventually work well, call anything to do with Linux "GNU/Linux", and are still waiting for Linux to displace Windows on the desktop because it'll really be any day month year decade now.

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Cash'n'Carrion restocks atomic keyrings

FrankAlphaXII
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I wish the NRC didn't suck. I'd love to get one,

That is all.

I love their reasoning for it too. This is straight from an email from NRC:

NRC regulations [10 CFR 30.19(c) and 10 CFR 32.22(b)] and policy (Federal Register Notice of

March 16, 1965, 30 FR 3462) do not allow licensing toys, novelties, adornments or any consumer product containing radioactive material considered a frivolous use of radioactive material and where the end use of the product cannot be reasonably foreseen.

Other consumer products that are not frivolous use, but contain self-luminous radioactive

material, must go through a two step safety review process consisting of: (1) an engineering evaluation and registration for the device as well as (2) a licensing review of the program involved in possession and distribution of radioactive material.

In order for NRC to be sure consumer products containing radioactive material are safe for distribution to the general public the product must be below a certain activity and/or found to incorporate engineering features making release of the radioactive material unlikely. In

addition environmental studies must show that during the product's life from manufacture to disposal, no adverse impact will be caused on the environment or on those who may come in contact with the radioactive material"

Even though there's less tritium in one of these things than occurs in your tap water over a month, NRC thinks its frivolous, won't license them, and won't let them in the country.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: El Reg eggs Benedict

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Hollandaise ingredients?

If you're in the US you can buy Clarified Butter from Whole Foods Market if you're located near one. Occasionally other stores like Publix in the Southeast or Smiths in the West will stock it but its kind of hit or miss.

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New Mexico mulls sale of first US commercial spaceport (and LOHAN launchpad)

FrankAlphaXII
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New Mexico politics are a murky world, with everyone from the United States Federal Government (mostly via the Military and Nuclear Weapons complex), the Tribes, the Mexicans, the Intel corporation, and many other smaller players all having huge amounts of influence, so understanding the motivations here are probably an exercise in futility unless you know who has this guy bought and paid for, or if its simple jealousy toward the district that T or C is in or against the Senator from District 35, or a political game to spite the Governor since she's from the other party and an enthusiastic supporter of the Spaceport.

I thought Florida was difficult to understand until I started digging into New Mexico while attempting to understand my wife (who is a New Mexico native) and her friends and family's apathy toward the game out there and gave up trying to understand who is pulling who's strings where and why because its the most damned Byzantine thing I've ever seen.

And now that I'm thinking about the place, I want some Green Chile and a Sopapilla. Thanks Obama El Reg.

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Linux clockpocalypse in 2038 is looming and there's no 'serious plan'

FrankAlphaXII
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UNIX?

Leaving the Linux kernel aside, does anyone have an idea of which commercial UNIX products (as well as *BSDs) have this issue and which have been fixed already? I can't seem to find a reliable list anywhere.

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How many Watches will Apple flog? 20, er, 18.5, no, five, wait, 50 million!

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: iWon't

The $350 "low-end rubber version" sounds like the Swatch from hell.

I'll stick to my heirloom Rolex GMT that my grandfather passed down to me (and the only damned way I could afford one), thanks.

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

FrankAlphaXII
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>>Lenovo won’t be getting another cent of my PC budget from now on.

Absolutely right. They won't be getting a single damned dime from me either. I don't really like Dell but I'll probably be getting whatever their business class laptop range is nowadays next time. You don't reward bad behavior if you want it to stop.

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Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

FrankAlphaXII
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I wonder if this was why the Lenovo I bought last year had two extra partitions pre-installed that only DISKPART saw. I blew them straight to data hell, along with Windows 8, when I was upgrading it to Windows 7 but I've always wondered what the hell they existed for. I doubt the certificate survived the formatting but now I have to check.

Last time I buy a product from them though, I'll tell you that. I knew I should have just plunked down the extra 200 bucks for the MacBook Air and Windows 7 license.

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Big Blue drops a billion dollars to refresh its pig herd's lipstick

FrankAlphaXII
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Spoken like someone with first hand experience with IBM mis-management. Instead of being relevant and making products people want, they'll just stick a band-aid/plaster over the business equivalent of a cancerous mole and sell more stuff to Lenovo when that doesn't work out.

I wonder what the next part to go is, cloudy bullshit or mainframes?

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ACHTUNG! Scary Linux system backdoor turns boxes into DDoS droids

FrankAlphaXII
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If it is some one/some bot brute forcing root using SSH, then the threat footprint has got to be pretty small. Isn't root disabled by default over SSH?

Its been awhile, about a year or so, since I switched from a Linux distribution to using FreeBSD and PC-BSD, but I'm pretty sure none of the major Linux distros will default to allowing something that stupid. So while it is a threat, its apparently not the nuclear apocalypse that some of my more excitable colleagues told me about earlier because most distributions won't allow that kind of behavior without being configured to do so, unless I'm gravely mistaken.

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FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Adak's bad, Shemya's worse

>>No, send them to Adak, AK for a permanent tour

Back when my Dad was in the Navy that was the threat they'd always use as a punishment detail for people (not the permanent part, but the Adak part) that the Navy wanted out but couldn't involuntarily chapter for whatever reason and refused to take an early "voluntary" separation. If you were there by your own volition, you have my utmost respect sir. In the Army we used Fort Irwin, WSMR/Fort Bliss and Fort Greely in mainland Alaska for the same kind of thing.

The Navy base at Adak's closed nowadays so I'm assuming they use Ascension in the South Atlantic and Shemya relatively close to Adak in the Aleutians, and maybe even Diego Garcia (though its not anywhere near as harsh and oppressive a landscape) for the same purpose.

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Seems they've forgotten what "broadband" actually means

>>Vermin Media and BT in the UK have redefined 'fibre optic' to mean 'partly fibre optic but there's copper cable for the last bit to your house'

American Theft and Thoughtlessness (AT&T) does very much the same thing with their uVerse offering, its fiber to the SAI or whatever they call the cabinets for it (it would be an SAI for DSL and PSTN, so I'm assuming they use the same terminology). They market it as fiber optic but except in very limited circumstances your "last mile" is going to be copper.

I well and truly hate that company, there is no reason whatsoever that a connection that requires no digging or replacement of their equipment should cost $500 even before the equipment deposits and that's exactly what they wanted to charge me. I have pretty good credit, not the best but I don't have a foreclosure and my revolving non-student debt's under $5k so the deposits wouldn't have been much, but attempting to extort 500 bucks out of me to make up for the lack of deposits I'd have to pay before even using the service is insane. I laughed at the salesman who was trying to sell me on it, because I thought he was joking. He wasn't.

I wish FPL offered access to their fiber optic network for consumers, as they're one of the few public utilities that doesn't fuck up that often (at least they've never had their techs cause so much damage to the containment buildings at their two nuke plants that led to the closure of a reactor like Florida Power/Duke Energy did at Crystal River 3) and has fairly good customer service, but the Cable and telecom companies have successfully managed to swindle the state into not letting them sell directly to anyone but other large businesses.

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Whisper keeping schtum over abuse of user data

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Surely a typo?

Yeah it is, but maybe they misled him as well and he didn't know until someone he knows at the Grun told him what they found to be going on privately. Lying to people seems to be Whisper's MO, so I wouldn't be too surprised they lied to an employee. Even a high profile one.

Then again, he used to be associated with Gawker Media, and they're not exactly a paragon of ethics or legality themselves but they tend to know how to save their own skins, so maybe he figured out which way the wind was blowing and got the hell out.

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Facebook is MORE IMPORTANT to humanity than PORTUGAL

FrankAlphaXII
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>>People actually confuse Facebook and the internet in some places.

Where? At the Intersection of Narcissist Road and Idiocy Lane? I mean seriously.

I use Facebook, I like Facebook for what it is (for me, a cheap way to talk to people I served with in the Army, get news from on the ground regarding disasters and emergency incidents, and to communicate with family who I otherwise wouldn't get a chance to), but most of the shit on there is completely inane garbage re-posted by people who should generally know better. I have a hard time believing the COO's story that anyone gets it confused with the wider internet or even the web.

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MAINFRAMES are SO NOT DEAD: IBM's launched a new one

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Mainframes are dead are they?

>>Or is it consoles this month .. I forget.

I thought it was Tablets this month? I may be mistaken, you never know what "analysts" say is dead.

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AMBER alerts of snatched kids to appear on Facebook (and Bing)

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: I hope you can opt out

You do know you can opt out of the Missing Child alerts and still get the actual Emergency alerts, right? The for-real Life and Safety Emergency Alerts might just save your ass in any number of ways.

The University is a whole different thing, and I doubt they offer their students, faculty or staff an opt out, but the CMAS (actually damn thats right, they renamed them "Wireless Emergency Alerts", same thing though Its really close to other acronyms at both FCC and FEMA so I can understand why they changed it) or whatever does for either or both types of alert.

Oh well, most people don't pay attention, or the Emergency Manager doesn't have communications/PAO put it out as quickly as it needs to be because of other systemic problems in their organizations, but the idea behind it is pretty sound. It beats the alternative, which are the 1950's era Civil Defense Sirens and Emergency Alert System on Television.

If your provider wants to give you any shit about it, cite 47 CFR §10.280. Obviously this is just for the US. I have no idea if the UK or Canada have any equivalent to it, or if it can opted out of.

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Trial of alleged Silk Road kingpin set to begin

FrankAlphaXII
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He's lucky its the Feds....

Most US States would slap him with an aggravation, continuing criminal enterprise charge, and a requirement for consecutive mandatory minimums for each individual charge if he was to be found guilty. He'd be facing maybe 150 years in Florida, and in all likelihood life for the six charges of hiring a hitman.

Personally I find that 20 years is bullshit, prohibition simply doesn't work, but its a damn sight better than 150 years (or more).

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Longer....

>>Not under duress, per se

Bullshit.

The way the Japanese cops extract confessions would be considered "torture" to Europeans, oh but wait, its not the US doing it so its okay. They get a pass.

They use sleep deprivation, food deprivation, loud noises, threats of physical violence, mock executions, whatever else they can short of actually touching you to extract a confession and they can hold you for up to 23 days while they're doing it. With no access to an attorney on top of it until you've confessed and you get indicted.

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FBI has its fingers deep in NSA surveillance pie, declassified report shows

FrankAlphaXII
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The problem with figuring out anything to do with the FBI is its disjointed and internally highly competitive nature and with the redactions after skimming through it, I can't tell with 100% certainty who exactly was making the 702 requests, whether it was NSB at Quantico, Headquarters, or one (or some, or all) of the field offices. The field offices are their own personal little kingdoms and they don't cooperate with each other routinely, much less with HQ or Quantico unless it suits them.

It shouldn't surprise anyone that FBI was/is part of PRISM or ECHELON or any of the other programs, though I have my doubts Criminal Investigations really did much with it due to its inadmissability outside of Espionage investigations, I'm sure it was used to point toward admissable evidence though. I might be wrong, but FBI's culture is idiotic and self-defeating alot of the time.

You'd have to FOIA information directly pertaining to NSB and CIB's information sharing to find out for sure and good luck with that.

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'American soldiers, we are coming...' US CENTCOM military in Twitter hijack shame

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: I don't see a blue tick next to the profile name

Social Media is up to the individual command's PAO so policy varies widely throughout the Defense Department, individual branch, unified command, functional command and even specific unit down to the Brigade or even sometimes Battalion or Company level (in the case of Reserve units).

Since they have people from all five branches that can post to their accounts, having 2FA attached to a single cellphone (if thats how twatter does it, I don't use it, so c'reckt me if I'm wrong) is kind of unwieldy unless the Major or Captain running the account has it locked to their issued FOUO phone or manages to somehow get someone at DoD or JCS to issue a phone to the command strictly for the Social Media accounts, and while I've never heard of that being used as an exception, it isn't to say it doesn't happen.

Its not an ideal situation obviously but as it stands there isn't much they can do about it unless DoD has altered policy for the Unified Commands and CENTCOM's slacking by not keeping up with messages from USCYBERCOM and NSA/CSS. Since everything posted has to be approved by the PAO themselves anyway, I don't see why they wouldn't but you know never really know.

Again, this kind of thing is what happens when the Agency that's ostensibly involved in securing Military and National Government Communications goes over toward mere collection and exploitation and shafts their Information Assurance responsibility.

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Police radios will be KILLED soon – yet no one dares say 'Huawei'

FrankAlphaXII
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Boffin

Drop in the Ocean

Overhauling emergency commo systems is just one small part of issues that the UK has in relation to Emergency Preparedness and Response.

I work in Emergency Management and the UK really needs to get off its ass in that regard, especially with the Government worrying about the effects of climate change on natural disasters yet making absolutely no public planning as to how to deal with it. There's nothing like NIMS, there's an old version of ICS that the Met Police and I believe City of London use, The UK's idea of Comprehenisve Emergency Management is not fit for purpose if you ask me, which is a shame as your Civil Defense plans were among the best, much better than the halfassed shit that FCDA and OEP had in the US at the time until FEMA was created in 1979 to unify it. Its a shame that Thatcher, Major and Blair all decided to virtually ignore domestic emergency planning aside from anti-terrorism, the UK could still be setting the standard, and your standards and doctrines from what I've seen (some are still classified) were a fuck of alot better than California's and the Federal Civil Defense Administration's plans, which is what the whole US used and still uses in some forms such as the Incident Command System which came from CALFIRE in the 1970's, though was not adopted as a national policy until 2004. Also, Counter-Terrorism isn't even emergency management, its a Policing, Intelligence, and Military function. Emergency Management deals with what happens after a gas line explodes or a terrorist blows it up and takes out a council estate or a tube station or what have you. But if you're not preparing or mitigating, and have a codified means of preparation and mitigation what's the point of reponse and recovery?

Your Government doesn't even have a standing agency under the Home Office or at Cabinet Level (where it should be) to assist the Prime Minister to handle it, and COBRA hardly counts. COBRA, from my understanding, is basically a half-assed version of our National Watch Center in DC and a non-survivable version of the Mount Weather Special Facility or Raven Rock's C4I centers. All it does is provide a means of the Cabinet Level and executive (in your case the Prime Minister) to assess what's going on and manage from the top, which doesn't work too well. CALFIRE realized this in the 60's when they created the common Incident Command System where the Incident Commander is the most competent person.

What the UK needs is a custom version of NIMS geared toward the UK's hazards. I see stories about the floods and storms every year and people dying from them and the response being somewhat piecemeal and patchwork with noone in overall control on a permanent basis, and none of the responders on the same page. Perhaps adding an extra layer of bureaucracy like a UK style FEMA is a dumb idea, but a framework of incident command and control for the existing agencies to use is a good idea and a UNISDR best practice. If the Developing World can do it (and does do it, the Ebola outbreak's a good example though it has some flaws and heavy handedness from some nations Armed Forces) there is no reason that a common incident management system should not be implemented.

Anyway, on to the subject after the Hurricanes that The Man Who Fell to Earth mentioned, the Cellular systems worked as they were supposed to as long as the base stations survive somewhat. To a user they'd appear to be down and unusable, but to the operator and the government as well as some FOUO (For Official Use Only) users it works normally for voice for the most part unless its LTE and works completely normally. Without LTE you don't usually have a data channel to speak of unless you can con the National Guard into using a Military SATCOM, they don't have to let you use it but you do have voice, and voice is good enough to compile an ICS-209, the datasheet we use for tracking who is doing what and where. The Incident Commanders at the Federal Response Center and National Watch Center engaged the US' equivalent to the MTPAS, but with our systems, we can and do lock out anyone who isn't on a SIM, landline or IMEI which is enabled to use the National Communications System from using most networks. Notably, the TCP/IP, X.25 and Frame Relay networks aren't subject to it aside from some traffic shaping to allow FEMA's teleregistration system and the Air Force's Air Material Command, Army Surface Distribution and Deployment Command, the Military Sealift Command and USTRANSCOM, as well as the Postal Service (yes, the Postal Service, I'm not joking. It sounds weird but there's a major reason for it when we're accounting for the deceased and missing that the NDMS may have missed at DMORT)

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Usual gibberish

I'm an emergency manager, and what you're saying is absolutely correct. First responders cannot be inundated with information they don't need. What the EOC needs is not what you need on the ground, you need to know what's going on in your area, what hazards are present, the current disposition of the civilians in the area, if there are any special considerations like Hazmat contamination, etc.

I was a Soldier too, in both the Active and Reserve Components before I "retired" (Warrant Officers never retire completely) and went into the field. I've got a few informed opinions on the basic emergency preparedness and response issues in the UK and ill be posting a rant about it below. You guys really need the political will to get a modern comprehensive emergency management system. And I don't see any political party making it a priority, neither the Conservatives, Labour, LibDems or even the Kippers have an overhaul of the UK's Emergency Preparedness and Response doctrine as a part of their platforms.

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White hats do an NSA, figure out LIVE PHONE TRACKING via protocol vuln

FrankAlphaXII
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>>Units of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) or Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) are obvious prime suspects for this sort of malfeasance.

No. Not really even close. That's exactly the same thing as saying that the FBI and CIA are prime suspect for the NSA/CSS' programs, or that MI5 and SIS are the same for GCHQ's programs.

But its a forgivable mistake. Russian Signals Intelligence is not very well understood even in the foreign policy and military communities. Most of it is conducted by a part of the Russian Federal Protective Service called the Special Communications Section, or Spetssvyaz, which is a successor agency to the 8th Main Directorate and 16th Main Directorate of the KGB, and the later FAPSI after the fall of the Soviet Union. The rest is undertaken by the Armed Forces GRU.

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Reg man confesses: I took my wife out to choose a laptop for Xmas. NOOOO

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: If she likes the colour ...

>>Look up the model number and see if it is easy to install your favourite Linux distribution.

Did you not read the article?

The user's requirements include Word and iTunes, which is not "close to Word" and "sort of like iTunes". Neither iTunes or Word run natively on a Linux distribution, maybe you could virtualize them, but that sounds a major pain in the ass as opposed to buying a mid-range Windows notebook or a Macbook if he has the money and likes Apple's stuff enough to justify the expense.

Also, given his reluctance to support something as easy as google's purpose built surveillance device netbook for a user used to either OS X or Windows I certainly doubt he'd subject himself (or his wife for that matter) to a highly technical operating system, and one he'd have to force the hardware to use.

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ICANN's technical competence queried by Verisign report

FrankAlphaXII
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Mushroom

Re: Balance?

You may want to consider that early atomic bombs weren't very secure (aside from physical security measures like Military Police, Air Police and Marine security guards) or all that stable.

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Privacy-loving BOXING KANGAROO BIFFS DRONE out of the sky

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Civilian Drones vs. Military drones

Four hellfire missiles and two 500 lb bombs cannot level a city block. Simply not going to happen unless you're bombing shanties. There are plenty of gun camera videos out there of 500 lb bomb strikes and even more TADS video of US and British Army Apaches shooting Hellfires if you want to see what I mean, don't get me wrong the damage these weapons can inflict is nothing to sneeze at, but its not like Daisy Cutter or Grand Slam grade damage either.

You're talking about a fairly large area here, if you want to level it, you're gonna need a manned attack aircraft like an F-15E Strike Eagle, F-16F Desert Falcon, F-2 (Japan) Viper Zero, Tornado, Su-25 Frogfoot or a bomber like a B-52, Tu-90 or B-1B. You would be able to take down a few buildings with a Reaper's 4 Hellfire/2 JDAM loadout, but nailing an entire block would take a significantly larger payload than what the Reaper* can carry. You might be able to fit enough armament on the RQ-170 to be able to do it, since they're roughly the size of an F-117A (they operate them out of the same hangars at Tonopah Test Range Airport that were used for the F-117 when it was still a black project so it wouldn't surprise me at all if they can handle the same level of armament) but since that's a grey project they're tight lipped about what it can actually do, the RQ-170 may not be able to equip weapons at all.

Either way, calling the Civilian drones simply "drones" and calling the Military and Government vehicles either UAS or UCAS depending on capability would work for what you're after. Technically the civilian ones are UAS as well, but it would be an easy way to differentiate. Also, there are no purpose built civilian UCAS, though you might be able to mount a carbine on one of the bigger civilian drones or strap a bomb to one. I seriously doubt the Government would go for a 2nd Amendment argument in that case though so I don't recommend doing it.

*-I'm assuming you're referencing the Reaper due to the dimensions you gave, though you're slightly off as the Reaper is 11 meters long with a 20 meter wingspan.

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Makers of Snowden movie Citizenfour sued by ex-oil exec

FrankAlphaXII
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Keep in mind that ARCO was a part of BP up until last year and they're responsible for the largest superfund site in the US. They're not exactly shining examples of corporate responsibility. Its rich that this guy wants to sue over this when he's a former representative of a company responsible for that and partially responsible for the Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Anyway, I seriously question how Edward Snowden was or is seeking profit. I don't quite see how he's profited. I have reservations about him but profit seeking is not one of them. Now the movie and Glenn Greenwald are a different story altogether, but Edward Snowden himself appears (on the surface at least) to not care about money.

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Don't panic, US Navy has only deployed a ROBOT SHARK (but where are the lasers?)

FrankAlphaXII
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Calling Dr. Evil

Y'know, they did Laser Beams last week. They seem to enjoy blowing up parts of Boghammars with them

Now they just have to put them together.

I wonder why the US Navy has decided to source people from the Dr. Evil School of Naval Warfare.

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

FrankAlphaXII
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Devil

Might make some people angry here but...

Im gonna get downvoted to hell and back for this, but I actually like it.

At least in Firefox 35 on a Windows 7 desktop, ill let you know my verdict about the way it looks on Firefox's FreeBSD port later as well as on Android next time I saddle up the "Porcelain Pony". As I've stopped using Linux since the systemd pissing match has made everyone involved look like infants or children, and also since support on my preferred distro for the proprietary driver's kmod for an entire major manufacturer's video cards was dropped because the maintainer for the kmod threw a fit over some perceived slight (I'd rather use an OS not beholden to the whims of petulant children in relation to its future, thats why I switched) someone else from that camp will have to weigh in on what it looks like to them and why it sucks or doesnt.

Okay let me qualify that statement, I like most of the site redesign anyway, its easier to navigate using the top bar and with the dropdowns it gives you an idea of what the top stories are without having to sit on the main page for 15 seconds or whatever to potentially suffer through previews of five (or was it six?) articles that have no interest to you whatsoever.

However, I don't like the lead image being so huge, and its hard to tell where it ends and the Top Stories portion of the page begins. You could make it a bit clearer by either increasing spacing/padding between it and the Top Stories section, reducing the size of the top stories font by a couple of points, or by putting some sort of a divider between the sections. I also don't like the Vulture logo and "The Register" wordmark being aligned to the center of the red band, s/he and it has always been aligned to the Left, at least since 2004 when I started reading this website, and it should stay that way. That's not so much a design decision as an identity and branding thing if you ask me.

Everyone else complaining just isn't holding it right.

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Why did it take antivirus giants YEARS to drill into super-scary Regin? Symantec responds...

FrankAlphaXII
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While I'm silghtly inclined to agree, the only thing wrong with that is that there have been no samples from Iraq or other places of Five Eyes interest. If it was Five Eyes, you'd better bet your ass there'd be targets in Iraq, Russia, Ukraine, Cuba, Quebec, the United States, the UK, and China and quite a number of them.

However, with Fiji, Kiribati and Indonesia being targeted, it does seem a bit Aus/NZ-ish. That could be just to throw people off though, it's not really possible to say until more samples are found.

Might also be France or China, see my comment above.

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Nation states?

Duqu? Turla? Vic already mentioned Stuxnet.

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Okay, honest question...

I think its Chinese after reading the Kaspersky technical paper on it, since none of the C&C servers they've seen are in China, but there is one in Taiwan, one in Brussels, and two in India. It makes it easy to claim NATO's doing it, especially with samples coming from Afghanistan and Iran. A little too easy I'd figure. Especially since there are no known samples from anywhere China may want to fuck with a little, like Taiwan, Vietnam, the Philippines, Japan, Russia, South Korea and the DPRK government, the US and the vast majority of NATO, etc. Its a little too convenient for my liking.

It could also be France, all of the countries that submitted samples are of an interest of France, and one country is very noticeably absent from the list, Iraq. France gives fuck all about Iraq. It was never their problem except when they were selling Saddam Hussein nuclear technology and nerve gas. I'd be interested to know if any of the European microstates have infections, especially Monaco.

However, it might be five eyes and with Fiji and Kiribati being targeted its sort of easy to believe (I believe New Zealand has responsibility for them) but then again, its a little too obvious for anyone involved with UKUSA, especially with cryptonyms in the Virtual File Systems. NSA/CSS and I'm presuming GCHQ would strip it out. Also whoever it is isn't very familiar with UKUSA classification levels, because one of them looks like it is labeled as Unclassified just before a supposed cryptonym.

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FrankAlphaXII
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Re: sleep tight

If you were working on something like this, you should probably know that development would be compartmented all to hell, you'd never know exactly what it is you were actually doing. Only the sysadmin, the devops manager, and maybe even security might have an inkling. However I doubt the sysadmins really know any longer.

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Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Bah!

Yeah, the Commander's notes got shredded around the time Rickover got fired. Plus, they were about the arctic anyway if you may recall.

Joking aside though, there's less uncertainty and less error when they're directly observing it as opposed to scanning it with a Synthetic Aperture Radar system like a few scientific instruments on polar orbiting meteorological and climate satellites and some Intelligence birds up there do (or can).

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FrankAlphaXII
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FAIL

Considering that Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute are proper scientists and thus use SI measurements like virtually every other organization involved in scientific research or using scientific methodology worldwide (like Electrical Engineering, RF engineering/SIGINT, etc). I strongly doubt that they made that kind of mistake. Unless of course you believe in the AGW Religion, which left science behind in favor of pseudoscience and a pseudoreligious eschatological belief system which is a major disservice to actual science.

Plus if you go and read their paper, or even the abstract from that paper, its pretty obvious that they don't use the Imperial system.

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HP, Symantec PAIR UP to fight off disaster cloud rivals

FrankAlphaXII
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Boffin

Yes, interesting, but....

My degree is in Emergency Management so I may accidentally toss around terminology that isn't in wide use outside of the profession, I apologize if I do. We do try to use plain language as much as possible as talking in code is what you do when you don't want people to know what's going on.

While this tech seems interesting and worth looking deeper into, especially in regard to using their product for providing another layer to enhance in-house DR (HP's dreaming if they think they're going to convince anyone with a decent understanding of emergency management, business continuity and disaster recovery practices to replace their internal systems and off-site backup images with HP and Symantec's product alone), it may still not be deep and far reaching enough for Continuity Insurance in a number of places or from certain insurers. Reliance on a single solution is usually the antithesis of redundancy, and a major facet of BC is redundancy to support a minimum level of service in the event of an incident disrupting normal processes, so I wonder how HP/Symantec will address that glaring issue.

Also for some industries and critical infrastructure you can't outsource DR/BC functions for a number of reasons such as industry regulation (e.g. HIPAA, SOX, etc), among other reasons, so no matter what this won't work for them unless its a compliment toward existing plans and not a replacement.

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Apple Fanboi? Stand by to get Beats Music LIKE IT OR NOT

FrankAlphaXII
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Fanbois and Sons

Classic. A masterwork. My wife actually believed me when I told her your story here, then she realized what she was saying and threw a can at my head.

You, Sir, get an upvote.

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What kind of generation doesn't stick it to the Man, but to Taylor Swift instead?

FrankAlphaXII
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>>The answer is quite obvious: Of course they do. Ref. last week's any election

FTFY

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FrankAlphaXII
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The Republicans probably lost any hope of that by going for the low hanging fruit in this election instead of holding their horses and waiting for 2016 because they don't understand strategic patience, and mistake it for weakness, cowardice and indecisiveness.

Last time they had a majority in both houses (plus the presidency to make it even worse) it lasted for two whole years and was an unmitigated disaster, Bush would have let them do whatever the hell they wanted and they did absolutely nothing. Noone talking about the midterm even so much as mentioned that to my knowledge.

I don't particularly care for Romneycare/Obamacare, and most people really don't if they have to deal with it. I'm on the left and I don't like it. If I wasn't Tricare eligible I'd paying twice to four times as much for roughly a quarter of the benefits I had on my last non-Tricare policy. Its great. I recommend it to everyone.

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Pitchforks at dawn! UK gov's Verify ID service FAILS to verify ID

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Security questions...

You're much better off not doing anything with Bank of America. Stick with someone local, or at least regional, Fairwinds and SunTrust are pretty good companies for financial services. And if you're eligible, Navy Federal is a pretty good choice also.

However, I wonder how Bank of America having branches in a place that doesn't exist according to them works out. Bank of America is a pretty stupid company, so I wonder how they have it figured out. I'm assuming they have branches in Ocala anyway.

Regardless of all that I've noticed that systems that are designed for nationwide use tend to fall over on Floridian names, or the operators can't figure out how to spell how we say things, usually Seminole/Bastardized Creek and Timucua words (for a dead culture we sure as hell use their names for things).

Anyway, I know how this kind of thing goes a little too well. One of my schools, the place I started higher education at actually, is on Econolockhatchee. That's always a fun one to try to get people to spell correctly.

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Apple KILLS SUPER MARIO. And Zelda. And Sonic

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: Simple arse-covering by Apple

Unless it winds up being a Nintendo iPhone, don't hold your breath. Nintendo does not do third party licensing, and if you have ever had the misfortune of playing the CD-i Zelda and Mario games, you know why that is. Thank the Dutch for fucking that one up for everyone else.

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Blighty: Welcome your new, faceless MI6 chief – Alex Younger

FrankAlphaXII
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Re: If that's really him in the photo...

He was a field officer. Its kind of different that what you're I think you're imagining. They run assets, issue orders, set targets, recruit new assets and such. He probably never left Kabul or whatever FOB he was at though. Even if he was having to deal with local assets as long as he can grow a beard and sort of speak the language, he'd be fine. Keep in mind that in Afghanistan, there are a bunch of light skinned and light haired people in other ethnic groups than the Pashtuns.

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George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests

FrankAlphaXII
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I'm sorry but the whole thing sounds like control freakery of the highest order for the sake of money.

I'll quote Chaucer here: "Therfor my theme is yet, and ever was—'Radix malorum est cupiditas'"

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Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods

FrankAlphaXII
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Well if you have networking infrastructure, like a cable modem or router that uses Linux and for some stupid reason uses bash as its shell (why they'd do that is beyond me, but I know a few products that do) you may not ever get an update for it because the manufacturers for the most part are pretty piss poor about firmware updates as it is.

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