* Posts by Sandtitz

365 posts • joined 6 Oct 2010

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Office for Mac 2016 Preview: This letter will self-destruct in 60 days

Sandtitz
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WTF?

Re: I'm puzzled

I thought every Mac that running Mavericks is eligible and able to run Yosemite as well?

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Bad movie: Hackers can raid networks with burnt Blu-Rays

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Re: Part of HP Bloatware

"Something that just plays the stream you are interested in. Perversely, the MacOS BD player is a better option in this regard. Ripping the content away from the context of the rest of the disk is also a good option."

Let me rephrase the question:

What Blu-ray playback software would you recommend for the IT-declined people with their 'HP Laptops'?

PowerDVD and such don't require ripping or searching for the correct stream file. HP pays something for the these programs so that people would be able to easily watch films. If HP was to replace it with another BD playback software what would you recommend? It doesn't have to be a free solution, but it should be easy to use for all those masses who buy computers from supermarkets.

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Sandtitz
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Re: Part of HP Bloatware

"I removed PowerDVD from my wife's HP laptop the other day."

What Blu-ray playback software would you recommend then?

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Google's 'encrypted-by-default' Android is NOT encrypting by default

Sandtitz
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Re: I don't really like Apple/iOs @ThomH

"On malware/viruses: I don't believe Windows has a significant security problem, it just doesn't have a gatekeeper. The benefit is your freedom to download a greater diversity of apps, the detriment is that you have to look out for yourself. Nowhere near every app with a problem has been some dodgy hack from a Russian warez site but you can be confident that Dropbox, Facebook, Desert Golfing, etc, when downloaded from Google or Amazon or equivalent, are safe."

See what I did there?

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Acer enters Windows Phone fray with cheap Liquid M220 mobe

Sandtitz
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Stop

Re: Backing the underdog

"Xiaomi seems to be doing quite well with Android."

What is your definition of 'doing quite well'?

Wasn't there some news a couple months ago that Xiaomi is selling devices practically at cost with a minuscule profit (couch change), and that only Apple and Samsung make real profit with Android phones.

Had Nokia turned to Android they would have battled with Samsung. Could there have been really space for both of them to do high-end phones or would they both have endured a long battle with altogether less profit than what Samsung now makes since they would be having lower prices and/or even higher spec'd phones?

The Nokia organization was top heavy and reacted slowly to market changes anyway even if the engineers had brilliance. The company was doomed long before Elop developed his coup de grace.

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Sandtitz
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"I know this is an entry level device, but those are pretty lousy specs these days. I hope it at least has an SD card slot."

It is entry level, no question. The specs are quite similar to Lumia 520 - released almost 2 years ago. That model is still very usable.

The lack of an SD card slot may not matter since photos can be automatically uploaded to Onedrive. Of course one cannot install too many big games or apps or the world map, but how big of a problem that is to people who are buying a basic phone for €79?

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Seagate NAS owners: hide it behind a firewall. Fast.

Sandtitz
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Unhappy

Re: You put your NAS on the internet?

Not putting the NAS on internet doesn't solve the problem though it helps a bit.

These device are likely on the corporate LAN and are thus vulnerable to malicious users. Patching is still needed.

This isn't the first poorly programmed NAS line from Seagate. The previous Blackarmor NAS line was garbage as well.

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'The troll stats saddened me as a human, but didn't surprise me as a boffin'

Sandtitz
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WTF?

See icon -->

"Yes. Mostly because nobody uses Microsoft's browser any more."

I certainly don't use IE and most of El Reg hacks and audience probably don't either but its 2nd place behind Chrome doesn't look threatened at all as Firefox usage is slipping.

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RIP Leonard Nimoy: He lived long and prospered

Sandtitz
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Farewell

"Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most... human."

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Lenovo: We SWEAR we're done with bloatware, adware and scumware

Sandtitz
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Re: Aw crude

Honestly, microsoft should figure out a way to mandate that OEMs (or would it be some legal/licensing issue?) ship with clean windows installs

That'll never happen since Microsoft would really need to remove the Office trial version as well. And all those preloaded Metro apps as well (mail, news, weather etc)

Microsoft has the Signature program for OEMs that features clean installs. Never seen one myself.

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Sandtitz
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Re: novatech @linicks

I wouldn't buy any of those bare bone laptops from them.

The 14" Ultrabooks and the "Everyday" models are all 1366x768 and can't be customized.

The 15 inch "Pro" laptops sport the same resolution - you need a 17" display to get FHD.

Only the "High Performance" category has Full HD on some models and that's it.

Configuring a model to match Lenovo W540 for example will get a cheaper price but those Lenovos have a 3-year onsite warranty and they also weight a lot less.

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NO ONE is making money from YouTube, even Google – report

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Flame

Re: I think you'll find this is actually...

There's plenty of other examples as well: LOTR series, Return of the Jedi, Batman, Spiderman, Forrest Hump...

Makes the Greek economy look legit.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

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FAIL

Re: Who has paid for the survey?

Does any Linux distro come without a browser? Should we factor in Firefox CVEs? Over 100 vulns in 2014.

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Lenovo CTO: Hey, look around – we're not the only ones with a crapware infection

Sandtitz
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Boffin

Re: Just take off...

"At least with Lenovo you just need to install their 'System Update' utility which will detect your hardware and download all the relevant drivers (especially useful when there are 2 or 3 different cardreader/audio/etc used in a given model) and deselect what you don't want. Pity the other manufacturers don't have something similar."

Uh, no. The other manufacturers do have something similar.

HP Support Assistant works with all their laptops and desktops. The HP Softpaq Download Manager is a very similar tool though a bit more "pro".

Samsung - Samsung SW Update

Fujitsu - Deskupdate

Dell - Client System Update App

ASUS - Live Update

All of these of course require some sort of network connectivity so a (W)LAN driver may be needed first. Of all the mentioned utilites the Lenovo System Update is easily the best solution, since it usually Just Works, whereas the others may sometimes miss some drivers for some reason.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

Sandtitz
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Re: Quiet news day?

You cannot say anything nice about Microsoft products without downvotes from Linux/iOS users. TFTFY.

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Give us a week to GUT Superfish, begs Lenovo CTO

Sandtitz
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FAIL

Re: I still dont get it.

"I'm aware that it has a higher resolution screen...blah blah...military toughness...blah blah...but still, its outlandishly expensive!"

I'm sorry but your post is full of FAIL.

You compare two mightily different laptops together and wonder why the higher-spec business model costs more than the consumer model. That Lenovo model you linked to is not even the current model.

Do you really not understand that for some people price is not the first or only factor when buying something? Why would you spend £700 on an ASUS when you can get an authentic Asus EeeBook X205TA for £175?

Are you driving a Lada? I hear it looks seats as many as the Jags and Mercs and has four wheels as well.

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TrueCrypt + Norton AV = BSOD, wail disgruntled users

Sandtitz
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Re: Norton/Symantec Defined Bloatware

because Microsoft could care less about security in those days.

Windows 95 was a product of its time.

MS couldn't just come up with an OS that didn't have the backward compatibility for DOS applications. Since DOS was single-user without any security considerations, Windows 9x was pretty much the same.

If MS had just pushed their existing, more secure NT systems to the general public ('AOL users'), OS/2 could actually have been a contender since it was about as backward compatible with existing software. NT required 2-3 times more memory than OS/2 or Win95.

In retrospect, Win9x was a stopgap solution to get developers to create native Windows software and it paid off. Windows 3 already had its share of productivity software but no games to speak of. After a couple of DirectX revisions the games also moved to Windows platform.

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Re: "Who uses Norton?" @Peter2

"And 7zip's LZMA format blows RAR out of the water in compression sizes, absurdly so"

I disagree with the 'absurdly' part in your post.

I happen to have the free SpagoBI 5.1 installation package (1,5 gigs, 40k files of mostly jar files and js/html/gif etc) on this laptop I'm writing you, I decided to put your claim to test. (an i7-4600U with an SSD)

The ZIP file is 865M and took 3:43 to compress

The RAR5 file is 316M and took 5:35 to compress (512M dictionary)

The 7Z files is 304M and took 14:28 to compress (512M dictionary)

I couldn't select a bigger dictionary since my laptop had just 6 GB free.

The bottom line is that it wasn't an absurd victory.

"when you get to very large numbers of slightly similar files since it deduplicates."

Deduplication or "solid compression" was first practised by RAR in the early 90s, so it's nothing new. Tar+Compress/Gzip/Bzip2 does basically the same but since tar doesn't try to lump similar files sequently, and the 'dictionary sizes' in Bzip2 is small the compression doesn't get to anywhere same levels as RAR or 7zip.

This is all academic of course since RAR and 7Z aren't natively supported in Windows or OSX.

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Sandtitz
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"Who uses Norton?"

Well, Sam uses it.

Several clueless home users renew their Norton subscriptions without blinking but has anyone ever seen a bought and registered WinZip? I certainly haven't.

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This one weird script continually crashes Android email

Sandtitz
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Re: " clock ticking on Google"

"Google can wash their hands of it all they want, but if this became a widespread thing affecting millions of Android users they aren't going to care whether it is on their OEM or on Google."

I'm not disagreeing with you. IANAL, but since Google provides free updates they are most likely legally "off the hook".

The IT declined masses don't know what Android is. Even if their current Android device was made useless by this malformed email bug, maybe they would boycott the manufacturer and change to Samsung/Sony/HTC/LG/whatever and the new phone would have a newer OS and woulnd't crash like "that piece of crap Samsung that crashed constantly" or whatever.

This is an issue with the Android ecosystem that OEMs are responsible for pushing updates - and have to go through the carriers as well, unlike Apple and Microsoft, who push updates without the carriers having any say.

Are you certain about WP?

Microsoft has a web page that lists the latest updates for all WP8 models in Europe. Take a look at the UK - starting with the 520 model all 5 carriers listed have the Denim update, except 3 UK only having the Cyan. The 620 has the Denim with 3 carriers, two carriers only have Denim. And this isn't limited to UK.

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Sandtitz
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FAIL

" clock ticking on Google"

The thing is Google can was their hands of it since they have apparently fixed it in 4.4.x and 5.0, and they can just point at the device manufacturers who have no incentive to update their old devices.

I have at work two nice Android gadgets that didn't receive updates beyond 4.0.x IIRC: The Thinkpad Tablet and the pretty expensive Panasonic Toughpad. And because they have a locked bootloader I can't install a vanilla Android - they're as insecure as Windows XP these days. Should have bought the Windows 8 version of the Toughpad - free updates until 2023 (or whatever Windows 10 will bring if available)

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Got $600 for every Win Server 2003 box you're running? Uh-oh

Sandtitz
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Meh

Re: Over a barrel.

So it's maybe $600 with a Windows 2003 server (minus the potential discounts the article mentions)

What's the going price for extended support for RHEL, SLES?

Are they offering any custom services beyond their original lifecycle programs for RHEL3 or SLES9?

Just asking.

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BLAME ENGINEERS: Workstation sales soar by 8.9 per cent a year

Sandtitz
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Re: So where's the laptop

there's no such laptop. It's easy to spec things that are not available.

When laptops start to take 64GB you'll be needing 128GB? And in Apple Air-esque form factor too.

Consider the Eurocom Panther 5SE. It packs up to 12 core Xeons and 4 SSDs, though Complement the basic FullHD display with a USB powered Displaylink monitor for "easy" portability.

You'll still be limited to the paltry 32 gigs on memory but the GPU memory (16GB) can be utilized as a RAM disk.

Then again you could just scotch tape an UPS into a Proliant and carry that too.

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Patch now: Design flaw in Windows security allows hackers to own corporate laptops, PCs

Sandtitz
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Re: Unfixable on server 2003

"This stinks of the w2k scenario where m$ wouldn't supply (iirc) dx9 which was about the era I got out of windoze in favour of unix."

W2K received DX9 and DX9 updates until 2010. Of the post Win3.1 versions only Windows 95 was limited to DX8 (because Win95 lost support before DX9), and NT4 was limited to DX3 - probably because at the time all the games were for 99% DOS and the rest for Win95 (or 3.1), and NT wasn't sold for consumer use.

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Sandtitz
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Re: "unfixable on Server 2003."

Same happened with NT4. Support ended in 2004 but the MS03-010 bug was found over a year earlier.

"The architectural limitations of Windows NT 4.0 do not support the changes that would be required to remove this vulnerability."

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Why Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi 2? Upton: 'I drank the Kool-Aid'

Sandtitz
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FAIL

Re: Please link to your numbers @Flocke

"Last time I saw Microsoft's numbers, Microsoft scored 52/year (patch Tuesday) and the Linux numbers included every package multiplied by the number of distributions. I admit that was a long time ago and things have changed - these days Microsoft do not update every Tuesday."

"Better to Remain Silent and Be Thought a Fool than to Speak and Remove All Doubt"

Patch Tuesday is so named because the patches are usually delivered on the second Tuesday of every month. That's about 12 "Patch Tuesdays" per year. Not 52.

Since the Patch Tuesday was established in 2003, it may be better if you refrain commenting on things you apparently have little knowledge of.

Linux kernel apparently had 133 publicly disclosed vulnerabilities in 2014.

Windows 7 apparently had 37 vulnerabilities in 2014

These are not "MS numbers", and don't include the different packages.

Feel free to point the errors in this post.

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Bill Gates – I WISH I was like Zuck and spoke Chinese. Yep, I drink poo

Sandtitz
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Facepalm

Re: French - Anything but easy.

"Bill, a word of advice, from experience. it is easier to learn modern Hebrew that it is to learn French."

Sorry to ruin your rant but Bill didn't say that French is easy - he only thinks it's easier than Chinese or Arabic:

"...I wish I knew French or Arabic or Chinese. I keep hoping to get time to study one of these - probably French because it is the easiest."

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Official: Whiteboxer Super Micro is a $2bn server company

Sandtitz
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Re: a mere 20 years...

I CAN'T HEAR YOU, THE HP'S ON. WHAT?

Surely you meant "I'm sorry, I can't hear you over the sound of how awesome I am"

re: Warranty

Seems to depend on the product. I was looking at servers, Twins and blade systems. Seems their "parts only" stuff, like mobos only get the one year warranty. Gotta admit, I haven't bought "just parts" in some time.

Supermicro warranty page:

SuperServer and SuperBlade products**: Supermicro provides a three-year warranty for labor and one-year warranty for parts. This limited warranty includes advance part replacement service covering a period of 1 year from Supermicro invoice date.

"Where did you get this nugget of information?"

From their product managers.

Oh dear.

Ask yourself why Supermicro doesn't publicly claim their thermal design superiority if that was true.

The difference I've found is that you can consistently push Supermicro's gear far past the advertised temperatures for rather long periods of time.

I think you're using weasel words, mate.

Have you run other brands on the same condition and seen them shut down or fail otherwise?

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Sandtitz
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Re: a mere 20 years...

"quarter as loud as those "I CAN'T HEAR YOU, I HAVE THE HP ON! WHAT? I SAID I HAVE THE HP ON! NO, I...LISTEN, LET ME CALL YOU BACK, I HAVE TO MOVE TO ANOTHER ROOM!"

That's just rubbish.

"Supermicro offers a standard 3 years parts and labour warantee on everything (on year cross shipment)"

Supermicro website:

"Motherboard, Chassis, Power supplies and Super Barebone products: Supermicro provides a three-year warranty for labor and one-year warranty for parts.

"Supermicro is one of the only manufacturers I know of which sells at least some models with 5 year warranties."

So it's no different from IBM, Dell or HP then?

"Supermicro servers are generally designed to be able to run hot - hotter than those provided by other manufacturers"

Where did you get this nugget of information?

They are, however, also designed to operate in higher temperature environments than other manufacturers

SOME SM servers are designed like that. And in specific configurations (couldn't find the specifics on SM website though)

Most Supermicro rack servers seem to be operating at max 35°C like the competition.

Dell, HP and IBM (Lenovo?) all have some server configurations for 45 C operation and SM has a couple models with designation for 47 C inlet temp.

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Why Microsoft's 3D HoloLens goggles aren't for Google Glassholes

Sandtitz
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WTF?

Re: True Holography??

"Does this product actually have anything at all to do with Holographs??"

Very unlikely but please explain how you came up with this conjecture since I haven't seen any mention of holographs nor even holograms. Most likely the product doesn't feature anything related to Holocene period or The Holocaust either.

"Sound a lot like market hype to me. I guess if they called them 3D glasses it would not make a splash."

Google Glass likely doesn't have actual glass, NetHack isn't used for hacking nor does it have network features, Ford Escort didn't actually provide an escort service, and Oracle is anything but.

Take a chill pill, bro.

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Adobe finds, patches ANOTHER exploited Flash 0day

Sandtitz
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WTF?

"Flash seems like the most bug-ridden and damaged piece of software still in use today."

Worst.Program.Ever?

Chrome 40 - 62 security fixes, released two days ago.

Chrome 39 - 42 security fixes, released Nov 2014

Chrome 38 - 158 security fixes, released Oct 2014

There was 5 more releases last year alone and I can't be bothered to check the rest of the release notes.

But hey, maybe Google now really did smite the last remaining bugs!

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Microsoft just saved Windows Phone... Now stop whining

Sandtitz
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Facepalm

Re: They ain't THAT bad.

"If I am going to be on call for my company than not only are they paying for the phone service but I am going to get whatever phone I want."

Remember to ask for Vertu or at least one of those Lamborghini mobiles.

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Pull up the Windows 10 duvet and pretend Win8 and Vista were BAD DREAMS

Sandtitz
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Re: Most hated version of Windows

"I never had the misfortune of experiencing ME, but 3 and 3.1 were very bad."

There were technically much better operating systems in terms of multitasking or stability or otherwise; Windows 3.x was bad but as a whole package it was miles ahead of competition on PC platform back then, and most importantly it had lots of software available.

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Snowden doc leak 'confirms' China stole F-35 data

Sandtitz
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Re: This is probably very bad.. @P.Lee

>>Which Chinese knock-offs have been superior to the originals?

>I hear Lenovo make some ok PCs.

I hear that too, but they aren't 'knock-offs' I was after.

The counterfeit Lenovo batteries and Lenovo mobile phones are very likely inferior to the genuine Lenovo parts. Do you disagree?

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Sandtitz
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Stop

Re: This is probably very bad..

"I'm presuming they'll take the good and discard the bad and end up with a superior A/C."

Which Chinese knock-offs have been superior to the originals?

I can for certain tell you that those outrageously blatant copied cars have no superior features, except of course, much reduced price.

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Hollywood vs hackers: Vulture cracks Tinseltown keyboard cornballs

Sandtitz
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Coffee/keyboard

"NCIS had in intriguing one last week."

What a terrible show NCIS is - but it's the only show where two people can use the same keyboard simultaneously.

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Adults-only Chrome add-on grabs you by the Googlies

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Boffin

@patrick

"and i bet no admin rights are needed to install just like all the other google downloads [...] and before people mention blocking"

I'm still going to mention the blocking. ;-)

Create a Software Restriction GPO to allow running software only from places where the end user doesn't have write access. That will deny installation of Chrome or running eg. a portable USB version.

If Chrome is desired in your organization, install the ADM extensions and deny Chrome extensions via a group policy.

I highly recommend the software restriction policies in all organizations by default anyway since it prevents running any dodgy downloads such as browser hijackers or worse. Even user space programs can generate DoS traffic, transfer all data you have access (incl. servers) to China, encrypt everything you have write access to, or exploit a privileges escalation bug.

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Get your special 'sound-optimising' storage here, hipsters

Sandtitz
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Go

Re: Too late - it already exists!

"I'm surprised that Buffalo agree to rebadge their SSDs, host the manual, and have anything to do with this at all."

Not surprising. Melco is a holding company that owns the Buffalo brand.

It's still a ludicrous product, up there with the Audioquest silliness.

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Buffer overflow reported in UEFI EDK1

Sandtitz
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WTF?

Re: Of course! @Ivan 4

We have just replaced some motherboards on some industrial equipment and the biggest headache we had was finding replacement boards that would allow us to disable all the UEFI secure boot crap that interfered with not only the OS but some of the programs.

Ivan,

please name those motherboards you tried and failed with.

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Sandtitz
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Re: Of course! @Stuart

Microsoft's Windows Hardware Certification Requirements says that "Disabling Secure Boot must not be possible on ARM systems" if the manufacturer wants to offer Windows on it.

That is true, but those Windows RT devices (never seen one) and WPhone products are not commodity hardware (as in generic x86 PC) and are no different from the bootlocked iPhones or Androids.

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Sandtitz
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Re: Of course! @Stuart again

"Thankfully on x86, the requirement is that the user must be able to add their own keys. This is not a trivial process however and differs between UEFI implementations. So immediately, anyone who has a desire or need to run an OS other than one of the select few, has a few more hurdles to jump over."

You are correct. Then again, security is not easy and if you desire to use any type of trusted boot you'll be installing certificates or TPM-like hardware. If you want to boot into an OS that isn't covered by the preloaded keys you'll just have to disable the Secure Boot thingy. No OS that I know of requires Secure Boot and probably never will on x86.

"Ever tried getting into the UEFI setup on a modern x86 machine? You need lightning quick reflexes, and an educated guess as to what button to hit! Been there, done that on a few machines."

The "educated guess on the correct button" for entering setup is just as problematic with or without UEFI. Cold boots help if you're too slow to react. ;-)

"Others have pointed out that there is a lot of code in the UEFI kernel."

I'm not disagreeing with that.

The whole debacle with UEFI reminds me a lot of the introduction of ACPI back in the 90s. Linus et al. were cursing it since it was much more complex code and thus prone for bad implementations (which was true) but it brought noticeably better power savings than APM from the get-go and my problems with ACPI have been with the computers before WinXP era.

"With the rush to get things to market, you can bet your bottom dollar that manufacturers won't be testing their code to ensure it's safe from malware (the intended target for Secure Boot), but you can guarantee the blackhats will!

How do you propose they could ensure safety from malware? No-one does that and I still haven't found a vendor that didn't have bugs in their security software.

"I therefore believe that while there were some noble ideas in Secure Boot, it in all probably will not achieve what it ultimately set out to achieve"

So far I haven't seen reports of bypassing it. I'm sure there are bad implementations though.

"and will instead cause grief with all the additional things that can go wrong."

Look, there's all sorts of stuff that will cause grief to some parties, be it any new technology or the lack of it. OpenSSL has fucked up royally and caused lot of grief yet I'm still using their tech.

So far the Secure Boot problems i've seen and heard of have fallen into one category: how do I turn it off?

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Sandtitz
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Re: Of course! @Stuart

"But as time goes on people who need/want to use Linux, or don't want to buy new hardware when upgrading their operating system will be increasingly screwed"

Several Linux distros work with Secure Boot.

Secure Boot can be disabled in BIOS in case you can't or won't use it.

Interesting (well, not really) how many downvotes I get for pointing out facts or just asking for clarification...

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Sandtitz
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Re: Of course! @Stuart

Please explain how Secure Boot is destined to become more of a headache than the problem it tries to solve.

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Sandtitz
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Re: Of course!

"doesn't lead to any useful features."

Secure Boot and faster POST.

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Here's Johnny! Top Ten fantasy Blu-ray boxsets and special editions

Sandtitz
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Re: Pedantic attack! @Duffy

First page, just before the Twin Peaks part.

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Sandtitz
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IT Angle

Pedantic attack!

The Twin Peaks set is missing the companion novel "Secret Diary of Laura Palmer"

The Hayao Miyazaki Complete Collection misses almost all short films but includes a bonus disc with a 90 minute conference piece where Miyazaki announces his retirement? Happily there's On Your Mark, probably the best animated music video most of you've never seen. (available on several video sharing websites of course)

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Microsoft has made excellent software, you pack of fibbers

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WTF?

Re: Win7...

"Including Win 8 and 8.1, which, being 64-bit, point blank refuses to run anything 32-bit, even in compatibility mode."

Are you trolling or stupid?

Your tactic works, seeing how many upvotes you already got.

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Google unveils Windows 8.1 zero-day vuln – complete with exploit code

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Windows

Re: Sick and tired of microsoft @Dan 55

"four out of the last five Patch Tuesdays have needed a rollback of somekind."

None of those patch tuesday problems have been a problem with any of my clients.

There have been plenty of MS updates that have caused havoc with some users. Usually the problems have arised on a very small subset of users due to special hardware/software circumstances and most people never have to uninstall any updates. (and most users wouldn't even know how to uninstall anything anyway)

Same goes with other operating systems, there's always some people whining how the latest Android/IOS/OSX update broke something.

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