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* Posts by Badvok

350 posts • joined 27 Oct 2010

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Android busted for carrying Fake ID: OS doesn't check who really made that 'Adobe' plugin

Badvok
FAIL

Re: Patch cycle

"My Google Nexus 7 (2013) tablet is still on Android 4.4.3"

You do know that it needs to be connected to the Internet to update don't you?

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Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?

Badvok

Re: Promises

"Tell that to Margaret Thatcher and the Community Charge, introduced into Scotland a year early as an experiment."

You might want to re-think your argument after a little research. The Community Charge was a change in the way an existing tax (rates) was calculated and collected, not a new tax.

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Badvok
Mushroom

Re: Realism

Loving the way everyone seems to round-up the proportionate share for Scotland to 10%. If it was done on population I think it would be about 8%, but I wonder what it would be if you counted people who actually paid the license fee.

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Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart

Badvok
Mushroom

Re: Why bother?

Oooh, look at you, you don't really care about spending £90 per month on electricity. Maybe you should wake up, take a look around you and notice that some people struggle to find that amount of money for food.

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Badvok

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

@"No, I will not fix your computer"

"You're almost definitely wrong, and let me explain why, as this is simple physics/biology."

Ah, yes the old, "can't see the pixels argument" - who on earth wants to see individual pixels? It is the visual effect that gets better with higher definition. The real world is made up of curves and angles and these appear better/clearer/sharper if the display doesn't need to anti-alias them. Higher definition means less anti-aliasing = better clarity.

However, if you really are one of those people who likes to look at all the pretty individual pixels then your argument is sound.

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Badvok

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

"The BBC recommended viewing distance for UHD 1 ("4K"), for maximum visual resolution, is 1.5x screen height."

And the BBC isn't biased in this having position at all, no sir, no way is it concerned about limiting the cost of bandwidth required to carry UHD signals and justifying the level of compression it will use like it did for HD.

Actually the calculation is based on being able to differentiate between two vertical lines separated by a single pixel and is pretty much correct in that respect. However, I don't tend to watch many TV programmes or movies that comprise only vertical and horizontal lines. It requires a much higher resolution to accurately reproduce a 30° inclined, or curved edge, without visible anti-aliasing.

(FYI, this is also why smartphone screens have gone beyond Apple's 'retina' limit which was based on the same miscalculation.)

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Badvok

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

"1) Unless you are sitting about 2m from a 84" screen (4m from 160") or larger there is little point in more resolution."

Speak for your(visually challenged)self, I am lucky that I have vision within the normal range for humans and so can see a difference at much greater distance than that. Perhaps you actually need to a) get your eyes tested, or b) actually go see a 4K screen showing 4K content.

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Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage

Badvok
WTF?

1200 devices supported - WTF?

Anyone care to have a go at enumerating that list? No wonder they haven't got around to supporting the Xbox One yet.

On the other hand this might indicate a significant flaw in their system because it might mean that there is a completely separate software to support each version of Android on each different handset!

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Climate: 'An excuse for tax hikes', scientists 'don't know what they're talking about'

Badvok

Re: Maybe we could get a consensus

"but you can't deny that there's more *news stories* about extreme weather"

That might be because one of the largest news providers to us in the UK has openly committed itself to supporting the Global Warming/Cassandra/Chicken Little agenda. It is one of the few issues on which the BBC admits to a bias.

This has led to vastly more extensive coverage of recent flooding even though the amount of land or number of homes affected was significantly smaller than previous events.

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Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?

Badvok

Google has yet to respond to our request for comment on Zscaler's research.

Err, I think they already did - it's called Android L I believe.

Though with the speed that new versions of Android actually make it into real use we'll be stuck with a crappy permission system for some time yet.

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Victim of Tor-hidden revenge smut site sues Tor Project developers

Badvok

Re: Analogy defect!

"Errr, what? So you're saying that TOR was designed to allow people to post naked pics of others anonymously?"

Wasn't it? You didn't actually fall for all that 'freedom of speech' guff did you?

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Badvok

Analogy defect!

Yeah, if Ford produced the car used with the specific intention of providing people a means to run other people over anonymously.

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10Gbps over crumbling COPPER: Boffins cram bits down telco wire

Badvok
FAIL

Re: Bell Labs GaAs modem from 1960s

@AC: The first transatlantic telegraph cables didn't have repeaters - check your facts! Triple fail!

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Badvok
FAIL

Re: Bell Labs GaAs modem from 1960s

@JeffyPoohPooh - I guess you also missed the bit of history (or very selective memory?) where they laid the first transatlantic telegraph cables, these didn't have repeaters, yes they failed pretty quickly but communication was established. Of course not at 10Gpbs, I never said that (it was more like 1bpm), I was just pointing out how stupid your 6000db attenuation figure was in conjunction with your patently ridiculous assertion that a 600 mile long wire couldn't provide any sort of signal even if the energy pumped into it was akin to the big bang.

I have no doubt that Kev99's memory has served him false with this story, but your ridiculous attempt to sound like you know what you are talking about is a mega-fail.

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Badvok
FAIL

Re: Bell Labs GaAs modem from 1960s

"Multiply *your* 'per mile' loss per mile by 600 miles. You should have a total loss budget of at least 6000 dB."

And that's why transatlantic cables never worked ... err, hang on a sec ...

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We need to talk about SPEAKERS: Sorry, 'audiophiles', only IT will break the sound barrier

Badvok

Audiophile?

Is 'Audiophile' a term that the Reg has adopted and changed the meaning of? Somewhat akin to the Reg having its very own definition for 'Boffin'.

I'd normally describe myself as an audiophile as the dictionary description does fit: "a person who is especially interested in high-fidelity sound reproduction". However this article seems to redefine it as "a gullible fool who's easily separated from his money for bragging rights".

Perhaps we need a Reg Dictionary page to clarify these changes to the English language that the Reg are attempting to introduce.

On a side note: A perfect square wave needs infinite bandwidth and hence will always be an impossible ideal. (If you don't agree with this then please do come back to me when you have calculated the complete Fourier series that represents a square wave.)

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Google pries open YOUR mailbox, invites developer partners

Badvok
Thumb Up

Re: So basically just like giving out your IMAP password then

Yep, or your POP3 password, but keep it quiet or you'll upset all the people who like having a dig at Google no matter what they do.

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Google's URL-hiding 'origin chip' is 'backburnered'

Badvok

Re: Clarification needed.

It is only the stuff to the right of the host name that is hidden, so in your examples sandras_blog.blogger.com would show as sandras_blog.blogger.com and geoffs_blog.blogger.com would show as geoffs_blog.blogger.com.

And this site, for example, shows as forums.theregister.co.uk not just theregister.co.uk.

I have it turned on and quite like it, I can always click on the box to get the full URL if I want to look at it. I really can't see why people have an issue with it.

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Stephen Fry MADNESS: 'New domain names GENERATE NEW IP NUMBERS'

Badvok

Re: Well...

"Assuming I have not miscalculated ..."

You have.

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Everyone can and should learn to code? RUBBISH, says Torvalds

Badvok

Re: arehole

"It's also moronic because ten years from now coding won't look much like it does now. Twenty years from now it may well not exist in any recognisable form. Even if it does, it will be done better and cheaper in China, India and Vietnam (etc) than it is here."

Couldn't help laughing at this para, I've been doing this shit for nigh on 35 years and it hasn't changed one little bit, I don't think it is likely to in the next 20. (Yes, tools, APIs, terminologies and languages have changed but the base concepts haven't.)

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Quantum teleportation gets reliable at Delft

Badvok

Re: How fast?

Yes, they have determined the minimum speed, but I can't be arsed to provide a link when a certain company starting with 'G' does that so much better.

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Watch Dogs: Eat, sleep, hack, repeat

Badvok

Re: Avoid for now

This game was designed for a Controller, so use a controller and you'll enjoy it more. Some games map to Mouse+Kbd, some don't.

I assume you've missed a '1' from before the '6GB' in your PC spec, I doubt you'd be running that config with that little RAM (if not then that might be your problem since 6GB is the absolute bare minimum for this game).

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Google's driverless car: It'll just block our roads. It's the WORST

Badvok

Re: FUD

@The Mole, totally agree, the term 'Luddite' also sprang to mind.

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LG G3 fights off screen-res war rival Samsung with quad-HD cutie: In pictures

Badvok

Re: 2560 x 1440 on a 5.5" phone

@mage: I was about to upvote your excellent post but then I got to the last paragraph.

If you look at the aliasing needed to represent a straight line at 30º incline to the horizontal you really need pixels much smaller than 1/2 the resolvable limit to do it without aliasing and to achieve pin sharp clarity.

Also, there is no such thing as 'real LED', there are organics and semi-conductors. Neither produce colours that perfectly match our human cones and hence neither can accurately reproduce the entire range of colours we can experience.

Ah, what the hell, have an upvote anyway :)

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Game of Thrones written on brutal medieval word processor and OS

Badvok

"all that incest* doesn't write itself"

Nah, that's not the core of the plot, it is more about paedophilia and reinforcing the misguided notion that teens getting married was the norm in days gone by. It was picked up by the producers for the amazing number of scenes containing nude or partially nude under-age girls (even if the actresses actually aren't, the characters they are portraying are = a very weird kind of paedophillia).

I think the books would have been 1000% better if he had used a more up to date word processor that auto-corrected the names, his character names are often just ridiculous corruptions of modern names that just make reading them awkward.

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Apple, Beats and fools with money who trust celeb endorsements

Badvok

Re: A fool and his money are easily parted.

What I find more amazing than some of the claims for these 'audiophile' snake-oil lures, is the amount of time and money that is spent trying to disprove/discredit them, as this article most effectively demonstrates.

(Note: 'audophile' in quotes because it is only people who would like to be thought of as audiophiles by their superficial mates who fall for the traps, a true audiophile will always listen first and pay up only if they think the improvement is worth the money.)

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UK's pirate-nagging VCAP scheme WON'T have penalties – report

Badvok

Re: "and create the best possible customer experience online.”

It always amazes me how many people aren't able to actually decide whether or not to buy something but simply cough up the money whenever offered the chance.

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A first-world problem solved: Panoramic selfies, thanks to Huawei's Ascend P7

Badvok

Re: Dual SIM

"just not in the UK where phones are generally subsidised by a Network"

Eh? Don't you mean US? Phones haven't been subsidised by the networks for a long time here in the UK.

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Feast your PUNY eyes on highest resolution phone display EVER

Badvok

Re: @Michael Tusch, CTO of Apical

Hmm, thumbs down for that? I guess I must be the exception then and people do actually want to be able to see the individual pixels - go figure.

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Badvok

@Michael Tusch, CTO of Apical

"you'd need to be nearer than 18cm (7 inches) away and would need very good eyesight to see 513 pixels per inch"

The last thing I want when looking at any display is to be able to see the pixels, I want smooth sharp curves where I CAN'T see the pixels! (I think 600 dpi is probably the ideal level given our current vision capabilities.)

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Flying Toaster screen savers return on GitHub

Badvok

Re: Burn in was easy to achieve

My favourite example of burn-in was the early Reuters terminals. These had an alert box that was always on display but when there were no alerts to be displayed would display the REUTERS dotted logo. Thus the screens would display the company logo even when turned off.

(Very difficult to find a screen grab from that era but here's a BBC story that includes an image: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2775965.stm )

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G20 gives Google, Microsoft, Apple et al tax deadline

Badvok

Re: But... MUH INFRASTRUCTURE!

"You can dislike a political entity without being a racist."

Not these days you can't, that's why Dieudonné has been barred from entering the UK.

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Google warns Glass wearers: Quit being 'CREEPY GLASSHOLES'

Badvok
Black Helicopters

Paranoid schizophrenia

I read somewhere recently that schizophrenia affects about 1 in 100 people. However, these comments pages seem to attract more than would be expected if that were true.

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Apple Mac Pro: It's a death star, not a nappy bin, OK?

Badvok

Re: Oooo, the shiny!

You have to congratulate them, Apple have done an amazing job getting this beast of a machine in a good looking form factor - if I had the money to waste I'd definitely buy one.

The rather ungainly equivalent spec, but vastly cheaper, boxes from HP and Dell do make one realise that this box will be purchased only by those who are willing and able to pay a lot just for looks.

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El Reg BuzzFelch: 10 Electrical Connectors You CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT!

Badvok
Mushroom

Re: Apple?

"Lightening connector, 30 pin?"

What does that do then? Shave a few pounds off anything passed through it? Or is it more about adjusting the brightness of transmitted pictures?

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It's big, it's expensive and it's an audiophile's dream: The Sonos Sub

Badvok

Re: Well..

I think you'll find that the jury is still out on that one, it is definitely not proven.

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Facebook app now reads your smartphone's text messages? THE TRUTH

Badvok

Re: Could Facebook not use Android intents?

Don't be so sensible, how would they gain access to all your SMS messages if they did it like this?

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Stephen Fry rewrites computer history again: This time it's serious

Badvok

Re: Overreaction?

However, when I read Mr Fry's article, having already been aware of the history, I simply interpreted 'cracked' as meaning 'split apart'. Talk about mountains from mole hills.

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EE BrightBox routers can be hacked 'by simple copy/paste operation'

Badvok

"Access to the ISP user credentials might be abused to hijack a target's broadband account."

So EE don't use any form of physical authentication to ensure you're connecting from the right line?

I thought that was why all BT HomeHubs used exactly the same username and password - BT don't care, they authenticate you physically. I'm not sure I'd trust any ISP that didn't.

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KC engineer 'exposed unencrypted spreadsheet with phone numbers, user IDs, PASSWORDS'

Badvok

Re: Where's the story?

@ShortLegs: Google 'sarcasm'. It is apparently industry standard for all passwords to be stored as a hash, therefore that password you see on the giffgaff site MUST, by definition, be a hash of the actual password.

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Badvok

Re: Where's the story?

"Industry standards state that passwords shall not be stored except as a hashed output."

Hmmm, if all ISP were to follow this 'Industry Standard' then I wonder how they could tell you the password so you can connect your router to their network. After all it is normal practise for these passwords to be fixed by the ISP and not user changeable.

Nudge, nudge, wink, wink, want to know the password for the giffgaff APN? I've successfully managed to reverse the hash they've used and the password is: "password".

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Badvok

Re: Where's the story?

I think a number of commentards here have missed the bit about this being the network logon credentials which are normally assigned by the ISP rather than them being the user's own password (even if they are also the default passwords used for the email service).

One does wonder how some of these commentards expect the ISP to tell you the credentials you need to log onto their network if they are never allowed to use clear text.

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High Court derails Google defence in Safari browser stalker cookie brouhaha

Badvok

Re: More info plus all court documents

"In the case of the Google Safari issue, the users viewed those adverts on devices in the UK - and the cookies were placed on devices in the UK."

Interesting interpretation that unfortunately sums up a fairly typical ignorance of the technology involved.

To put it another way: The users accessed a web site. That web site served content from Google's non-UK web servers (probably US based), Google's non-UK web servers used perfectly legal cookie semantics to store a small tag on the users device. Further accesses to Google's non-UK web servers utilised this tag to attach records in their own non-UK databases to that browser instance and then used that data to decide which ads to serve when the user next accessed them. No user data was stored in the UK, and no illegal activity was performed on the device in the UK, so where exactly did the offense occur?

Seems like a typical case where our judicial systems can't get to grips with the modern world.

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Badvok

Re: More info plus all court documents

An interesting assessment. So a UK user accessing a non-UK service makes the operator of that service liable to prosecution under UK law.

I also wonder whether this judgment might also set a rather dangerous reverse precedent, i.e. that UK companies with users overseas must abide by all the applicable laws for the countries those users are accessing the services from?

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Badvok

Re: According to Companies House ..

And you know for certain that that was the legal entity responsible for using the cookie do you?

I suspect, but don't know for certain, that the workaround for Safari was orchestrated and implemented as part of Google's main US operations and not by Google UK. Are you still certain it is so clear cut?

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Amazon, Hollywood, Samsung: PLEASE get excited about 4K telly

Badvok

Re: WGAF

"I want one in the 32 to 40 inch range for use as a computer monitor, but it has to be priced at $500USD or lower."

I think you are pushing your luck to get any sort of decent monitor in that size range at that price, let alone a 4K monitor.

However, there is the Dell P2815Q which is a 28" 4K monitor that has an RRP of $699. To keep the cost down they don't really support gaming at 4K, it will only do 30Hz (but will go to 60Hz for FullHD).

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Badvok

Re: Can anyone tell the difference?

Those articles always crop up whenever anyone mentions TV display resolution - they are kind of like old wives tales - some little nugget of factual information blown out of all proportion and context.

Most of the 'scientific' arguments about visual acuity in relation to TV display resolution actually only work out if your eyes are CCDs and are perfectly aligned with the screen and the images consist of only vertical and horizontal lines. If you introduce any kind of misalignment between the light receptors and the light emitters or perhaps show a real-world image with some curves in it they collapse in a heap.

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Thought your Android phone was locked? THINK AGAIN

Badvok

So let's get this straight: There is a little bug in the android code base (nothing to do with Linux or Java) that lets an application that is already installed and running on the phone disable the lock screen without it having to ask for that level of control when it was installed - Wow, just ... Wow that is an amazing vulnerability.

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That toolbar you downloaded is malware? Tough, read the EULA

Badvok

Re: Remind me again

Dunno about useful, but when major, supposedly reputable, corporations push them so flagrantly, is it any wonder that some people think they might be?

I wonder whether Ask would even exist if it wasn't for the diligent efforts of Oracle to push their crap.

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Microsoft pockets a HUGE '$28' on an Xbox One: But NOT REALLY

Badvok

Re: The true hardware guy's object is to...

Since the price of the Xbox One including the Kinect device and controller is more than you would pay for an similar spec PC without those, I'm not sure why anyone would bother (except for the challenge itself).

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