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* Posts by ShelLuser

1814 posts • joined 19 Dec 2010

Microsoft's murder most foul: TechNet is dead

ShelLuser
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Stop

@DZ-Jaz

I'm not saying it is the correct strategy. However, it is not wrong either.

Oh but it is, it is wrong on so many accounts.

Because what you overlook in this statement is Microsoft's core customerbase. Not looking at the depth of their pockets but simply at their sheer numbers: the end users.

Windows still is one of the most widely used operating system. And many small players, my company included, use that to leverage our own business. For me TechNet is a key asset in my company (you guessed it; mainly aimed at systems administration).

I think this is a very wrong strategy. Microsoft seems to be overlooking an obvious issue... If you have a $600 product and you manage to sell 2 you have a $1200 revenue (not a profit perse mind you).

But if you lower said price to, say $400 or $300 you might very well be able to sell a whole lot more (depending on the product). If we stick to $400 and you then manage to sell 4 products you now have made $1600 revenue.

These are but small numbers, now try to think even bigger.

Trying to gross in more money doesn't automatically mean that you'll do so by getting the same sales amounts. What is also very important to realize is that big sales more than often start small.

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MoD signs Microsoft mega licensing deal for 180,000 PCs

ShelLuser
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Joke

Well...

"Yes. They still keep telling each other that next year linux will own the desktop."

But they are making progress. Just check the response to, say, Unity (Gnome desktop) and compare that response to the current of the "desktop standard" OS Windows 8.

Gnome was first in introducing something which made their users run away, and Microsoft followed up on it.

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Brit fantasy artist sues James Cameron over Avatar world

ShelLuser
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Devil

The last Airbender

For me there is only one true Avatar and it's most certainly not this sci-fi remake of Pocahontas (personal opinion).

And that involves the story around Aang, the last Airbender, from a fantasy world where there are only 4 nations which each have mastered control ("bending") over one of the four ancient elements: Fire, Water, Earth and Air.

What makes this animation series a true classic in my opinion is the way its being played out. It touches "adult" topics such as things like oppression, warfare, the ancient "power corrupts and total power corrupts totally", but also gives us an insight to the wide variety in a world. Different nations, different people, different habits.

The best parts about this series, in my opinion of course, are the fact that it actually has an ending, the eye for details (it spans 3 seasons, which matches the 3 nations (the Air nomads had been wiped out by the Fire nation)) and...

So you follow the series and learn almost from the first episode that the fire nation are the main oppressors here. They murdered the Air nomads for no other reason but to stop the next incarnation of the Avatar. Then they started invading the nations of the water tribes and eventually also directly assaulted the Earth nation in an attack which would most likely have taken millions of casualties (the "Scorched Earth" technique).

So what would you expect when you'd visit this fire nation? A whole country of power hungry and war-eager people ready to chop of the heads of any outlander?

More than often the activities of a government don't always have the support of all their citizens. Something which Avatar managed to bring to the viewers attention in a more than excellent way. There is a war? People go on with their lives, the only thing they do hope for is that their family will be home soon.

THAT is Avatar for me.

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PRISM leaks: WTF, you don't spy on your friends, splutters EU

ShelLuser
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Pint

So..

When the Americans demanded access to every bit of privacy sensitive information regarding EU citizens then there was no problem at all. I've never been to the US and quite frankly with the current state of affairs I also wouldn't want to go there, but even so the US government still wanted to gain access to my bank accounts. We all might be terrists after all.

But now, when its happening to the upper brass themselves, all of a sudden we're in a panic. How typical.

To be honest, given the -IMO- paranoia state of the US I can to some extend understand that they're bugging buildings in Washington. I don't agree with it, but I can see where it's coming from. In fact, I think it was to be expected. After all; its not as private as an embassy.

Still, the rumours that they even infiltrated in several buildings in Brussels is taking it one step too far in my opinion. That almost brings back memories of old Mother Russia where diplomats simply expected to be bugged.

I recall reading a story about a Dutch politician who was on a business trip to Moscow (we're talking the 70's here) and on the last day in his hotel he started talking to his wife how cool it could be if the Russians would give him some Caviare as a 'going away present'. Even mentioned a completely random brand which he just read about that very day in a paper.

Guess what he got before departure, with compliments of the Russian state?

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Win 8 user? Thought that was a CAPTCHA? R is for ruh roh

ShelLuser
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Joke

@dgharmon

And you, uhm, also checked your bank account just to be safe? ;-)

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Schwarzenegger says 'I'll be back' for Terminator 5 reboot

ShelLuser
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Joke

I'll be back

For more money.

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Microsoft's MoodScope app predicts smartphones users' feelings

ShelLuser
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Joke

I can see it now...

User is at home? Check!

User is behind his/her computer? Check!

IP address is known with Microsoft? Check!

Users PC is running Windows 7? Check!

Mood: You suffer from suppressed moments of anxiety.

Advice: It's because your computer isn't as effective as it could be, and your subconscious knows this. Fortunately you don't need to seek professional help, just get a Windows 8 license, unlock your true potential and change the way you work forever!

[2 months later]

User is at home? Check!

User is behind his/her computer? Check!

IP address is known with Microsoft? Check!

Users PC is running Windows 8? Check!

Mood: You suffer from depression.

Advice: Consider seeking professional help.

[user thinks: man, this application is GOOD]

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Windows 8.1: So it's, er, half-speed ahead for Microsoft's Plan A

ShelLuser
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WTF?

Merits?!

"Further, if you disregard the noise of Start menu debates, there is obvious merit in concepts like sandboxed apps easily deployed from an app store"

What merits would that be? Or better put: apart from the merits for Microsoft themselves, which obviously sits in the middle of the revenue of both customers who might pay to buy software as well as developers who have to pay to sell software...

I don't see much merits for customers, apart from some ease of use. But that ease comes at a hefty price, because which company controls what does and doesn't get into the appstore? Leading up to: Would Microsoft allow Apache to push OpenOffice into their appstore? Let's say during launch of their possibly upcoming own version of an metro stained Office?

There is a dark side to all this, and that goes double if we're talking about desktop usage.

Don't forget that big changes start slow. And I sure would NOT enjoy the moment when we suddenly discover that Windows 12 (to name a random future release) no longer provides any means to install software yourself APART from either using the appstore or an Enterprise environment.

That is the kind of risk I'm seeing here. And as said: it starts slow. An optional app store, what will be the next move though?

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Windows 8.1: Here at last, but is it good enough?

ShelLuser
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Windows

In short..

"Have you downloaded the Windows 8.1 preview and what do you think?"

I didn't even bother anymore because I simply don't see the point.

They fooled me once with the customer preview, they fooled me twice with the developer preview (basically all the mumbo jumbo marketing nonsense surrounding it), but guess what? I won't be fooled again; I got better things to do.

The way I see it none of the complaints which people had regarding to desktop usage have been addressed. Well, their loss.

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Microsoft partners seriously underwhelmed by Windows 8.1

ShelLuser
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Windows

How long before...

We'll get the lame rhetoric again: "Our partners don't understand our vision and great leadership!"?

A better question: How long before Ballmer will finally realize that the time of dictation is truly behind them?

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Windows 8.1: 'It's good for enterprises, too,' says Redmond

ShelLuser
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Windows

@and-job

"trouble is, most people when they buy a PC have this turd pre-installed and they are not given an alternative. Microsoft play the games with manufacturers to keep their virtual monopoly intact."

Agreed, but that sense of security is crumbling. People start to realize that they can also wait it out (Windows 7 vs. Windows 8) or better yet: ignore the thing all together and get something different such as a tablet.

Microsoft still seems to be relying on this particular sales model, but the times have changed drastically.

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ShelLuser
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FAIL

Does the author actually know how TechNet & MSDN work?

"MSDN and TechNet subscribers can download the preview version now, but you certainly won't be able to deploy the final version for free."

And why wouldn't people subscribed to either TechNet or MSDN be able to deploy the final version for free? We can already do that with version 2012, why would R2 be any different?

Because that is exactly how these environments work. I quote: "Microsoft TechNet Subscriptions help IT Professionals confidently evaluate Microsoft software and plan deployments.", which basically means so much as being able to deploy software and operating systems in specific environments for evaluation and testing purposes. What software you ask? Well: "Microsoft full-version and beta software, with no feature limits". It's this reason why I can easily pick up a full version of Server 2012 right now if I want to. And this has now been extended with the 2012R2 preview and essentials preview versions.

MSDN works basically in the same way, although the focus isn't on the software itself but the purpose to develop software for it: "Software, services and support – you get the complete package for all your development and testing needs." and what do you know? If you check out the MSDN subscriber download page you'll get a good overview of some of the stuff available to MSDN subscribers.

The main difference is the approach. Where TechNet provides a wide variety of software for testing and evaluation, MSDN focusses on development platforms and software for development purposes (you don't only get to download Visual Studio for example, you'll get licenses to grab an accompanying Windows version as well).

SO I don't know where the author got his wisdom from but it doesn't make much sense to me.

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Obama says US won't scramble jets or twist arms for Snowden

ShelLuser
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@Eddy

Quite frankly I think the real issue here is media coverage. So I would translate that first sentence into: "I'm not going to be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker, as long as the media is hot on his trail".

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ShelLuser
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Joke

@NukEvil

That's probably part of Obama's latest political move; trying to make the word "hacker" to sound as negative as possible. Then, when he can eventually announce "We got the hacker" he probably expects everyone to be cheering again.

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Microsoft talks up devices, Windows 8.1 at developer shindig

ShelLuser
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FAIL

Let me fix that for you...

"Rapid release cadence is absolutely fundamental to what we're doing"

I beg to differ. It has become fundamental for you because of what you're doing. And what Microsoft is currently doing is releasing products over their entire range which their customers would rather avoid best as they can. And it's getting out of hand I think.

This isn't about people disliking certain changes any more, in my opinion Microsoft is alienating themselves from their own customer base, even their own fans, and it's becoming dangerous I think. Visual Studio 2012? Most developers prefer not to upgrade but to stick with 2010 because of the better interface, and given that VS2010 supports .NET 4.0 as well you can also easily it together with modern Windows versions. Of course 2012 becomes a requirement when developing for Windows 8, but who's going to do that? New developers, like myself, will have no choice but to buy this version because 2010 is no longer available, or they need to grab an MSDN subscription. I know some people did just that solely for grabbing 2010 and took the extra's (software licenses) as a bonus. But it was 2010 they were after.

Xbox One anyone? I'm a PS3 user and although I prefer the environment you won't find me trashing the Xbox. In this case there was also no need what so ever, because Microsoft's own Xbox fans were doing that themselves after the news of all the Xbox One tie ins (no second hand games, constant internet connection, etc.). Sure; Microsoft reversed some of those decisions, but the initial act remains. And the damage has been done; because all console users know that if you buy a gaming console then chances are high that its functionality will change over the years.

And what does Microsoft do? Instead of realizing what is going on they're going to release more products over a shorter time period. And I don't think it's hard to guess what their motivations are: more money. They're going to need it if no one is buying their stuff any more.

But honestly: instead of creating more products, why not start with creating better products instead? You know: products which people would actually want to use? Because if even your fans are rallying and openly state that they'll just skip and avoid certain versions, even on your own fora, then something is very wrong here.

Don't go for quantity; try going for quality instead!

I honestly think this is a very dangerous development for Microsoft. Make one product which people don't want and you can calculate the risks involved. Start mass production of that stuff and you may very well head for a big financial impact.

Even so, I do hope I'll be proven wrong. But I have a bad feeling about all this.

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Windows 8.1 start button appears as Microsoft's Blue wave breaks

ShelLuser
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Stop

@Justin

They need to add an option to Windows 8 to make it work exactly like Windows 3.1 did - why should I be forced into using Microsofts crappy new "user friendly" UI when what they had before worked perfectly fine for me?

I know you're joking but quite frankly that is exactly what they should have done. Because when Windows 95 came out, which basically introduced the start menu to the masses, it still retained the option to use progman.exe, and that feature has been included with more modern Windows versions for a long time. Some people fell back to that but eventually everyone picked up on the start menu.

But I do believe that this is the main reason why Windows 8 is the catastrophe it is today: people aren't given a choice, so they''re simply making one themselves by not getting involved with Windows 8 at all.

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ShelLuser
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Windows

@hungee

2 click access to device manager, uninstall programs, control panel, System, and so much more.

Unless you're a user like me who uses a non-privileged user account. When I run certain msc files I need to raise my privileges. On Windows 7 this means right click on the option and "run as administrator". With this great Windows 8 that has become impossible because you're already using a context menu (you need to right click to access this menu) yet one which only starts msc files without being privilege aware.

Therefor on Windows 7 its a meagre 3 click option for me: click the start menu, right click (for example) "my computer" and click "manage". Due to my privileges and because I'm trying to access 'my computer' the system automatically picks up that I need to raise my privileges.

And well; because the control panel sits in my start menu as a menu option I too can reach all these with 2 clicks (start -> hover -> click).

Do almost anything faster

Like what? When working on Windows 7 I heavily use the "recently started programs" section which dynamically changes based on the software I often use. This allows me to almost every time use 2 clicks to start the software I need the most. Better yet: because it's dynamic I don't have to do a thing myself.

Try that with Windows 8.

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ShelLuser
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Windows

@AC

"At the risk of a bazillion downvotes: This is exactly, pretty much word for word what was said when XP came out by many many people (myself included)."

With one huge difference: XP still provided a working progman.exe, so if you really didn't like the start menu and wanted to go back to the way it was you could.

People had a choice in the matter, even if it did require some in-depth understanding how this stuff works.

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ShelLuser
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Stop

Visual Studio 2013?

"The company revealed on Tuesday the availability of Windows Server and System Center 2012 RT, Windows Intune and SQL Server 2014 and Visual Studio 2013.".

Not quite correct. As you can read on Microsoft's techblog they announced the upcoming build preview of Visual Studio 2013, that will be available at the end of the month.

Visual Studio 2013 itself is expected to be available later this year, according to that same blog that is.

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Play the Snowden flights boardgame: Avoid going directly to Jail

ShelLuser
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Joke

@Anal

Because they would most likely expect a little display of courtesy back. But for some reason I doubt that Google would consider it a bonus if Snowden started to advertise for them ;)

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ShelLuser
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@AC

".. they are talking to him in an uncomfortable room about all he knows about the NSA."

Or he's freely giving them any information they want (and as much as he can produce) in exchange for safety on the terminal, to be raised with a scheduled direct flight.

That would be the most likely scenario in my opinion. He's already an unwanted person, so he basically has nothing to lose any more.

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PlayStation 4 is FreeBSD inside

ShelLuser
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Windows

I pity..

I pity the fools who read this news and pick it up as a confirmation that one operating system is better than the other.

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Ed Iacobucci: Brains behind OS/2 and Citrix, nicest guy in tech

ShelLuser
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@btrower

"For the most part, in IT, the bad guys won."

I think it's not so much an issue of "bad guys" perse, but more so of people who have little to no affinity with ICT and the tech sector as a whole, and thus only approach things from a business perspective. And business can sometimes be ruthless, but that's just the way its supposed to be in my opinion.

Even so; I think it's that lack of understanding which makes those guys look like "bad guys". Simply because if you know their product by heart and then ask them something about it, even if its not too specific, they more than often cannot answer your question because in the end they know jack shit about it.

That's most likely also why the author could describe a situation where he could talk to the CEO without any marketing drones around. Simply because this CEO knew what he was talking about, thus didn't need any drones to shield him from specific questions.

Based on what I read so far I bet this was also the kind of guy who would easily tell you that he didn't know about a certain issue and only because of that would need to refer you to one of his colleagues. Compare that to what you get these days during presentations when people ask critical yet fair questions...

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Steelie Neelie: One cloud contract model to rule them all

ShelLuser
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Pint

One question remains though..

"One of the big barriers to using cloud computing is a lack of trust," she said. "People don't always understand what they're paying for, and what they can expect."

But is that caused by a lesser degree of competence from these people, or because some Internet based companies can get away with just about everything? Often in the EU, more than often, do you get to see Internet "ghost" firms which will gladly accept your money but won't deliver any services.

And the worst part (though I can only comment on my local situation of Holland): 9 out of 10 cases the police has no or hardly time for cases like this. Especially because it's usually petty theft and resources to trace these culprits would be quite hefty... Over here the latest report surfaced last week: a few Dutch and Belgian people had booked a vacation with an Internet firm, and that firm is now all of a sudden "gone" and so is their money.

So is this about the companies? Or about an, often EU led, government which refuses to give its citizens the protection they're entitled to and basically try to let others deal with all that?

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Making the case for upgrading from Server 2003

ShelLuser
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Windows

You like hard questions? ;)

"The hardest question to answer is the simplest: why make the move from Server 2003 to Server 2012?"

Well, I think I can top this one with an even better question: "Why make the move to Server 2012 with its dinkey-toy interface, while you can still get Server 2008R2?".

Not only will the price of purchase be lower, you'll also get a product which was designed to be the direct upgrade for 2003, thus making the upgrade process a whole lot easier per definition. Another thing to keep in mind is the product itself: 2008 has been around for quite some time now, so you can be sure that a lot of the "out of the box" bugs have been addressed by now. Server 2012? Considering the very poor reception it gets I have my doubts there.

Finally there's an even bigger issue to keep in mind: the dreaded End Of Life issue which we're addressing right now. Windows Server 2008R2 extended support ends in 2020, as can be seen here (link to lifecycle page of Microsoft support).

The Windows Server 2012 EOL date on the other end only adds a meagre 3 years, it's support ends in 2023 as you can see here.

Sure, time is money. But not having to deal with the dinkey toy interface that was Metro is also worth a lot of money to a lot of systems administrators. There is much more to this story then "merely upgrading".

In my opinion companies are much better off picking 2008 over 2012.

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Rise of the Machines: How computers took over the stock market

ShelLuser
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@InLog

I disagree for many reasons. The first being the obvious one: people pay to be able to trade on the stock market. So where the article says that in some transactions millions were lost, the other side of such situations is that there were also plenty of people who made lots of money out of it. Its the beauty of the stock exchange in my opinion: almost everything works both ways.

Another aspect is the damage itself. What damage exactly? Trading or investing on the stock exchange involves taking certain risks. You can try to regulate all you want, but its those risks which allow people to either make or lose lots of money. Regulating only means postponing the inevitable.

And that's problem number two: If you regulate the amount of trades people can make you're not only blocking possible losses, but also blocking possible profits. Because having the option to purchase many stocks in one go is a good way for a trader / customer to invest and for the company which sells those stock to make some profit out of this.

And it's those profits why most people trade on the stock exchange in the first place.

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Oracle posts flat revenues on slow software sales

ShelLuser
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I wonder...

"Oracle had earlier forecast software sales growth of as much as 11 per cent, but the actual figure was just 1 per cent, bringing the total to $4bn in new software sales."

I can't help wonder if this would include software sales from Sun (and in my opinion Sun had plenty of quality software for sale besides Solaris).

Because if this would be true then for me it would be the perfect example as to how far the oracle arrogance can go.

I mean; every former Sun customer knows that the moment oracle took over prices were raised almost two folded, and even higher after that. I was lucky and had the option to bail, I know many other companies weren't that fortunate.

So I can't help wonder.. Because if my assumptions are right I wouldn't be surprised at all if we can look forward to a steadily decrease in software sales, going down as it goes and if I had anything to say about it eventually hitting rock bottom, hopefully with a bang too.

And for the record: No, I don't like oracle at all.

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Can DirectAccess take over the world?

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Refreshing

Both the article as well as the development. Although I'm very sceptical about the continuous "we're running out of IPv4, the Internet blows up tomorrow" (and nothing happens the day after) I still think it's a good thing that some companies (and projects) started paying serious attention to IPv6.

I'm somewhat proud to say that very soon all of my customer websites (and my own of course!) will be accessible using both protocols.

Either way, I think it's quite refreshing to read a story which shares both the strong and weak points of a new development. I was especially interested in your (author) display of interest in the possible potential. Because in my opinion a lot of Microsoft developments show high potential, in a lot of cases its poor marketing (and "after-sales") which turn it into a disaster.

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Google staffing boss: Our old hiring procedures were 'worthless'

ShelLuser
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No offense but...

I want to have as little to do with Google as possible.

And only once you start thinking about how that might be done will you realize "how deep the rabbit hole goes".

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Can Microsoft's U-turn stop the Xbox 360 becoming another XP?

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Pint

@ge

This.. I was thinking the same thing.

Many people overlook something very nasty yet also very important with console gaming: stuff changes over time.

I think that's a very dangerous (and sometimes unwanted) development, but seems to happen all over the place. My best (but dated) example is a PS3 game called "Gran Turismo 5". Its a very cool racing game, but when I bought it most races had a grid start, I loved it. In the mean time someone apparently didn't agree and now almost every race has a rolling start, something I really do not enjoy at all. Of course this happened half a year or so after purchase, so even if I wanted to (I don't) I couldn't get a refund.

But the same thing happens on your consoles. Although it doesn't bother me at all the PS3 used to have an option which allowed people to install an "other" operating system. That functionality has been removed over time; even consoles can change.

So before anyone starts countering your argument I think they should keep this in mind as well; with consoles you can't be sure that the thing you bought will continue working as you expected it to.

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Virtualisation: Where are my savings?

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Stop

What a load of nonsense...

"It seemed so plausible, but for most of us the savings never arrived. Why not?"

That heavily depends on the market. The article sounds as if you're targeting the whole industry, and if so it would be a clear sign of ignorance.

We're not saving eh? Ok, then let me spell something out for you.

In the old days you could only opt for either website hosting (getting your own private, but limited, webspace) and if you required more the only available options left were either hiring a server, or getting one of your own and make that available somehow.

The differences are even visible today. Take GoDaddy. They provide dedicated servers for you to use. Of course a decent one (8GB memory, 2x 1TB HDD, 10TB/month data traffic) will cost you approx. E 160,- / month at the time of writing.

GoDaddy also provides Virtual Private Servers and that shows a clear difference. Although the specifications are often lower you also pay a lot less. In this case a 'Deluxe' server would cost you approx. E 50,- / month. So you could easily opt to getting 3 servers instead of one.

And there are plenty of such examples. Leaseweb for example; dedicated servers starting off at E 30,- / month vs. cloud hosting starting around E 7,- / month.

So now you can get a full (virtual) server of your own to do as you like, while paying a whole lot less when you get yourself a physical server.

How is this not saving? How more obvious than this can it possibly get?

Sure, I know what's up. The article most likely talks about companies with in-house servers who more than often now get into contact with virtualization options but won't save a dime if they don't know how to use it. But that's not what the article told us, it basically addressed the whole market.

In the end it depends on the situation at hand if you'll be able to save up or not. The tool doesn't make the solution, it can only provide one. But that doesn't automatically make it the right solution for every problem.

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PC makers REALLY need Windows 8.1 to walk on water - but guess what?

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Joke

At least it's good for something...

All those "business analysts" are having the time of their live, selling their "wisdom" to anyone who wants to have it.

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Julian Assange: I'm quite happy to sleep on Ecuador's sofa FOREVER

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Boffin

Not quite...

"It is legally bound, under higher laws which it has acceded to, as part of its United Nations obligations, to accept the transfer of political refugees to the country which granted asylum,".

Makes me wonder what those higher laws actually are. But if he feels this way; why not start a prosecution?

I think he's totally off though. Because if you look closely you'll see that there still is no "official" system in place which regulates the use of immunity. For example; because of the immunity of ambassadors and their cars they normally also don't have to worry about parking violations. As a result plenty of diplomats basically allow their cars to be placed "where possible", even if it's officially not allowed.

Yet there are also many countries which don't tolerate such behaviour and demand that their own embassy personal pays up for their own traffic tickets. And there are also host countries which use alternative means to enforce the law. In Holland it's not uncommon for a diplomatic car to get towed away. They can't search it but it seems they can move it out of the way.

Or what to think about embassies which hire personal from the host country but immediately make it clear that they can't count on immunity because they're not citizens of the main country?

A small example, but one which clearly shows that there currently is no specific ruling in these matters. Some countries are very strict with upholding diplomatic relationships (not paying for traffic fines) whereas others couldn't care less about "pesky details".

As such, I think Mr. Assange is doing some wishful thinking here, but he seems to be completely off.

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Latest NASA ASTRONAUT class is HALF FEMALE

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Joke

Could it be?

All chasing after Bruce Willis perhaps, imagine the disappointment when they finally realize that it was all a movie and not in the least based on the real thing ;-)

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Julian Assange: Google's just an arm of US government

ShelLuser
Silver badge
WTF?

@Eadon

"What I can do with Android, however, which I cannot do with iOS or Blackberry or Win Phone 8 - this: I can download the Android source code, inspect it for spyware, modify it to remove it if I wish, compile it and put it on my phone."

Can you really now?

According to the Android website (link to android.com) the current version is 4.2, codename "Jellybean".

But according to the Android developer site (link to source.android.com) the most recent version of the source repository is 4.1.

That strikes me as a bit odd, considering that 4.2 has been released almost one year ago.

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Bone up on fresh EU privacy law - or end up in the clink, IT biz warned

ShelLuser
Silver badge
Pint

It's going to be awesome, yeah sure....

When governments start regulating stuff they hardly understand you'll get regulations which the involved sector will hardly understand. And that often results in major annoyances (or worse) for the group which rights those regulations should protect in the first place.

Take a look at the "cookie law"; it's a perfect example. Basically the law states that websites need to warn visitors before they come into contact with tracking cookies ("trackers"). But this regulation does not include cookies which you might need to keep your website running as optimal as possible.

Despite of that most companies basically approached the whole thing with "better to be safe than sorry" and made it involve every cookie on their website. And can you blame them? Because one could argue that every cookie can be used to track people; at the very least you can pick up from which domain they originated (or said to originate).

And as a result we now get to click 'yes' on almost every website. And to make sure they don't track you it's often stored in a cookie with a short expiration date so you can keep clicking yes, which has quickly became user annoyance number 1.

So when that researcher says that: "end users were already preparing for the new rules of the incoming regulation" I think he drew the wrong conclusions. End users aren't getting ready to sue the heck out of the market, I think they're getting ready to browse the web without getting annoying "cookie banners" on every site they visit.

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SCO vs. IBM battle resumes over ownership of Unix

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@Daniel

Someone forgot to kill the parent process. That's the only sure way to get rid of defunct processes.

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Shy? Socially inadequate? Fiddling with your phone could help

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But in the end..

There's always a huge difference between a computer program or a real person. Quite frankly I think that if people really have this kind of problems with their social live they're better of relying on friends or family. If that isn't an option then professional help.

Because actually conversing with a real person will actually make them feel comfortable with the process, because it's real. I don't think this compares at all to a computer simulation.

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Boffins find evidence Atlantic Ocean has started closing

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@Ian

How about global moving? ;-)

Global warming won't work any more I think because that has lost some credibility as of late.

But we definitely need something new so that we can start expensive investigations into it for the greater good of the children. And the best part with this name is that "moving" doesn't even have to involve the plates, you can easily make something up as well.

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When to say those three little words: 'I am quitting'

ShelLuser
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"When to say I quit..."

Rule 1: When you already have something else.

Unfortunately there are too many people who overlook this and manage to get themselves into major problems because of it...

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Red Hat to ditch MySQL for MariaDB in RHEL 7

ShelLuser
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I dunno

Why not make a real statement and use (for example) PostGreSQL instead?

Each to his own, but it would have left a little more impression with me than simply going for the "best mysql compatible dba out there".

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Critical Java SE update due Tuesday fixes 40 flaws

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Windows

@AC

Very reassuring that Java is being used in many banks

And the ones which don't more than often resort to ASP.NET. You're point being?

7
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I told you I'd be back: Arnie set for another career revival

ShelLuser
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Re: Getting on a bit

Begun the search for more money has.

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We want to put a KILL SWITCH into your PHONE, say Feds

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Leave this to the manufactorer: NOT the government

I have a Windows phone (WP 7.5), which I happen to like too, and guess what? It already has such a feature which I can also chose to turn on or off: "Find your phone". It sends my phone identifier to Microsoft, optionally along with some other information I can opt in to send them (search results, spoken text results, etc.).

The next part is my Microsoft account or ID. I can attach my phone to my Microsoft account thus giving me direct remote access to my phone using their Windows phone website.

This access can then be used for all sorts of things. I can browse their app store using my PC and after I decide that I want something I can tell it to send the app to my phone straight away. But I can also tell my phone to ring, lock or even format (erase) itself.

Why would I need the government for that?

I don't think this is for the better good; it's for their own good. Maybe I'm paranoid, could be, but I wouldn't be surprised if the next step would be attaching said kill switch to voice recognition software. You know: you're mentioning "let's bomb the bass tonight" and all of a sudden your connection is gone and 5 minutes later you got police all over you for suspicious activities... "But I was going to a dance party? Acid you know, stuff from the 90's?" "Oh, poison is involved too? Tell it to the judge you damn terrist!".

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EU signs off on eCall emergency-phone-in-every-car plan

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@Pen-y-gors

Well, here in Holland we already had idiocy like that in the past. "Rekening rijden" ("Driving by bill"), every car would need to be fitted with a GPS device (and they even said that's what it had to be) so that it could detect if you were driving on a road for which you had to pay.

The plan never made it, but it seems some politicians went up the ladder a bit.

I think we have every right to be concerned. Because what will be next? Once the politicians finally discover that such devices can also measure speed I wouldn't be surprised one bit if eventually some "political genius" cooks up an idea to have the devices track the speed of a vehicle and when it goes too fast you'll need to pay, no matter what.

Think of all the money they can save by not having to station police men alongside the road?

And when looking at Holland; I don't think those police officers will be placed elsewhere in the force so that they can now perform other, more important, tasks. Of course not; they will have to go because that is really going to help the government save money.

This may sound like far fetched science fiction to you, but once they start adding this big brother crap into the cars I'm quite convinced that it will only be a matter of time. As crazy as it may sound, I've seen politicians do even crazier stuff. Just because they're politicians doesn't make them smart people.

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Girls, beer and C++: How to choose the right Comp-Sci degree for you

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I went broad instead of going deep

That means not just learning the syntax of Java or C++, but why languages work the way they do

In other words make sure to lay out a good foundation on which you can continue building. A very solid and valuable advice, even though newcomers may think this to be extremely clichéd (and in a way it is). Another thing I'm missing out on (or maybe I overlooked it): A degree isn't necessarily a "get into the market for free" ticket. I've seen many examples where someone with a high end degree simply knew shit about the basics:

"Why would you want to declare a variable?".

"A trick question eh? Well, you don't have to if you're using C# or avoid adding explicit in VB".

"No, I want to know why you'd want to declare one first?".

Stuff like that always reminds me that you might be better off going for a broad approach. The reason I went for this route is because I'm a systems/network engineer (or administrator?) which means that you'll be doing a lot of different things. From helping people out with simple Word problems right down to setting up a firewall design, that's the kind of diversity I really like.

But to me broader is always better.

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BYOD beyond the noise

ShelLuser
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Windows

Hmm...

the different types of BYOD policy choice you can make, the infrastructure you need to build to support your policy, the problems of provisioning and access.

Infrastructure we need to build, or the infrastructure they want us to build? Considering where it's coming from I wouldn't be surprised if we get a story about how "analysis" (done by Freeform Dynamics obviously) has showed how "certain hardware components" which "surprisingly" happened to build by HP are just what the doctor ordered.

Depending on the kind of environment we're talking about I don't think there has to be much impact. Most Enterprise based wireless routers normally support multiple SSID's for example, and a whole lot of extra's to tune them (think about speed limitations, shielding of certain networks, hiding networks, etc.).

If systems administration is any good then I think they can apply basic risk assessment to such an environment to prevent disaster from happening. Most likely within their current environment as well.

Maybe I'm just being cynical here, but the real problem at hand would be convincing the upper brass. They're most likely prefer paying attention from "case studies by the experts". This will go double if said environment is merely following the hype-want-to-be.

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Whoever recently showed us the secret documents: Do get in touch

ShelLuser
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It's just a plot...

be aware we've just moved offices

Just moved offices without a nice and cosy office warming party with all the commentards?

I think this is just an elaborate plot to hide the obvious truth from us ;)

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NSA PRISM deepthroat VANISHES as pole-dance lover cries into keyboard

ShelLuser
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@murph

Perhaps to make sure he'd keep his mouth shut. Oops! :)

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ShelLuser
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@AC

"Law abiding citizens have nothing to fear (and everything to gain) from such a system"

Unless someone changes said law to include something totally outrageous (it wouldn't be the first time, esp. if you look at this from a world-wide scale) and then uses this system to enforce said law.

Now you're suddenly in trouble.

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