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* Posts by SuccessCase

750 posts • joined 5 Jan 2011

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Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up

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I had a problem with my Virgin service. Kinda packed up completely for a day. Now at least it's clear why.

Almost as annoying as the parent next to me in my local Costa Coffee, who thinks it's OK to let his daughter play on her iPad with volume on full so together with the Costa music soundtrack there is a sound cacophony going on.

I've asked him if he has headphones for his daughter and at least he has grudgingly complied. Now we just need to organise a nationwide campaign. It is NOT ok to play media through your tablet speakers in public places like cafe's, for the whole cafe to hear. I'm a parent, but this creeping "children rule the roost and the delicate little dears mustn't have their play space in any way shape or form inhibited" is just infuriating.

Sorry, completely off topic, but I just had to vent on this. Arrrgh!!!

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'You have no right to see me NAKED!' Suddenly, everyone wakes up at the Google-EU face-off

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"I could say more fool you for storing emails anywhere than on a computer that you control"

You just did, but in a mealy mouthed way. Moreover unless you are only ever sending emails you wouldn't want read in a business context encrypted and control the systems at both ends, you too, by your own judgement, are a "fool" as, I'll wager, are pretty all commenting on here.

I get fed up with these trite comments that effectively excuse companies of bad practice and let them off the hook by blaming the user. There are plenty of cases where private data is stored on systems outside of our control where we can reasonably expect and do expect privacy to be maintained. My bank account, my medical records, my tax records. While I accept these institutions haven't always performed perfectly and I don't expect all services will be accident free or free of the occasional breach we should and do expect the attitude towards the data should be that it is private, should be respected by the custodian and that it should remain private.

We are talking about large companies with high brand value. It is not beyond their capability to ensure personal emails are kept safe, secure and are never, ever deliberately read. Indeed such is the minimum we should expect. If banks were similarly loose with our bank accounts there would be no banking system. So I would suggest, if you keep your money in a bank, you are equally a fool for "trusting" a computer system outside of your control. Of course you do keep money in a bank, accept it is secure enough, so logically there is no reason not to expect a similarly high standard to applied to other data.

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@RyokuMas Yes, free stuff buys hearts. I actually have experience of the abuse of data in the manner I'm alluding to above, the details of which I can't divulge due to an NDA plus the fact I don't have permanent documentary evidence of the abuse, but rather the word of a trusted colleague and friend. The company concerned wasn't Google, but another very large tech company, so I can't claim I have experience of Google abusing trust in this way.

During a negotiation a friend of mine could see printouts in a file where the data printed out included my personal data I had stored on a cloud email service run by the company we were negotiating with. And yes there would have been some stupid and highly compromising material in there, of the type any young red blooded man is likely to have when sending emails to best friends. I don't have to explain the content as it was (or should have been) private data, but I mention it now because it is so relevant to this topic and the, unfortunately unprovable, compromise of my privacy was wholly unacceptable.

Given this experience, I find it very frustrating now when commenters come out with stuff like "as though they are going to be interested in looking at your personal data," and "you're not that interesting." "They" can and in at least one case have; so I'm sure there will be many more such cases.

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"David Drummond, chief legal officer for Google, said the American advertising network was working the US government to deal with the NSA's mass snooping on innocent netizens."

So a company with an interest in seeing every bit of data they can get their hands on, is "lobbying" the government to avoid doing the same, Google are quite possibly the most powerful data monger in the world because they are being given their data in many cases voluntarily. But they need to be reigned in. They are also acquiring much data that has not been voluntarily provided, such as when a contractor working on a project copies commercial information contained in email threads over to his private Google Mail account, or when they read my personal contact details delivered to them courtesy of a friends address book, or when a report is copied to a Google Docs account. Multiply up this "web" of personal data across their user base, index it as they have, factor in all the knowledge of illicit activity courtesy of Google Mail accounts set up for naughty purposes, and regardless of the rights wrongs, cleverness or stupidity of the users, there is an incredible amount of information that could be used to coerce, exploit or influence. Plus there is NO, undertaking (despite disingenuous privacy statements worded to sound as though there are built in protections) that a human Google admin cannot view all this information. There is huge temptation, massive power through information available, and the only protection against corruption and abuse by the most powerful surveillance network in the world (Google not the NSA - on the basis freely given info and a massive global unparalleled indexing and semantic analysis capability on a scale not available to any other agency, means Google have uninhibited insight in all the data in their domain) is an open door and promise "we wouldn't do that."

People need to wake up. Google is already too powerful and, if they haven't already started to use their information base to leverage power in ways that are close to the line or even crossing the line, rooting them out after they do will be a nigh on impossible task.

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Google Calendar jumps into Inbox/Gmail era

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The New Microsoft

And now Google Inbox accessed through the browser can't be accessed on Safari and is "for now" Chrome only.

Google apps on iOS adhere to Material Design interaction standards, so for example swiping from the edge of the screen to return to the previous hierarchical view controller doesn't work, resulting in a disjointed user experience.

Google maps has become nagware, unless you are prepared to sign in to a Google account and allow Google to track your every move.

Google used to be a company that supported universal access from all devices, now they are ratcheting up the requirement for the user to do things how they want them to be done and only on their chosen platform. Google are fast becoming the new Microsoft.

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Watch out, Samsung and Apple: Xiaomi's No 3 in smartphones now

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Re: As long as Apple is making the profits.

@gazim It seems to me sometime about 1995 the human genetic code flipped a bit and, for large swathes of population, the ability to abstract, negate, and evaluate logical truth conditions went for a Burton. I hope this incapacity hasn't carried over into the upcoming wave of electrical/electronics engineers and/or chip designers, or else we're fucked.

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Xiaomi do copy Apple, but they do it so much better than Samsung. Xiaomi actually have taste, which is why, in my view, in the longer term they are a bigger threat to Apple than Samsung has ever been.

However for now they are a bigger threat to Samsung, because they are grabbing that middle market. Indeed it is primarily because of Xiaomi that Samsung are losing ground, with margins being squeezed. Samsung are now in a vice between Xiaomi and Apple.

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Big Retail's Apple Pay killer CurrentC HACKED, tester info nicked

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"hasn't iTunes been hacked a bunch of times? I've seen lists of email addresses associated to Apple devices leaked online many times."

No. Itunes user accounts have been hacked, but that's an entirely different thing and is most usually the consequence of using weak passwords, or because the associated email account has been hacked.

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Let's make an app that POSTS your POO to APPLE HQ

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Puerile

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Weekend reads: Russell Brand's Revolution and Joy Division's Ian Curtis gets lyrical

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Russell Brand "I remain uncharmed by the incessant rationalism that requires the spirit’s capitulations.”

Why am I reminded of this classic Mitchell and Webb sketch?

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Revealed: The amazing magical innovation in the iPad Mini 3 – a lick of paint

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Re: Thinness.

@Andy Prough.

"Not sure why thinness means you have to glue down all the components."

Because doing so increases device reliability. Today's mobile devices are so sleight, everything is packed in with such precision, connectors are minute and easily disturbed and the components themselves have to contribute to structural rigidity. In the past you, would have a expected that to be the sole responsibility of a chassis structure instead (and in the past, with plenty of airspace between the chassis and the components: how things have changed).

One of the ways to add strength is with glue. Kinda like ply wood, only with the layers made of expensive electrical components. Ply wood with bad glue glue is less resistant to e.g. torsional stress and the layers can separate and move relative to one another when subject to load. When components contribute to the structural rigidity of the device, the same principle applies and such movement would see e.g. ribbons disconnect. As devices get thinner we are going to be seeing more and more glue, probably to the point where one day all the components in these things will get set in a block of epoxy resin, or thermally conductive epoxy resin like, material.

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Apple flings iOS 8.1 at world+dog: Our AMAZEBALLS 9-step installation guide

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Re: I've installed it!

No you get down voted for admitting you own an iThing on The Register.

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FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for

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Re: Huh?

@jtaylor, Do you, do you think when I search in the search box on an Android phone, it might be sending the data to Google?

Fuck. Me.

Being an IT professional, I would never have guessed it. You know, not having read the EULA and all. This is a big deal. A huge story is about to break.

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Re: Same as iOS 8

Stupid story. You've got to be a bit bloody thick if you think it's your own computer that has indexed the web and returned search results. And yes you can just turn it off if you want to.

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Apple's new iPADS have begun the WAR that will OVERTURN the NETWORK WORLD

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Re: Very worrying!

Yes, you can but just not now. And it's the network operators, not Apple that request those restrictions on the use of soft SIMs, so you complaint is the right one directed at exactly the wrong party. Apple has to, to some extent, please the network operators as partners and though they are slowly getting the upper hand, they have to move the operators slowly towards the inevitable. This is just the same as how when they introduced tethering the network operators were upset unless they had control over the feature. They resisted, some charged if it was switched on, but the writing was on the wall and now, in the UK at least, nearly all of the networks allow tethering for no charge (though primarily because they now have either metered pricing or packaged pricing). It was the same pattern with music too, where the labels (their partners) wanted DRM but Apple (and most specifically Steve Jobs) didn't and slowly over-time they got their way.

There is simply no value in Apple restricting their customer's choice of network. All you have to do is look at the incentives to understand who is doing what. Incumbent telco's fear young upstarts getting in on the act. The networks have probably already started to wake-up and realise this is all a play for who controls the user's preferred addressable ID and that may end up being WhatsApp. They will cling on with every means at their disposal though, fearing being forced into what they are, little more than utility service providers like heating, lighting and refuse collection. Nobody want's their WiFi login screens. They just want a device that one way or another allows them to talk to their contacts and allows them access to the Internet.

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Re: Very worrying!

It's not an "Apple" SIM, it's a soft SIM. There's a standard for a software based SIMs and Apple will be using it. The networks are resisting switching over to using them and Apple doesn't want to alienate the networks. Their tactic is clever however. If they introduced software SIMs with the iPhone, the networks that don't cater for them are likely to be pissed off enough, they will marginalise the presentation of the iPhone within their stores. The iPad however is not used directly for telephony services. By introducing a soft sim in the iPad the networks will get used to the fact they exist and any that don't supply soft SIMs they will end up losing out to the networks who do. Obviously users are more likely to select a network where the service can be provided out the box and without requiring a trip to the store. Once the networks have got used to providing service via soft SIM to the iPad, they are more likely to accept the same on iPhone.

People really aren't thinking sufficiently about what this means. One thing it can mean (dependent on negotiation with the networks) is that Apple will be in a position to synchronise SIM's across a single user's devices. Which means if you don't have your telephone with you, they will be able to ensure you can place a call using effectively the same SIM card, but from the device you do have on you. It's crazy you can't do this already and the only reason is because the networks have been dragging their feet so they can gouge money from consumers by ensuring they have to have two different accounts for their phone and tablet. With this capability, for many trips I would take only my iPad. If you have a case to carry it in and are going to have it with you, and use headphones with a mic (or bluetooth headset), there's little point in taking a phone as well.

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Re: Very worrying!

Soft sims are, IMO, the most consumer friendly consumer beneficial development to arise in telecoms in the last 15 years. Commenters read one misguided and ambiguous article, alight on the "Apple in control" angle and lose all powers of reason.

The thing that makes your handset a money syphon when roaming overseas is the sim card. If before departure, you can simply purchase a PAYG soft sim over the web from a provider local to your arrival destination, you, the consumer, get what you should always have been offered.

If Apple or anyone else, doesn't offer a soft sim, they won't get promoted through the network's stores. Their competitors will be though. That's still 50% of Apple's business. They aren't going to turn their back on ensuring the customer has a variety of network channels.

When Apple had their greatest leverage over the networks - shortly after the launch of the iPhone - the networks had little choice in new style touch based smartphone manufacturer. Steve Jobs insisted AT&T provide unlimited data. That was good for consumers and data options have gone downhill since Apple lost their leverage. Where the competition with Android was great for smartphone hardware choice, it was bad for the cost of networking a device. The networks re-asserted their oligopoly tendencies and all at the same time re-introduced metered pricing (what are the chances, but no, I'm sure there wasn't any illegal collusion going on there !).

The point is, when it comes to network access, the concerns of the hardware manufacturers and the consumer will be more closely aligned with soft sims in the mix. Look at the evidence; in this hard-sim world, loyal customers are treated worse than new customers. When shopping around is less convenient and fulfilment takes 40 mins in a phone shop, the result is bad for consumer.

But yes, one point on which I do agree with Andrew, is when Google are in competition with the networks they might be tempted to restrict supply in a way that benefits them at the expense of both the consumer and the network.

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iPad AIR 2 and iPad MINI 3, 5K iMac: World feels different today – and it IS

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Re: Retina iMac

"The models will start at $2499 (£1999), so be prepared to shell out for the shiny thin model."

Yes expensive for a computer in absolute and relative cost. But actually very very cheap relative to latest gen. high resolution displays. For a certain class of user, this actually has clear additional value for once. Actually quite stunning.

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Bad news, fandroids: He who controls the IPC tool, controls the DROID

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Re: How many

"The press and snakeoil companies continue to embarrass themselves in public with this nonsense."

and next commenter "JASOVTTSUC"

Well I would agree that The Registers security issue reporting leaves a lot be desired. They too often dramatise inconsequential issues. As always it's important to read the article carefully and logically evaluate based on what is known and established rather than what is implied.

Yes also The Register far too often quote vested interest "security experts" (read anti-malware salesmen) without adequate discrimination.

Having said that, in this case the "security expert" has presented his findings at a black hat conference - a foreboding place if you are acting with no more basis than a "snake oil" salesman and that's somewhat more noteworthy than a mere press release. This article is a bit short on established fact and is too vague, so it will be important to read the details. But on the face of it, this sounds very worrying for Android.

The Register cry wolf all the time. But then also there are sometimes very real large scale security threats. Heartbleed and then Shellshock have shown complacency is a grave error. Both were exploited in the real world effectively and damagingly extremely quickly.

You would be a fool not to keep track of this one.

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Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says

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Re: @AC I suspect Google will fail

"Margin's all well and good, but you still need to shift units!"

Which Apple do in huge volumes. Unprecedented on a model by model basis. However it's also worth noting that, no, you don't simply seek to shift units regardless of the margin. As margin goes down, risk increases and innovation reduces as you take less product risks. The usual dynamic which has pretty much this effect is profit remains static, volume goes up as a device category takes hold, but margin must then be decreasing, and business risk increasing. The net result is you end up with a worse business than two years ago when you had half the volume. This is in fact happening to Samsung at the moment (whilst also they are shifting fewer units). They have other business interests to help offset their problems but the mobile handset market has been such a massive chunk of their revenues, it can't be entirely offset. Apple have always recognised the trap this represents and the result is they focus on the high end, maintain margin, and remain the most valuable company in the world. But this is also why they need to ensure their recent glitches with software updates are not repeated. They have had some real glitches over and above the usual level of anti-Apple nonsense and that will be very damaging for them if they allow it to continue (indeed it will have been already). A high-end brand has to offer high-end quality.

For the converse, just look at what happened to manufacturers in the netbook market.

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Jonny Ive: Flattered by rivals' designs? Nah, its 'theft'

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

Thank-you Philip.

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

@Trevor_Pott

Surely you value logic Trev. Last time I checked "many" wasn't a part of the nomenclature of set theory and doesn't have a formal definition meaning "most," or "more than 50%". If a population is large enough even 1% can be many. "Techies" represent a pretty damned large population.

"What saddens me is when the only creative capacity that some individuals have is rabid fanboyism tied to misplaced brand tribalism. Those people are just wastes of carbon."

What saddens me is when educated technologists, who should, if they are good at their work, have minds with a logical bent, repeatedly engage others with one or more of the logical fallacies. So for example, ad-hominem attacks by calling someone "a waste of carbon," instead of attempting proper debate, or the straw-man argument misrepresenting what they have said as a broad generalisation, when even moderately careful reading would lead to the conclusion it is no such thing. It seems the problem is that some people simply can't read and comprehend with with an open mind when they disagree with the point another has legitimately made and argued.

As for my supposed fanboyism, I'm not the one taking tribal offence, frothing at the mouth or throwing insults around. I'm perfectly happy to argue my corner firmly but cogently. I know my views aren't always popular with The Register readers (then again oftentimes they are - I get more upvotes than down votes) and especially you Trevor. Anyone with an iota of appreciation of the history of science, philosophy or logic should know popularity and consensus are no arbiters to the truth. The best way to the truth is through respectful debate. The history of your posts rather illustrates to me that perhaps that point is lost on you.

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Re: @SuccessCase Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

"Has it occurred to you that 'techies' may not be the ones designing the phone styling and look & feel of the OS?"

Yes

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

@Trevor_Pott Seems strange you are self identifying with the subset of techies with no creative capacity and then getting all bent out of shape Trevor.

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

"Most of the features that Samsung ' copied' in the blood linked to seem to be vast improvements on the Apple designs"

Next post: my impossible to prove but nevertheless sincerely felt belief that for many techies, design taste is like the colour "red" to people with Deuteranopia.

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Re: @SuccessCase Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

"Do you have any hard figures and reliable studies to back that up, or are you just being 'creative'?"

No I have no studies to back that up. I have eyes. I lived during the period when techies could customise Windows 3.1 with their own colours and fonts. 'Nuff said.

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

BTW, I don't agree with all the examples given in the second link. Namely, the MacBook Air "copy," USB Connector "copy" and camera connection copy and possibly the iPad "copy". It seems to me in those cases the conventional arrangement argument I've given above applies sufficiently that the similarity with Apple applies only as a single factor or at least is not particularly onerous and they can't clearly be called rip-offs.

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Re: Those in glass houses, Sir Jony...

People see what they want to in this debate. I think there is some important principles that are rarely applied when talking about copying. It's easy and IMO deliberately disingenuous to refer to any single factors and label it as copying.

The very fact of a single factor implies no creative design effort is required. So for example, screen size is a single factor. Colour is a single factor. "Flat" is a single factor. These things are simply the building blocks of design and being "the same" on any single factor says nothing at all. Nor should it. If to re-use a material, colour or size constitutes copying and is bad, then everyone is a rip-off artist. Clearly that's nonsense.

But once multiple factors are the same we can start to take notice. Having said that, multiple factors being the same are not always a bad thing. Sometimes they are the same because we are dealing with a parody or a tribute, both of which have their clear role and their own special kind of creative merit.

But, multiple factors may also be the same in ways that are entirely conventional and required no creative input to get there. At this point in time, having a screen, a processor and RAM are an example of this. So multiple factors alone are not sufficient to declare copying.

A good creative product design sees multiple design factors combined to make a coherent entity where each of those factors is integral to and contributes to the improvement of practical feature, or create an aesthetic harmony, or most usually both. They may be combined with conventional factors as well (such as the aforementioned processor RAM and screen). That doesn't matter. It's the combination of new additive factors that are significant.

So no, Samdroids, single factor concepts like screen size are not a creative design. Nor is the concept of a "flat" user interface which has been around for a lot longer than smartphones.

THIS is an example of a multi-factor design similarity that amounts to a simple rip off where the rip-off merchant has done precious little thinking for themselves :

Rip-off second icon in the row

There are many many examples of multi-factor copying by Samsung when it comes to Apple iPhone and iOS it's hard to know where to begin. Here's just a few examples

Samsung multi-factor copying is rife

Now I know many techies don't have much in the way of creative capacity. So they tend to see a design and think, "yes, that's the solution and the obvious way to do it". But for each of the examples given in the link above, to understand the degree to which Samsung engage in multi-factor copying, just consider the Nokia equivalent. In each case it will be it's own distinct design, where a Nokia designer has spent time and honoured the customer relationship with effort and the statement to the effect I'm going to do this the Nokia way because I believe in my skill and the creative industrial production of this company.

When people say copying is the sincerest form of flattery they say it because they have little control over it and it's a positive spin to put on something that you have no real control over in life. When you have no control over such things, it's important to remain positive and look after what you can control more than what you can't. We don't say it because slavish copying is OK, or nor does it mean doing so other than for reasons of parody or tribute to the original creative, is OK either. It's little more OK than plagiarism. It's tacky, cheap and is like saying to your users, "we couldn't be bothered to present this to you on our own terms according to own design beliefs and values because frankly, we prefer theirs."

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No one wants iOS 8 because it's for NERDS - dev

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Re: Not the only reason to avoid iOS 8

@roland6

That's interesting, I should have read the details more closely. Not sure why you've been down-voted for simply making a relevant clarification. Perhaps it's because you didn't declare war on Apple and revealed yourself to be an iThing owner.

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Re: Not the only reason to avoid iOS 8

oh and for me, the other thing that has been a more annoying issue than it should be, also related to copy and paste, is that sometimes, when scrolling in a web page, you can accidentally select some text, and the highlight won't go away by tapping elsewhere, you have to select some "other" text but then you have the other text selected instead. It's probably more annoying than it should be because it becomes a kind of frustrating game to try and unhighlight the highlighted text. Why I can't just ignore it is beyond me.

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Re: Not the only reason to avoid iOS 8

For some people. By no means all. For me speed has not been an issue. It is just as fast. I have had some problems with copy and paste in Web pages where it seems there have been changes such that other DOM elements on the web-page get in the way of the text you want to copy more frequently than before. That used to happen on iOS7 as well but it seems there have been changes to the layout engine where it happens much more frequently now.

The main reason upgrade has stalled is simply because the download is so big many devices have enough room, and very few users bothered to the degree such that they can be bothered to either back-up photo/videos, delete content to make enough space, or to plug their device into iTunes to do the update.

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Breaking news: Man with Apple shares really wishes they were worth even more

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Re: Screw Ichan

"To me, that is the ONLY thing I can credit to him."

And you're so close to giving a reasonable assessment! Can't you also credit him with having the strength of mind and vision to drop out from college to launch the world's first commercially successful personal computer ? Or having guts in being prepared to cannibalise his own existing products (so conspicuously unlike Microsoft) ? Or helping to bankroll Pixar and doggedly assuring the creative team had the space they required to succeed and thereby producing another massive success story? Not building Apple back-up to being the most commercially successful company the world has seen ? Or leaving behind perhaps the strongest senior teams in the tech, who, to a man, think it an immense privilege to have worked with him and all of whome accord him immense respect?

I understand there are reasons you might consider him an arsehole (as there is for many if not most CEO's). Such characters are often complex and the most driven usually have some less social traits. And being, in younger years, smelly and being prepared to rip off your best friend aren't, of course, traits shared by all driven people. But in his defence, his friends retained immense respect for him, in spite of his flaws (and that speaks volumes), he did eventually learn about the existence of soap and Woz, who knew the man very well and was on the receiving end of his most conspicuous and documented deception, saw it as born of an arsehole single mindedness and determination to throw all into their future company and arsehole "I can do this better" assumptive attitude. Woz, despite being ripped off and very hurt, still very much considered Steve his friend and they remained friends and of course, the brutal reality is Steve could indeed do the business side so much better than Woz. And Woz not being richly rewarded for his time at Apple was, by his own assessment, his own "fault" (if it can be called that) and not Steve's. Zuckerberg who has since shown a similar single mindedness to-the-point-of-character-flaw trait is also, to all accounts, as was Jobs, hugely admired by his senior team and commands immense loyalty.

As for the worth of Apple taking a legendary dive, Apple is a company about which, people in their droves, have been saying such is just about to happen every year for year upon year. Of course the day will come when their value reduces. But how many years now is it since the register have started on about "Peak Apple"?

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OMG, we're gonna be invaded by NEXUS 6 replicants – no, wait. It's just a rumored phablet

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And the logic of the rest of the rest of Mr former Google employee's quote is plain absurd.

"Google doesn't want to make the same mistake that Apple made over the last few years by missing out on the demand for larger phones."

Clearly, launching now, they already have!

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Sapphire glass maker's woes caused by Apple relationship 'breakdown'

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Apology accepted, Captian Neda

Thanks to John Gruber for that link

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APPLE still building fanbois CULT HQ in Cupertino, it seems

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Re: Totalitarian architecture...

"A circular structure will still maximises the average distance to a destination"

Nonsense. An unlikely but nevertheless feasible linear structure does that.

I understand the point you are trying to make, but how inefficient the circular structure is all depends on the size of the hole in the middle. Not much different from having e.g. a large atrium in a cubic structure and more efficient for any given ratio of office to hole/atrium in the middle. If what goes on in the middle is a part of office life, it's hardly inefficient. It's not all about footfalls from point A to B but also about e.g. how much peace and tranquility can be found at lunchtime or when holding meetings in the outdoor central area. Plus of course it's simply nice to have natural light from two walls and a circular office is quite efficient in that regard. Similarly cuboid office dwellers like atria (yes I had to look up the plural form) because they feel less hemmed in.

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Re: Totalitarian architecture...

"Hubris. But they might remember that as a public company, it's not their money that's being spent, but the shareholders'."

1. It is "their" money more than the shareholders, since it was given to them on the understanding they are in charge and the shareholders have a share in the company and their leadership.

2. Any shareholder's who don't like it, have been entirely free to divest and purchase alternative stock. Apple shares have risen plenty since the HQ announcement so there is no problem with that.

3. The notion a the company grown to have the highest market cap in the world and some 80,000 employees and that is being criticised for holding too large a cash pile, should stay crammed in an HQ built when they were had about 3,000 employees is hardly credible. Any large HQ will be expensive. Clearly they have to move. Are you suggesting they should inflict an HQ with low architectural merit on their employees and the community?

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Re: Perhaps Jasper should start a CULT of his own

Well with Samsung third quarter profits down 60% and Apple set for another record quarter (it's been ever upwards since the iPhone launched) Jasper is somewhat scraping the barrel to distract from his years of "Peak Apple" prognostication fail.

Jasper, do you really think it looks like a Nazi structure or was that just your mind racing to find something, anything, other than the image of humble pie that keeps popping into your mind's eye?

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Apple tries to kill iWorm: Zombie botnet feasting on Mac brains

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Re: admin password needed

You're not a Mac user are you. Mac software is signed by Apple. You have to specifically turn off the feature to install unsigned software. If it is signed, you know the source of the software and can be sure.

And memory sticks. What are those? I seem to remember using things called memory sticks in my youth but it's so long ago I can hardly remember.

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Steve Jobs makes world a better place FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

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Re: Of course, if Jobs had invented a cure for H.I.V., the Register would still hate him

"You would hate him too if you were denied access to special events and got the cold shoulder at every request"

By all means be a feeding hand biter. Just don't fucking whine or act surprised or act as though it is at all unreasonable when someone then declines to feed you.

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Doctor Who becomes an illogical, unscientific, silly soap opera in Kill The Moon

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Re: looks like no more Who for me...

Well said Brid-Aine Parnell.

Dr Who has become the distillation of the BBC's proscriptive brand of humanism. It lays down humanist ideals so far outside the bounds of practicality if you have any belief they represent the way to be, we are left with no choice but to hate ourselves.

If two aliens are holding us hostage, one has his finger on a button about to wipe out 100 billion lives, the other has a knife to the throat of a fluffy bunny, the doctor will spend time and mental energy devising a plan to save the 100 billion lives AND the bunny. Contrast with but one moment or moral dilemma encountered by real leaders of substance in the real world. Look at the choices men like Churchill or Roosevelt had to face. When Britain and her allies were exhausted and thoroughly spent, having beaten back the Nazi threat and Churchill was confronted by a demand from Stalin that his soviet forces should take command of the over 20,000 Polish soldiers who had courageously fought at our side; Churchill knew the Soviets would take the opportunity to extend their dominance of Eastern European states and neutralise the force. He knew the Polish soldiers were likely to be led away and killed and he had a choice to make. Go against Soviet Russia, which would mean military action he knew we couldn't win and that would result in further death and destruction, or, leave/betray our allies and friends by leaving them to their fate at the hands of Stalins forces. In the event of course, he left them to the Soviets and they were massacred.

In Moffat's world such a moral dilemma doesn't exist. Churchill *failed* to find a Sonic screwdriver in his pocket to wave at the problem and make it go away. In Moffat's world, the Poles weren't killed, they were freeze dried in time and will be returned to their loved ones. But in Steven Moffat's world there further exists the big fat lie that if you can't find the sonic screwdriver/magic wand to dissolve the dilemma before your face (and here's where fantasy becomes pernicious) then you are a failure and you have no soul.

Of course I understand it is important to introduce children to higher ideals and attempt to instil the belief that good actions and perseverance will win the day. Fantasy plays an important role in the learning process. But Steven Moffat's idealism goes multiple steps too far and has become an insult to living and the real choices we face. By demonising any thinking on the basis of realpolitick, he is a part of a sentimental, over-indulgent insufferably idealist media-class helping to damage the capacity of many of the young - who feel intense social pressure to accept the philosophies like the BBC's proscriptive brand of humanism - to deal with practical life and the real world.

Yes on the one hand it's only a fantasy TV fiction. But on the other, IMO, I don't think it is too melodramatic to say, Moffat's Dr Who is the very essence of a special form of political correctness that is condemning the UK international irrelevance.

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Apple to unveil new iPads, iMacs and OS X Yosemite on 16 October, claim sources

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Re: To quote, from memory, a Ms Bee riposte

@Betacam. It now appears you have "not cared" three times in a row. "Not care" to make it four?

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You don't have to be mad to work at Apple but....

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Well as I was playing along; Right back at you :)

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Re: glad to stay away

I had Pizza for dinner. Just thought everyone would like to know that.

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Jasper, I don't think submitting a single review and awarding yourself five stars just before publishing the article counts really. You could at least bother to get the co-working sitting at the desk next to you to post another five star review.

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Brits STUNG for up to £625 when they try to cancel broadband

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Re: cost no more than outstanding contract

Document the problems, and if they don't listen to reason, sue them through the small claims court. It's really easy to do and costs very little to submit the form. Many will think "I'm small fry, what chance do I have against a company with deep pockets and expensive lawyers," but actually that is why it will work as a tactic. One thing I know from my days of working in a large corporate is that they always take note of legal claims. Lawyers live in fear of being seen to have missed something they should have known about. Indeed usually the law department is quite small, and the claim will be handled by someone relatively senior and whose salary and time is worth a hell of a lot more than the cost of the claim. Almost always, they will resolve it by cancelling the debt rather than waste an expensive corporate lawyers time on it, and at that almost regardless of the merits of the case. Their thinking will be, "since this customer has been so pissed off as to bother to sue us, he's probably right. Even if he's not, he's a customer, and it's not worth our time." So if you have bothered to collect even a modicum of evidence of bad service, the chance they will just cancel the "debt" is very high indeed.

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Bendgate backlash: Apple claims warped iPhone 6 Plus damage is 'extremely rare'

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Re: "Rarity" is not the point

Ah, so that's why there's all those HTC1's with plastic deformation.

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Re: "Rarity" is not the point

"Nothing you have copied and pasted from Apple's press release is in any way responsive to that issue."

What an independent test lab, outside of Apple, running tests commissioned by Consumer Reports, which prove the iPhone 6 and 6 plus are perfectly durable and in fact more durable than some of the competitor handsets that have been out on the market for a number of months, is not germane to this topic?

... next without a hint of irony you'll probably start talking about a reality distortion field.

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Re: "Rarity" is not the point

I see, Credas a mistake in my O'level physics terminology which has nothing whatsoever to do with the proof given in the source I cited gives you your excuse to ignore the controlled lab tests conducted by the source I cited. You think that's good reasoning? Or maybe it's simply because one of the Internet gossips wants to apply a kind of faux intellectualism so he can continue gossiping.

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