* Posts by chris 17

183 posts • joined 1 Nov 2010

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Evil Wi-Fi kills iPhones, iPods in range – 'No iOS Zone' SSL bug revealed

chris 17
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“There is nothing you can do about it other than physically running away from the attackers. This is not a denial-of-service where you can't use your Wi-Fi – this is a denial-of-service so you can't use your device even in offline mode.”

Does that make sense to anyone? Are they suggesting it'll mess with your device even if WiFi is off as in airplane mode but you are still in range?

if so that surely makes a mockery of airplane mode where your device is still talking via radio?

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NASA guy to White House: Be really careful with that HTTPS stuff

chris 17
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Re: bureaucrats rather than techies

It's trivial to put a load balancer or other device that can do https in front of the target http server(s).

Making a mountain out of a mole hill this is.

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Troubleshooting feature on Cisco routers is open to data-slurp abuse

chris 17
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Re: Cable pr0n?

but what was the machine the cables where plugged into, didn't look like any recent network system i've seen.

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Got iOS 8.3 installed? Pssh, you are SO last week… version 8.4 is out

chris 17
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Re: <sarcasm>Yay!</sarcasm>

@ Anonymous Coward

plug your idevice into a computer and update via itunes, no extra space required then. the extra space is only required when updating over the air

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Motorola's 5-incher finds the G-spot: Moto G 4G budget Android smartie

chris 17
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Re: eh?

@ Arnold Lieberman

why not just 1 sim on Three or giffgaff that does phone and data? I can't imagine your 2 sims splitting V/D being cheaper than 1 for voice and data on those networks.

for £10 on three i get 1GB 4G, 600 minutes x net and 2000 mins on net. i was previously on the £7 per month tariff giving 500 GB 4G 200 x net and 2000 on net. all you can eat 4G data and 200 xnet = £17. or 4GB + 600 xnet for £16.

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Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

chris 17
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Re: Yes, without super high def entertainment there is nothing to do.

catchphrase :)

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Force your hand: Apple 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display

chris 17
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i used to use spotlight for everything, including calculations, now its in the middle of the screen i find its a real pain in the arse.

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chris 17
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Re: @ AC

absolute nonsense, my macbook from 2008 is running the latest os yosemite 10.10, it'll be 7 years old this august.

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chris 17
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7 years this year for my 2008 macbook (8GB RAM and 256 GB SSD. its complaining about the battery now.

I've had 8 work laptops (1 HP, 6 dells and a Lenovo) in that time.

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BT Home Hub SIP backdoor blunder blamed for VoIP fraud

chris 17
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Re: Well watch out for 192.168.99.X

no need to hide private IP's on internet forums as they are non routable across the internet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

its the public addresses you need to worry about as they lead right to your network.

you are being far too paranoid. just 1 firewall properly configured that doesn't deliberately lie to you is sufficient to keep you safe, most will have a firewall on each computer too.

if you are this scared at the moment, just wait till ipv6 is rolled out, each machine will have its own publicly addressable ip, whilst right now you only have 1 publicly addressable IP for all your home devices.

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chris 17
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Re: A few at fault here

if you pen tested the internet connection from the internet before the pbx was installed its likely the port in question would have been shown as not listening/down/nothing there just as you would expect if the firewall was configured to drop inbound traffic. Its an undocumented feature on the BT HH thats at fault. even if the pbx was installed and just happened to be offline at the time of a port scan it would have looked like the ports where locked as expected. The fix in this case would be, assuming the pbx runs on *nix, is to enable the firewall on the pbxs and permit only those ports from specific internet IP's.

Who would bother to test if the firewall was truly blocking for the specific ports in question? When you do the job for a while you expect to trust your equipment, basic or advanced, firewalls generally do as they are told.

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chris 17
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3. It quickly emerged that the IP PBX had been set up on the same subnet as the computer network

FAIL - not only from a security perspective, but stupid from a networking perspective too. Again, if you want to do a botch-up job like this, you'd better know the implications of it.

even if they where on different subnets they would need some security (ACL or firewall) between the subnets to make any difference. just having multiple subnets is not enough, Also having the PBX on a different subnet to everything else may not have made any difference here.

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chris 17
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Re: Really?

just what are the advantages of business broadband access to the internet over domestic access to the internet if you are on a best speed possible tariff?

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chris 17
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using the supplied documentation, the administrator selected the settings that indicated all non solicited inbound connections would be dropped. The expectation driven by the available information was that all inbound non solicited comms would be dropped. If it said block all non solicited inbound apart from SIP then everyone would be clear that the sip port was vulnerable and take approprate action.

So as a home user i now need to pen test access to my (and those i care about) internal network from the internet as i can't trust the config settings on my ISP supplied router.

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BT slams ‘ludicrous’ Openreach report as Vodafone smirks

chris 17
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Re: And now it all makes sense

Void-a-phone :) bought Cable and Wireless WorldWide (the other half of Cable & Wireless plc when it split) so has iirc the second largest fibre network in the UK and a worldwide network presence. They could if they wanted to build out their own network like NTL/Telewest/Virgin but won't as its cheaper to lobby OFCOM and gain access to open reach at cheaper rates.

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Ford: Our latest car gizmo will CHOKE OFF your FUEL if you're speeding

chris 17
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Re: If the gov was really bothered about speeders

@ Jimmy2Cows

except for situations like overtaking

everyone would be permanently overtaking then like the twat who over took me in a 30 when i was doing 30 the other week.

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chris 17
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Mercedes have had this as an option on their cars (i've driven C & E classes with this) for at least 4 years now. I got the impression this was a COTS system developed by Bosch and selectively added to cars by the manufacturers.

Nice ford add by the reg :)

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Hated biz smart meter rollout: UK.gov sticks chin out, shuts eyes

chris 17
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does anyone actually know anyone that thinks smart meters are a good idea?

As has already been mentioned once the novelty has worn off it won't stop people carrying on with their lives, watching tv, boiling the kettle, turning the tumble dryer on or whacking the thermostat up. It won't stop my other half leaving the sky box on when turning the tv off or leaving the tv on when turning the sky box off, won't stop the bathroom lights being left on all day and all night unless i switch them off or turning the oven on 2 hours before its needed. i need smart devices and appliances that can remind people to turn them off if not in use or better still just turn themselves off , not smart meters

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Banks defend integrity of passcode-less TouchID login

chris 17
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Re: Your phone and your thumb!

@ Tim Brown 1

How very dramatic! the first of many to come. There are probably limits on how much money can be moved by the app and even if the phone and thumb where stolen the phone could be remotely bricked. I can't see this resulting in a spike of muggings involving amputation on the off chance the owner has installed and setup mobile banking by one of these banks that uses TouchID, the risk is not worth the reward (easy to trace the destination of the money increases the chances of being caught). Hundreds of millions of iPhones and a few hundred thousand app downloads.

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Tell us, do you enjoy the thought of BT-EE's sweaty fourplay?

chris 17
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Re: platitudes

you pay line rental regardless, its for the supply of the line carrying the service to you. i don't recall paying for the phone service for many years, its always been free with the line rental.

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chris 17
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Re: platitudes

BT have to provide a competitive service just as everyone else does. Open reach charge everyone the same including BT, SKY & Virgin. There is no conspiracy here. If Open Reach was independent everyone would be lobbying it to their advantage and it would be a complete mess, costs would go up and service down. despite ditching Marconi, 21CN seems to be successful and has enabled others to provide services on Open Reach at a competitive costs. gone are the days of paying £20 just for unto 8MB broadband.

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chris 17
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Re: Recently switched to EE

If your on ADSL its essentially the same service from all the providers. Some have backhaul at the exchange, which could be cheaper for them, others just have BT provide the backhaul or just have BT provide the service how would anyone know the difference?

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Vodafone Pay TV launch rumoured for November

chris 17
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I wonder if VM's expansion plans are a reaction to Vodafone entering the TV market or just BT's push for market share? As VM have shown they have no interest in creating content they should let others provide services on their infrastructure and see the take up increase. Earning something from the homes their wires are installed in is better than nothing!!

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chris 17
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Love or hate it but Sky are knocking out some great content. If byour a sports fan that is the only place in town but with stiff competition from BT.

I watch F1 and the core team that moved from ITV to BBC are now on Sky and producing great content both during and outside of the race weekend. This is at the expense of the BBC coverage which was excellent but now nowhere near as good but the Sky coverage is an improvement over what was excellent BBC coverage. Having written that if I didn't get F1 with my HD subscription I would not subscribe to sky sports just to get the once or twice a month F1 races that anyone wanting F1 now will have to do.

In my opinion Sky do in the large provide value for money if you enjoy watching their content.

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Ark scoops £700m to host ALL UK.gov's data centre needs

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A gold MacBook with just ONE USB port? Apple, you're DRUNK

chris 17
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all these complaints about only 1 port and very little mention of the core m cpu.

surely the use of the core m is the significant event here?

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chris 17
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Re: I don't get it

the cheapest watch starts at ~$399, there are loads of watch makers who sell watches starting in the 10's of thousands, i don't get your point?

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chris 17
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Re: 1 USB port? Seriously?

um, this is just one machine in their portfolio of machines, they also sell macbook airs, macbooks & macbook pros. if you are hell bent in buying this machine then you can buy an adapter that enables you to plug in additional usb devices like sd card readers.

i don't understand the bitching of supposed technical people. THIS has some limitations so see what else is in the catalogue that suits your needs.

No need to think different just think, this is not the product for you and move on

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Scotland to get National ID system 'by the backdoor', campaigners mull challenge

chris 17
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I wasn't conveying an opinion just my understanding of why HMRC wanted access to medical information.

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chris 17
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if you are registered as a non dom (i.e a British national that lives over seas and therefore does not pay UK taxes) frequently accessing the Scottish NHS will show that you are actually living in the UK and subject to taxes.

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Hated smart meters likely to be 'a costly failure' – MPs

chris 17
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Re: Sort of related question

if you have a Vaillant boiler look into getting the weather compensating boiler controls vr470f. This will allow the boiler to operate as efficiently as possible by varying its output according to the prevailing outside temperature in addition to maintaining the house at desired temperatures at day or night. It would be better if it allowed a greater number of temperatures to be set.

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Super SSD tech: Fancy a bonkers 8TB all-flash PC?

chris 17
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@ Lee D

2TB is a lot to be carting about, is it important? is it backed up, what happens if the laptop is lost/stolen, what happens if the drive dies?

Surely you only use a hundred GB or so of that data at a time that could be easily cached on an affordable (<£150) SSD, the rest could be resiliently stored with fast remote access to it.

the concept of carting all your data around is outmoded. Fast networks and fast storage reduce the need to have all your stuff with you.

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3 spectastic Lumias for price of 1 rival flagship: Microsoft sells biz on cheapie experience

chris 17
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Re: Excellent pricing

@ Arnold Lieberman

how many hours do you estimate you spent setting up and optimising this to work as you like it?

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Ericsson, Telstra and Qualcomm up the ante with 600Mbps demo

chris 17
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Re: Willy Waving

@Mage

i really don't understand why people complain about others pushing the current envelope. Bill Gates said you didn't need more than 640 KB, one of the richest men on the planet got it totally wrong and made his money of the back of proving he was wrong ever since.

I do think there is a limit as to how much of something is actually useful and how much is surplus, i.e the UK speed limit is 70 MPH but for technical reasons (need revs & gears) my car can do much more than that. If they designed it to do 70 MPH at the edge of its envelope it would be woeful at everything & I'd buy something more spritely.

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chris 17
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Re: Nice.

That's similar to ADSL, although ADSL is saved through lots of bandwidth at the telco side.

most mobile comms are bursty with a few sustained demands like video streaming etc.

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IBM sued for talking up semiconductor business it couldn't give away

chris 17
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Re: Worthless chip manufacturing plant??

we could have setup a just giving page and chipped in the money from the bottom of the sofa, car seat etc

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Britain needs more tech immigrants, quango tells UK.gov

chris 17
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in my eyes, there is a lot of fragmentation in how companies staff IT in the UK. In the past there where network, server, desktop, application & developer teams, many of the labour intensive roles like developer and application teams have been hived off as packets of work to third party companies, initially based in the UK but now more likely abroad. In my eyes this outsourcing is what is reducing the availability of UK based staff, and now many organisations require data to be retain in the eu/uk which requires staff here hence the need to import those foreign nationals doing the jobs abroad to do them here instead!!

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Euro broadcast industry still in a fug over that 4K-ing UHD telly

chris 17
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Re: Again?

1080i is less bandwidth than 720p which is why 1080i is used for HD.

1080i is 540 lines interlaced with the next frame so at 30 frames per second that is 30 frames at 540 lines each frame

720p is 720 lines each frame so at 30 frames per second that is 30 frames at 720 lines each frame.

i'm always amazed at how many people don't understand the difference between p & i.

1080p is the current gold standard and requires ~ twice the bandwidth of 1080i effectively 2 HD channels, the providers would rather eek out 2 paying HD channels than 1 for the same money.

incidentally in the UK SD is 576i which is 288 lines per frame, 1 HD channel at 1080i is ~ 2 SD channels, 1080p is ~3.75 SD channels.

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chris 17
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Re: "Satellite is the ideal way to distribute 4K. We will drive it just as we did with HD"

Also 1080i is lower bandwidth than 720p, just 540 lines shown each frame vs 1080 with progressive.

i read many years ago it was the reduced bandwidth that the providers liked as they didn't need to rent so many frequencies from the satellite providers.

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Traditional enterprise workloads on an all-flash array? WHY WOULD I BOTHER?

chris 17
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The reason that ERP system has an 80ms client side latency is because the query took 13 separate 6ms storage requests and 2ms of processing to answer. Turn those 6ms requests to 1ms and your latency drops to 15ms, turn them to 500us requests and the total latency drops to 6.5ms. This is without doing any modifications to the application, there is basically no better place to invest money in to optimize than storage performance.

totally agree!!

You only have to look at a typical webpage to see the huge number of requests going here there and everywhere to deliver the page content. Internal apps aren't far off especially the security conscious ones that have to retrieve secure keys from hardware security modules. this all adds to the latency experienced at the client, its not all a single simple san data retrieve.

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chris 17
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Re: Budgets are binary

That's the same problem with budgets across the public sector, there is no onus or reward to save money, but you won't get in trouble spending more than you could have but within your budget. Also if you spend less now you'll get less next time and have to work harder to justify why you need more than last time to do x. Stupid blind accountancy.

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Capita gobbles up more public sector pie

chris 17
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i'd hate to be a recruiter covering crapita. when ever they call me they are very reluctant to say its for crapita and when i tell them i'd never work for them they immediately start the spewl on how much turnover and how advantageous it is to work for such a large organisation.

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chris 17
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Crapita strikes again. I've been avoiding working for them for the past 10 years, every business they buy they close and relocate the "service" elsewhere. Problem is you never know where they will strike next. I imagine for security reasons they need to keep onshore a lot of the government department jobs which is a good thing at least. There should be a limit to the amount of contracts (value or volume) one organisation can have across government, that would atleast promote competition between the players.

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Thecus N4310 4-bay: A NAS-ty beast for the budget-conscious

chris 17
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lenovo ts440 with xeon e3-1245 v3 with 4 x empty Hot Swap drive bays including delivery = £308 from ebuyer or this NAS?

I'd go for the xeon powered machine any day, install esxi, freenas and consolidate all home servers to one plug socket (freenas, dns, media server, windows machine etc).

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Virgin Media to splurge BEELLIONS on UK network infrastructure expansion

chris 17
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Re: Wholesale...

@ Ledswinger

its not the same concept. there are loads of people in VM's patch that are ADSl customers on poor speeds. i'd rather have sky broadband over VM's net than just VM. I'd guess there are a lot of customers like me and it would encourage greater usage of VM's infrastructure earning VM more money from it. OpenReach is earning for every ADSL line (line rental), VM could be earning too if they opened their net up for high speed BB to competitors. The issue is VM are earning too much from line rental that costs them sod all (they don't have the same network costs per line nut this may be regulated) & competitors would expect a healthy discount on that. VM are "cutting their nose to spite their face" on this.

The closest concept of VM allowing competitors on their net is like Virgin Mobile operating as an MVNO on O2's mobile phone network.

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Basic minimum income is a BRILLIANT idea. Small problem: it doesn't work as planned

chris 17
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Re: Hmm

After WW2 Britain had a choice to repair or renew and chose to repair and maintain.

Germany had no choice and had to renew. Massive rebuilding projects ensured employment and investment in modern efficient machinery and practices. This propelled Germany into the industrial power house it is today and contributed to the downfall of British manufacturing as it couldn't compete due to its lack of investment (it was good enough before before etc)

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Capita lands spot on mega £5bn NHS commissioning deal

chris 17
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Re: I forget

"They originally started biz as Sim systems, a company started by Bedford council "

Not according to Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capita

Capita was formed in 1984 as a division of the non-profit CIPFA (Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy). In 1987 it became an independent company with 33 staff as a result of a management buy-out, led by Rod Aldridge, and was first listed on the London Stock Exchange in 1991.

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What time do you call this, BT? Late, state-funded broadband rollout plods on

chris 17
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i'm closer to the exchange than our cabinet and get 17mbs on our fttc (the very limit of service availability) ads would be ~ 6mbs, whilst our last house i was getting ~22mbs on ADSL2 (same exchange different cab). having just got VM i'm now hoping FTTdp will be rolled out asap and save us from the crappy VM throttling. i'm in total agreement with the first poster, in that no one else wanted to put their money in and even if they did, they can't do the work any cheaper than BT can.

it would be great if i could get a different provider over VM's cable network, just like i can over OpenReach, Transco & National Grid.

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chris 17
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Re: What I want to know..

@AC

"is if BT is forced to temper its enthusiasm for raising charges where the infrastructure was in essence paid by the users via their taxes. "

if we gave you all the infrastructure can you maintain it for free?

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'Tech' City hasn't got proper broadband and it's like BT doesn't CARE

chris 17
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Re: The whole point - encourage new businesses

~2004 the national organisation i was working for was paying £2.5k amortised per month per site for 256 -> 512 kbs atm leased lines across ~20 sites. Its expensive complicated stuff and costs. If you want the cheaper broadband but the isp has no capacity it'll cost them to add capacity which may not be economically viable for broadband but could be for a business leased line. I'm sure the company in question would take the same approach to any of their customers where the cost of doing the work would exceed the rate they could charge for it.

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