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* Posts by TonyJ

88 posts • joined 30 Dec 2010

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iOS services intended solely for diagnostics: 'I don’t buy it for a minute'

TonyJ

Re: Oh come on

Except to outsource even that function to cameras.

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Microsoft's MCSE and MCSD will become HARDER to win

TonyJ

Revenue generator

They're a revenue generator. Full stop.

I was the 54th person to be Citrix Certified Enterprise Architect (CCEA) back in the day.

It was a bloody tough cert to get, made even more so by questions on products that were no longer in support.

At the end of it, I got a badge, a certificate that looked like it'd been printed on an original HP DeskJet printer and was on paper so thin you could see right through it.

But delight of delights I got access to a CCEA-only website. Which consisted solely of a list of exams required to become CCEA accredited.

At the same time I was working towards my MCSE in Windows 2000, having passed the Windows NT networking essentials exam.

It didn't take me long to realise that these things exist for one purpose - to generate revenue for the vendor. By making it a pre-requisite to have x numbers of y certifications they guarantee that partners will cough up to have them.

I've been in the position where, at the annual renewal people (including me) were being asked to sit down over a week and take numerous exams to qualify because we were the ones they thought had the better chance of passing. Try getting on a course any time in the year otherwise and you had zero chance.

So my last MCSE was in Windows 2003 and I seem to recall it was a single exam. I am yet to find a scenario where my experience combined with the companies I've contracted to (MS, HP, Siemens, etc etc) in addition to the kind of projects I've been involved in hasn't been enough.

I _have_ been queried on why I never bothered to become, for example, PRINCE2 or TOGAF certified and my answer is always the same: I don't need the certification to be able to converse with a PM and since I am not a PM I don't need PRINCE2 and I would prefer a common sense model that has proven to work.

And traditionally I am shy of hiring someone with multiple certs - particularly from multiple vendors - for one, it shows a general lack of specialisation and two when do they have time to fit their day job in??.

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ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US

TonyJ

One rule for the US of A and one for everyone else

Bullies all round. Big companies using lawyers and ridiculous laws* to force smaller and innovative companies out of business and to avoid paying taxes.

Rules and laws that seemingly get made up in real time by judges depending on god alone knows what criteria?

Love how the Americans seem to believe that they have a god given right to interfere with every last corner of the world and yet don't want a level playing field for businesses. Or governments.

Trying not to make this _too much_ of a foaming-at-the-mouth rant but that's made my blood boil.

*I don't blame the companies directly for some of the laws, however, I suspect that big business has a hand in an awful lot of them that give them an advantage of some/any kind.

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Apple OS X Yosemite 4 TIMES more popular than Mavericks

TonyJ

I am curious - and this is in no way a flame but genuine curiosity - what makes an OS feel 'unloved'?

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Multiplayer Elite to debut on May 30th

TonyJ

Re: "David Brabham, co-author of the original BBC Elite"

Thanks for that correction. I'd love to blame autocorrect etc but it was a simple case of fingers and brain not working in concert :)

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TonyJ

Worth adding...

...although I'm sure the fans will already know - Frontier Developments is headed up by David Brabham, co-author of the original BBC Elite.

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Powershell terminal sucks. Is there a better choice?

TonyJ

As others have said,

The ISE isn't all that bad.

Or take a look at Sapien Powershell Studio. http://www.sapien.com/software/powershell_studio

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Cost-cutting Barclays bank swings axe on 5,600 IT and ops bods

TonyJ

Again...?

What is it with Barclays and removing I.T. staff?

They did a similar thing many years ago early into my career. I still remember driving 2 1/2 hours to one of their remote sites, waiting around 1 1/2 hours for someone to find a code to get into the server room so I could diagnose why a server hadn't rebooted (remember this is pre-lights our remote control days).

One floppy disk ejected later and the server booted.

A server down for almost half a day because there was no one around to eject a disk.

15
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Chap builds mobe based on Raspberry Pi

TonyJ

I'm impressed

I could just about still do the electronics side of things despite it being more years than I like to admit since working in that field.

When it comes to actually programming things - well I haven't done that for even longer and I wasn't that hot at it to begin with.

And let's face it, when you're 'tinkering' you're using 90+% of knowledge that's out there and applying it. In fact, when you're engineering you're using other people's knowledge as building blocks for your own.

I can't remember the last time I heard of an engineer coming up with something completely unknown before. Scientists in R&D that may be working with engineers (and vice versa), yes but not engineers.

Happy to be proven wrong on that, by the way.

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Helpdesk/Service Desk Recommendations

TonyJ

OTRS

I also second OTRS.

It'll do everything you need and then some - including some great reporting.

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Nothing's as SCARY as an overly aggressive SOFTWARE PIMP

TonyJ
Pint

:-)

Made me chuckle, Dabbsy. Just what the Dr. ordered on a Fri lunchtime.

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Boss at 'Microsoft' scam support biz told to cough £000s in comp

TonyJ

Re: Shocking

Agreed. What they did was fraud, plain and simple.

The leniency shown will just tell others it's a reasonable business model.

I'm just surprised he ran it out of the UK.

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Plod foils drone drug drop down under

TonyJ

Re: "A man, a woman, a quadracopter and a bag of illicit drugs"

Nah...not enough f***ing snakes for that ;-)

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Samsung chairman wins £500m legal fight with brother

TonyJ

Sad...

When families lose sight of things. Even sadder that yet again, only the lawyers come out on top.

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Spam, a lot of it: Bubble tea is the Seoul of wit

TonyJ

My personal favourite

Was the one I got that had been personally approved after their face to face meeting by 'primary minister gordon blair'.

Late last year.

Should've kept it - it was genuinely funny.

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

TonyJ

Re: utter crap

Agreed. Our local council did a similar thing - from 50p per hour, to 70. Then less than a year later to 80. Shopping visitors dropped so over that following Christmas, they made it £1 all day and had a record Christmas.

When charges we're reintroduced they were £1 an hour. All within less than two years. I think it's about £1.20 now - I don't go there very often. I don't mind paying to park, per se, but when the spaces are inevitably so narrow that passengers have to get out before you are fully in the space, and my car is inevitably damaged by other car doors, and the council won't accept any liability but expect us to have had a near 300% price rise in such a short period of time, it galls me.

When did it become legal to use ANPR for this purpose too? Surely that's some kind of breach of privacy? I remember a few years ago a bloke successfully sued a credit card company for sending him a statement when he'd opted out of paper and his wife read it. Upon realising he'd been having an affair she filed for divorce. Could a similar thing happen with this? Or is it like software EULA's where by using the car park, you explicitly agree to all the terms and conditions?

I agree though - it's greed that drives most of the decisions, and car owners are an easy target.

I've said before on reg forums - bin the parts of the DVLA handling excise duty. Bin excise duty. Add 5p per litre onto fuel and include third party insurance in that. You save on bureaucracy. No one can dodge paying as it becomes pay-as-you-go. No one can drive uninsured and it's fairer because the more you use the roads, the bigger the share you pay. And then use some of it to repair our crumbling, third world roads.

Sorry...pet hate. Off the soap box now.

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CEO Marissa Mayer puts on brave face as Yahoo! shows another loss

TonyJ

Re: Yahoo?

Quite. But my own initial reaction to Yahoo! stories is more "but...what do they actually _do_ that makes them money?"

Maybe I should Google them* and stop being a lazy arse. :-)

*See what I did there?

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Sony on the ropes after Moody's downgrade to junk

TonyJ

Have to agree with many points

The rootkit; the DRM, the way they used to (still? haven't bought anything Sony for years) profiteer by requiring additional items to use the piece of kit you'd just bought - my wife bought me a PS2. We'd just moved into our new house and money was incredibly tight. She'd saved a long time to get it me for that Christmas.

I remember being so annoyed at Sony because there were no memory modules - you had to buy one! Ok it didn't stop you playing the racing game that someone else had bought me but you just couldn't save your progress...

The tax avoidance - "No Mr Tax men of the world...the PS3 is a computer - look it has an option to turn it into one...no it isn't a games console that should attract higher rates of tax"

The way they went after Geohot (might have that name slightly wrong) - you know, things like insisting the hearings were held in an entirely different state of the U.S. to ensure they got a favourable judge. The way they froze assets (seem to recall at one point they at least tried or threatened to have his parents' assets frozen).

Did they make great kit? Yeah in the 80's they did. Do they now? I have no idea, personally, and no wish to find out. Have they ever had good customer service?

I also remember being in the Sony store in town. A guy had dropped off a camcorder that wasn't working properly. Apparently, despite chasing he was getting conflicting info and told different prices. So he popped in to get it back - he complained to the manager there. Quite politely I have to say. He was annoyed that, despite having warned them, his camcorder was still in bits in their workshop.

On leaving, the manager turned to another member of staff and said, out loud "what a miserable c*nt".

Now I have another vague memory - not sure if this is planted :-) but didn't Samsung OEM TFT display panels for Sony for quite some time?

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Citrix soothes frustrated Mac fanbois with Windows VDI tech

TonyJ

Hmmm

Why they couldn't get XenClient - a bare metal client hypervisor - to run properly is anyone's guess.

They came close with v5 - just a few missing bits like wifi support missing. Personally I'd much prefer to be able run without an OS stealing my resources. And ok you are getting some bolt-on management and control but beyond that it is basically another version of what Parallels, Oracle and VMware have been offering for years.

Sorry Citrix, but on this one...meh

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Microsoft shops ditch XP for New Year as Windows market share expands

TonyJ

Cowherder...I have a little Acer tablet I picked up a few weeks ago with Windows 8.1 on it.

Well it shipped with 8.0 but after going through the ridiculous process of installing half a gig of updates, it eventually allowed me to upgrade to 8.1 and as mentioned in a Reg article a while ago, gave me an additional 5GB of free space on the flash post-upgrade.

Anyway, I digress, slightly.

I chose this particular tablet because of two reasons: first was price. It was sub <£230 quid inc VAT at the time.

But the other was, being an Atom based tablet and therefore running 'proper' Windows and not that abortion that is R/T it was compatible with the apps I need but in this case particularly, the software I need for my [scuba] dive computer.

That means now, I can sling a small device that has run for around 7hours of constant light use, in my bag when I go diving and get instant feedback from the computer.

And when I go to Egypt in a couple of months, I'm not taking a much pricier and heavier laptop.

I've always thought Win 8.x would be a better touch-experience than a desktop experience and I was right - I actually like using the thing.

It does what I would like it to do and does it well, unlike the iPad I gave the wife after a few hours and the kids' Galaxy Tabs. (Before the rabid downvoters...note I said it does what _I_ want...YMMV)

Still wouldn't fancy 8.1 on a traditional desktop/laptop device yet though.

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US Department of Justice details Kim Dotcom evidence

TonyJ
Devil

Tapeador...

Your arguments and methods of putting them forwards (i.e. unrelated ranting that seem to be there for the pure reason of getting responses...aka trolling) feel somewhat familiar...

Do you, perhaps, go by the name Eadon?

All we need from you are a couple of anti-MS comments scattering around, whatever the topic.

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TonyJ

Re: I'm curious...

Thanks Trevor - that is exactly what I meant. It'd be fine for them to say "Accused of the crime of conspiring..." but they don't appear to be saying that do they?

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TonyJ

I'm curious...

Can he not claim, given the use of such words as "conspiracy" that he cannot possibly be given a fair trial? That the outcome of any such trial is already tainted by the way information is being presented to the public and reporters?

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Microsoft: Don't listen to 4chan ... especially the bit about bricking Xbox Ones

TonyJ
WTF?

I genuinely do not understand...

...what drives these malicious little snotrags to put information out that they know will cause damage to someones devices.

Scumbags.

That is all.

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Dodgy Kaspersky update borks THOUSANDS of NHS computers

TonyJ

Re: So to the downvoters of testing...

I didn't say it _was_ a Windows update but I was making a point that I presume all the people who are too time/budget/whatever excuse constrained to test updates that have, in the past, been known to cause issues occasionally also don't bother to test their Windows updates. Or their application updates.

Yes, for remote working/home working staff it makes sense if you're not using something like an always on VPN/DirectAccess solution to allow their systems to autoupdate and then there are times where you have to weigh up the impact of a zero day exploit / piece of malware etc and the damage it would cause over the potential instability a remediating patch or update would potentially cause if it's installed, but most of the time there is zero excuse for what is effectively laziness.

And yes I agree that the vendor should have caught it but they didn't and the IT staff should have therefore had policies in place that caught it before it became such a huge issue.

Christ - would you just roll out a brand new application suite without any testing?

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TonyJ

So to the downvoters of testing...

Presumably you all just allow Windows Update to run on all of your clients and servers without first testing they don't balls up your systems in some obscure way too?

AV cock ups, whilst fewer than they used to be, are anything but unheard of.

Budget? Simple - let your IT team have the releases first. These individuals should have the necessary skills to remediate any damage.

I find it laughable when people say "we don't have the time, budget or resources" - this doesn't have to be any more onerous than you make it.

But downvote away.

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TonyJ

What happened...

....to testing updates before they get applied?

It's no major issue if an update borks my own laptop - I can rebuild it and restore as necessary but I'd expect controls to be in place before any system-wide updates went out for an enterprise.

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EYE-GASMIC: Apple MacBook Pro 15-inch with Retina Display

TonyJ

I have a late 2011 MBP

As I've mentioned a couple of times on the Reg forums, I have a late 2011 15" MBP upgraded to 16GB RAM, a 512GB SSD and the 750GB spinner upgraded to 1TB and moved into the superdrive slot.

It's been the best Windows laptop I've personally ever owned and since I picked it up stateside, it was about on a par for the equivalent spec non Apple hardware in terms of UK pricing.

But no way I would consider a unit - however good the screen - where my upgrade options were a flat zero! Can't even replace a battery? No etnerhet port? No thanks, Apple.

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EMC lobs sueball at Pure, tells court: Look what they told EL REG

TonyJ

American 'English' Dictionary...

The very first word in it appears to be Litigation

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Sources: Azzurri coughs £1m to end O2 call centre spat

TonyJ

Cannot say I'm surprised

Azzurri were why, a year ago, O2 offered to allow me to take my small business account elsewhere.

I have rafts of contradictory emails from Azzurri - from the same person even, which proved they were out-and-out lying to me.

In the end, a senior manager within O2 offered me three new handsets of my choice (iPhone 5's in the end) plus cut the account cost by 50%, and gave me a boost-box if I'd sign to another 24 month contract on the pomise that they (O2) would take the support of my contract on in its entirety and should they try to shift it back to Azzurri the contract would become null and void again.

The information I was provided was that O2 themselves had underestimated the uptake of iPhones, hence the need to ship some of their support to Azzurri.

Unfortunately there was no warning or choice at the time - the first I knew was when I received an email from someone@azz.com or some such vaguely connected email address explaining that he was now my account manager. I very nearly wrote it off as a phishing email.

On the whole, I've always been reasonably happy with O2 and when things have occassionally gone wrong, when it was O2 I dealt (or now deal) with, it was generally settled quickly and well.

My account manager at Azzurri was asking a simple question of his manager(s) for almost 6 months.

Hopefully, O2 will have learned a lesson and will endeavour to keep their support (at least business) in-house.

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Z30: The classiest BlackBerry mobe ever ... and possibly the last

TonyJ

Too little, too late.

I used to have BB handsets. First through work and then my own.

I bought the wife an original iPhone and she hated it - the things it couldn't do outweighed, for her (then), the things it could and the BB platform blew it out of the water. But when things like being able to trivially connect to an Exchange solution and apps were introduced for free, the rot started to set in for BB.

Their ((BB) handsets started to drop tremondously in quality whilst their prices remained high. Their lack of simple support for push mail or sync calendars unless you had an Enterprise class backend infrastructure, were the beginning of nails in the BB coffin.

Yes they were inherently more secure than other handsets available at the time but things like apps and usability of droid and iphone were even more of those nails in the coffin.

I don't know if they particularly are any more (as in I genuinely don't know). but I can remotely wipe my devices using various tools from free to paid for, for example, and my solutions are built to be secure from the outset but they may still have layers not available elsewhere.

Anyway, I guess my salient points are that they rested on their laurels for far too long, churning out the same old stuff on hardware that was looking ever more dated whilst the world, it's dog and other manufacturers got on with trying to produce stuff that people might actually both want and use.

Of course there's a contrary argument there now that would go along the lines of said manufacturers have stopped that and are now getting on with trying to sue the f*ck out each other while world + dog looks on bemused and wonders when we'll see some more innovation again.

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ZTE Open: This dirt-cheap smartphone is a swing and a miss

TonyJ

Re: Swing and a miss ... of the point

To a large extent I agree. Plus to compare it to a Apple iPhone - even the original one in the UK in '07 would cost over £800 with the contract tie-in - when it's a budget platform really isn't comparing apples with apples (see what I did there!).

Give it a bit of time and let's see. It'd be nice to see the OS upgraded regardless of the manufacturer for once, but hey ho.

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Star Wars revival secret: This isn't the celluloid you're looking for

TonyJ

This isn't the format you're looking for

Ok let's face it - by modern standards, the original Star Wars trilogy might seem a bit pants - like someone said, wooden acting (I believe for at least the first film the actors weren't really bought into the idea), some dodgy stop-motion and rather camp baddies.

But that's not fair is it? Because it was a thing of its time - it used loads of then unheard of techniques and technologies.

Most films of the era have what you would describe as somewhat wooden acting compared to today.

But we were kids seeing it fhrough kids' eyes for the first time and there#s never been anything like it for us before that, so we do tend to look on the films with fondness - hell I even have an original Millenium Falcon, AT-AT and X-Wing somwhere at my folks place (played with and with bits missing the way they should be :-) )

It wasn't the use of CGI and digital media that let down the latest three films (or even the remastered originals) it was shitty plot, trying to retro-fit new ideas into old films (R2D2 flying for example...erm if that's the case why use a crane to get him into an X-Wing?) etc etc.

What the new films need are a damn good script with care and attention - perhaps it may be made easier by the fact they're not being forced to follow an idea such that they have to write the scripts to fit but only time will tell.

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eBay UK having problems

TonyJ

eBay UK having problems

Tried to sign in all morning without success til about 5 mins ago but now it's telling me none of my info, including my stuff for sale is avaialble.. I'd say it was unavailable for roughly two hours - that's a big outage for the 'bay

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O2 tears wraps off £26-a-month mobe sport, music, games (and 4G)

TonyJ

I'm on O2 for my business tariff

Share a number of lines - when I first signed up about four years ago they were great.

Then, because of iPhone demand, they shipped their support to Azzuri. Didn't ask, just did it.

Support went downhill. So, it seemed, did their coverage.

I'm still with O2 because to keep my business, they gave me new handsets for all of my numbers, reduced the price of the tariff and put my support back under their aegis and out of Azzuri.

They also provided me with a boostbox so I could get a decent signal in the office.

And a couple of months ago it seemed they were showing some common sense by decoupling their service costs from their handset costs - want to upgrade, sure...just pay. It may end up costly but at least it's transparent.

But now this...1Gb of data at 4G speeds??? How many seconds would that take to burn?

And how about those of us who don't want these silly bundles of music and sport? How about those of us who would like to be able to tether our laptops for work without paying stupid amounts of money (to the extent it is cheaper for me to now use a Three One Plan SIM only in a cheap handset and tether using their all you can eat data plan)...and that's on a rolling 30 day contract.

So O2, when this contract comes up for renewal, who do you think, right now, will be getting my business? Hint...not the stupid provider(s) who think 1Gb of data on a 4G connection will suffice!

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Apple will swap fanbois' killer phoney phone chargers for legit adapters

TonyJ

Re: Why?

Quite right Dave and why should they? They're a business, not an individual and businesses exist to make money for shareholders and (erm..ok...) pay taxes. Ok they should pay taxes.

But they aren't being altruistic now - this is business and brand protection. Anyone digging a little will be able to find that the problems are cheap knockoffs but many people are too lazy to dig or look beyond a headline.

And presumably they're trying to protect against expensive repair costs under warranty - assuming they can't prove if a non-genuine charger was used?

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Microsoft pledges Linux boost for Windows Server and Center R2 duo

TonyJ

Re: Enough already

More like 'My My little pony(tm)" is better than your 'Action Man(tm)' because it's different and I love it and yours blows. Nah nah nah.

At the end of the day, this is The Reg forums. It isn't the place for reasoned debate whereby both sides of the story let alone the facts ever get in the way of a good foaming rant!

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TonyJ

Except Hyper-V is free.

You only need to license Windows guests. And in their haste, many people often overlook the enhanced licensing you get when running Windows guests on a supported hypervisor platform.

And your data is somewhat out of date - look at Hyper-V 3.0 functionality.

VMware load balancing and DRS also simply hands off guests to another host if the current host is too resource constrained.

Let's not forget too, that the 3-server versions of VMware are constrained by features and - again a point oft overlooked - if the time comes when you need to upgrade, you also have to buy the management server as a separate and quite expensive component...VMware is not cheap in the enterprise.

There are other alternative hypvervisor platforms out there - Citrix or non-Citrix Xen, KVM etc.

You could always select the appropriate software for yourself by assessing which matches skill sets, features, price points etc.

Or take the usual foaming at the mouth option of most of the people posting here and choose only your favourite technology because vendor x is bad.

3
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Devolo dLAN 500 AV Wireless Plus: Triple-tech connectivity for the home

TonyJ

Had powerline for ages but

As soon as I moved to fibre, it totall screwed the white BT fibre modem to the point I was getting <10% or max sync speeds.

Tried different brands too as I had both Delovo and D-Link.

It was only laziness that'd stopped me running an ethernet cable for some years anyway so not too difficult to do but I wouldn't mind knowing if anyone else has seen similar issues or if I just happened to get a dodgy modem?

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Boffins, Tunnel Tigers and Scotland's world-first power mountain

TonyJ

Re: Splendid!

Agreed - these articles are not only fascinating and well written but shed light on many buildings / sites I've been past or close to and never really given more than a passing thought or glance.

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Apple MacBook Air 13-inch 2013: Windows struggles in Boot Camp

TonyJ

Didn't have time to read all of the comments...

...so sorry if I'm repeating anyone.

I have a late 2011 MacBook Pro. As I've written elsewhere it's a great piece of kit that has proven to be a high performing, stable, reliable Windows platform.

It can be immensely annoying - having had one Apple upgrade destroy the Boot Camp partition enough that it wouldn't boot but not enough to destroy and reinstall easily.

For me, it replaced a very very unreliable Asus rig of similar spec and actually because I was lucky enough to pick it up from the US, of similar pricing. That reliabillity was very important to me.

In between I temporarily used both a throwaway Dell and a Mac Air.

The Air was simply too much of a compromise for me - core 2 in a world of I3's, 5's and 7's. Poor display and even poorer display performance even on a day-to-day use. Amazing for dragging between offices though and a decent keyboard.

Terrible connectivity options but I knew that before I bought it. Non existent upgrade options which I didn't fully appreciate (my mistake) prior to buying it.

Which is why I wouldn't get another one. Nor a retina MBP - sorry but if I'm spending that kind of money I want it upgradeable at my leisure and with a choice of components.

Yes, they have their place but step away from the pro- and anti- rhetoric and do your own homework.

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The IT crowd: Fiercely loyal geeks or 'inflexible, budget-padding' creeps?

TonyJ

Broad brushes but mostly accurate

I've worked for vairous companies both large and small over the years. I've done the hands-on support through to the hands-off consutlancy and everything in between.

Luckily I have mostly worked for and with decent people and managers. Not always - I happened to spend some time at one company where the directors believed that the function of IT was to say that they can do anything but then deliver nothing. They completely missed that bit where there was no budget (ripped off software, anyone?) and that the very directors demanding changes to live systems would then shift the goalposts at random, often contradicting themselves and would blame IT when things inevitably went awry because they were experimenting on a live environment. The MD would do this and then tell his IT staff that they were lying about the shifting sands etc.

One notable thing there has always stuck in my mind - the ops director refusing to have the aircon fixed in the IT office where there were servers sitting due to no room in the server cupboard, but screaming at his team because they didn't stock batteries for the wireless mouse that he'd gone out and bought unbeknown to his IT team.

Now on the other side of that fence were the IT staff themselves, some of whom were indeed lazy and had got into the habit of just saying yes because it was easier, and then were happy to just put up with being shouted at because they'd missed a deadline or three.

Ok in that particular environment it was a case of two extremes but there was definitely an attitude that the IT department should be able to come up with new ideas to drive sales, new initiatives that would add value to the business and even should be able to design all of the artwork for a replacement web site. Yes, that they should be more business savvy. The point being of course, if they were more business savvy they'd probably not be working in IT to begin with.

And what happened the one time they came up with an initiative that generated more sales of add-on products? They had their bonuses capped because the directors didn't believe tha IT staff should be able to earn so much. Needless to say there was never any desire to repeat the initiative shown that time.

But I've worked with bosses who inately understand that generally, technical staff are best not being micromanaged and that can take a mature "as long as the work gets done on time and well" approach.

And the one thing I always look for when I want to recruit / promote to a consultant type role? Not the technical nounce - a techy is a techy is a techy at that level. No I'd like the people that can talk to others, that can give potential customers that warm and fuzzy feeling that their systems are in safe hands.

I want people that understand that the person is the key not the shiny box with it's new software.

I think too many tech guys just get blinded by the shiny for the sake of it, but hey - that's their job too, isn't it?

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Not even Asia can save PC market's slump

TonyJ

Agreed - the whole need to upgrade on a regular cycle has to some extent gone. I am seeing colleagues who bought powerful laptops 18 - 24 months ago (myself included, actually) that are still powerful enough to handle everything thrown at them - and in some cases that includes gaming.

Undoubtedly tablets and phones with ever bigger screens have eaten into the market for the casual internet browser etc although there'll always be a need for 'proper' computers with keyboards and mice for even day-to-day work. But combined with the power you're getting and the OS's that won't die and consoles for casual gaming, there is an ever decreasing need to upgrade so often.

4
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'Priyanka' yanks your WhatsApp contact chain on Android mobes

TonyJ

Proof yet again

That no matter the underlying technology, users will always be the weak link.

Although...have people learned nothing since the days of "I Love You" or is it a generational thing?

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Windows 8.1: 'It's good for enterprises, too,' says Redmond

TonyJ

Suspect it won't be 'that much' of a lemon from MS's perspective

Simply because lets face it - corps buying licenses have to buy the latest offering. Whether they then downgrade that licensing doesn't matter - it's a <new version> license sale.

To compound that the people still buying laptops and desktops for the home - whilst it may be a declining market, it's not yet a dead one - on the whole will stick with whatever OS is on there already.

And let's not forget that your average home user, whilst they may be influenced somewhat by techie friends and family members are _not_ in and of themselves very technical. The fact that your average PC World generally don't sell a computer with anything other than Windows on it means that most will not even know there are alternatives.

Indeed I can't think of anyone outside of my immediate circle of colleagues - and very few within - that even build their own systems anymore thanks to the likes of Dell commoditising the PC over the years.

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Citrix halfway to Avalon with XenDesktop 7 desktop and app virtualizer

TonyJ
Alert

XenApp Users

Well I'd guess that given they've gone to XenDesktop 7, straight from 5.6, that we'll shortly see a XA 7 to align product numbers.

Generally agree on StoreFront but Citrix's idea seems to be to use the Merchandising Server to keep clients up to date in a controlled fashion. In terms of keeping the legacy clients up to date, it wasn't all sunshine and happiness - unsigned packages, part-failed installs, upgrades that changed or broke install paths etc could be a huge problem.

I never got on with the Java client but then I have memories of the piece of junk it was back in MetaFrame days.

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Our new 1.5TB lappie drive isn't thick, it's just the densest - HGST

TonyJ

I would tend to agree with him actually

Although I have both in my laptop - a 512GB SSD and a 1TB spinner, until the price/capacity of SSD starts to come closer to HDD, I can't see mass take up of anything other than where you can use two drives - one for the OS and speed, and one for the apps / data.

That 940(?)GB at around £400 the Reg had the other day is at least heading the right way, but it still has a long way to come down.

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Creative Suite cloud lurch crushes beret-wearers' cost-slash bid

TonyJ

Really...

"This is an easier way of helping us manage customers' licensing".

You mean

"This is an easier way of helping us to lock customers into perpetual licensing".

There you go. Fixed if for you.

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Ofcom: Parents, here's how to keep grubby tots from buying Smurfberries

TonyJ
Paris Hilton

Can you no longer cap your call balance?

I ask this seriously as I guess, like many people, my phone has so many minutes of bundled time to landline and other mobile numbers that it is to all intents and purposes unlimited.

However calls abroad and to premium numbers cost a fortune, but since I never let my kids play with my idevice (but the wife occasionally does hers) it makes me wonder if operators still offer the ability to cap outgoing call costs at £xx ?

Seems to me that that would be an ideal safety measure - cap your outgoing calls and turn off in-app purchases?

Though I do like the idea of turning the device into aeroplane mode prior to handing it over anyway.

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Microsoft Xbox exec quits after ENRAGING the INTERWEBS

TonyJ
FAIL

Christ on a bike...

Seriously? Forced to resign because of a simple opinion. Not an official MS position at that, either, but his own.

And even if it was official - chased down because of it?

I don't want to live on this planet any more.

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