* Posts by Pen-y-gors

927 posts • joined 1 Oct 2010

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Google Translate MEAT GRINDER turns gay into 'faggot', 'poof', 'queen'

Pen-y-gors
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Re: "Bulldyke"

Language is so confusing - what do Merkins (and google translate) make of the annual Dyke Jumping Competitions in East Anglia?

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Regin super-malware has Five Eyes fingerprints all over it says Kaspersky

Pen-y-gors
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Detector?

Does the SpyShelter anti-keylogger software (see yesterday's article) detect/block this?

I think we should be told...

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Anonymous: Snap on that Guy Fawkes mask, we're marching against child sex abuse

Pen-y-gors
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What could possibly go wrong?

Probably a good idea for all paediatricians, paedogogues, pedestrians, pedants, pedalo owners and podiatrists to leave the country for a few days around then.

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Keylogger: Somebody STOP ME! Oh hang on, I just did

Pen-y-gors
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Someone else

crossed off the GCHQ Xmas card list - unless they've left in any backdoors of course.

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Snoopers' Charter amendments withdrawn – FOR NOW ...

Pen-y-gors
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Things may be improving, in an odd way

Interesting report (link here) about warning from ex-GCHQ boss that with wider use of end-to-end encryption, the spooks will have to start working up close and personal - i.e. physically planting bugs and having surveilance teams watching suspects. You know, like it used to be. And an effective end to universal, warrantless bugging, as it won't work any more.

Maybe it will soon sink in to our 'masters' that monitoring everything is a waste of time and money (as has been shown so often, when trrrrrsts attack, and are found to have been on the spooks radar anyway, but they just didn't do anything about them)

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'One day, YOU won't be able to SENSE the INTERNET,' vows Schmidt

Pen-y-gors
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Everything's connected?

and owned by Google?

I really, really do not want to end my days wearing internet-enabled underpants that show me adverts!

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Chickpea stew à la Bureau des Projets Spéciaux

Pen-y-gors
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Garlic optional?

Looks and sounds rather delicieuse. But how on la Terre can le garlic be considered optionell? It's foreign - garlic is mandatory!

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Microsoft: We bought Skype. We make mobiles.. Oh, HANG ON!

Pen-y-gors
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VOIP - Flavour of the month?

With or without video, this seems to be the way to go. Just had an advert email from HMA, who do a very good VPN service, and are now offering HideMyPhone - one or more free new phone numbers to be used via their app, at a rate that is a lot less than I pay for normal mobile calls. I assume others are offering similar deals.

But if M$ get their act together with wearable hardware and Skype, then yay, we have the Dick Tracey watch!

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UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns

Pen-y-gors
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No shit sherlock!

"UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns - System holds records of ALL scouts in the country"

Wow, how could that be allowed to happen? Next we'll hear that the Upper Chudleigh Campanology Society database holds records on all members of the Upper Chudleigh Campanology Society. Shameful!

Out of interest, what would be the point of a UK Scouts database that DIDN'T hold records for all UK scouts?

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Leaked doc: Europe's justice chiefs forming plans to cosy up to ISPs

Pen-y-gors
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When will it sink in?

Dear Law-makers

It's simple. I am not a terrorist, therefore there is no reason or justification for you or anyone else storing details of my movements, my activities, my financial transactions or my contacts.

If that person over there is reasonably suspected of terrorist activities then the police should be able to ask a senior judge nicely (with their reasons, obviously) for an order permitting them to request that various bodies start recording details of that person's movements, activities and communications etc. and pass them to the police.

Is that so difficult to understand?

Yours sincerely

A law-abiding citizen.

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Beam me up, Scotty, And VAPORIZE me in the process

Pen-y-gors
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Makes no sense

"The system could prove vital for companies that wish to retail products to 3D printers. By holding buyers to a single copy, retailers could ensure a product can be sold and printed without the risk of pirates selling off additional copies of their 3D printed products."

That's nonsense - the retailer's original would be destroyed in the process, and there's nothing to stop the buyer re-scanning and duplicating the copy.

3d printing may one day be handy for creating a limited range of objects fairly quickly, at a distance. Problem is they'll all look almost, but not quite exactly, like a plastic model of the Eiffel Tower.

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Sorry...

Yes, but...

I don't think I've ever risked actually fully upgrading a Windows OS in situ (installing service packs doesn't count), as the chances of finding out the new OS is either a) a total lemon or b) the 'upgrade' bricks the PC are just too high. I've always waited to change OS until I need a new laptop/PC - which happens every 4-5 years. In this case my Win 7 box is 4.5 years old, and should be good for at least another 18 months (possibly with an upgrade to an SSD). Then I'll (probably) get a nice new machine with Win 10 pre-installed, and take the opportunity to clean out all the crap as I migrate data and essential software.

It's a strategy that works for me - I've never owned a copy of Win 3.0, ME, Vista or Win 8!

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: WTF.....- "supported lifetime"

@Credas

I suspect "supported lifetime" is pretty clear. M$ support (i.e issue security updates for etc) the last few OSs. So XP support ended in April 2014. I believe Vista support is due to end in early 2017, and Win 7 in 2020. So supported lifetime of Win 10 will go until about 2026 or so. And if you want support after the end-of-support date THEN you will have to pay, as you do for XP support now. They're not daft enough to suggest that they will support Win 10 for the next 50 years.

That's all it means, it's nothing new, it's what M$ have always done. It doesn't mean that when support ends it stops working, just that if you want support after 10 years, you'll have to pay for it.

I'd say "Simples!" but that's a bit naff....

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LEAKED: Samsung's iPHONE 6 KILLER... the Samsung Galaxy S6

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And the price will be?

If it's £200-£250 I might be interested. Pointless spending more than that on a phone.

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Drinking to forget? OK. But first, eat a curry... QUICK!

Pen-y-gors
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Really useful food additive

If they can manage to get the circumin so that it's colourless and tasteless (ground turmeric is a bit of a giveaway) then it could be added to military rations, hospital food, school meals, macdonalds - anywhere where events likely to cause PTSD may happen.

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2015: The year of MAD TV science, but who can keep up?

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Do the older amongst us

I think I might have had a sense of deja vu - but VCR wasn't quite the same situation as 4K (and HD). There was the format war over recorders, but generally people found them to be quite handy once they had one, they added useful functionality - allowing time-shifting, recording films to watch again, renting movies - but 4K really doesn't add anything substantial. And I have to admit that I haven't had my VHS recorder plugged in to the telly to record anything for years, and I've not bothered getting a DVR, cos there's very little on that's worth watching again. Now that they show the same film 19 times within a month, who needs to record?

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Pen-y-gors
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Honestly, what's the point?

Just looked at what 4K TVs are available. Some of them are 85" diagonal - a bargain at £13K! Who the flip needs an 85" TV? Try getting a 40" and sitting closer to it.

What I can't see are any 20" 4K TVs for £250, which is what I'd want, if and when present, perfectly adequate, TV dies.

And would Corrie, X Factor or even those wonderful historical documentaries with Lucy Worsley be seriously any better in 4K?

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Elon Musk SNOWED UNDER with Googley DOLLARS for Space Internet

Pen-y-gors
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Re: I don't have any dollars

@ciaran "Nothing in Europe has an exciting vision for space"

I dunno...what about the Skylon/Sabre spaceplane? Get that lot working and all current bets are off! Why don't we have any eccentric European billionaires who want to back that?

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Your anonymous code contributions probably aren't: boffins

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Re: Obfuscation

The article suggests that obfuscation tools can't beat their analysis, but as one of the things their analysis uses is lexical information, then presumably obfuscation at least makes it harder to get a match, although still not impossible - presumably it would need larger samples to work on? If it works perfectly well without lexical information, then why waste time using lexical information in the first place?

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SECRETS of the LOST SCROLLS unlocked by key to HEALTHY BOOBS

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I love science!

It will be wonderful if they can actually read entire scrolls with this technique. Who knows what lost works from the classical period may be found? There may well be a lot of boring stuff, but so many works of classical authors are lost or known in only one copy, we may be lucky and get some new Pliny or Catullus to make the life of future N. Molesworths hell!

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Facebook worth more than Portugal? Hell, it's worth a LOT more than THAT

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40c an hour?

"It's just nonsense to value people's time at under 40 cents an hour."

Errmm...no,...not really. I think valuing people's time using FB at about 1 cent per hour is probably quite reasonable. Just because people do something doesn't make it economically valuable. How many hours a year do Americans spend pleasuring themselves? How much is that worth to the economy?

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SO. Which IS more important to humanity: Facebook, or Portugal?

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A bit unfair

To compare GDP (annual income) with total asset 'value' - if you added up the value of Portugal it's a lot more than FB.

But it's interesting to see how many countries have a lower GDP than say, Google. Income 2012 was $50 Billion, which is more than the GDP of about 130 countries! Facebook income last year was about $10 billion which is more than the GDP of about 70 countries (and doesn't include Portugal - a lovely place)

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Google: What this planet needs is INTERNET FROM SPAAACE

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Re: Good stuff

@AC

Errrm....as I understand it, there's no 'uploading' to some sort of server on a satellite or anything. The satellite just functions as a channel for a comms link between client and server - client connects via wifi or whatever to small local mast that talks via the satellite to the server. As it's in very low orbit (750miles?) the lag is much much less than with geosynch satellites at 22000 miles.

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Just WHY is the FBI so sure North Korea hacked Sony? NSA: *BLUSH*

Pen-y-gors
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Trust?

"All this is mostly based on anonymous briefings by shadowy intelligence types."

and we should believe that because...?

If you REALLY want to know what the NSA is up to then as a shadowy intelligence type (honest!) I'll happily give you an anonymous briefing - for the usual brown envelope full of swiss francs left in a hollow oak tree in Hyde Park.

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DVRs at the ready tonight: El Reg's motor Vulture is on the tellybox

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Freesat

babe station = CBeebies?

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'It's NOT FAIR!' yell RICH KIDS ... and that's a GOOD THING

Pen-y-gors
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Question:

Does the potential recipient of the $1/$20/$40 know the game setup? i.e donor has been given $100 to split. Or is it an out of the blue - "I have some spare money,would you like $1"? And is this all done with real money? How does it work with $1000 or $10000? Do rich merkins still turn down 20% of $10K?

Makes one think...anyone willing to give me $1 million to try the experiment with some Peruvian llama-farmer? I'm sure he'd be happy with $1000!

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Please use TWO HANDS to access AdultFriendFinder

Pen-y-gors
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Name names!

Who are these four dodgy hosting providers?

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Nimble gives Mann severe kicking while he's down

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Who'll fill his shoes?

Don't rate their chances of getting a replacement!

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I'll build a Hyperloop railgun tube-way in Texas, Elon Musk vows

Pen-y-gors
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Re: Pure Genius @Graham dawson

But HS2 (as planned) doesn't even go to Edinburgh! If it was a true High Speed network linking all of GB (Bristol, Cardiff, Brum, Manchester, Leeds etc and on to Glasgow and Edinbugh) then there might be a point to the project. Cost would be insane though. As would the price of tickets. (But why is HS2 so much more expensive than building the original railways in the 19th century, which connected up just about every village and hamlet?)

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Kim Jong-Un shoot-em-up Glorious Leader! yanked

Pen-y-gors
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Re: FTFY

Not paranoid enough!

Generally sounds like a reasonable set of procedures, but don't like the sound of the 'offsite server every 2-3 days'. My setup is rather less thorough, but does involve ALL daily/weekly backups going onto a NAS drive safely in another building. This allows for fires in the office, and potential burglary of office by someone who nicks anything that looks like a computer. Also do occasional extra backup to a USB drive which is only plugged in during the actual backup, to reduce the risk of nastiness affecting backups on the network.

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Pen-y-gors
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Sums it up really

"Is it really likely that the developers had no backups of its source code and other data?"

How difficult is it to schedule a daily backup? To be fair, completely bullet proofing every computer is virtually impossible, but would you want to buy anything from a 'professional' IT developer who couldn't even manage a daily backup?

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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Pen-y-gors
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Re: 711

I quite agree - I have two cars, one built in 1989, the other in 2011, by very different manufacturers. Both have similar instruments in similar places, a gear stick, rear-view mirror and steering wheel in the same places, doors and wheels in the same places (OK, one has the hand brake on the right, and a few buttons and switches are different) but fundamentally they work the same way. I want computers to do the same. I don't expect my keyboard layout to change every time I buy a new one, ditto with my desktop OS. Fine, when I buy my first driverless car (sometime in the 2040s) THEN I'll expect a radical change of instrument layout, but only because the function has changed!

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Paris terror attacks: ISPs face pressure to share MORE data with governments

Pen-y-gors
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Which part of...

"Certainly - let's see your court order" do governments, police and the 'security' services fail to understand?

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Tax Systems: The good, the bad and the completely toot toot ding-dong loopy

Pen-y-gors
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Tobin/Robin Hood Tax

I disagree about Robin Hood tax on share/currency transactions being a bad thing. Potentially it's a very good thing.

We want to encourage investment in business. We want to discourage quick buck financial speculation. A small transaction tax on every share trade and currency trade will address this perfectly.

For someone buying shares as an investment, who is looking at earning several percent a year in dividiend over the next 5-10 years, then a tax of say 0.1% or 0.2% on puchase is peanuts and will have no noticeable impact on their buy/sell decisions. Ditto for pension funds who are INVESTING for the long term.

Same for currency transactions - given the variation in buy/sell currency prices, 0.1% extra on the cost of your holiday cash is trivial, and the tax could be waived on pseudo-currency conversions like buying stuff on plastic from USA in dollars and it's charged to your card in sterling.

But for speculators who are doing dodgy deals, banking on making a tiny profit hundreds of times a day, then the tax puts them out of the game. This probably falls into your category of a Pigou tax - taxing something to discourage unwelcome economic activity. As share and currency speculators are a bunch of worthless parasites who add nothing to the global human experience, their unemployment would be no loss. And a transaction tax would be less painful for them than the suggested alternative of an oxygen tax on them - $100,000 per litre of oxygen breathed. Cash only. In advance.

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: I wonder - North London commuters

True - but £42 BEEELION seems rather a lot to pay to let commuters avoid breathing sweaty armpits. Wouldn't buying a few more coaches for the commuter trains be a bit cheaper?

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Pen-y-gors
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A cynic writes...

"I would never claim that economics is entirely settled, nor really even mature as a science"

Fixed that for you

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Last year was utter rubbish. Thanks for being part of it!

Pen-y-gors
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VATMOSS

I must admit that I'm generally in favour of the idea of the EU, but this whole VAT thing really makes me wonder - Uk govt quite sensibly accepts the idea of de minimis and exempts very small businesses from registering for VAT. Why can't the EU do the same?

And I'm sure the Amazon lawyers are currently working flat out to come up with a new loophole - e.g. every customer asks for the goods to be delivered to their 'residence' at No. 1 Amazon Subsidiary Crescent, Luxembourg, where the householder, Mrs Anne Mazon will kindly forward the stuff, free of charge, to their 'holiday' address in Croydon, Berlin or Piotrków Trybunalski. Luxumbourg VAT rates will apply....

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Users shun UK.gov flagship digital service

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Re: on both a 28k modem and a 56k modem

But the actually process of filling in the various online forms is remarkably painless, given how complicated the rules are. I'd prioritise making sure the core system works well over remembering to update the likely download time

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Cap’n Ericsson and his great SEABORNE CLOUD wheeze

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Hopefully very secure

What do we know of the technical skills of the Somali pirate hackers? I bet they'd like all the info about their potential victims in one place!

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Islamic script kiddies aim killer blow - at Bristol bus timetable website

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Curious...

facebook are usually happy to close accounts for the slightest reason (breast-feeding photo?) - how come a hacker/trrrrssst one is still functioning? Ditto a googlemail account?

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Ground control to 2014: A year in SPAAAAAAAAAACE

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Space is becoming everyday

There have been so many wonderful 'space' events over the last year, but strangely, for me, the thing that made me sit up the most was a report on the news when Virgin had their accident. The reporter said something like "and in the USA a spaceship owned by Virgin Galactic has crashed during tests' or words to that effect. The key thing was a) it wasn't the top story, and b) the reference to A spaceship - not the Virgin Galactics prototype spaceship, just A spaceship, in the same everyday way that they report 'an aircraft owned by ThingyAir has crashed'. A small thing, but it struck me as rather significant - humans in space is now normal.

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Pen-y-gors
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Re: Missed a few

...and don't forget we said good-bye to Venus Express - after nine years trolling round Venus getting some very interesting science.

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SpaceX six days from historic rocket landing attempt

Pen-y-gors
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Why land at sea?

Given the technical issues of landing on the barge, possible bad weather, rough sea etc., why don't they go for a landing on land? Somewhere big and flat, like a dried up salt lake? No inhabitants to worry about if you miss a bit, bar the odd land speed record bods, hot, dry, and a very large area to land on. In the long term spaceplanes are going to have to land at a spaceport. The Heathrow Shuttle is bad enough, passengers aren't going to want a lengthy trip ashore in an old ferry.

I'm genuinely curious - the russians always land on land. Anyone know?

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El Reg tests portable breathalyzers: Getting drunk so you don't have to

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Re: Drink and drive, a simple rule:

Weeeell, yes and do....do you mean "Had a drink? Never, ever get behind the wheel of a car ever again?" Seems a bit extreme.

The tricky bit is deciding if you had a drink or six some time ago, when is it safe to drive? Couple of pints at lunchtime - can you drive home after work at 7pm? 4 pints in the pub at night, are you safe in the morning?

What would be really useful is a pocket gadget to answer that question, something that I'd assume these things do. But as the article states

"...keen to stress that the results you get from their devices shouldn't be used to test whether you're safe to drive"

one has to ask what the hell the point of them is?

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German minister photo fingerprint 'theft' seemed far too EASY, wail securobods

Pen-y-gors
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Biometrics? Meh!

Austin Freeman's story 'The Red Thumb Mark' (available on Gutenberg - it's jolly good) was published in 1907 and revolves around a faked thumbprint left at a crime scene. Why are people still trying to use basic fingerprints as identification evidenc in 2014?

Just about any biometric other than DNA can be faked with enough effort. For private individuals it's probably not worth the hassle, but when it's GCHQ/NSA/CIA/KGB/the Chinese involved faking the biometrics to access foreign government networks (or even their own government networks) then money's no object.

I'm waiting for the next big thing in biometrics - the discovery that the pattern of one's "rusty sheriff's badge" (as Stephen Fry referred to it on QI) is unique. There's a whole new meaning to the idea of dropping your trousers for immigration checks.

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UK banks prepare for Apple Pay 'invasion', look to slap on bonking protection

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Where do Apple fit in?

Another report about this had Apple saying that privacy etc isn't an issue, as the transaction only involves the customer, the retailer and the bank.

In which case, how do Apple justify taking any commission, even if it's 0.15%? Surely any costs to Apple should be paid by a one-off fee to purchase some form of App?

It's a bummer though? Who do I generally trust less? The banks or Apple? That's a hard one.

Who do I trust less when it comes to data security? - that's easy, Apple.

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UK retailers in TABLET PRICE SLASH BONANZA

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Big name no guarantee

I got an ASUS TF701T Transformer 13 months ago - nice bit of kit until they upgraded to Android 4.4.2 - now the OS burns up battery even when it's off - use on mains only or recharge every 12 housr! Fairly useless response from ASUS Tech Supprt as well.

Might as well stick to cheapo no-name and throw it away if it breaks.

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Blind justice: Google lawsuit silences elected state prosecutor

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I haven't read everything about this but...

...weren't Google concerned about him launching his prosecution/enquiry after 'colluding' with the MPAA, and that he was acting as a pawn for the MPAA rather than working on behalf of the good citizens of Missssssspi? After all, what has misssisssspi got to do with Hollywood?

Yes, it's worrying when justice depends on who has the most money, but hey, what's new? Isn't that the American Way?

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JPMorgan Chase mega-hack was a simple two-factor auth fail

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Without downplaying the possibilities...

The names, addresses and phone numbers of many million UK residents were published by a hack of BT - it's called the Phone Book(TM)

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