* Posts by admiraljkb

472 posts • joined 15 Oct 2010

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VMware's Photon Machine 'microvisor' may not be so small

admiraljkb
Joke

So Photon as a pure microvisor...

has been torpedoed?

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Intel literally decimates workforce: 12,000 will be axed, CFO shifts to sales

admiraljkb

Re: Wonder what this kind of news means for AMD

AMD's been cutting and cutting for years, so cutting too many more at this point would seem a bit scary if they are to survive.

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Intel preps for layoffs: Chipzilla sharpens axe for deep job cuts

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Doing the time warp?

"Or are these redundancies so hard-hitting that they're being backdated?"

Retconn'd redundancies? That'll be a new way to handle accounting "challenges". :)

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Admin fishes dirty office chat from mistyped-email bin and then ...?

admiraljkb

Re: Devils advocate.

bounce is better. That way as an admin you don't get into a situation you aren't comfortable with. Lets face it, that's between them and their SO's unless it impacts the business, and then its up to their managers and HR to request logs. Whatever my personal feelings are on it, my business one pretty much ends up correcting it and letting it go since that is/was the policy. Of course, I'd then immediately change the policy next week to bounce typoed internal emails after that. I generally follow a don't ask, don't care policy regarding people's personal crap at work...

I've accidentally ended up in similar situations myself on occasion due to monitoring the internet firewall for things like blocked legit sites that needed unblocked and run into someone surfing NSFW's. I'd typically just take them aside, QUIETLY, let them know they could get in trouble if another admin or the security guys saw that, and then let it drop. I generally wouldn't see their userid again pop up again, except for one of the night security guys... yeah, you don't wanna know...

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admiraljkb
Joke

"Hmmm, did they claim expenses for two hotel rooms and not use one of them? Wasteful."

that brings us another option - forward to accounting for why they're getting two hotel rooms.

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Linux command line mistake 'nukes web boss'S biz'

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: "rm" stands for "remark"

"dd" can be a career limiting move if HR catches you on "that" site again...

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admiraljkb
Joke

Re: It's fake

"Once I ran rm -rf /dev/usb/ and my printer just disappeared."

Thats what happens when you use those reman cartridges. New cartridges from the manufacturer have built in protection from that.

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admiraljkb
Paris Hilton

Re: It's fake

Yep, the ServerFault Topic is closed now, and it IS a late April fools... At the top of question is this notice:

"Edit: This is a hoax by a f***** troll."

Paris, cuz, oh hell, its Friday and ServerFault was trolled, so why not.

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Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

admiraljkb
Coat

your #2 is actually #1, but regardless, its a crappy law. I'll get my coat, as the US will be too tech-hostile to stay in if anything like the proposed law passes....

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admiraljkb

I don't see how this and HIPAA can be resolved against each other

On one hand health care providers are told to keep patient data secure, and then if the encryption to do that is banned, they'll start to get sued for not being properly HIPAA compliant. If encryption is backed off on JUST mobile devices, then Doctors will have to go back to paper instead of tablets...

Not to mention the fact that putting our encryption LOWER than the rest of the planet makes every bit of our infrastructure vulnerable to terrorist cyberattack or state sponsored cyberattack. Might as well revert all our power and water plants back to full manual control and pull all the computers out... How stupid are US politicians? (yeah, bunch of clueless OLD lawyers, nvm)

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Field technicians want to grab my tool and probe my things

admiraljkb
Pint

"anyone remember those stupid all-in-one PCs... "

@x7 - I've got one in the attic still if you want me to forward it to you. It was a beast indeed, and even more fun to work on when the PC side of the power supply burnt out. Ironically, I didn't use it much after that...

(actually I'd forgotten that beast was up there, but now need to figure out how to get rid of it, so umm, yeah, thanks for that! The city's tube recycle days are well over, and tubes are difficult to properly get off your hands now... Maybe if I ignore it another 10 years...)

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admiraljkb
Coat

in my final year or so as an onsite Field Engineer...

I only pulled out the whole tool bag when I had a lot of hardware calls, since carrying the whole bag just slowed me down when servicing 22 stories of a building... Keeping in mind that this was 1999-2000 - generally I just carried:

* 3 screwdrivers - two small ones for laptops in my shirt pocket, and 1 big long one to screw/unscrew deep inside HP printers primarily

* A small case of floppies with common drivers/bios/firmware for what was needed in the day, since the majority of my tickets were software rather than hardware.

* a couple of HP pickup rollers in my pocket to fix paper jams that were due to old rollers. I was happy to see those kinda calls, they were always quick in/out affairs.

* if going on a lot of HP LJII/LJIII calls (or IBM 3268 and 3274 mainframe printers), I'd carry lube for the squirrel cage fans. Leaving the bullpen carrying lubricant was guaranteed for some remarks on the way out though...

(Hmmm, and re-reading the above, the innuendo bits above write themselves. It *mostly* wasn't intentional, but there it is, I'll get my coat before HR arrives... Field Engineering is a perverted field...)

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Etsy security rule #1: Don't be a jerk to devs

admiraljkb

Re: Um.... why are so many companies reinventing the errors of 50 years ago?

Theoretically if its a proper DevOps shop, then when the code is checked in on a dev branch, automated tests are fired off in the dev environment, if it successfully passes, the code promotes to a qa/test environment, if successful there, then it promotes to a pre-prod/staging environment, and if successful there, then promotes to prod. LOTS of testing occurs before it makes it to production, and devs have NO access to any environment other than their dev ones. There might even be a UAT (user acceptance testing) environment in there as well after qa/test, depending on how things are setup

That is if its a real DevOps shop. If its a "DevOps" shop instead because the term sounded cool, and "lets use it on a resume" kind of shop..., then yeah, devs are making changes in production and PHB's are pretty clueless that they have major issues.

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Apple Fools: Times the House of Jobs went horribly awry

admiraljkb

Re: Newton

"I doubt Apple will be around in another 40 years, but who knows. Apple may re-invent themselves again."

Actually, Apple has so much money right now, that if they ceased operations altogether, laid off all engineering and sales staff they'd still be around, and probably even bigger in 40 years as an international investment bank.

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Bash on Windows. Repeat, Microsoft demos Bash on Windows

admiraljkb

Re: Stealing VMS

There was no marketing name back then for OS/2 NT since it never saw the light of day, well not exactly anyway. WinNT3.1 was *mostly* OS/2 NT. Technically the only thing actually missing would have been the OS/2 2.x subsystem and presentation manager. The OS2 1.x subsystem was still included and HPFS was still a native filesystem and remained so until NT4.0. I was pretty excited by the prospect of OS/2 2.0, and then the 3.0 variant shortly after to get us out of the DOS era. good times. :)

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admiraljkb

Re: Stealing VMS

@patrickstar - you're close - WinNT's original name was OS/2-NT 3 (as it actually was OS/2, and still is by lineage). IBM was tasked with the last legacy x86 OS/2, v2.x, while MS was tasked with the portable microkernel version that would run on anything and everything (this arch was violated by NT4+, but thats a different issue). Then that whole MS vs IBM flap about Presentation Manager vs Program Manager, and several other arguments behind the scenes. Needless to say, Presentation Manager was swapped out for Program Manager, the product was renamed to Windows NT 3.1, and IBM and MS's source code sharing agreements ceased with OS/2 1.x, DOS, and Win3.1. MS left in the OS/2 1.x subsystem, which meant that WinNT could still NATIVELY run OS/2 1.x text apps, but couldn't run OS/2 2.x apps.

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admiraljkb

@davidp231 - Looks like it. Windows NT has always had the ability for multiple subsystems like this. That was one of the cool design features of NT back in the day. This was how it ran Win16 and OS/2 apps in the beginning after all. It was part of the original design work for NT3.1, but largely just got pi$$ed away when Ballmer decided they didn't want compatibility with anyone other than themselves in the naughts. Nice to see another Ballmer policy going buhbye.

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admiraljkb

hmmm, in combination with all the other announcements in the last 6 months, It does lend more credence to my "next Windows server after 2016 will have a Linux kernel theory". It WAS a crazy a$$ wild eyed lunch talk with friends theory. (I based it on Apple's great success at effectively outsourcing their lower level OS to BSD while sticking to the API's and GUI that end users actually care about). Its increasingly looking less crazy, but with that said, I'll believe it when/if I see it... I'm waiting for the Balmerites on the board to stage a coup on Nadella and undo all this.

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The only way is down for NetApp, HPE and IBM storage – study

admiraljkb

Given the complete volatility in storage right now - there is NO way to get an accurate prediction for the coming year.

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Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage

admiraljkb
Linux

Re: "Even using third party utilities like DoNotSpy10, no guarantee that a lot more remains active"

"I'm a huge Linux fan but Linux is facing its own issues right now with SystemD. "

meh, systemD is nothing compared to the Win10 issues. Don't get me wrong, its controversial, but really not in the same league as the win10 privacy debacle.

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admiraljkb

Re: It's the data harvesting

"Did you pay for Windows 10? Nope. You paid for Windows 7/8, Windows 10 is NOT an update to 7/8, it's a different OS."

GUI /= OS

Actually, Vista/Win7/8.x/10 are all the SAME underlying OS with different GUI designs. The actual OS nitty gritty under the hood is the same architecture with relatively minor improvements accumulating over time. There were some medium/major improvements to the OS between Vista and 7 to get the bloat down (mainly the Video subsystem by eliminating double buffering, ala presentation mode), but since then, the GUI has been the main thing getting jacked with all this time in order to run the same UI on tablets/desktops.

Lets look at the earlier NT lineage which changed UI at the same time as it changed the underlying OS, and might be the source of your confusion

the NT3.x lineup was the same GUI and OS underneath (and the prototype for the current winOS with ring3 drivers). It was still effectively the microkernel/portable OS/2 that it started development as. BUT, they threw Program Manager on the top instead of Presentation Manager and didn't include compatibility with OS/2 v2 apps when the MS/IBM relationship went sour. (the OS2 1.x subsystem remained in NT until Win2k)

The NT4 through WinXP lineup was the same GUI (mostly) and OS underneath (pushed drivers down into Ring0, ruining processor portability and optimized to single CPU systems, which MS went on to regret in the multi-core era, and had to fix with "Vista" reverting out much of the NT4 lower level mess. Its this era that created much of the issues MS had with trying to get a newer portable device going due to what appears to have been a lot of hardcoded mess in NT4, which in turn generated a lot of their security headaches which persist to this day.). Now GUI wise, it would have been nice if they'd put the W9x GUI on top of NT3.x and kept making underlying improvements going and waited for HW to have caught up.

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HP Inc won't shake you down for ink in 3D printer era, says CTO

admiraljkb
Coat

Ummm, didn't Carly Fiorini say something pretty close about inkjet cartridges right before she was fired? Just saying.... :)

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Google buys NetApp ... buildings

admiraljkb

Re: Everybody Relax...

*If* it was to a normal Property Management type group, then yeah, it would be completely normal. BUT, by selling the buildings to Google and doing a leaseback, means they are planning on some "strategic reductions" of many of those sites/employees which gives Google the opportunity to move employees in slowly (or maybe quickly) over time. I'd be real nervous if I were a NetApp employee in one of those buildings.

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Millions menaced as ransomware-smuggling ads pollute top websites

admiraljkb

Re: Online Ads, the gift that keeps on giving

"Personally I think that if big sites are serving up ads they are liable for the damage."

They ARE liable,unless they have a big ol "our ads may infect your computer" waiver you have to accept before entering the site... I don't think any lawyers have picked up the task yet, but its just a matter of time.

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admiraljkb

Re: Checks for anti-virus?

If you are using Windows as a daily driver without ad-block, then good luck... So much of the malware stuff that is out there (many unknown) bypasses the AV products. For the last several years, the Pron sites are safer than the news sites for keeping your PC errr, well, umm, "CLEAN?". :) Thats really screwed up.

Ads should be straight up pics and text. Who the !@#$@ in their right mind (in the ad business) would allow ads to run Flash, Java, Javascript, etc etc etc... Idiots... I and many others started ad-blocking for security reasons. (oddly enough, it also means that sites SNAP now instead of draggggggging/struggling to render)

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admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Websites visited by millions of people daily

"They target very popular sites, with a large proportion of technically illiterate people."

You mean the illiterati?

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Former Nokia boss Stephen Elop scores gig as chief innovator for Australia's top telco

admiraljkb
WTF?

Elop - incompetent or criminal?

How did Elop not end up in jail? Either he was truly incompetent of the highest levels (which would then be pitiable, but not jailable), or undertook criminal espionage and sabotage actions against a publicly traded company (more likely).

Pretty obvious that Telstra is in real trouble now. They don't share any board members with Yahoo do they?

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admiraljkb

Re: Elop possesses two inimitable qualities

I agree, with a slight corrections:

1. Innate sense of customer expectations

2. Do the opposite of what those expectations are, because, well, customers heh?

3 Be secretly still working for an old employer, making decisions to primarily benefit them

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Microsoft has made SQL Server for Linux. Repeat, Microsoft has made SQL Server 2016 for Linux

admiraljkb

Re: Microsoft Linux?

They've already brought out their own distro for what runs their network in Azure. Its Debian based. At some point, its looking increasingly likely that they'll move off the current Windows Kernel and go BSD or Linux. Mac did it when they switched to BSD for their underlying OS which is helping them make huge profits, so don't know why post-Ballmer MS wouldn't follow suit. Maintaining a kernel and all that low level hardware/software crap by yourself is expensive as hell and nobody appreciates it nor is really willing to pay much for it. Much easier to collaborate on what amount nowadays to a commodity, and work on your apps, services and user experience which is where the profits are.

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admiraljkb

Re: Bring Office to Linux

*supposedly* they have a skunkworks MSOffice on Linux that's been around since the Ballmer era (and predates the Android and iPhone versions that suddenly showed up). I don't think it'll ever release at this point with their focus on o365 and subscriptions.

My *general* impression though at this point, is they are looking to go ahead and kill off the legacy code thick Office and go pure subscription with the o365 "Web" Office once they get it to parity levels. This helps keep consistent subscription income going versus "ONE and DONE" licenses for Office of varying versions scattered all over everywhere which also create support nightmares for them. I *could* be wrong, but Nadella seems to be headed in that direction.

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admiraljkb
Coat

Re: Why?

>>Does anybody actually WANT SQL Server on Linux?

My personal and business opinions often differ, and this is no exception:

My PERSONAL opinion: Hell no...

My BUSINESS opinion: Without that Windows Server license, there is a lot more flexibility on which pool of hypervisors to run it on, since I have a limited number of Windows DataCenter licenses to take care of X number of hypervisors. For an example - running MSSQL on Linux gives me greater flexibility in HA and balancing load as I can now float/spread MSSQL servers among 12 hypervisors instead of just 3.

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Mechanic computers used to pwn cars in new model-agnostic attack

admiraljkb

Re: Battlestar Galactica...

Have to agree. Separate systems that are unrelated probably should be air-gapped, or at least fire-walled properly. Definitely the Onstar type systems should have incredibly limited access to anything on the vehicle. Firewall things off like you do any other network these days. Air-gap the "radio" with Internet access built in for Pandora and such from anything else... For getting diags remotely, put a R/O Diags computer (aka a syslog server in effect) in the DMZ that communicates with the outside world and gets data PUSHED to it from disparate systems, but do not allow it to initiate communications into the internal car network.

BAN CANBUS in cars! :) Its time has come and gone. We need something with more than a slight hint of security in it nowadays.

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admiraljkb

Re: Carmageddon

@Andy Non: You'd be looking for a pre-1995'sih car then. Good luck with that. You'd need two to have a spare.

In general, the tech on vehicles is actually obsoleting them pretty quick, MUCH faster than the mechanicals wear out. My father had a a few 1950's Studebaker trucks he sold recently. No computers in there, and they were surprisingly serviceable for vehicles in their 60's and relatively easy to get parts for since the Mfg hasn't existed in ~60 years. This is in contrast to my 2003 F150 truck which appears to have been prematurely EOL'd for parts by Ford in the mid 2000's. While its needed very little repairs (rat eating wiring harness and ethanol congealing in and burning up a fuel pump), had to go to a junkyard for the wiring harness only 4 years after buying the truck...

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Yahoo! kills! search! APIs!, games! and! Astrology! site!

admiraljkb
Joke

Re: Cost of an Astrology site

@breakfast - brilliant idea. Put the devs about to get laid off to work on automating Astrology? Then they could sell AaaS. (Astrology as a Service) to all the newspapers and other media firms who could layoff their Astrologers? Marissa missed another opportunity. :)

(oddly enough, I'm writing this as a joke, but seriously wondering about the business opportunities of something like that.)

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admiraljkb

Re: Date?

> Something about "how big a coffin do we need?"

followed by, "if we wait 6 more months, we can save even more money with a much smaller one"

Yahoo! seems to be getting circled increasingly by vultures, but those vultures all appear to be waiting for the value of the company to be much closer to zero to save on acquisition costs. (ala its only "mostly dead", so they're going to wait it out a little while longer)

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Donald Trump promises 'such trouble' for Jeff Bezos and Amazon

admiraljkb

Re: The Issue

@Flocke Kroes

"He can ask/pay a congressman to introduce his law. "

Presidents have routinely "made law" via Executive Actions, increasingly so since the 80's. While I agree with the Chief Exec being allowed to take certain actions with rapidity as required (The President is the Commander in Chief and the Chief Exec of the Country after all), I do think that Congress should vote to approve any Exec Actions after 6-12 months, and if they aren't approved, they need to just expire. Otherwise, the President has "effectively" bypassed Congress and legislated laws.

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Get out of mi casa, Picasa: Google photo site to join Wave, Code, Reader in silicon hell

admiraljkb
Pint

"Why silicon hell and not silicon heaven (where all the calculators go)?"

am I the only one who read that with Kryten's voice saying it in my head? :)

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iPhones clock-blocked and crocked by setting date to Jan 1, 1970

admiraljkb
Coat

"*Date format as defined per ISO 8601"

and in this modern era, is there another date format other than for the non IT industry civvies? :)

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VMware axes Fusion and Workstation US devs

admiraljkb

Re: cognitive dissonance

actually thank Innotek which Sun bought and then, well you know the rest. This apparently was one part of the acquisition they valued enough to leave alone. A lot of internal Oracle development folks were already using VirtualBox, so there would have been an outcry from within if it was fooled around with too much.

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'Shut down the parts of internet used by Islamic State masterminds'

admiraljkb

This is where we know its time for the poor old dude to retire from public service. He probably still has an AOL account at home. :)

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Want to boost your payslip? Get DevOps on your business card

admiraljkb

Re: Cool!! I can buy 100 business cards for £5

>>I'm sure its a bit more complex than just having the card

Yep. You have to be part developer, part IT, have reasonable architecture skills, be geared for very dynamic environments, possess heavy duty automation skills, able to translate Devspeak and ITspeak between those two warring sides of the shop, combined with the political chops to tell both Development and IT to GTH and still have them thank you for the privilege. :) I'm sure it changes based on environment, but my sums up my last two DevOPS roles.

Quick way to tell - If someone says they're DevOPS, and Jenkins is missing on the resume, then they probably aren't DevOPS. :) Just having Jenkins doesn't make them DevOPS in and of itself, but its a positive indicator that they lean in the right direction automation wise.

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Jenkins plugs 11 security holes with two updates

admiraljkb
Thumb Up

Jenkins is a dessert topping and a floor wax.

I was setting it up for development environments 4 years ago, and then setup a couple more for automated transfers as well as IT automation jobs. It's primarily for continuous integration and devops, but it's good at helping to automate nearly anything, even new user creation in ad to create the account and the other setup details that would be manual steps otherwise. I mostly use it for Linux automation tasks and devops/CI. Makes it easy to setup complex tasks behind the scenes, and then hand it over to tier one support to just click a button. Once you start automating on Jenkins, it doesn't stop. :). It's an awesome general purpose automation tool.

And now I have some servers to patch after testing.....

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Block storage is dead, says ex-HP and Supermicro data bigwig

admiraljkb
Coat

Re: really?

ah, the good old days. I remember swapping an i8088 cpu out for an NEC v20 in order just to get enough of a performance boost to get the interleave down to 3:1 on my MFM 20MB HD. Reports ran much faster after that... *sigh* Does this mean I need to start yelling "get off my lawn" to all the neighborhood kids?

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Doctor Who's good/bad duality, war futility tale in The Zygon Inversion fails to fizz

admiraljkb
Joke

"OTOH, how much did the people in the pods remember between capture and release ?"

How many fish remember that? Surely there is something in the Shadow Proclamation against a capture/release program of sentients? :)

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admiraljkb

Reality Distortion Field / Suspension of Belief

Well, the problem is the reality distortion field can only be maintained if the field isn't breached by something so out of character, or out of "universe" that causes your disbelief suspension to cease. Once the Reality Distortion Field collapses, every little loose thread becomes apparent and causes you to keep looking for more. A Military Aircraft that is UNIT's equivalent of "Air Force ONE" without fancy UNIT extraterrestrial countermeasures, armaments and enough parachutes (or escape mechanism) for the crew was one of those, the UNIT unit with Bonnie under London not killing Bonnie and all the Zygons present was another. The UNIT contingent going into the church and being slaughtered instead of just killing the hostiles (who looked like family members) would also be uncharacteristic of UNIT soldiers. Sure regular Army, but UNIT's trained to deal with these sorts of things. All of those things seemed to me to be lazy writing, because had the characters actually done their normal/believable thing in the Whovian Universe , there wouldn't have been a 2 episode arc. It would have been a quick 30 minute done and DONE. Instead we had a complex circuitous route taken to a) get us back to having an Osgood, and b) get us back to having 2 Osgoods.

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