* Posts by admiraljkb

499 posts • joined 15 Oct 2010

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Google turns on free public NTP servers that SMEAR TIME

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Smearing

"Second point - ..."

So was that on purpose, or just accidental? Either way, pretty funny, and "its about time" someone made that crack.

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CloudFlare warns of another massive botnet, er, flaring up

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Usual White House clownshow

sar chasm, thats near the Grand Canyon right?

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US election pollsters weren't (very) wrong – statistically speaking

admiraljkb

Re: You illustrate this perfectly!

@Tikimon - dude, I really wasn't trying to single out anyone. Yes, I called out Trump first since a) pollsters said he'd lose b) I could make the "red state" observation, and c) I don't live in a Blue state to make a direct observation on people who were reluctant to make their choice known. I could only observe those around me in a red state who were extremely reluctant to declare anything, and who had not been so reluctant in prior years.

I suspect since pollsters said their numbers were underreported on Clinton as well in several areas, that many voters that selected Clinton were equally reluctant/ashamed to do so. Hence me postulating the theory of maybe pollsters just ask people who they will NOT vote for. :) Sorry if I had some clarity issues in previous post.

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admiraljkb

Elector allocations

its done that way to make sure that the large pop states (TX, NY, CA, FL, etc) can't run roughshod over the rest of the country. Even so, it could be argued that with 55 votes, CA in particular may already have too much influence in a Presidential election, particularly with the statewide winner taking all the State's electoral votes.

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admiraljkb

Well, before the election, I knew very few people (in a heavily "red" state) that would fess up to wanting Trump. Based on that observation, I suspected they were probably too ashamed to admit that to an anonymous pollster and possibly to themselves. I figured *if* Trump was within 10-15% of Hillary poll-wise, he'd probably win, and he was within 10% at the final day... Not a terribly scientific observation, but it turned out a good guesstimate. Somehow have to factor in the psychology of people who vote not FOR a candidate, but AGAINST a candidate. (which seems to be most of the votes submitted this cycle were either AGAINST Hillary OR Trump, but not actually FOR either and might not admit to voting for either) . Maybe they need to change the question - like "which candidate(s) would you NOT vote for?", and not even worry about the "who are you voting for?" questions.

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Linus Torvalds finds 163 reasons to wait a week for a new Linux

admiraljkb
Pint

Re: Take Christmas and the new year off, please.

"I've had a few long lunches* and come back to put in a few really productive hours at the office (or so I thought at the time) only to come in the next morning and look at the code and think wha???"

I've had something similar... Had an accident during a weekend where my hand got sliced open and had to be sutured, the obligatory shot of morphine, then some oxy-codone for afterwards... I felt FINE (morethanfine) the following day as I was still taking pain pills, and since I thought I felt "normal", just WFH'd and got some code knocked out. Unfortunately/fortunately I didn't have anyone to code review, so I left it for the following day. Yeah... next day rolls around, and I'm NOT on pain pills... Looking at the code... WTF, who the HELL WROTE THIS? Uhhh, It was indeed me, but I didn't actually recognize "this brilliant code I wrote yesterday". Thankfully I didn't check it in...

the Beer for obvious reasons... Don't drink and code kids! :)

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Team Trump snubs Big Internet oligarchs

admiraljkb

Back in the "olden days" companies would give campaign contributions to both parties, and just kinda stand clear otherwise in order to not make enemies with whomever was elected. Taking sides is a risky business that puts the business at risk. I suspect the various Boards of Directors will put a muzzle on high ranking execs from here on out.

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Forget 'shadow IT' – it's 'self-starting IT' now

admiraljkb

Re: Shared IT

"Might give pause for thought about who they are sharing with and also those "high enough up" to ignore policy wouldn't want to share, they want their own ;)"

Yep, seen that, and as a result, NOT a fan for outsourcing anything other than janitorial services. After having gotten a contract QA engineer up to speed, they were re-assigned to a DIRECT competitor. I was LIVID, and objected to the higher ups. I don't know if it did any good, but the QA Engineer was reassigned back to us a quarter or two later. You really have no idea on contract stuff WHERE your trade secrets go ultimately, and there is no real way to protect yourself and still have the outsourced resource do their job.

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admiraljkb
Facepalm

Re: This isn't "self starting" ...

"... this is going against corporate policy and procedure. In my world, such loose cannons are terminated without so much as a by-your-leave."

Agreed, but my experiences with these type of folks, is they are smooth talking, fast walking snake oil sales types that come in schmooze/dazzle the board with what they say they can do for their dept, and get approval to pull their whole dept off the grid from normal IT.

Oddly enough they actually do have the talent necessary to do it (at first), some brilliant engineers who can handle it, and it works great for about a year, maybe TWO. Their brilliant/but short handed staff which had been working just fine? They've had attrition, and the replacements aren't as capable as their predecessors, OR their predecessors didn't document themselves well enough for a replacement to step in and have a snowball's chance in hell at success, and they leave. Starting in on year 3 or 4? Its falling apart or has collapsed completely, the department is in a lot of trouble, and begging corporate IT to help out, and bad mouthing IT to the board for not being team players... Effectively a Kobyashi Maru scenario for Corporate IT... (I've also seen where it went wrong from the get go, but the end result is the same, somehow the rogue's failure was still IT's fault)

Moral of the story, hire/retain ONE smooth talking snake oil type in corporate IT to politically counter the rogue in whatever dept that is pitching a breakaway movement.

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Magnetic, heat scanners to catch Tour de France electric motor cheats

admiraljkb

Re: UCI can "fix" this by removing/reducing minimum bike weight rule...

> "Especially considering that they have no minimum weight limit on MTB's"

Good point, given the amount of abuse a MTB takes, you would figure UCI would have a minimum weight there too.

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admiraljkb
FAIL

UCI can "fix" this by removing/reducing minimum bike weight rule...

Its because of UCI regulations with a MINIMUM bike weight that make it possible to have a hidden motor on the bike without a weight penalty. You can't use a hidden motor for very long due to battery capacity restrictions. Any benefit of the motor is cancelled out by the extra effort of hauling an extra kilogram or so for 200km. HOWEVER, since the weight rule took effect, bike weights have come down dramatically due to better manufacturing techniques. Since you have to make up the difference to get it back up to the minimum weight, it paves the way to put a motor in, either that or lead weights. Bikes you see at the Tour, have to have weights added to them to make them "legal", or at least this year they did. Not sure what was used for "ballast" last year.

UCI response on all this- "Are we going to repeal/revise the weight rule? Nawwww, we're just going to spend a lot of money on testing equipment (some of it dubious) to find motors that likely wouldn't be there if we didn't have a minimum weight restriction...."

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admiraljkb

Re: Tech

"Let's face it. Bikes need some new technology besides weight shavings and hipster wood paneling."

There is a lot of new tech like electronic wireless shifting and such, as well as much improved data recording and analysis tools of rider performance.

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NIST: People have given up on cybersecurity – it's too much hassle

admiraljkb

the 40 they interviewed...

may not be enough for a proper statistical sample, but it does match what I've been seeing out in the real world where people just don't give a flip anymore. I've basically been told repeatedly by different people (and I'm paraphrasing) "All this security stuff is just a downer, so stop harshing my mellow." and this was corporate IT folks, although family members and friends have been no different.

I agree with their findings that there is massive security burnout in a large swath of the population.

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Tim Cook's answer to crashing iPhone sales: More iPhones

admiraljkb

Re: More than one

"Just like TV, people will want more than one iPhone..."

Based on what I've seen around me (and YMMV), people that would have more than 1 phone would not have two iPhones they'd have two or more Android devices for playing around with (like one they didn't mind getting lost/broken/whatevs at the concert,vacay, or at the lake), or they'd have one of each (like an iPhone for work and Android based for personal). Those are the scenarios I see around me currently for people that have more than one. In either scenario, its not ultimately good for Apple since both devices aren't Apple.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

admiraljkb

Re: So it's time...

"Or a HD recorder. ..."

I refuse to spend $100/month to have to fast forward constantly. Last time I had cable TV, the channel providers had gotten sneaky putting up a quick splashscreen making it look like the program was starting, but then shove two-four more commercials.

Its far cheaper to have Netflix/Hulu/Prime and for stuff not on them, to just buy it outright, and then you don't have all that annoying fast forwarding nonsense. (I pay the extra $ for ad free Hulu, so awesome)

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Smut shaming: Anonymous fights Islamic State... with porn

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Click the bottom one

ummm, how often is clicking on bottoms SFW really?

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Microsoft and LinkedIn: What the CEOs are planning

admiraljkb

Re: Do I really want Microsoft to have full access to my professional history?

"Why LinkedIn Monetizers yes, and Microsoft Monetizers not?"

LinkedIn is mostly neutral with no direct ties to anyone. Microsoft has a vested interest in Microsoft (as it should). So now, a site used mostly for professional networking* is all of a sudden owned by a very biased party.

* so there HAVE been an awful lot of Facebook style posts there lately, which is forcing me to re-eval my relationship with them, prior to the MS buyout.

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Don't go chasing waterfalls, please stick... Hang on. They're back

admiraljkb

Re: Church of Agile and Evangelists

I follow the religion of Pragmatism, pragmatically of course.

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admiraljkb
Coat

Re: Organizational microsoervices?

"Maybe the "guys in their 50s doing COBOL" who quit when hearing "agile" were like that, in which case they deserve the job market they will encounter"

@DAM - actually - the COBOL guys have been making BANK for a while (since before Y2K), so at this point unless they did something foolish with their money, they can just retire and be done with it. If they quit when they heard Agile, I suspect they could have left at any time and were just there for "fun". Let that be a lesson for anyone with legacy systems where the only folks that can *properly* develop on it are in their 50's. Its time to do a crash program migration (or get fresh blood that likes COBOL ha), since many folks in their 50's can just up and walk at any time if they so choose, and those two did so choose. I've seen well positioned guys in their 40's do that as well.

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Bloke flogs $40 B&W printer on Craigslist, gets $12,000 legal bill

admiraljkb

Re: Shouldnt the American Bar Association be delisting this douchebag?

The Indiana Bar Association would be responsible if he was a lawyer licensed in Indiana, and he's not a lawyer, nor is he licensed in Indiana.

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admiraljkb

"The fundamental difference in US and UK legal systems in this regard is that costs in the UK can be awarded to the winning party...so if you issue frivolous lawsuits in the UK and keep losing you'll have to pay my legal bills as well.....whereas in the States each party is responsible for their own costs"

In Texas and several other States, same thing in order to keep frivolous lawsuits down. Its just Indiana that hasn't caught up with the times.

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admiraljkb

just Indiana and other states like it.

"The problem with this case is that the US legal system doesn't have any allowance to recognize that some people are just grade A nut jobs."

Correction - Indiana legal system. Several US States DO have measures to prevent this and punish the plaintiff severely for bringing such a frivolous lawsuit.

Common misconception that its all the "US", but in truth the United States is still 50 independent States under a Federal style government. So there are 50 independent sets of legal systems (not including the various American Indian Nations and other Federal Protectorates like Guam and Puerto Rico), then the Federal Legal System on top of all of that when dealing with interstate legal disputes, legal issues crossing State borders, or things that affect multiple States in general. Most States' legal systems are based on English Common law, but some like Texas are based on Spanish Common Law, so there isn't one heterogeneous set of laws spanning the country per se.

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admiraljkb

"Pony up $500 and have him buried."

@John - That's in Illinois (Chicago area to be more precise), but it is next to Indiana...

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Microsoft: Why we tore handy Store block out of Windows 10 Pro PCs

admiraljkb

Re: I'm frustrated with the Pro/Enterprise distinction

"No joke. Azure, Sharepoint, Hypervisor and 365 (or their decedents) will be ALL that is available to end users within 10 years. You will then be micropayment'd to death and not even realize how useless and expensive your computer has become for real work"

@ecofeco - yeah, combined with other recent moves by Nadella, it would seem to indicate that MS might abandon the desktop/laptop market entirely after 2020 or so and go straight cloud services which have higher profit margins than WindowsOS. Building/maintaining an OS is pretty expensive.

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admiraljkb

Re: I'm frustrated with the Pro/Enterprise distinction

1Rafayal - I've read the marketing stuff as well, and thought the licensing stuff had been taken care of after the Vista licensing debacle just like you until I was in a position being over it. Have you TRIED getting MS desktop licenses lately for a small enterprise? I have, and it wasn't as cut and dry as its SUPPOSED to be, nor could I get good answers from MS or CDW for what licenses I really needed. Particularly when you are doing VDI and attaching the occasional non-MS (Mac, idevice, Linux, Android) endpoints into the mix. Most of the "Enterprise" license schemes allow VDI only when its another Enterprise endpoint.

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admiraljkb

I'm frustrated with the Pro/Enterprise distinction

<rant> If you are in a Corp IT environment, you logically would go out and get the corp IT version, which used to be PRO. Now Pro isn't really any different than Home that can join a domain, so maybe it should be now called HomeLab version because you really shouldn't use it anywhere but labs/homelabs? It certainly isn't the real Professional version. What was Pro is now called Enterprise, but you can't get Enterprise licenses without having a Pro License first? ugh...

MS is killing themselves and the rest of us with them by complicating their licensing to such a degree that regardless of how hard you try, there is no way to be in compliance now on the desktop, unless you stop using MS for all but bare essentials. The desktop/laptop licensing garbage has gotten so bad, that for VDI environments, its cheaper just to get a datacenter license on the server and have everyone use Windows Server as their VDI desktop... Not to mention its easier to do that and be in licensing compliance than trying to do it "legit" with Win7 or 10 Ent licenses. MS licensing Attorneys and Marketing weenies have lost their mind and probably a LOT of revenue with the current scheme. </rant>

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Speaking in Tech: The Gartner and OpenStack smack-talk episode

admiraljkb

Re: Clarification

@Knieriemen Poor Linda is just out of touch with the industry and even with her employer Gartner who did an abrupt about face on her.

Given that ATT, Verizon, Deutsch Telekom and Walmart along with many, many others are betting the farm and their networks on OpenStack, its no longer some fringe tech that she thinks it is. OpenStack has already passed the tipping point adoption wise just due to the sheer scale of the behemoths now involved who are moving off proprietary solutions (and dedicating development resources to the project) in order to increase their pace of innovation, and better their bottom lines because time is money. What was said over and over from the Telco's in particular at the conference last week is they took 6 month odd lead times and turned them into days, hours or even minutes depending on what was being done. Thats just like printing money for them. Those folks aren't going back to old school stuff that Linda is apparently attached to (or being paid by?).

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VMware's Photon Machine 'microvisor' may not be so small

admiraljkb
Joke

So Photon as a pure microvisor...

has been torpedoed?

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Intel literally decimates workforce: 12,000 will be axed, CFO shifts to sales

admiraljkb

Re: Wonder what this kind of news means for AMD

AMD's been cutting and cutting for years, so cutting too many more at this point would seem a bit scary if they are to survive.

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Intel preps for layoffs: Chipzilla sharpens axe for deep job cuts

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Doing the time warp?

"Or are these redundancies so hard-hitting that they're being backdated?"

Retconn'd redundancies? That'll be a new way to handle accounting "challenges". :)

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Admin fishes dirty office chat from mistyped-email bin and then ...?

admiraljkb

Re: Devils advocate.

bounce is better. That way as an admin you don't get into a situation you aren't comfortable with. Lets face it, that's between them and their SO's unless it impacts the business, and then its up to their managers and HR to request logs. Whatever my personal feelings are on it, my business one pretty much ends up correcting it and letting it go since that is/was the policy. Of course, I'd then immediately change the policy next week to bounce typoed internal emails after that. I generally follow a don't ask, don't care policy regarding people's personal crap at work...

I've accidentally ended up in similar situations myself on occasion due to monitoring the internet firewall for things like blocked legit sites that needed unblocked and run into someone surfing NSFW's. I'd typically just take them aside, QUIETLY, let them know they could get in trouble if another admin or the security guys saw that, and then let it drop. I generally wouldn't see their userid again pop up again, except for one of the night security guys... yeah, you don't wanna know...

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admiraljkb
Joke

"Hmmm, did they claim expenses for two hotel rooms and not use one of them? Wasteful."

that brings us another option - forward to accounting for why they're getting two hotel rooms.

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Linux command line mistake 'nukes web boss'S biz'

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: "rm" stands for "remark"

"dd" can be a career limiting move if HR catches you on "that" site again...

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admiraljkb
Joke

Re: It's fake

"Once I ran rm -rf /dev/usb/ and my printer just disappeared."

Thats what happens when you use those reman cartridges. New cartridges from the manufacturer have built in protection from that.

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admiraljkb
Paris Hilton

Re: It's fake

Yep, the ServerFault Topic is closed now, and it IS a late April fools... At the top of question is this notice:

"Edit: This is a hoax by a f***** troll."

Paris, cuz, oh hell, its Friday and ServerFault was trolled, so why not.

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Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

admiraljkb
Coat

your #2 is actually #1, but regardless, its a crappy law. I'll get my coat, as the US will be too tech-hostile to stay in if anything like the proposed law passes....

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admiraljkb

I don't see how this and HIPAA can be resolved against each other

On one hand health care providers are told to keep patient data secure, and then if the encryption to do that is banned, they'll start to get sued for not being properly HIPAA compliant. If encryption is backed off on JUST mobile devices, then Doctors will have to go back to paper instead of tablets...

Not to mention the fact that putting our encryption LOWER than the rest of the planet makes every bit of our infrastructure vulnerable to terrorist cyberattack or state sponsored cyberattack. Might as well revert all our power and water plants back to full manual control and pull all the computers out... How stupid are US politicians? (yeah, bunch of clueless OLD lawyers, nvm)

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Field technicians want to grab my tool and probe my things

admiraljkb
Pint

"anyone remember those stupid all-in-one PCs... "

@x7 - I've got one in the attic still if you want me to forward it to you. It was a beast indeed, and even more fun to work on when the PC side of the power supply burnt out. Ironically, I didn't use it much after that...

(actually I'd forgotten that beast was up there, but now need to figure out how to get rid of it, so umm, yeah, thanks for that! The city's tube recycle days are well over, and tubes are difficult to properly get off your hands now... Maybe if I ignore it another 10 years...)

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admiraljkb
Coat

in my final year or so as an onsite Field Engineer...

I only pulled out the whole tool bag when I had a lot of hardware calls, since carrying the whole bag just slowed me down when servicing 22 stories of a building... Keeping in mind that this was 1999-2000 - generally I just carried:

* 3 screwdrivers - two small ones for laptops in my shirt pocket, and 1 big long one to screw/unscrew deep inside HP printers primarily

* A small case of floppies with common drivers/bios/firmware for what was needed in the day, since the majority of my tickets were software rather than hardware.

* a couple of HP pickup rollers in my pocket to fix paper jams that were due to old rollers. I was happy to see those kinda calls, they were always quick in/out affairs.

* if going on a lot of HP LJII/LJIII calls (or IBM 3268 and 3274 mainframe printers), I'd carry lube for the squirrel cage fans. Leaving the bullpen carrying lubricant was guaranteed for some remarks on the way out though...

(Hmmm, and re-reading the above, the innuendo bits above write themselves. It *mostly* wasn't intentional, but there it is, I'll get my coat before HR arrives... Field Engineering is a perverted field...)

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Etsy security rule #1: Don't be a jerk to devs

admiraljkb

Re: Um.... why are so many companies reinventing the errors of 50 years ago?

Theoretically if its a proper DevOps shop, then when the code is checked in on a dev branch, automated tests are fired off in the dev environment, if it successfully passes, the code promotes to a qa/test environment, if successful there, then it promotes to a pre-prod/staging environment, and if successful there, then promotes to prod. LOTS of testing occurs before it makes it to production, and devs have NO access to any environment other than their dev ones. There might even be a UAT (user acceptance testing) environment in there as well after qa/test, depending on how things are setup

That is if its a real DevOps shop. If its a "DevOps" shop instead because the term sounded cool, and "lets use it on a resume" kind of shop..., then yeah, devs are making changes in production and PHB's are pretty clueless that they have major issues.

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Apple Fools: Times the House of Jobs went horribly awry

admiraljkb

Re: Newton

"I doubt Apple will be around in another 40 years, but who knows. Apple may re-invent themselves again."

Actually, Apple has so much money right now, that if they ceased operations altogether, laid off all engineering and sales staff they'd still be around, and probably even bigger in 40 years as an international investment bank.

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Bash on Windows. Repeat, Microsoft demos Bash on Windows

admiraljkb

Re: Stealing VMS

There was no marketing name back then for OS/2 NT since it never saw the light of day, well not exactly anyway. WinNT3.1 was *mostly* OS/2 NT. Technically the only thing actually missing would have been the OS/2 2.x subsystem and presentation manager. The OS2 1.x subsystem was still included and HPFS was still a native filesystem and remained so until NT4.0. I was pretty excited by the prospect of OS/2 2.0, and then the 3.0 variant shortly after to get us out of the DOS era. good times. :)

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admiraljkb

Re: Stealing VMS

@patrickstar - you're close - WinNT's original name was OS/2-NT 3 (as it actually was OS/2, and still is by lineage). IBM was tasked with the last legacy x86 OS/2, v2.x, while MS was tasked with the portable microkernel version that would run on anything and everything (this arch was violated by NT4+, but thats a different issue). Then that whole MS vs IBM flap about Presentation Manager vs Program Manager, and several other arguments behind the scenes. Needless to say, Presentation Manager was swapped out for Program Manager, the product was renamed to Windows NT 3.1, and IBM and MS's source code sharing agreements ceased with OS/2 1.x, DOS, and Win3.1. MS left in the OS/2 1.x subsystem, which meant that WinNT could still NATIVELY run OS/2 1.x text apps, but couldn't run OS/2 2.x apps.

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admiraljkb

@davidp231 - Looks like it. Windows NT has always had the ability for multiple subsystems like this. That was one of the cool design features of NT back in the day. This was how it ran Win16 and OS/2 apps in the beginning after all. It was part of the original design work for NT3.1, but largely just got pi$$ed away when Ballmer decided they didn't want compatibility with anyone other than themselves in the naughts. Nice to see another Ballmer policy going buhbye.

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admiraljkb

hmmm, in combination with all the other announcements in the last 6 months, It does lend more credence to my "next Windows server after 2016 will have a Linux kernel theory". It WAS a crazy a$$ wild eyed lunch talk with friends theory. (I based it on Apple's great success at effectively outsourcing their lower level OS to BSD while sticking to the API's and GUI that end users actually care about). Its increasingly looking less crazy, but with that said, I'll believe it when/if I see it... I'm waiting for the Balmerites on the board to stage a coup on Nadella and undo all this.

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The only way is down for NetApp, HPE and IBM storage – study

admiraljkb

Given the complete volatility in storage right now - there is NO way to get an accurate prediction for the coming year.

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Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage

admiraljkb
Linux

Re: "Even using third party utilities like DoNotSpy10, no guarantee that a lot more remains active"

"I'm a huge Linux fan but Linux is facing its own issues right now with SystemD. "

meh, systemD is nothing compared to the Win10 issues. Don't get me wrong, its controversial, but really not in the same league as the win10 privacy debacle.

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admiraljkb

Re: It's the data harvesting

"Did you pay for Windows 10? Nope. You paid for Windows 7/8, Windows 10 is NOT an update to 7/8, it's a different OS."

GUI /= OS

Actually, Vista/Win7/8.x/10 are all the SAME underlying OS with different GUI designs. The actual OS nitty gritty under the hood is the same architecture with relatively minor improvements accumulating over time. There were some medium/major improvements to the OS between Vista and 7 to get the bloat down (mainly the Video subsystem by eliminating double buffering, ala presentation mode), but since then, the GUI has been the main thing getting jacked with all this time in order to run the same UI on tablets/desktops.

Lets look at the earlier NT lineage which changed UI at the same time as it changed the underlying OS, and might be the source of your confusion

the NT3.x lineup was the same GUI and OS underneath (and the prototype for the current winOS with ring3 drivers). It was still effectively the microkernel/portable OS/2 that it started development as. BUT, they threw Program Manager on the top instead of Presentation Manager and didn't include compatibility with OS/2 v2 apps when the MS/IBM relationship went sour. (the OS2 1.x subsystem remained in NT until Win2k)

The NT4 through WinXP lineup was the same GUI (mostly) and OS underneath (pushed drivers down into Ring0, ruining processor portability and optimized to single CPU systems, which MS went on to regret in the multi-core era, and had to fix with "Vista" reverting out much of the NT4 lower level mess. Its this era that created much of the issues MS had with trying to get a newer portable device going due to what appears to have been a lot of hardcoded mess in NT4, which in turn generated a lot of their security headaches which persist to this day.). Now GUI wise, it would have been nice if they'd put the W9x GUI on top of NT3.x and kept making underlying improvements going and waited for HW to have caught up.

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