* Posts by SuccessCase

839 posts • joined 5 Jan 2011

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Virgin Media starts its broadband-of-the-gaps fibre rollout

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It would be nice if they got service for their existing customers to work without continual drop-outs first. Virgin, there is this thing called network monitoring, where you can pro-actively identify when connections are developing problems before the customer even notices. Use it.

Oh and when I phone up, don't pretend you can see I haven't rebooted my Cable Modem for ages and that I should try doing that, when it is the first thing I do before phoning if the system has developed problems. It just proves you would rather lie to your customers to save a bit of time than be honest and that often your callcentre's don't actually have a view of the status of my Cable Modem. I'm sure often that request fixes the issue, but it's really annoying when there actually is a problem and you pretend it needs to be done.

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Pew, pew, pew! Sammy shoots out updates to plug mobile keyboard snooping bug

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"Such as both the user and the attacker being 'on the Internet'?"

Actually the AC is perfectly correct and Samsung have given out bad/misleading advice. What Samsung should have said is that there must be another compromised device on the same network/subnet - quite significantly different to saying the attacker has to be on the same subnet or network. Attacks by any miscreant hacker worth his salt are almost always conducted using a proxy devices and there are plenty of bad/old routers that can be exploited and/or compromised and run remotely and left waiting for a Samsung phone to join. To describe such a common scenario as the attacker having to be on the same network is at best misleading spin (most likely) at worst revealing of a worrying ignorance on Samsung's part. A release relating to a security compromise is no place for spin or propaganda.

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Apple! and! Yahoo! fight! the! man!, claims! EFFing! daftness!

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Re: So practically pointless

"A lot of EFF activities of late seem dubious."

Like what?

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Re: Errrmmm

I'm not surprised you're confused. The Register are engaging in their usual shoddy reporting and showing yet again that they will do everything they can to dis' Apple. The EFF, a well respected organisation doing important work defending Internet freedoms, have commended Apple. Right well then there's only one thing we can do; lets dis' the EFF. Surely if they are commending Apple, they must be a bunch of money grabbing capitalists spreading corrupt propaganda? So with top reporting integrity, let's, without a shred of evidence, leave hanging the suggestion their report has been bought. Let's put the qualification the EFF provided in response to this unjustified slur at the end of the article so it isn't too close to contradicting the disgracefully misleading sub-head we have left there because if someone pats Apple on the back we love to throw mud at them. Let's have bad enough grace to maintain the suggestion of unethical practice by the EFF, even though they have a history of defending important rights and The Register have NO reason to doubt their work except, oh, Apple under Tim Cooks leadership, are proving to be rather more ethical than our preferred Mega-Corp, Google. Shit our Peak-Apple meme failed. Shit, Apple are open sourcing SWIFT and allowing apps to be installed on devices by any Xcode user (available free) regardless of wether they are members of the development program. Shit Apple have committed to protecting user privacy have published a white paper giving comprehensive detail of how they are protecting it (pretty much ignored by The Register) and are doing a far better job of it than Google.

Seriously Register, you need to start re-evaluating. Increasingly it seems you have picked the wrong mega-corp to assume "super-evil" can always, and without thought, be prepended. Tim Cook basically told the US government they are wrong re-access to private data and to take a hike. Perhaps it's time to simply recognise that, for a CEO of his level, he is a quite surprisingly progressive and has a slight activist bent; and yes that tendency probably is informed by his experiences as a gay man. You're acting like a bunch of kids who the more you are found to be wrong, the more entrenched you become.

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Hey Google, what’s trending? Oh, just the death of journalism

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The Register have been leading this trend since 1994, so are way ahead of Google.

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Apple seeks fawning 'journalists' for in-house 'news' self pluggery

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"Not surprisingly, the ad fails to mention anything about independent journalism. So when news breaks about its nemesis Google's Android, or factory conditions in China, we can be sure Apple News will be scrupulous in its complete lack of coverage."

The Register can hardly throw stones. When one of your articles was asking for a fact checker to maintain journalistic standards and I commented that it must be to weed out the facts as on many occasions The Register couldn't resist putting snark before fact, one of your journo's replied that I was talking nonsense. I then replied cited multiple instances of factual errors where The Register had done just that (on my part without snark, emotional language or rudeness - it only took me a minute to find quite a few problem cases) and he censored the comment. Mind you I did then send a rather rude follow up comment but by that time it was warranted. Any journo's who suppress facts stated in an objective without personal insult or malice, are pretty shoddy journo's have a very weak grasp of the nobility of their profession. Oh and, hypocrisy.

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Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

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Re: Not my experience

So for practical reasons, simple, no more explanation required. That is why for you the tech made sense at the time you used it. When you actually stand back from it, Trevor has spent two pages wondering how it is there are people out there who don't think like him. There are two groups, zealots and these scientist people, and he can't help but admit this second group tend to be rather clever, and he goes through all sorts of mental contortions trying to reconcile his world view in which these two groups exist and buy Macs. Of course if he just threw out the prejudice inherent to a reductionist world view that tries to discriminate people into Trevor Pott labelled buckets "zealot Mac user", "scientist Mac user" then he would be more able to see the difficulty he is having and his reasoning on the subject establishes nothing because it is no more than a struggle with his own prejudices.

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All right, who guessed 'street mapping' for those mystery Apple vans? Congratulations

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Given the car has multiple camera sensors spaced widely apart, I expect Apple will be capturing 3D data and mapping textures.

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Apple extends idiot-tax operation, makes devs pay to fix Safari snafus

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Typical The Register looking for every negative re-Apple as usual. As a developer, I'm actually very much in favour of the pay to submit to the AppStore model. The amount charged doesn't exactly break the bank, and it gets rid of all the bedroom programmers who will be submitting the fart and cat photo apps who are in danger of reducing the ratio of signal to noise to something awful. The end user interested in useful apps doesn't want an App Store like that. The Pro-programmer doing serious work and seeking to make a living doesn't want it and the Appstore becomes unnavigable if there is too much crapware (discovery is already enough of a headache as it is).

Of course its important to encourage beginners, and everyone has to start somewhere, but you can, because you can download XCode for free, and this year Apple have changed the model such that everyone can compile code and install it on the device (previously if you had not joined the program, you could only install on the simulator).

You only have to pay to join the App Store once you are ready to distribute code. Also given Apple allow free apps, but review all apps before releasing them on the Appstore, it seems to me quite reasonable to charge at this stage, as that is when they are incurring the cost. Plus of course you get the opportunity to submit two incident report tickets should you need dedicated help from Apple.

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Ed Snowden should be pardoned, thunders Amnesty Int'l

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Re: Sadly

I'm not sure. I think it will happen. With a little time. Laws have been changed, legal cases have found the gathering of information was illegal and unconstitutional. There is no doubt it would not have happened without his action. He, Snowden, has been proven entirely correct and righted a wrong committed against all US citizens (shame it doesn't extend to other non US citizens). Those facts won't go away and will remain a reminder that a government will maintain petty spite rather than admit and correct wrong doing. Similar to how when politicians have done wrong and resign, after a bit of time they get recycled, the government will take some time, so they can maintain Snowden did wrong and maintain that they disagreed with how he went about it, but after some time it will be easier to pardon him than keep him an ongoing reminder of government pettiness and hypocrisy.

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Fanbois designing Windows 10 – where's it going to end?

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Re: Design by Comittee!!!

"The specific problem here is quite straightforward. Normal people don’t sign up in large numbers to try out very rough alpha software, or at least not knowingly."

The problem is consulting users to decide design choices at all. Years ago I used to do graphic design. Every now and then I would have a client sitting on my shoulder or a design would get reviewed by a marketing board or some such before it was complete. Almost every time this occurred, whenever there was a customer making decisions part way through the process, the result would be a dreadful compromise. Yet I know from experience, whenever the customer didn't have the opportunity to review work until it was complete and coherent, in general, they would prefer the work I had done. Getting understanding of user input and preferences is a good idea. In this regard, I'm pretty sure UI design will be the same as Graphic Design. Giving users power and choice during the design process is abdicating your design responsibility and a bad idea.

Of course every now and then I would come up with a dud design and every now and then the customer would have a great idea, so I'm not being dogmatic about this; just saying that in my experience, across the large volume of work I did, I know the clients were usually happier and (ironically) preferred the result when we could keep them out of the process until a final coherent design was delivered.

Referring to asking users what they want, Steve Jobs would quote Henry Ford. “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

The problem isn't a failure to ask normal people. It's a problem of a fear of design and abdicating design to normal people. Sinofsky didn't prove Microsoft needed to listen more, he simply proved he was a good politician and a bad designer and he lived in a political environment where the man who promised to save Windows (by welding it onto a tablet design) would survive. At Microsoft pure designer in the mould of Johnny Ive would have remained unpromoted and unloved.

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Apple: Relax, fanbois! We never meant to read your heart rate during wild wrist action

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When exercising, you use the workout app.

When at rest, the watch records your resting heart rate (which is a health function rather than a fitness function).

The watch also monitors how much you have exerted yourself during the day. You can set target for movement which is monitored in terms of calorie burn. The calorie burn calculations use heart rate data and regardless of whether you have used the workout app or not, a record of exercise gets added to your exercise record for the day, whenever you have an elevated heart rate. The heart rate measurements are taken less frequently when not in the workout app.

Yesterday I went for a cycle ride on a course I cycle often. I started the workout app and paused the workout part way through when I was waiting to meet a co-rider, but after we met, I forgot to unpause the app. It was a good daily session (about 45k), so I was annoyed when I realised I had failed to resume the workout app, assuming the exercise session would have failed to register against my daily target. When I checked the exercise app, the recorded calorie output was, as I expected, far lower than it should have been (about 550 calories when normally over that course it would have been about 1500+). However when I checked my daily exercise record, I was pleased to see my energy output had been recorded (so I still exceeded my daily target). Over 1200 calories had been added to my tracked exercise for the day. So this confirms the watch tracks exercise even when not in the workout app. However I noticed the amount added was about 20% less than it would normally have been if I had used the exercise app throughout the course.

So, to me it is clear the behaviour of the watch is:

1. Any elevated heart rate is tracked as exercise and added to your exercise record. If you are not specifically in the workout app, the sampling rate is clearly lower. It may take a while before the watch registers that you have an elevated heart rate. And once it decides you are exercising, my guess is that it does so less accurately (with a lower sample rate) than if you specifically start the workout app. It makes a record of your energy output for exercise tracking and checking if you are meeting daily targets (if you want that function), but, though it checks your heart rate every now and then, doesn't keep a record of your heart rate when it is elevated.

2. Switch on the exercise app and the tracking of energy output is more accurate and done with a higher sample rate for your heart rate. Plus it keeps a record of your heart-rate throughout.

4. When not in the exercise app, though the watch checks your heart rate, it only takes a record of your resting heart rate. I presume this behaviour is deliberate and is a health monitoring function (e.g. specifically not an exercise record). Resting heart rate is a significant health metric. Lower resting heart rate indicates a higher general fitness.

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Windows and OS X are malware, claims Richard Stallman

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Re: desktop web browsing that provides the cut down experience of the web

@Mage

Did you read the Benedict Evans piece? It's very well put. He takes a different angle on things. What he is is not saying is that the mobile web browser is better than the desktop web browser and would concede if you take that as the narrow definition of the web then the point does not hold. The point he is making is more profound than that. He does not see much value in any longer taking a constrained view of what constitutes the web because that no longer reflects particularly well how we are spending our Internet connected time. If we define the web, as powered by http and JSON type services (e.g. not just the HTML web), in conjunction with Apps, it turns out mobile is offering a much richer experience because the mobile device embodies and provides continual access to a large range of sensors either not available or less conveniently accessed/used in the context of desktop or laptop. So now we have apps like What's-App, Foresquare, Facebook, Instagram, Periscope, Twitter, Siri/Google Now, Maps with Directions, Passpack for Scanning Loyalty cards, Strava for cycling and running - all these things are less constrained and better served and provide for richer use cases in the context of mobile (and often, in key regards, are better performing due to native app code) than their desktop web browser bound counterparts. My point above is that this is another way in which Stallman is failing to see how users are really using computing these days. He appears to be stuck in the browser centric world of 2006.

Also don't forget Facebook is working on an instant articles feature because users are becoming so attuned to app level performance, even the time it takes to load a page over http is now seen as a problem to be overcome. The user testing results for Facebook's instant articles are apparently outstanding (e.g. people really, really like them). So now newspapers are in a panic fearing, using the web and HTML alone, they will not be able to match the instant appeal of news articles delivered via Facebook.

This actually is an area where I do start to agree with Stallman - only I think there needs to be other strategies than an OSS OS. It won't be good if the majority of text articles we read are being delivered by a proprietary social network.

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Re: A fool without money will soon be ignored

"Apple has devised a clever anti-freedom model of black box fashions."

And this is the key point Stallman seemingly fails to appreciate. The way Apple is anti-freedom is the same way the modern motor car is "anti-freedom." The freedom inhibited isn't what the the user cares for; the freedom to pull the engine to pieces and service it on your kitchen table. 99% of users are only interested in whether their car will take them where they need to go, preferably without ever having to personally service the engine. And that of course isn't inhibited at all. Indeed, as comared with Linux, as much as it has improved over the years, lay users find they are positively empowered as they find laptop, phone, tablet and now watch all work seamlessly together. Plus as Benedictine Evans has noted, it's now desktop web browsing that provides the cut down experience of the web (the http services "web" not html web) as compared with mobile.

Mobile first

So the chance of convincing the lay user to abandon the richer user environment in preference for a desktop os they don't feel they need, don't want to have to service and that doesn't integrate as well with their phone... Well we are seeing the result.

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VR rift OPENS UP: Total Recall Technologies hurls lawsuit at Facebook's Oculus

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Usually the plaintiffs will put forward their strongest argument summarising the case to curry sympathy from the point if first reading. The fact the summary they have given doesn't present anything like a knock-down case is in and of itself revealing. The legal text quoted for example doesn't say Luckey was inhibited from competing with his own work. Just because you do some work for someone, they don't own you or your knowledge of the space you are working in. Non disclosure is not equal to non-compete (nor is an exclusivity agreement). They may have been disclosing information to him he was already aware of from his own work in the area. Additionally it's interesting they are suing for breach of contract and not for patent infringement. So it would seem Luckey hasn't stolen their invention at all. He's just decided to do a headset in the same field as he was already working (and for which he was employed - because he was already knowledgable of the field). I could imagine the people who employed him left spluttering - "no our young minion is daring to act as a non-minion, and doing rather well, get back to your station minion"

Over time as the minion has done very well indeed and in terms of business expansion and sale to Facebook that annoyance probably turned into a gleam in the eye accompanied by hands being rubbed together.

Of course I'm saying all this without sight of all the evidence, so could be way off base.

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Adult FriendFinder hack EXPOSES MEELLIONS of MEMBERS

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Re: Phew

@frank ly Now you just have to hope El Reg doesn't get hacked because seeing as you've just 'fessed up on here !

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Apple announces 'Home' iOS 9 app to run the Internet of Stuff

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Re: oh £100 light bulbs with that special glow

"There is only one meaningful use case for IoT - preventative maintenance"

Imagination fail.

We live in a world where power tools and lawn mowers can be purchased for like 2p (ok I exaggerate a little, but cummon' prices are now ridiculously low), and you think the ONLY meaningful use case is "preventative maintenance." Nonsense. Soon pretty much every household mechanism will be WiFi enabled and computer controllable and at an extremely cheap price. Even for Apple users. Light bulbs, blinds, curtains, thermostats, locks, music systems, heating. Heating when you leave the house. Off. As you approach home. On. Front door lock as you approach the front door from outside; unlocked. Fridgeswith image recognition, barcode recognition and mould detection, connected directly to your online food shop order. Robotic vacuum cleaner that activates only when you leave the property. Remote unlock will allow you to things like let your kids friend in the house who has arrived early before you have got back. And that's just what I can think of doing a 30 second brainstorm.

The point is these are small conveniences, but once there is a standard where doing these thing "just works" and the price is low (which it will be), sure as eggs are eggs we will all be IoT users.

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Record smartphones sales, but feature phones far from dead

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"any questions about who sold what and to whom are met with a mumble"

Doesn't have a regional breakdown, but for Q1 this year the following is estimated but with some justification -

Top 5 vendor Android handset sales:

HTC 5.0m

Sony 7.9m

LG 15.4m

Samsung 83.3m*

Combined Operating Profit (top 5 combined) $2.09 bn

Apple handset sales 61.17m

Apple Operating Profit $11.27 bn

Source: Charles Arthur

*see the footnotes in the linked article

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Steely wonder? It's blind to 4G and needs armour: Samsung Galaxy S6

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Re: Not the fastest?

@AC You are reading the wrong websites then. The most scientific of the technical review websites are Anandtech (these guys are serious silicon boffins and have always given the most detailed breakdown of silicon capabilities of any site out there).

The reality is these measures mean increasingly little to real world use, however Samsung are still beaten by Apple in almost every category. Pretty impressive For Apple, since they have been out for the better part of a year now and showing that when systems need to be tuned for lower power consumption, a greater number of cores is not a synonym for better performance.

benchmarks

@werdsmith, great answer

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Apple's Tim Cook and Salesforce's Marc Benioff DECLARE WAR on anti-gay Indiana

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Re: It's never black or white.

"Is Apple's influence such a good thing when thinking about corporate tax laws, the 100+ billion they're hiding in tax heavens?"

It's interesting how erroneous memes start with loose thinking. Apple are frequently cited in articles on tax avoidance (perfectly legal) these days, so it seems reasonable to make the sweeping statement they are hiding 100+ billions in tax havens. Except they aren't. They are keeping their money in the jurisdictions where they earned it and not moving it to the U.S. because when you move money doing so attracts tax. When no tax is due, there's no point in moving money back to the U.S. or any other place in the world, until you need it there for a reason. Otherwise if you later need to move your money elsewhere in the world you will have needlessly paid tax where it simply wasn't owed in the first place.

Indeed Tim Cook is on record as stating Apple do not use financial instruments for side-ways effects on tax (do not use instruments for effects other than their intended purpose - so no loans from one Apple subsidiary company to another to reduce profit margins in higher tax jurisdictions ) and they do not move money to to jurisdictions it isn't needed other than for the purpose of tax reduction. Those are actually pretty strong statements and deserve to be acknowledged. Especially when certain competitors who are trying to claim the moral high ground and do make use of financial instruments purely for their sideways tax effects and do move money to tax havens when it is not required there to cover any genuine operational costs. Google I'm looking at you.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

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If they won't play nice providing a hack we can always send Clarkson round to punch a few engineers.

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Banks defend integrity of passcode-less TouchID login

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Often written I know, but my bank First Direct, started phoning me and then asking ME to provide my security id details to them - an anonymous person calling out of the blue - to prove who I am !!!

Whenever they have done this I ask - are you seriously asking customer to divulge security details to an anonymous caller? Adding "Really ?" At this point to compound the stupidity, they display a complete lack of understanding as to how authentication works, by suggested a number I can phone them back on !!!

Of course I could do a search to check the number belonged to them, but most customers won't be doing that.

I notice they no longer do this, but still, the fact a bank adopted this policy in the first place is beyond belief.

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Apple's portable power podule patent promises paroxysms of fanboi joy

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Re: I don't get it

In this case, I think your analysis is entirely correct. People are so up in arms about software patents, these days they very often jump the gun where criticism of hardware patents is concerned, but in this case it very much appears to be an obvious combination of existing techniques. Indeed techniques that have already been combined with different fuel cell technologies a few times over. All tech companies file patents for everything they can however. Unfortunately the US Patent Office tends to approve far too many of them.

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Analyst dons Tim Cook mask, thinks: Glass went well for Google. Let's do that, too

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I predict the Pope is going to say a prayer sometime in the coming week.

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Google adds evil-code scanning to Play Store

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Re: Apple's process isn't fully automated

"The last thing they want is apps from bad actors attempting to report back data that informs the author what has been tested by the App Store team - or worse, tries to report back on their test centre network configuration."

Indeed most likely, the app is run first on a simulator on a VM, then on a device attached to a VM with no outside connections to anything including other simulators/apps under test.

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Re: Apple's process isn't fully automated

@wolftone You have submitted an app without testing it on a device. OK we will let that pass as its' your risk.

You seem to think the lack of a callback email from your app indicates Apple didn't test it. I can assure you they are not going to test app submissions of never seen before code whist connected to the Internet. Not a chance. The last thing they want is apps from bad actors attempting to report back data that informs the author what has been tested by the App Store team - or worse, tries to report back on their test centre network configuration. I'm sure you understand why. Especially if such data involves a secure link they can't see inside of. They will run the app first on a closed intranet and check if it attempts connections to the right kind of services before testing on a connected network, if indeed they feel they need to ever bother with the latter.

They will also be scanning for conditional code that might change the purpose of the App at a later date, though it can be difficult to find such if it is well disguised.

You seem to be implying Apple should have done your testing for you and their testing is somehow deficient because they didn't and you released a broken app ! I would suggest it's not a good idea to advertise your approach to QA and app release to the public at large on the Internet.

Apple are perfectly prepared to let an App developer hang himself with his own code. They learned some time ago when to intercede and when not to. Their testing will check for system compromising crashes (crashes can interrupt file write operations and can in certain circumstances lead to filesystem corruption), unreasonable resource usage, will check your app doesn't probe the sandbox in unreasonable ways. If your app is simply badly coded and untested on the device, that's your lookout and though they reserve the right not to, they are perfectly prepared to let such apps through - especially since they so often get flack when they reject apps if the submitter thinks the bugs are minor. Indeed it's easier for them to release all apps that do no harm to the system, and avoid the impression they are taking any responsibility for App QA.

So their testing is there to protect Apple, the iOS system and the user. Not you, your app or it's functionality or even your business - that's your lookout.

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Re: Flagging installed apps?

"Lovely job" and "Antivirus" are words that should not be seen together in a single sentence with a single subject and no negative clauses.

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Disney CEO: Dead Steve Jobs choc-blocked me!

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Nice try on the spin, except what you stated you have made up without any knowledge of the facts and simply isn't true. Chris De Salvo was very senior on the Android project, working across the whole thing. He had no problem saying what he said because he's a straightforward guy who has no particular axe to grind. He was simply fairly (and creditably) acknowledging the iPhone for the influence it had on their work. Talk about Fanboi, the quote comes from the horses mouth and your reaction is to try to demote the guy that said it so you can preserve a little preferred fantasy account of history in your head.

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"Firmly believing that Google had ripped off Apple's OS"

They did rip-off Apple's OS. Chris De Salvo, a senior engineer in Android is quoted as saying, when the IPhone is released "we are going to have to start over." at that point Android looked like Blackberry OS. They quickly changed it to incorporate mutli-touch navigation paradigms similar to the iPhone.

Now whether they criminally ripped off Apple's OS. That's another matter and no, despite Steve Job's ire, they did not.

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Want that awesome new Apple TrackPad? Don't get a MacBook Pro

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"I'd not bother reading El Reg if it was the arse kissing fawning fanboi you want it to be."

I'd settle for critical but authentic. Anything less and you are just fooling yourself. Of course some people like to fool themselves and paint the world with disaster. Misery likes company.

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Re: @SuccessCase

Funny, and if you need your snark even at the cost of pretend drama or melodrama, I can see your point.

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So Tim Cook stated the MacBook Pro, shipping as of Monday, has a force touch trackpad. Has the iFixit Teardown contradicted this? No. Is there any indication it's inferior to the MacBook trackpad internals? No. Should it be the same internal design? Well the MacBook Pro has more space, so why should it be. Does this story amount to anything of note? If it performs the same, which I'm willing to bet it does, especially as it's on the Pro machine, no not a bit.

The Register as always doing the best hatchet job they can with the minimum of justification, which let's face it, is a rather poor hatchet job.

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Office for Mac 2016 Preview: This letter will self-destruct in 60 days

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Re: Not downloading

"I have been trying on and off for four hours and nothing happens."

It's Microsoft. You have to re-install your OS first. If you're lucky it will "take."

Oh and don't forget to delete/edit a few keys in your registry. I know it's a Mac, but they are bound to have installed one somewhere.

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Apple Pay a haven for 'rampant' credit card fraud, say experts

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Re: thanks Apple, now I'm living the dream!

Clearly you like trolling. Go walk in yourself.

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Tim Cook chills the spines of swingers worldwide

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i agree the once a day charging issue, is far from ideal. It is in fact why bluetooth headsets threatened, but never quite made it to mainstream. There is the wireless headset dream, and then the reality of having another device to charge when worrying about ensuring one is charged is already more than enough (in my own experience things like laptops and tablets are far less of a worry because most of the time I use/need my laptop I'm at an outlet or on a planned trip where charging is part of the routine). This is why I'm predicting tepid success for the Apple Watch (a similar "adoption level" to bluetooth headsets with a significant dolop extra from the sports activity market - so say 4% of iPhone users after two years). For any normal company that will represent huge and successful revenue stream. But Apple that's going to represent a lot of management overhead for little extra gain. They are doing it because wearables are strategic, the category won't go away (a bit like Bluetooth headsets) and they will raise the bar at launch (but on a device where non sports activity users will find the marginal value entirely undermined by the inconvenience of a need for daily charging). Fail the value test, find power reliability an issue, and the thing will end up being left at home.

There will be a set of core users that love it of course (probably me included because I tend to like Apple kit). I was extrememly bullish when the iPad came out. But on this, far less so, but simply because of the battery charging issue.

Johnny Ive had come up with the ideal design when thinking about the need for charging, using the Milanese loop strap, or simple pressure-from-the-sides, clasp for ease and convenience in taking it off to recharge, but my worry is then a secondary one. It will be super easy to theive. I predict a return of pickpockets with the skill to take watches without the user knowing (invariably involves a distraction). This will be great for them. Almost like a pickpockets trainer bike with stabilisers. Hopefully Apple will already at launch have extended the device disabling tech that is reducing iPhone theft rates or that will very quickly become a big negative story for this thing.

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Re: So let me get this straight....

No what you read somewhere was a clickbait peice written to sound like Apple are dropping some of the health measurement features when they in fact haven't done so and the watch contains the identical feature set as it had at announcement.

The peice was commenting on past features that were already dropped before the watch was announced and seemed to somewhat deliberately make an ambiguous use of tense to make it sound like there is a doubt over the watch feature set as it is now.

The Register might want to study how it was done, since their Apple bad-light machine seems to have become a bit patchy since they have so spectacularly crashed and burned with their oft cited Peak Apple fail.

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Reckon YOU can write better headlines than us? Great – apply within

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Re: Well...

I presume The Register want candidates to state their fact checking predilections so any who are too conscientous can be filtered out; as on the evidence to date, if facts get in the way of an opportunity for a good bit of snark, drop them.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

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Shoddy Lack of Fact Checking

This is extremely bad reporting. Really, do some fact checking El Reg. This is a "report" (it in fact isn't a report), its a badly disguised press release by a security firm who sell services to the PC industry. The database they have trawled is the US National Vulnerabilities database, which lists fixed reported vulnerabilities voluntarily reported by companies. There is no equivalence or assurance in terms of how comprehensive vendor reporting is, nor does the database try to pretend there is, all the reporting is voluntary. If a vulnerability isn't reported by the company it isn't reported. If a company reports more fixed vulnerabilities, it will have a higher count on the database, if a company has a ton of vulnerabilities and fails to fix them, it will have a low count on the database. If a company reports vulnerabilities on a precautionary basis but that were never exploited, they will appear on the database. In other words the database can tell you nothing about the relative state of security of OS A versus OS B.

The company that prepared this report, works for PC industry vendors. It provides a nice bullet point for PC marketing. There is nothing, nothing, objective or professional about it. Your half-hearted disclaimer in the last paragraph is hardly sufficient to claim objective reporting on this one.

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Money from apps? It's all about Apple iOS, says survey

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Re: So, basically, there's bog-all money in apps.

Sorry selected the fail icon by accident. Though I don't agree with your comment it wasn't intended to be a reference to it.

Reposting here:

There's plenty of money in apps. The iOS Appstore alone in the US raked in more money than the U.S. box office. Additionally, very many apps are not made to bring in independent revenues, such as e.g. Starbucks/Costa loyalty apps, so any figures that divide revenues by number of apps published are somewhat misleading. Bennedict Evans, with some justification last year, estimated the iOS Appstore economy to be worth about 14 billion dollars per anum Google Play store about 6 billion.

workings out

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Re: Because I'm worth it

Nothing unintelligent about buying healthy products with a healthy margin. The alternative is what so often results in the kind of race to the bottom price competition that drives companies like Lenovo to think Superfish is a good idea,

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German music moguls slammed for 'wurst ever DMCA takedown spam'

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Re: die die die

I was a little worried once when catching a Lufthansa flight, to see a flyer sticking out of the seat pouch titled "Die First Class"

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UGH... opposable thumbs are so tiresome! Why not mount your iPhone on your face?

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This is a stealth patent. The diagram is but one, probably quite deliberately crap, embodiment. The claims are the important part and will be as broad as possible covering other uses such as VR. The point of a stealth patent is precisely that it covers a whole range of possibilities whilst not obviously pointing competitors to the possibilities. Indeed Google Cardboard provides the perfect example of how such a patent can be valuable. I think stealth patents are pretty underhand, because the point of the patent system is to make an invention obvious and documented as part exchange for the protection of the court, but The Register, always seeking to find the most negative angle has lead them to miss the fact that this stealth patent is precisely about VR. All companies engage in filing stealth patents by the way. It is simply to a companies advantage to do so. So by all means be negative, but the real negative angle story here is about the use of stealth patents. This is in fact far from a "crap" patent as the Register wish to suggest (though many would like to suggest all patents are crap, this view even seems to be spreading to hardware patents).

From the claims:

"The device of claim 1, wherein the optical subassembly is operative to adjust a resolution of the at least one image frame to compensate for how close the user's eyes are to the display screen of the portable electronic device. "

So one of the dependent claims, refers to an optical sub-assembly, precisely as you have in VR goggles. It refers to the assembly adjusting "at least one" image. That is the patent attorney making the claim as broad as possible whilst firmly ensuring it covers optical assemblies that can adjust TWO images - e.g. one for each eye, e.g. precisely what is done by project Cardboard.

That's how you need to read Patents. Don't read the words, they are frequently deliberately obtuse. Read the logic.

When The Register talk of Apple following Google, that is only from the point of view of what the public see (another thing The Register consistently fail to appreciate). The fact this patent was filed in 2008, if Google or Samsung haven't filed one earlier, it pretty surely means Apple R&D are already looking at this. Companies like Apple, Google and Samsung have teams of patent attorneys ensuring all patentable material the R&D dept are working on is patented. If this patent is passed by the examiner, then you can be pretty sure Google/Samsung submitted no earlier filings or they will be able to block it.

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Apple Watch 'didn't work on HAIRY FANBOIS, was stripped of sensor tech'

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Re: Reading comprehension

And in any case, even though Cook didn't say that, it would be ok to imply an activity monitor can help prevent cancer, because it appears sitting on your arse all day is a major contributing factor in the cause of prostate cancer, which actually is a major killer. Can't see it's too controversial or difficult to understand why that might be the case. Take the piss all you like El Reg, but getting up and moving around every 20 or so mins is a very good thing to do indeed.

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Hey Apple - what's the $178bn for? Are you down with OTT?

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Re: BBC Death

Anonymous Coward has rarely been such an appropriate term.

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Re: BBC Death

@badvok

Well seeing as I have for most of my adult life worked as a consultant in the Digital TV industry and have deliver VOD services to millions of customers for a living, I think I know the meaning of the terms I am using and I most certainly and specifically mean OTT.

VOD refers to on demand service that includes programming delivered by dedicated closed TV networks; the economics of which are very different from OTT. The new world order in television is being driven by the fact service is OTT (which of course includes VOD service). The fact of VOD being available was not the key point. VOD service has been available for years and made no difference to the cosy relationships between the TV networks and the content providers. OTT is blowing the relationship wide open and is what enabled the likes of Netflix to deliver the service they have.

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Re: BBC Death

"Just because the next generation are not using it now, does not mean that their tastes, preferences and watching / listening habits will stay the same as they get older."

True, but what perhaps you don't appreciate is that it is literally dead in colleges. Many younger adults are getting out of the habit of watching it entirely and that has never before been the case. They will grow used to an almost exclusively OTT world. I've been monitoring this because it is my industry. I deliver TV services and software solutions. New habits are being formed and IMO they are unlikely to ever come back.

And when they come back to it, they find it patronising and dumbed down. The next time the BBC News is on, stand back from it and check the tone and level of the discourse. Intelligent people have been suffering from boil a frog syndrome. It is actually dumbed down to an almost unbelievable level. They speak with a tone of voice if someone were to speak to you like that in the street, you would find it hard not to punch them.

It is for good reasons with good intentions. Due to the public service remit, they strive to provide service meeting all needs, including viewers with low IQ and developmental challenges. But really the dumbed down one size fits all approach is no longer necessary. OTT can meet these needs more directly and in way that are more efficient or satisfying for the end user. Really next time you are watching the news back up and check this out for yourself and you will realise the extent to which what I am saying is true.

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BBC Death

There is a huge degree of lock-in within the TV industry, with many projects funded through subscription rather than a-la-cart pricing. One of the big resource drains has been the need to keep TV channels filled up daily with content. With OTT, that requirement is simply going away.

The controversial point (in the UK anyway), is that this also removes the need for the BBC license fee model. The truth is the cost of the the high-quality (but increasingly rare) content we enjoy (costume-drama, news and nature) can can comfortably be covered by a-la-cart pricing when we are paying on a program by program basis, but don’t have to pay for the likes of Eastenders and day-time TV. It will simply be cheaper to buy just what we want than to pay the license fee. In my household we are already paying for higher quality production and choosing other, often higher quality, sources. I’ve been, in the past, happy to pay the license fee, but not now that it is less efficient and protecting lower quality production. Everyone will be different but I personally have not interest in it and it's clear this is true for many others as well. Especially not now my Netflix subscription got me Breaking Bad, Damages, The Good Wife, Dexter, House of Cards, Marco Polo, Archer etc.

The BBC model is out of date. The BBC is also dying. In schools and colleges up and down the country, students, the next generation, hardly touch it, preferring Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes and illegal downloads. The BBC are living in the past and think they are providing a world class service. The still do in very limited silos. But mostly they aren't. My investigation shows students are hardly ever watching BBC iPlayer in preference to other streaming services.

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Obama administration ENDORSES Apple Pay during Tim Cook's White House LOVE-IN

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It would be more honest if The Register had reported the real news, that Tim Cook did anything but endorse Obama's agenda. He declined politely I'd course, but quite firmly. He stated how history has taught that to compromise personal privacy even a bit is a bad move. He pointedly referred to how the right to personal privacy trumps the desire for government to know. But of course, this is the Register writing about Apple, so we get anything than objective reporting.

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