Feeds

* Posts by 45RPM

130 posts • joined 26 Oct 2010

Page:

My TIGHT PANTS made my HUGE iPHONE go all BENDY!

45RPM

Given the length of the device and its thinness, only someone with a very poor grasp of basic physics would be surprised that it will bend. I suspect Apple knew it would bend if mistreated, but underestimated the number of absolute tools out there who would abuse it in this way (and then be surprised).

Jeez, with those dimensions, I could bend it* with my hands even if it was a solid block.

*not to the same extent though, obviously.

3
0

Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights

45RPM

@Mark 65

“TERROR<IST>ERFUNDEN”, nicht war?

1
0
45RPM

Presumably he will be able to take legal action against these idiots - or are the dice so very heavily loaded against law abiding citizens?

The idiots who draft the laws that permit businesses to act ever more stupidly would do well to remember that government is by consent - even in the most draconian dictatorships. Once the people have had enough there is nothing that can be done to stop them getting their way and the revolution will come.

TERROR<IS>MADEUP would look good on a T Shirt though.

15
0

Apple iPhone 6: Looking good, slim. AW... your battery died

45RPM

Re: I'm trying very hard to give a shit

Laxatives. That's what you need. Laxatives and a copy of Autotrader.

17
0

Jesus phone RAISED from DEAD. Watch iPhone 6 get BURNED, DROWNED, SMASHED

45RPM

Re: Better Than Z2

How do they make you wait? Sure, waiting is an option if you have a lot of time on your hands and no bloody life - but normal people just order it online and have it delivered. Same as with any other brand.

There are lots of things that you can criticise Apple for without just making shit up. And if you just don’t like Apple, hey that’s cool. But you can just say ‘I don’t like Apple, but for no very well thought out reason’.

5
1
45RPM

Yeah - me too. But it wasn’t like I burned them into a puddle of goo. I burned them so that they looked shot up and then had them trailing black trails of dyed cotton wool across the ceiling of my bedroom, hotly pursued by another Airfix model. I’d make bullet holes with a heated up pin too.

3
0
45RPM

This, at least, is destruction with a point. Generally though, I feel rather annoyed by idiots who smash up gadgets / cars / whatever, regardless of manufacturer. Fuckit, I feel annoyed when I see twats kicking over snowmen or stamping on sandcastles. It's clever to create and mindless to destroy - and, as I say to my son, if you can't make it then don't break it. And, if you can make it, you probably won't want to break it.

6
0

Apple's Cook: We have never allowed g-men access to Apple servers

45RPM

It seems to me that users who are worried about the security implications of an ever more connected world have two choices.

1.) Roll your own cloud solution and hope that the open source code that you use hasn't been altered in any way by the NSA or <insert nefarious agency of your choice here>. Code reviewing all that isn't practical for most people, and hosting on your own server isn't guaranteed because you're relying on the trustworthiness of code that the server runs. I love Linux, and I love my Synology - but I don't have massive confidence that Synology's cloud software is secure, regardless of where the actual bits are stored.

2.) Trust in Apple - and hope that Microsoft follows suit. Google and Facebook, and so forth never will - their business models are predicated on the information that they can gather about you, so it wouldn't be in their best interests. Personally, I do trust in Apple. They've never given me any reason to doubt them, and I'm confident that they won't start now. And look at it his way, if Tim Cook was lying it would be the biggest scandal in the history of the industry, and Apple would be wiped out overnight. There's too much at stake for this not to be true.

I'm sure that Microsoft will up the ante on this - and, for the record, I'd trust them too.

4
4

'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

45RPM

Re: No POSIX

@Sandtitz

Why should Linux be Windows compliant? POSIX is an open set of industry standards, designed to improve interoperability. Windows is a closed Microsoft 'standard'. It would be easier for Microsoft to fully implement POSIX compliance than Linux implement Windows compliance. In any case, taken as a whole and including the tablet / phone ecosystem, servers and so forth, Windows is haemorrhaging market share - so, in many ways, it's more important for Windows to comply with the industry standard (POSIX) than for Linux to comply with the ersatz industry standard (Windows)

There are other shells available for Windows True. They aren't commonly used though - and it's even less common for Windows to have a halfway acceptable terminal app installed. Doubtless you're wondering why this matters - after all, you could just download and install your own alternative. In a secure server environment though, systems are locked down - and it isn't possible to just install the shell / terminal app / text editor of choice. *nix systems typically come with a vast selection of options preinstalled, thereby overcoming this problem. Furthermore, it doesn't matter what shell or terminal you install, Windows still can't be 100% configured / controlled from the command line and it's inherited CP/M's idiotic confusion over / and \. As to choice of shells, the same applies to *nix. On *nix masochists can even opt to have a Windows cmd shell, complete with confused slashes.

your friends would accuse Windows of "bloat" In my view, bloat isn't about providing a plethora of functions (which is a good thing, provided that said options can be hidden from the noobs). Bloat is about software which is far larger than it needs to be to fulfil its functions. For example, if a fizz buzz program takes more than a few hundred bytes to implement then it is (in my view) bloated - and there'll be many people here who would consider my code bloated, overblown and baroque. As stated previously, it isn't possible to 'just download' in a secure environment (although I have, of course, done so on my Windows box at home).

0
0
45RPM

No POSIX

Until Windows is POSIX compliant, has a terminal and command line that doesn’t utterly suck (I had high hopes for Powershell, and I was disappointed), and plays nicely with other operating systems out of the box (UFS support, SSH, SCP and so forth) rather than expecting other OSes to play nicely with it (Samba, etc), I’d say that Windows has a very long trek ahead of it to catch up with Linux.

7
2

Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure

45RPM

*Rolls eyes, chuckles* Lawyers, eh? Politicians! What a dick.

3
0

Apple iCloud storage prices now ONLY double Dropbox, Google et al

45RPM

Wow, shilling much?

But who are you shilling for?

I don’t dispute that it would be very nice if Apple’s prices were lower*, especially since iCloud backup doesn’t even work with the lowest (free) subscription. It would be nice, for example, if the ‘free’ subscription capacity was tied to the capacity of your iOS device. Bought a 16GB iPhone? Get 16GB free, in perpetuity. Bought yourself a 32GB iPad to go with your 16GB phone? Add 32GB to your subscription. Very soon, a regular upgrader would have more storage than they could possibly use (bragging rights only) - and it wouldn’t be as prohibitively costly to Apple as it might first appear because very few people would use anything like their allotted allocation.

The Celebrigate fiasco is so irrelevant to the discussion that I don’t know why you even brought it up (except, perhaps, to give the lie to the rest of your piece). The breach was caused by piss-poor passwords, an error that could trip up any platform - yes, even Windows or Android. Apple’s ‘fault’ was insufficient alerting to web logons, and I imagine that it’s a ‘fault’ that other platforms are vulnerable to too. Apple has fixed that hole - and I imagine that the others have too, whilst thanking the FSM that it wasn’t one of their users that got tripped up first.

2
1

Mac security packages range from peachy to rancid – antivirus tests

45RPM

Re: Chowder

I use clamXav - and it's successfully identified viruses on flash sticks that were missed by colleagues computers which rely on the work standard install of McAfee. Okay, so this probably isn't news - but at least clamXav ain't on the bottom of the pile.

1
0

Apple Fanbois (and girls) already lining up for NEW iPHONE

45RPM

Too much life?

These people clearly have too much life if they can afford to waste days of it. It would be most equitable if some of them could be relieved of this excess life in order to boost the years of those of us who have too much to do and not enough time to do it in.

And am I the only person who’d laugh himself stupid if, after all this queuing, Apple didn’t release anything new on September 9th. Just a big empty stage with the words ‘Fooled You’ on it.

2
0

Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'

45RPM

Re: I'm more impressed

You have a devious mind sir. Or is the voice of experience speaking?

2
0

Google on Gmail child abuse trawl: We're NOT looking for other crimes

45RPM

Re: slippery slope or lawsuit magnet?

@Steve Knox

At no point did I suggest that Google was breaking the terms of its contract. And yes, ultimately, if you don't want Google to read your shit then don't sign up to it*. I was suggesting that this kind of data mining is not in the long term interests of society (although I am very persuaded by the postcard argument).

As to the slippery slope, what is fallacious about it? If you had a time machine, would you argue with those who opposed (picking a suitably blown out of proportion example) Naziism, Soviet-style-communism, Fascism, McCarthyism and so forth that they were just subscribing to the slippery slope fallacy? Surely it's just a matter of how much slip you're prepared to accept before shouting 'foul'.

*up to a point. I don't want Google to read my shit, but I send email to people who don't mind - so, ultimately, that's me fucked - and I didn't even sign their blasted contract.

5
1
45RPM

Of course, because MD5 is always unique for a given file, and no two files can have the same MD5 - that would be unthinkable. In fact, it's the most efficient compression algorithm even - reducing petabytes of data down to a few handfuls of bytes.

Sorry. I'm bored of the MD5 argument now. MD5 doesn't come close to telling you what a file contains - its only purpose it to guarantee that something has gone wrong in a copy, in no way can it tell you if something has gone right. And it certainly can't be used to probe the content of a file.

0
1
45RPM

Re: Because you gave Google permission.

Not me. I pay for my email. But that doesn't matter does it? Because a great many of my friends, family and customers don't - and so a lot of my words are going to end up on Google anyway whether I like it or not.

16
2
45RPM

Re: slippery slope or lawsuit magnet?

@AndyS "the information from Google allowed law enforcement to gain a warrant"

I see what you've done there. You've put the cart in front of the horse - which won't work nearly so well.

It is the job of the law enforcement agencies to approach Google with a warrant, not for Google to approach law enforcement agencies and suggest that they might want to take a warrant out on one of their clients.

The Post Office isn't allowed to open mail and parcels without a warrant - why should email be treated any differently?

I concede that, in this case, the right outcome was achieved - but I worry that this will make it harder for the right outcome to be achieved in the future, and that it could result (in an unpleasant future that is merely a repetition of unpleasant events from the past) in innocent people being persecuted for lifestyles that are none of anyone else's damn business. Like being Jewish, or Muslim, or Homosexual, or Christian, or Transgender, or Atheist or any one of a number of things that have resulted in abhorrent behaviour from wider society in the past.

27
6
45RPM

In the same way that the post office doesn't open letters and parcels unless a warrant has been received concerning the recipient or sender, I can't for the life of me see why online services should be treated any differently.

It is right and proper that these offenders are caught of course, but it strikes me as something of a short term victory since scanning for crime in this manner will just drive the criminals deeper underground as a matter of course, making it harder for legitimate law enforcement agencies to gather evidence. In the future, the criminals will hide themselves out of reach of Google (and other service providers), and law abiding citizens will be further inured to the idea of giving Google, Facebook and so forth (mostly freetard services, to be honest) an all they can eat buffet of no-questions-asked data.

And yes, they'll claim that its for our own good, and that they're not interested in our law-abiding private email. I'm pretty certain that other organisations in the last hundred years might have claimed something similar - organisations whose ends were definitely nefarious. And whilst our governments and corporations may be relatively benign* today who is to say that we won't slide towards Macarthyism, Facism, Communism or <insert evil government of your choice here> in the future, regimes which may be able to coerce Google et al into spilling the beans on each and every one of us.

*or, then again, might just be pretending

16
3

Microsoft bakes a bigger Pi to cook Windows slabs

45RPM

Irrelevant

Comparisons with Raspberry Pi are irrelevant since the Raspberry Pi is cheap enough for it not to be the end of the world if it breaks, and this overweight shark doesn't even have Ethernet. So it comes with a Windows license? Big deal. The only advantage that Windows had in the embedded space, that there were plenty of developers who were familiar with it, has now been lost to lighter and more efficient OSs, thanks largely to the rise of Android.

For a desktop system, I can build cheaper. For an embedded development system I'd be looking at nix - in one of it's many forms. Linking this to Raspberry Pi is just link baiting.

52
0

Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle

45RPM

Maker of inexplicably popular, but rather poor quality, audio gear sues manufacturer of inexplicably popular, but rather poor quality, audio gear. What a sad state of affairs it is that this should be news.

53
2

Experts gathered round corpse of PC market: It's ALIVE! Alive, we tell you

45RPM

Define Power User

Please define 'Power User’. If running Office and Windows XP on a Celeron with 2GB of RAM qualifies as ‘Power User’ then I am a top gun fighter pilot*

*I fly rather elderly gliders.

5
0

The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots

45RPM

Re: It's the beginning of the next Maunder Minimum.

@Graham Marsden

Give Jake a break. He’s learned a new term and now he’s all excited so he wants to use it. He doesn’t know what it means of course, or how to interpret the data, but hey - learning is a process? Right?

11
6

Say goodbye to the noughties: Yesterday’s hi-fi biz is BUSTED, bro

45RPM

Old Skool FTW

I think I'll stick with playing with my NADs, thank you.

42
0

Samsung admits its Chinese supply chain STILL has labour-rights and safety problems

45RPM

Re: A bit dodgy use of pronouns

The problem, as I see it, is that we all have unrealistic expectations of how much our gadgets cost. If you think back to the 1980's, when our computers* were largely built in America or Great Britain, they cost a good deal more than we're prepared to pay nowadays.

Take the BBC B, without a monitor or disk drives, adjusted for inflation you'd be forking out £1,176. The Apple II (again, without disks or monitor) would set you back a cool £1,538. Go for an IBM PC (yup, even back in the eighties you could have an IBM PC if you wanted) and you'd need to find £5,242, with disk drives and monitor. A Mac would see you shelling out £4,211 of your hard earned pennies - and that would only get you a measly 128k of RAM and no hard drive.

Not fair to list 'high' end machines? Even a Spectrum (£515 adjusted for inflation), or a Commodore 64 (£922 adjusted for inflation) busts wide open what most people are prepared to pay these days. And you still didn't get disks or monitor at that price.

So next time you look at the cost of a top price personal computer, and wonder why anyone would spend £2,500, consider that even that price is historically excellent value for money - and if we want to do something about the abuse of workers everywhere, we need to be thinking in terms of at least £1k for a base spec machine.

No, I can't easily afford it either. But, on the other hand, I'd rather have to scrimp and save for my next computer than be complicit in the abuse of the people who built it.

*our computers being those used in the UK. I have no data for other countries.

4
0
45RPM
Pint

Re: RE: "So now it's Samsung............... " Fe, fi, fo fum... I smell a iPhanboi.

@Arctic fox

"That is in fact a reasonably objective description of the situation that firms like Sammy and the Fruity Company find themselves in. If you object to this description of the situation then I am forced to conclude that you are yet another example (AC, naturally) of the low forehead knuckle-dragging tribalists (regardless of the sect to which you belong) that we have all too many of here at El Reg."

Hear Hear! I'd buy you a beer in real life for this example of eminent common sense - please accept a virtual one in the virtual world.

1
1

UK govt 'tearing up road laws' for Google's self-driving cars: THE TRUTH

45RPM

Re: Intractible problems

Hear hear! But drivers are increasingly reliant on technology and rather dopey about solving these kinds of problems themselves. I know someone who insists that she's a good driver because she can apply her make up, talk on the phone and do a million other things whilst driving - and her car remains straight and true and stable the whole time. Of course, it all went to a can of worms when I turned off the dynamic stability system (and, with it, traction control, lane departure and so forth). A salutary lesson (and yes, the road was empty in both directions when I pulled that stunt).

The more electronics get thrown at cars, the more incompetent the average driver will get.

3
0
45RPM

I like technology as much as the next person - but I really don’t like the idea of self driving cars. I have no doubt that they’ll make the roads safer and so forth - but what happens in twenty years time or so when the majority of cars on the road have the required intelligence?

What happens is an orgy of scrapping as the old, dumb, cars that have served us faithfully until now are banned and forced from the roads. And what of those of us who have classic cars? Now as viable as a horse and cart for long distance travel, will exemption be made to keep a little character on our roads?

Yes, yes. I know. I’m being self interested again. But I really would prefer it if my fun wasn’t spoiled in the name of ‘elfen safety and the preferences of a bunch of politicos who don’t enjoy driving anyway.

3
3

Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

45RPM

@Malcolm Weir It sounds to me as if you have some very good reasons for not choosing Apple. Having very good reasons for not choosing Apple for yourself is not the same as having very good reasons for 'hating' Apple (I know you didn't use the word hate), or even for objecting to anyone else using an Apple product. For my part, I have very good reasons for using Apple products (and no reasons whatsoever for objecting to someone else's choice of platform).

Sure enough, I like Apple's hardware (and as you point out, that's just as well because I can't choose to run their software on anything else), but it's their software that really floats my boat - and so I'd have one foot in the Apple ecosystem even if their hardware was like Dell's or Samsung's. My other foot is in the Linux ecosystem and… shit. I've run out of feet. I also use Windows (actually, I develop software for Windows, Linux, iOS and Mac OS).

I don't hate any platform. They've all got their pros and cons. But I do find the continual waging of 'ner-ner-nyah-nyah-ner my OS is better than yours' and expressions of hatred very boring and childish. Especially since the insults are usually backed up with no experience or evidence - and when they are backed up by experience or evidence, the experience or evidence only applies to the use-case of the person lobbing the criticism.

My objection is to a product being purchased purely for reasons of fashion rather than for the merits of the technology itself. It annoys me that people buy an Apple (or HTC or Samsung or Sony…) device because it's fashionable rather than because it represents the best solution to their particular problems. Only education has a hope of solving that particular problem - but I fear that herd mentality and bloody minded tribalism will always win.

1
1
45RPM

@Bullseyed Disagree. This is OS Wars plain and simple, and you can wrap a reason around it if you like - but just remember that religious zealots have been wrapping spurious justifications around their chosen beliefs for centuries too.

Microsoft is anything but open (do you hate them too?), and yet there are many people out their who love Microsoft and hate Apple with all their hearts. In the past the same was true of Amiga (TripOS) and ST (TOS), Commodore 64 and Spectrum - it was ever thus.

The thing is that there are closed elements to Android too (Google Play Services, I think, is one, Google Search, Google Calendar and so forth), and open elements to iOS (the whole underlying OS (Darwin) for a start - download at opensource.apple.com). Google is in just as much of a position to take their ball away except…

…Except that the formats used are open. Contacts are stored as vcard. Calendars are stored as ical. Email is stored as eml. So if you try one particular platform, and then decide you don't like it, you can take your toys away and get something else - with no loss of data. And that isn't just true of Android. It's true of iOS too.

And why should you care what's in my pocket (unless you're trying to chat me up?). It's really none of your business, and it doesn't affect you in the slightest. Equally, I couldn't give a shit what you use. Got Blackberry? More power to you. Got Android? Cool, it's a nice *nix OS. If you want a super connected Internet OS, great for sharing and social networking, then Android is probably the best in the business. If you're a little more private then maybe you'd like to consider iOS. It isn't for me to say what you should use, or what reasons you have for using it.

And, as I say to my son, hate is a very strong word. And life is far too short for it.

1
1
45RPM

Yeah, I thought that was a bit unnecessary. It may be true, it may not be true. I don't really care. Seems to me that iOS has some advantages and that Android has some advantages too (not least HTCs sweet hardware - but I digress), Windows mobile looks pretty damn cool too.

Choose your OS. Be happy with it, I hope. Be happy for everyone who chose something different because it suited ther needs. But let's not get all religious about it. That's be as stupid as getting all religious!

Why can't we… work things out? Little people… why can't we all just get along?

24
0

Apple: We'll tailor Swift to be a fast new programming language

45RPM

@Charlie Clark 'I think they'd be stupid not to open source it (the core at least) and get academics paid by someone else to kick the tyres.'

I'm in total agreement with you. At the moment, I'd be surprised if they did open source it - but I seem to be in a little negative minority! If they do open source it then it'll be a great addition to my programming arsenal, and I look forward to learning it.

If, on the other hand, it's Apple system only, I'll probably still learn it (and I'll feel all bitter and twisted about it at the same time!)

3
0
45RPM

Re: Don't drink the Koolaid

Did you notice that this was WWDC? It's not about hardware - it's about the nitty gritty of software - the most interesting part of any computer system.

8
0
45RPM

Swift looks very interesting to me. Personally, I like Objective C (and plain old C too of course.). One of the things I like most about Objective C is that I can develop in Objective C on Linux - it's cross platform. If Swift is cross platform then I look forward to playing with it.

I hope I'm wrong, but Swift looks to be Apple only. I don't like the look of that at all. If the milk turns out to be sour, I ain't the kind of pussy to drink it.

2
1

Brits to vote: Which pressing scientific challenge should get £10m thrown at it?

45RPM

Re: Controversy abounds…

Actually, deserts are going to expand if we don't resolve global warming now. There's a happy balance between too cold and too hot - and the balance was about right fifty years ago. The problem is that, as we tip past the tipping point, the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere will increase - out of control. Not good.

I wish I could be as sceptical as you, and that Global warming scepticism was well founded. But that's just wishful thinking. Right now we're fucked - but if we act now we might be able to avoid being buggered as well.

0
0
45RPM

Controversy abounds…

Eco-friendly flight - Why limit this to flight? Why not just have eco-friendly power? Promising areas of research might include Nuclear power that doesn't produce waste that is radioactive for millennia, and that can't be used for weapons production. It might also include, as a sideline, ways of reducing power consumption of devices that we already have - <tongue-in-cheek>imagine a power-efficient PlayStation or Xbox (might look light a Wii U) or a power-efficient PC (might look like a Raspberry Pi)</tongue-in-cheek>

Sustainable food - If we can reduce global warming and world population, this one should follow automatically. GMO probably has a part to play too - provided that the innovations aren't patented, and provided the innovations concentrate on hardiness and not on making the crop able to survive ever more toxic pesticides. True, global warming may increase crop yields per hectare of farmable land, but the amount of farmable land will be reduced, and the nutritional value of the food grown will be diminished.

Safe and clean water - Again, linked to global warming, world population and sustainable food. Reduce global warming, and world population and the reserves of safe and clean water increase. Improve food sustainability and less water will be polluted with pesticides in the production of food.

Reduction of non-resistant antibiotics - I hesitate to say this, particularly when everyone knows someone who has been saved by antibiotics (and therefore I apologise if this comment hurts anyones feelings), but in planetary terms this is the wrong thing to be doing. No antibiotics and a bloody nasty plague would do more for the long term viability of this planet than anything else. Imagine a planet where the population was slashed from 9bn to 0.5bn? That'd hurt - entire families wiped out. A global disaster - but one that would remove all doubts about long term sustainability, and one that would (probably) deal with global warming in one fell swoop too.

A cure for paralysis and independent living for those with dementia. In the grand scheme of things, are these really the biggest or most important problems that we should be concentrating on?

2
1

Users folder vanished after OS X 10.9.3 update? Here's a fix

45RPM

Re: Uh oh

It's not just you. But, on the other hand, there've been a whole string of problems with Linux, Android, Windows and <insert name of any OS here>. Even VMS hasn't been immune - although the problem there is mainly an inconveniently placed bullet in the head courtesy of HP.

If you expect Apple to be infallible and believe that they don't normally ever have any problems then yes, panic! Unusual number of problems and bad news. If you expect them to be human then they're no worse than most and a lot better than some.

So have you been at the koolaid again?

11
1

Urinating teen polluted 57 Olympic-sized swimming pools - cops

45RPM

Just not trying hard enough

Only 57 swimming pools? What an amateur. Still, I'd better hope that the cops don't find me - I've polluted 544,243,827,160,494 olympic swimming pools. All I had to do was piss in the sea.

7
0

Hey, does your Smart TV have a mic? Enjoy your surveillance, bro

45RPM

Re: Which is why…

No need for an apology - my initial comment was written at haste and argued, at best, incoherently. Thanks though!

2
0
45RPM

Re: Which is why…

There's even a government website which lists all sorts of devices and their expected reasonable life.

Really? Sounds useful. What's the URL?

5
0
45RPM

Re: Which is why…

Hmm. My apologies. Perhaps I didn't make my point very clearly. It isn't so much about trusting anyone to play nicely with my data, it's about trusting them to ensure that the operating system is patched up regularly so that it presents a reasonable level of security (or facsimile thereof, depending on how tinfoil your hat is)

It isn't that it's impossible to remotely hack a patched up Linux, Mac or Windows system, but it certainly isn't easy. The reason that its difficult is that these systems are regularly patched to ensure that an OS compromise is non-trivial.

Sony, Samsung, insert preferred vendor of soon-to-be-connected gizmo here, have little experience of writing a general purpose OS from scratch and ensuring that it remains patched for the lifetime of the device. And the lifetime of the device is likely to be long. Worse yet, these devices aren't going to be like a computer, where it's easy to reformat the hard drive and replace the OS with one that is more up to date or more suited to your tastes. These devices are going to be more like mobile phones or portable media players. It's not that total replacement of the OS can't be done, it's that it won't be easy - and, anyway, life is too short to be slapping Linux on the telly, fridge, toaster, lightbulbs etc., and then keeping them patched and up to date.

The real problem is that the average lifetime of a television or fridge is an order of magnitude greater than that of a phone. My fridge is fifteen years old, showing no signs of packing up, and therefore not due for replacement. The TV is nearly ten, and much the same applies. Given that Samsung and Sony can't be bothered to ensure that a one year old phone is running the latest version of Android, I can't really see them bothering to update the OS of a ten year old TV.

So what to do? Your TV is now three years old, and you were lucky. You bought a TV from a manufacturer who kept it patched for a year or two. But now its getting on a bit. It's a bit old, and the manufacturer would rather sell you a new device - so no more patches for you. Your options are to disconnect from the internet (rendering the utility of the device somewhat moot), or buy a new one (which isn't very environmentally friendly given the huge piles of toxic crap that we throw away each year). And even sandboxing isn't going to help much - for two reasons. Firstly, because even sandboxing has its limits - only Apple really takes it to its logical limit, and (IMO) its the only reason that older iOS devices aren't hotbeds of malware. Secondly, because geeks, the early adopters, don't like it - look at all the bitching on el Reg about sandboxing on iOS - and on a TV or other consumer device, sandboxing is going to be more essential than ever.

You'll note that I've left government security out of the parameters of my argument. This is because government security challenges are either intractable or blown out of all proportion, depending on how paranoid / realistic about the limits of government probity you are.

9
0
45RPM

Which is why…

If I ever buy a smart TV (and I almost certainly won't because I don't seem to have enough time to watch the blasted thing), I'll be buying it from a company that understands about making its operating system secure and keeping it patched. Furthermore, it'll have to be from a company where the customer isn't the product being sold. As far as I can see, the only companies with that kind of clout and track record are Microsoft and Apple. Despite the rumours, I can't see either of them getting into the telly biz - so I'll stick with a dumb TV, thanks.

2
7

Look out, sysadmins - HOT FOREIGN SPIES are targeting you

45RPM

Hmm. Love of country versus getting my end away?

Well, make love not war they say - I'll vote for making the beast with two backs.

1
0

Researcher says Apple fibs about crypto for iOS email attachments

45RPM

Re: Apples not wrong on this if you ask me...

Aww - you spoilsport. Come on - get with the game. It's called the fun knee-jerk reaction game - and the best thing is that you don't even need to be able to think. You just need to be able to spew ill-informed bile.

1
1

Thanks for nothing, Apple, say forensic security chaps

45RPM

Typical Reg

You Reg. You are a card. Apple is too lax on security - bad Apple, naughty Apple. Apple is too tough on security - bad Apple, naughty Apple. And yet you still manage to make a nasty mess of love custard in your pants whenever a new bit of fondleable hardware gets shovelled out of Cupertino.

It's an object lesson in having your cake and eating it. Or, at least, trying to.

3
3

10 PRINT "Happy 50th Birthday, BASIC" : GOTO 10

45RPM

I'm pretty sure that 'Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code' is a backronym. Allegedly BASIC was originally styled Basic, and it didn't stand for anything other than what it was - a basic programming language. I can't remember where I read that, and I concede that it may be bollocks.

1000 GOSUB PutFlameProofPantsOn

1010 GOSUB BeAPedantOnTheReg

1020 IF YouAreWrong THEN END

1
0

Reg hack hacked off by iPhone 5 repair notice

45RPM

Re: These buttons are infamour

Of course, if there's an acknowledged fault with the device then it will be serviced, free of charge, even when it is many years out of warranty.

Speaking personally, I've never known Apple to have a 'not bovvered' attitude. Service has always been excellent. Other companies who've given me superb service are Sharkoon (on my PC case), Asus, Volvo…

Greater Anglia is the one company I can think of who give service that is fairly consistently bad - but I suspect that the staff are probably very demoralised, poor dears.

5
1
45RPM

Re: Preload the engagement...

When I was a support assistance, if some lousy hack had plonked his testes on the counter with a supercilious 'do you know who I am? I'm a bigshot journo and I'm gonna write bad things if you don't do what I want', I wouldn't have passed the buck. I'd have just mucked him (or her) about as much as I could (with a smile, of course). It's amazing how much you can muck a rude customer about without endangering your job.

Similarly, as stated previously, it's amazing how far above and beyond the requirements of your job you can help someone who is nice, and treats you nicely.

10
0
45RPM

In my experience, and this applies to all retailers, good service can almost always be obtained if you flirt with the staff. Not in an over the top, camp, way - just a little light flirting. Works with British Gas. Works with Orange. Works with Apple. Works whether you're male or female - people like to be liked, and if they think that they're liked then they can be persuaded to help out even beyond the strict letter of their job description.

I know this to be true because I've worked in a support role, and I've had occasion to try out my tricks (especially when I had an iPhone 3G - not a very good phone, but the Geniuses always replaced it for free (5 times no less), even when it was out of guarantee). I found when I worked in a support role that most people, even the nicest, sweetest people you could ever hope to meet, came storming in in high dudgeon and initiated the conversation with a complaint. No hello even. I was seen as being an obstacle, a minion to be defeated, on the way to getting their problem resolved. Needless to say, this got my back up and ensured maximum obstreperousness. When I was seen as a friendly facilitator and, yes, when I was flirted with, I became very, very helpful indeed.

Of course, sometimes there is just plain bad service - the trick doesn't work all the time. But you'd be amazed how far please and thankyou can stretch.

12
0

Page: