* Posts by TonyJ

236 posts • joined 30 Dec 2010

Page:

OH DEAR, WHSmith: Sensitive customer data spaffed to world+dog

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Another one...

Yes I keep having that trouble but with £5 notes. I've tried keying in the serial numbers but NOT ONE webtailer (is that a word?) will accept payment that way.

The difference being, I don't have bank notes in my wallet with instructions on them saying they can be used online. But I suppose it's easier to be sarcastic than find out further information, eh?

National book tokens...them's the beasties. Can be used online but only at Foyles when you do some digging.

3
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Another one...

You're obviously doing something right. I don't know how old your kids are but if they're hooked now they'll be hooked for the rest of their lives.

13 and 7. Both boys. The youngest loves to read. The eldest - it's a bit of a battle but one I think we are slowly winning.

Personally, I could easily imagine (and do) a life with no TV. But a life without books.... beyond comprehension. Although I confess to preferring the feel of a real book, I love the ease and simplicity of my kindle and the vast amount it can hold.

3
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Another one...

Getting tired of these muppets. First they sell or mishandle your data and then they sit back and claim it's not a breach and/or but nothing sensitive was misappropriated and/or... etc.

It's time the ICO grew a pair and hit them hard. It's also time where the companies in question were forced to provide credit monitoring subscriptions (and any necessary help) to anyone affected.

On a slightly related note my kids have been gathering up book tokens for a while. These are meant to be the 'universal' type that you can spend anywhere like WH Smiths or Waterstones. Which is true. Just don't expect to be able to spend them online... useful.

9
0

Citrix really needs to get its act together, and soon

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Citrix have a habit of losing their way

I remember when they were rebranding themselves as an infrastructure company, as one example.

Then there was the way they 'dropped' XenApp with the launch of XenDeskop 7.0 - only they didn't drop it, they just kind of hid it from sight.

And then they make some strange decisions - they spent all of that money for rights to XenServer and then did pretty much nothing with it. They removed or deprecated things like advanced storage features without any real warning. And yet they have some decent features when you consider the costs. Especially some of the tight integration with XD and XA.

Look at XenClient - this could have been a great product. I know some people fail to see a real use case, but I can see quite a few. Whatever your point of view, having a desktop/laptop bare metal hypervisor meant lots of separation. It could even be shoehorned onto a MacBook and that would've been a killer (if they could sort through licensing with Apple of course) for BYoD.

I've seen too many XenDesktop based VDI implementations that were done poorly to count.

I've seen too many XenApp implementations that weren't done particularly badly but went into environments that weren't designed for them and the contentions for resources killed Citrix. And as it was the thing users saw, then it was Citrix that got the blame.

I am a huge fan of using AppSense tools for things like managing profiles and enhancing security.

Personally I think that Citrix have an image problem that has been happening over a decade or more. Where do they position themselves in the enterprise any more? It's been a hard-sell for a while and with Microsoft and VMware snapping at their heels, it's only going to get harder.

0
0

Microsoft turns on Windows 10 file backup to Azure

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: the chance to store data for 99 years.

Wouldn't she be in another hotel anyway?

3
0

Sony PC owners to get Windows 10 upgrade as early Christmas present

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Looks like Sony hasn't learnt a thing

"...Credit card details weren't leaked... They were stored elsewhere. It's now looking like nothing was actually ever taken,..."

Sorry but a lack of evidence != to evidence nothing happened/was compromised/stolen

With so many millions of potential victims I suspect it might be hard to pinpoint a single common location if they were used sparingly.

Or not.

I have no proof either way ;)

0
0

CAUGHT: Lenovo crams unremovable crapware into Windows laptops – by hiding it in the BIOS

TonyJ
Bronze badge

I said this!

This is exactly what I said, when their abhorrent fake certificates and data trawling was made public...just what were they baking into their hardware. Guess we have at least part of an answer.

1
0

Dying cipher suites are stinking up TLS with man-in-the-middle vulns

TonyJ
Bronze badge
Joke

"...Does it affect LibreSSL?

(Can this now become one of the 'obligatory', and 'standard', El Reg questions? You know, like, 'does it run Crysis?', and, 'can you put bacon with it?')..."

What...an...utterly...stupid...question!

You can put bacon with anything! and it both works and immediately improves it!

2
0

Copyright troll wants to ban 'copyright troll' from its copyright troll lawsuit

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Remember ACS Law in the UK

They were doing pretty much the same thing, if I recall although they never actually brought a case to court and that's what ultimately cost them their business model.

I even got a letter from them once. Hilariously, it complained I'd downloaded something I hadn't. I threw it, and the other one they later sent straight into the bin.

0
0

EE recalls Power Bar phone chargers after explosion burns woman

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Interestingly

I have one of these things, though rarely used. It is not from the same batch, but my son complained that when he used it, it was getting extremely hot. Since then it's remained pretty much unused and I suspect will do so until we are certain it's only limited to the one batch.

2
0

Windows 10 wipes your child safety settings if you upgrade from 7 or 8

TonyJ
Bronze badge

I have an alternative

I've used this before. Offered for free, by Bluecoat and it works really rather well.

http://www1.k9webprotection.com/

Although I prefer a "computer in the same room as me" approach, as others have said there are times when I need to pop out of said room.

2
0

Global spy system ECHELON confirmed at last – by leaked Snowden files

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Fascinating.

"There's more and more muck emerging re ongoing child abuse in or near Westminster.

Today Ted Heath's name is back in the picture, indirectly. In his case and many much more recent ones, did the cops not know (in which case...) or did they not care because [?] (in which case...) or were they saving the information for a more important purpose (in which case...).

Yes I'm angry."

This...this is one of the main types of reason I am and always have been dead set against any country wide "think of the children porn filter"...

No way we'd get to hear about such things when governments can (and will) flick a switch at the drop of a hat and censor anything that they deem not to be in the public interest. It's why they fought so hard against the FOI requests about expenses.

17
0

'Fix these Windows 10 Horrors': Readers turn their guns on Redmond

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: No Control of Updating

"...What MS is saying is that you can have a free-update from your W7 Pro but only to something you don't really want. If you want W10 Pro you've got to buy it again. This is MS. Did you really think they'd changed their spots?..

Where did you get the idea that if you have Win 7 pro you cannot get Win 10 Pro?

From: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/Windows-10-specifications

Windows 7

From Edition -------------------- > To Edition

Windows 7 Starter -------------------- > Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Home Basic -------------------- > Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Home Premium -------------------- > Windows 10 Home

Windows 7 Professional -------------------- > Windows 10 Pro

Windows 7 Ultimate -------------------- > Windows 10 Pro

2
0

Contractors who used Employee Beneficiary Trusts are in HMRC's sights

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Reading some of the comments

I can see both sides of the argument to a very great extent.

There's an often overlooked concept that permies tend to get wrong and that is that as a contractor, I don't work for the company whose site I am currently sat at, I work for a limited company that just happens to be mine. My personal employment contract, however, is with this limited company.

So in the same way if you had staff from, say, Microsoft or HP on site, you wouldn't expect those staff to be asking your manager to approve their holidays. As a courtesy, on long engagements, they would be expected to inform someone, of course.

Also, in the same way that the business-to-business contract of engagement can be terminated by either party, exactly the same is true of the business-to-business agreement between my limited company, the agency whom I work through and the end customer. You wouldn't lose any sleep at their loss but you can usually understand that they (the company they work for) are being paid because there's usually a combination of skills they cannot easily fulfill themselves and extra risk that they will be canned - as with contractors.

And yet, it's inevitable that in many cases, the people on site expect to have the right to approve or otherwise things like working hours, holiday entitlement etc etc.

Ok, so having said that, there's no way I'd ever get my company and by association myself involved in such a scheme. My own stance has always been to avoid anything that looks in any way like it's exploiting some kind of short term loophole. Ultimately, it inevitably means I pay more taxes than if I were to use them, but so be it.

And I get at least one email a day inviting me to maximise my earning so I can take home more (usually between 85 and 95% of turnover)...they go straight into my junk... indeed, I get this from "Hannah" at info@contractjobs.com several times a week:

"....As a Contractor, did you know that operating as a Limited Company could give you returns of up to 90%?

* Perhaps you have a Limited Company already and are not getting the returns you thought you would?

* Are you thinking of swapping from Umbrella to Ltd to maximize tax efficiency but think it is a hassle?

* Do you need help setting up a Limited Company?

Find out instantly how much pay you could retain by trying our quick no obligation calculator now <http:/L..blah>

With superb support from our accountancy team coupled with easy to use, time saving online software, there really is a way to be very tax efficient AND not have too much paperwork. It is not much more than the paperwork you have with an umbrella solution! Find out more by calling us now on 0333 222 4054."

However...I don't believe the fault lies with the contractors entirely as emails like that can be tempting to some, or even the accountancy firms that cook such schemes up but mostly with the government.

Our tax laws are far too complex to be workable. Did you know, for example, that VAT is payable on adult shoes? It isn't payable on childrens shoes nor work boots. So...there is an entire section of the VAT guidelines that defines exactly what a boot is. (I will caveat that it's been a few years since I was looking at this so it _might_ have changed in the meantime).

There's also a blunderbuss approach here - rather than fight the big boys who are in cahoots with the very big accountancy firms who are, in turn, in bed with the government and get tied up in court for years, they shoot a broadside at smaller entities who cannot afford a long fight and are more likely to roll over.

I vaguely recall reading somewhere that one year, a prominent lord, paid less than £15k in taxes despite earning hundreds of millions from his various interests.

Companies do have a legal duty to minimise their costs and maximise their profit for their shareholders and that includes taxes but there needs to be a shift from both sides to make the whole thing fairer.

4
0

World-beating TWO-QUADRILLION-WATT LASER fired by boffins

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: We're gonna need

"We're gonna need

a bigger shark.."

Oh great. The newest arms race.

Bigger shark...bigger boat...even bigger shark...warship...where will it end??

0
0

Malvertising campaign hits 10 MEELLION users in 10 days

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: popular sites

Adblock, noscript/ublock, ghostery, no flash etc all spring to mind.

But even then it can be tricky to get into a site for full functionality with all of the above - not so much an issue if it's for personal use but even some corporate sites become largely none functioning sometimes and unfortunately there's no useful (read supported by the client/site) alternative.

0
0

OnePlus 2: The smartie that's trying to outsmart Google's Android

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Nice

Seriously? Thumbs down for this? Was your newsagent out of copies of the Daily Mail or something?

0
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Nice

"...I tried wireless for a year replacing every charger with wireless, after a year I had to admit to myself it was just a gimmick. It takes longer to charge the phone when doing it wireless, you have to get the phone aligned perfectly and it heats up (which won't be good with this snapdragon processor). Lets face it, it takes 2 seconds to plug it in for better results...

I agree with all of those points, but I added a third party charging inductor to my Note 3 and use it at work. Means I can have everything for my laptop plugged permanently into a USB hub and reduce the mash of connections plugged in and out every day, but also that I can just lay my phone down during the day and if I am called and need privacy, can wander easily.

None of which is essential, I agree, but I was / am a bugger for forgetting to plug the charging lead in.

2
2
TonyJ
Bronze badge

UK Bands

Can't see anywhere in the article which LTE/4G bands it uses.

The One had limited appeal over here due to not supporting all UK bands. Particularly, if I recall, band 20 was missing. I don't know if they ever got around to making a Europe specific version.

Although a quick look at the specs of the 2 reveals them:

https://oneplus.net/uk/2/specs

Connectivity:

GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900MHz

WCDMA: Bands: 1/2/5/8

FDD-LTE: Bands: 1/3/5/7/8/20

0
0

NASA: 'Closest thing yet to ANOTHER EARTH' - FOUND

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: [...] science being right and religion being bunkus

"..Religion is not "bunkus", it is a necessary tool in the construction of a society that is not based on you-got-what-I-want-give-it-or-I-kill-you..."

<cough> ISIL, the crusades, the Spanish Inquisition, burning or drowning 'witches' <cough>

Yeah. That religion sure is useful for all the world peace we now have.

6
1

The US taxman thinks Microsoft owes billions. Prove it, says Microsoft

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Lets hope they ARE being gutted

"@Turtle,

Yes, I have a mortgage you simpering douchebag. I worked for a very LONG time before I saved enough to afford one. Unlike you Mr. Grasshopper who apparently wasted every dollar you ever made."

I think, perhaps, you may have misconstrued the meaning...I took the comment to be jokey/sarcasm but fair in relation to how hard it is for people to get a mortgage these days. Indeed I fear for my kids and how they're going to manage to get onto the property ladder. Guess it'll be with my and their mum's help.

Here in the UK it seems there are more and more blocks to being able to make that first step and with house prices constantly moving upwards for the most part, and faster than wage rises...well...

Of course I could have misunderstood.

3
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

"...You didn't expect him to stop just because he'd retired from politics did you?..."

Nope.

Mind you, do insidious cretins like that ever truly retire? I always suspect they have their fists firmly up the puppets that come behind them.

0
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

"..Governments pass laws to allow corporations to avoid tax.

Corporations lobby/pay governments..."

This.

It amazes me that people get so blindly hot-headed about legal loopholes that corporations then "exploit".

Here's the problem - if a government (any government) makes tax laws that are so incredibly complex but full of loopholes, then massive corporations who can afford to pay the large accountancy firms (who themselves contract to said governments to advise and assist in the making of these laws and loopholes) will exploit them. More than that, corporations are not individuals and have a legal duty to maximise profits for shareholders meaning that they have to exploit whatever loopholes they can.

And I use the term 'loophole' loosely here as more often than not, it'd probably be more accurate to call them something like 'purposefully constructed mechanisms'.

Governments are then left going after the small businesses and individuals - who more often than not don't have the financial ability to fight their governments in court and will so just pay up - to make up the missing revenue.

I'd like to believe that tax laws could be simplified but honestly I don't know how feasible this is.

Mostly though the accountancy firms, politicians and corporations all have their snouts in the same troughs, feeding greedily from the same gravy train. (Apologies for the mixed metaphors).

7
0

Your security is just dandy, Apple Pay, but here comes Android

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Existing cards

"...My cards have zero liability to me, as well. But it won't stop a bank cancelling the card when fraudulent use is detected, requiring you to get a replacement..."

I moved from Smile to Barclays a few years ago (primarily because Smile were incapable of providing anything like real time transactions and on the odd occasion I had to phone rather than use the web portal, they'd made it almost impossible to get through to a person to speak to).

Last year someone managed to charge a load of transactions for what appeared to be office supplies and printing services.

Since I occasionally do buy such things, the fraud went unnoticed by the bank but I spotted it the next day on the banking app.

One phone call later, a trip to the local branch at lunch time and I had the money back in my account, the original card cancelled and a replacement in my hand. All I had to do was sign a document to say the transactions were outside of my knowledge, consent and control.

All very painless.

0
0

Reddit scrubs up: Child abuse? Gone. Drugs? Cool. RACISM? FINE

TonyJ
Bronze badge

I've never even visited Reddit to be honest, but surely there is a huge difference between discussing something along those lines openly (I have desires to xxxxxx but have never acted on them and it's a lonely place to be, kind of things) and actually encouraging others to commit such acts or admitting to them etc?

3
0

Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "...mockery..."

"...Australia wins on the poisonous spider competition..."

Australia wins on the "everything and anything trying to kill you" competition.

FTFY

I refer to the old joke about the boffins doing the longest, largest study ever undertaken with regards to dangerous flora and fauna in Australia.

After many years, they finally reported that the only thing harmless to humans there are some of the sheep.

1
0

Windows 7 and 8.1 market share surge, XP falls behind OS X

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: A bit of a false comparison

"You can't really compare OSX as a single entity against multiple versions of Windows - OSX comes in new versions too at reasonably predictable intervals. I know the upgrading of it is a lot nicer, and most Apple users shell out for new versions fairly quickly as (a) they can generally afford to and (b) the upgrades tend to be trouble free and add something worthwhile, even if they are smaller in scope than new major versions of Windows."

You make a good point about the versions, but OSX upgrades have been free for some time now.

And I'm yet to see an upgrade yet that doesn't break some third party app or utility.

4
1

Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Bye bye, old girl

Loved seeing her fly even if it was mostly at air shows. Certainly one of the most recognisable and striking shapes of any aircraft.

In my youth, as a member of the Air Training Corps, I got to marshal a Victor which included a visit into the cockpit. Oh, happy memories. :)

1
0

Does your company really need all that storage?

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: The real problem here...

"The real problem here...

...is simply that the users have an expectation of unlimited capacity and seemingly no way of determining what needs to be stored, and what should be discarded.

I dread to think what their homes are like."

Why?

Physical objects != Data

Equating data in a world where the likes of Google, Microsoft, Dropbox et al all give away GB of free storage to how people hold onto and store physical objects is not really comparable.

Combine that with the message people have been fed over the years to backup, backup, backup and I can see easily why the same pieces of information - photos, documents, etc are kept ad infinitum. Especially where there is no direct cost to the individual storing it.

0
0

Subaru Outback Lineartronic: The thinking person’s 4x4

TonyJ
Bronze badge

"..Having owned 7 different Subarus, I agree that they are superb cars, particularly the Legacy/Outback."

"..every few years you get a massive catastrophic failure of the engine or transmission that costs an absolute fortune to fix."

Sorry but we have different definitions of superb...something that has a catastrophic, potentially multi-thousands to repair, failure every few years? If nothing else, I want the new vehicle I've bought to be reliable enough that it won't cost me thousands.

I have an L200 specifically to hold all my diving kit and to be able to haul it all cross country when we're cave diving. It has a [mostly] traditional selectable 2wd/2wd/low ratio/locking diffs selector.

Mitsubishi replaced the first one I'd bought because it was so unreliable but the replacement is much better so far.

One of the many reasons I chose it - it has a 5 year, 100,000 mile warranty.

I'll tell you in a few years how reliable this one's been :)

1
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Subaru knows the correct lanes as well!

"Btw, we get almost 48+ mpg on the motorway at 80+ :) "

In the interests of legality and for any old bill reading, I presume that is kmh not mph ;-)

3
0

Microsoft releases free Office apps for half of all Android phones

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "Outlook would have been perfect."

"But Outlook? Why hasn't someone come up with a suitable alternative ? Or have they? How hard can it be?"

Because until fairly recently, MS wouldn't give any information away on their MAPI protocols.

0
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "Hate fest"...?

I don't always agree with you, Dogged. But. Spot on. Upvote from me.

5
1
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "Hate fest"...?

"...If the device is running Linux then it is a computer which is being used as a device.

There YOU go - Fixed that for you...."

I am sure, the average person using a set top box, or router fully understands that. Anything to get the year of Linux, eh?

2
2
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "Hate fest"...?

Re: "Hate fest"...?

You couldn't get on with Linux? It runs on more devices in the world than any other operating system so you are using it just about everywhere and you just don't realise it.....

There you go. Fixed that for you.

6
6
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: "Hate fest"...?

""Hate fest"...?

A bit strong, no? I've re-read the comments and yes, there are a few negative ones, but more go along the same lines as mine about bloatware, and there are even a couple praising MS."

Actually no, it isn't a bit strong. When I read down the comments right up to that one there really wasn't anything you could read as "positive" or "praising".

There is a definite lack of balance on here towards Linux. I'm not sure why so many Linux users, admins and devotees land here at El Reg. Sure, MS have a lot to answer for. They have, in the past, created some really awful software. Indeed, with the release of Windows 8 and the attempt to bring a phone/tablet look and feel to a traditional desktop, I think anyone would struggle to deny that they made one massive abortion but at least they tried something. And I'd even say that take away the GUI and you actually have a decent OS underneath.

I won't deny that a lot of MS's software is huge and bloated. I wouldn't begin to try and claim I know or understand the technical details of why, but to the people who switched to Linux xx years ago and haven't touched a piece of MS software since...what makes you think you're qualified to discuss the merits or problems of said software? I won't even suggest you try it, since you are obviously so biased in your thinking. Chronological error..."Why do/think that?" "Because I/we always have".

18
8

Guy puts 1990s MacOS 7 on an Apple Watch – without jailbreaking it

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: I miss System 7

"Norton-something or Adobe-something-else, or any of a number of dubious third-party control panels or extensions or 'screen-savers'. I recall there were many such niceties that did not play nice and though they could be shown to be the equivalent of digital foot-binding, it was nigh-impossible to convince people to do without them- though they were a drag on system performance."

Not much has changed there then.

3
0

This whopping 16-bit computer processor is being built by hand, transistor by transistor

TonyJ
Bronze badge

"How about 7400 ICs and wire-wrap ?"

Oh god I loathed wire wrapping.

But...the end results looked enchanting. Almost beautiful if done properly.

It's worth noting, not much (if any) of mine did! :)

2
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Reminds me at Uni ...

"Reminds me at Uni ...

I programmed a bit-slice CPU ...

And hand soldered my final year project."

Mine were much less fun.

Had to design and build a bar code reader. It did the utterly pointless thing of reading the bar code, and recreating it on a plotter - also built by me.

Had to build a memory expansion for the "D5E evaluation kit" to hold the necessary lookup tables and "driver" for the plotter.

I learned far more about bar codes than anyone would ever really wish to know. :)

1
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Tip of the hat

"OK TonyJ and anyone, what is the THIS that you want teaching?"

The underlying architecture of what drives a computer.

How the core components from a transistor upwards come together to make a gate. How gates come together to build logic. How... and so on.

In other words, it's all well and good showing kids how to use PowerPoint, but let's start by showing them how the actual computer works.

3
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Tip of the hat

I am always amazed at the dedication some people put into their hobby projects.

And I agree with the other posting - THIS is the kind of thing that should be taught about in school.

I don't envy him when it comes to troubleshooting it though. Ouch.

8
0

NatWest IT cock-up sees 600,000 transactions go 'missing'

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Surely I can't be the only one worrying..

"I think many people on this forum are complacent in their relative financial comfort. We've frequently commented to each other that the readership here are pretty unrepresentative of the population in general. This really is another aspect of this"

I couldn't agree more. I have been in a similar situation in the past where, thankfully many years ago now, I had to wait to replace the burst tyre on my car and drove with the space saver spare on it until pay day.

As I'm trying to get my son to understand "It may only be a tenner...but if you don't have it, it's suddenly a lot of money"

15
0

Cortana threatens to blow away ESC key

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: @TonyJ re the Escape Key.

"...The first mention of computers from the page you linked to is in 1984. Wiki claims that the Escape Key was present on TeleType Machines as early as 1849. So to answer your question, Yes. =-)..."

Do you have any evidence of this? Because according to these sources, it was invented in 1960 by Bob Bemer:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esc_key

http://www.bobbemer.com/ESCAPE.HTM

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/07/magazine/who-made-that-escape-key.html?_r=0

I am genuinely curious if there are documented uses of it prior to this.

0
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: I'll remap that key.

"You screw with a bog standard key to install a gimick in it's place, I'll remap it back to what it's been since before your company came into existence..."

Really? https://www.toshiba.co.jp/worldwide/about/history.html

We had escape keys on keyboards prior to 1873? Wow

On a less pedantic note, I remember Toshiba laptops fondly from the mid-late '90s when I worked as a repair bod and although the hardware, build quality and customer support back then were first rate, they did have a penchance for dicking around with non standard keyboard layouts.

7
0

Entertaining prospect: Amazon Fire TV Stick

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Plex on a NOW TV box third the price

Plex on a NOW TV box third the price

Sideload Plex onto a NOW TV Roku box (£10) and Bobs a male relative

I have a few NowTV boxes and they have a mix of Plex (moved away from) and Emby (what was MediaBrowser 3 which I can seriously recommend trying out). But as I understand it, it is now much more difficult to sideload other applications onto them?

If only the NowTV boxes would do Amazon Prime streaming, it'd be perfect for my uses.

0
0

Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: Simple answer why usage is growing

"Exactly, because Apple are the only company who specifically refuse to allow you to run OSX within a VM legally."

You can run OSX in a VM. That VM must, however, reside on Apple hardware

I guess this is a follow on from when Jobs scrapped the licensing of Apple clones. It makes no sense now though in the modern, virtualised world and is just another example of their locking in users.

0
1
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Well we need to agree to disagree. I've just recently completed a multi-thousand user refresh for a council in England.

As part of the requirements gathering, I spoke to a large cross section of users across multiple departments and I am struggling to recall any issues with Windows and/or Explorer. RSA/Web access/Application Issues etc etc but nothing I can remember as being the OS.

But I guess if you see the glass as half empty, then you will just reinforce your own negative perceptions.

1
2
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: My Tuppence Worth

Yup...Apple treat their staff really well! http://reg.cx/2fM8

1
0
TonyJ
Bronze badge

Re: My Tuppence Worth

I generally like and for the most part agree with your comments Trevor, but "The problem with Surface Pros is that they are sold by Microsoft, and Microsoft can't be trusted with anything, ever. They not only don't have our best interests in mind, they aren't even trying very hard to hide it any more.

Cloud first, mobile first. Staff, partners, developers and customers last"

First off - no company is ultimately there for the good of the people that work for them or their customers. They're there to generate profit for the shareholders.

Secondly - name me any other company of similar size to MS in technology that doesn't have all the same motivations and problems? Apple? Google? Lenovo? HP?

Thirdly - MS will eventually learn. It may come too late, but the steady kicking they're giving people like us by pulling Technet subscriptions, not listening to feedback etc etc will eventually come home to roost, so don't think I'm entirely on their side.

Ultimately though your comments show that you've sadly become blinded by rage with MS and it clouds some otherwise perfectly valid arguments.

2
2
TonyJ
Bronze badge

"Don't confuse reluctantly using Windows with "not hating Windows". In my experience, most people who use Windows loathe it, but feel they have no other choice.

Really? Because my experience is that most normal users - i.e. non technical personnel are absolutely and utterly ambivalent towards it - it's just something that is there and that they've got used to using on a day-to-day basis and really don't care one way or the other. The general moans have always been towards the particular application(s) they're forced to use, rather than the OS.

And therein might be the problem. Because they're not technical they moan about Windows as opposed to "Application X, Y or Z".

I've spent most of the last 20 years specialising in Citrix technologies and I still see and hear complaints about Citrix that are utterly unrelated to it - but it's a word they know, and is the most visible thing to fail.

I would also suggest that this is another case of the echo chamber as reported recently on here - if you mostly mix with non-Windows users, you will only get a positive reinforcement of their opinions. And when that comes to Linux/*nix/OSX they tend to be a very vocal group too.

7
0

Page:

Forums