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* Posts by Tom Maddox

755 posts • joined 4 Jun 2007

Production-ready ZFS offers cosmic-scale storage for Linux

Tom Maddox
Happy

Re: Gordon Phil Gordon Gordon AC Destroyed All Braincells Gordon BTRFS? You must...

Give it up Matt, you are just coming across as a juvenile angry neckbeard with mysterious chips on the shoulder.

Poor Matt, he's had a lifelong hatred of Sun (the origin of which I'm somewhat curious about). He is also pathologically incapable of admitting any error on his part. As a result, this thread is pretty much guaranteed to wind him to his maximum level of aggravation because:

1) It involves Sun technology.

2) He appears to be quite wrong (caveat: I'm not a ZFS user, but credible people throughout the storage industry have nothing but good things to say about it).

Now where's that popcorn?

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Living in the middle of a big city? Your broadband may still be crap

Tom Maddox
Headmaster

Re: 5 whole gig? I'm jealous!

If you're getting 2 gig service as you say, you have nothing to complain about!

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Angry commentard mobs to feel Facebook jackboot in site tweak

Tom Maddox
Facepalm

Re: Facebook changes

Well, you cared enough to comment on the article, so perhaps you should answer your own question.

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Whatever happened to telepresence? From $2.5m deals to free iPad apps

Tom Maddox
Go

Re: Why?

Our company uses images of black monoliths with two-digit integers and the words "AUDIO ONLY" emblazoned in red.

I must get this for my videoconferencing avatar.

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Corporate IT bod? Show 'em what it costs and management WILL pay

Tom Maddox
FAIL

Successful pre-IT companies

Successful companies also existed before electricity came along. Successful companies learned to use electricity; unsuccessful ones went out of business. Technology is an essential part of most businesses, one which reduces overall costs by automating repetitive manual tasks or which adds value by creating capabilities where none previously existed. Excel, these days, is more than just a replacement for paper spreadsheets, it's actually a development platform in its own right which enables business analysts to automate their own business logic. Arguably, this capability allows them to bypass IT, but who do they turn to when Excel crashes?

IT definitely does need to be service-driven (and most IT departments, in my experience, actually are), but saying that companies don't need IT is simply incorrect, by and large.

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Virty market share race reaches the bend and heeeeere comes Oracle

Tom Maddox
Thumb Down

Features

“They are not close to Microsoft or VMware, but it is pretty good if you are not trying to do dramatic things like moving virtual machines around.”

If by "dramatic" you mean "essential," this is an accurate statement.

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Google Drive goes titsup for MILLIONS of users

Tom Maddox
Devil

Re: Death to the cloud

My local servers are built with an eye towards application-layer redundancy such that, even if a major failure occurs, we should still have userland access available. There are certain cataclysm-grade incidents which could take our systems down, but the ensuing floods, cloud of fallout, horde of zombies, etc., would probably be of greater import than restoring services to the users (if my employers are reading this: I kid. As a loyal employee, I would, of course, place business continuity above protecting my own family from radioactive mutants.)

That said, the cloud is a very reasonable place to keep your work, assuming your work is not important or is easily duplicated.

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Downed US vuln catalog infected for at least TWO MONTHS

Tom Maddox
Thumb Up

Heh

Adobe's ColdFusion web development software is to blame for the downtime of the US Government's National Vulnerability Database.

The malware infected two servers . . .

ColdFusion has officially been classified as malware, apparently.

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Aaron Swartz prosecutor accused of 'professional misconduct'

Tom Maddox
Facepalm

Re: Wow!

Ah, Matt, dripping as ever with the milk of human kindness, I see.

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SimCity 4

Tom Maddox
Headmaster

Re: Where the "report errors" link gone

Ahem, I think you mean, "Where has the 'report errors' link gone?".

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eBay: Our paid Google advertising was a total waste of money

Tom Maddox
Headmaster

Grammar nazi hijack

The appropriate abbreviation for "advertisement" is "ad;" the appropriate abbreviation for "advertisements" is "ads." "Add" and "adds" refer to mathematical operations.

This has been a note from your friendly neighborhood grammar nazi.

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Health pros: Alcohol is EVIL – raise its price, ban its ads

Tom Maddox
Mushroom

ODFO

That's it, really.

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Yet another Java zero-day vuln is being exploited

Tom Maddox
Trollface

Fortunately for web users the world over, the exploit "is not very reliable", the researchers write. In most cases, the payload fails to executive and leads to a JVM crash.

So, it's just normal Java code, then?

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John Sweeney: Why Church of Scientology's gravest threat is the 'net

Tom Maddox
Thumb Up

Re: Sweeney

Well played sir, well played.

A commentard such as yourself should

Never

Knowledgeably

Exhibit

Reprehensible behavior such as you did.

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Civilization peaks: BEER-dispensing arcade game created

Tom Maddox
Pint

There is not enough beer

You must construct additional breweries.

</Starcraft>

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Billionaire baron Bill Gates still mourns Vista's stillborn WinFS

Tom Maddox
Facepalm

Re: Microsoft refused to allow the OEM’s to pre-load BeOS ..

Good job, kain, you failed to read the first line of the article you quoted:

BeOS is an operating system for personal computers which began development by Be Inc. in 1991. It was first written to run on BeBox hardware.

Or the paragraph right above your quote:

Initially designed to run on AT&T Hobbit-based hardware, BeOS was later modified to run on PowerPC-based processors: first Be's own systems, later Apple Inc.'s PowerPC Reference Platform and Common Hardware Reference Platform, with the hope that Apple would purchase or license BeOS as a replacement for its then aging Mac OS. Apple CEO Gil Amelio started negotiations to buy Be Inc., but negotiations stalled when Be CEO Jean-Louis Gassée wanted $200 million; Apple was unwilling to offer any more than $125 million. Apple's board of directors decided NeXTSTEP was a better choice and purchased NeXT in 1996 for $429 million, bringing back Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

In fairness, I misremembered some of the history myself, such as the Hobbit, but your claim that BeOS was originally written for the Mac is clearly false.

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Tom Maddox
Stop

Re: BeFS

@Gene: It wasn't F/OSS, no, but I'm not sure where the "closed as hell" comes from, in that is was no more closed than any other desktop operating system. Be definitely caught a lot of hell from the Linux fanboys, basically for not being Linux.

@kain: No, BeOS was designed for its own system, the BeBox, which happened to be based on the same chip as the Mac at the time, which meant that porting it to the Mac would have been much simpler than porting it to x86 was. Gassee tried to sell BeOS to Apple, who wanted to pay far less for it than he wanted, and, of course, Jobs was making his comeback and brought NextStep in instead. Be then made a move to the x86 platform and tried to position BeOS as a competitor to Windows, which failed in part due to Microsoft's efforts to keep OEMs from bundling any competing operating system with their computers.

The lack of apps was definitely an issue, so Be pitched the OS at specialist users such as graphic designers and sound engineers who could make use of the pervasive multithreading and high responsiveness of the UI, but it never really took off in that market. It was definitely unfortunate, because it was the most responsive and advanced OS, from a user perspective, available in the market at the time, but the company didn't really have a notion of how to sell it, especially against Microsoft's market power.

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Tom Maddox
Unhappy

BeFS

Back in the day, BeOS implemented a filesystem (called, natch, BeFS), which did all the things WinFS was supposed to do. It used metadata extensively with a database-like filesystem which allowed applications to access and store various data types in the filesystem without an intermediate store. It was also blazing fast due to the filesystem index being a built-in feature instead of an add-on.

Unfortunately, Be took on Microsoft at the height of its power and never really had a compelling story about why one might want to run BeOS instead of Windows, so it has vanished into the dustbin of history.

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'Let anyone be administrator' bug in VMware snapped shut

Tom Maddox
Thumb Up

Re: not a bug in the hypervisor

I'm reading it as a bug in one of the drivers provided by the VMware Tools package allowing privilege escalation in a Windows VM running the affected driver.

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LibreOffice 4.0 ships with new features, better looks

Tom Maddox
Trollface

Re: Am I the only one who likes the Ribbon interface?

Anything that takes 5 years to become less difficult shouldn't have been released in the first place.

You mean like . . . Linux?

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Tom Maddox
Holmes

Says it all, really

The previous code was just really horrendous," Meeks said. "Dialogs were constructed and drawn by hand – in fact, not even by hand. Programmers just sort of entered random numbers to lay them out, and it really looked awful.

This says it all. I believe this is the design philosophy behind all F/OSS and, indeed, all *nix GUI-oriented software.

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The business mullet: Cool or tool?

Tom Maddox
Thumb Down

Re: I'm not even going to pretend to care.

If you had $30 million in VC money riding on what someone else thought of your attire, I'm willing to bet you'd learn to care.

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Windows Server 2012 kicks ass: discuss

Tom Maddox
Stop

Enough, already

I haven't used Server 2012, but I have used 2008 R2, and I've found it to be robust and stable, and much easier to configure and use than any version of *nix, so I'm guessing that Microsoft has done some good work enhancing those qualities with 2012.

Note that I say this as someone who has deployed various flavors of Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and Solaris over the years. I recall very well Microsoft's dirty tricks. Nonetheless, I'm willing to sing the praises of Windows as it now runs because it meets my needs and the needs of the business I support.

Finally, I'm entirely fed up with this knee-jerk fanboy mentality in the technology. Maybe you should try judging technology on its actual merits instead of engaging in childish my-sideism. Eadon, I'm looking at you.

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Tom Maddox
Stop

Re: expect FUDD from Microsoft dupes

I notice that, like most *nix zealots, you ignored the detailed post which addresses your points and chose to focus on the troll.

BTW, I'm not sure what FUDD is. FUD is Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt; FUDD is presumably Elmer Fudd's XBox gamertag, and I'm not sure how that's relevant.

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Customer service rep fired for writing game that mocks callers

Tom Maddox
Joke

We here at the CRA . . .

. . . have no sense of humor that we're aware of.

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Wii-U boat torpedoes Nintendo's '¥20bn profit' into ¥20bn loss

Tom Maddox
Thumb Up

Re: Won't take my money

@Elmer Phud:

I see what you did there, even if no one else did.

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Truly these are the GOLDEN YEARS of Storage

Tom Maddox
Holmes

Layers upon layers

All that's happening is the next step in an ongoing evolutionary process. Over the past few decades, the number of intermediate steps between slow storage and fast compute has been growing, with on-die CPU cache, level 2 cache, level 3 cache, system RAM, HBA/controller caching, onboard flash cache, storage array cache, on-drive cache, and now array flash storage providing yet another layer designed to improve the speed of transfer from static storage to active compute. The slowest storage has essentially stagnated, from a speed perspective, merely growing in capacity. The next tier up, "fast" spinning disk, is itself turning into yet another intermediary layer for staging data.

All any of this means is that same as it always has: ultimately, the goal is to touch the disk as little as possible and keep the relatively small amount of data you're actually using somewhere else.

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Who ate all the Pis?

Tom Maddox
Facepalm

Re: WTF?

You think that mistyping slashes is a skill?

<FoghornLeghorn>It's a joke, son.</FoghornLeghorn>

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Tom Maddox
Trollface

Project manager

The project manager, meanwhile - and this is a man who is known to have struggled for some minutes to find the main menu in the new FireFox - has written a Python program that interrogates his diary in Google Calendar and switches on the central heating in his holiday cottage in Wales so that everything is nice and toasty when he arrives for the weekend.

So, the typical Reg reader, then?

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Samsung demands Apple's iOS 6 source code in patent case

Tom Maddox
Trollface

Hey, now, don't let logic, reason, and law get in the way of a perfectly good American Hate thread.

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Cisco and NetApp fatten up Flexpod, chuck it at cloud biz

Tom Maddox
Thumb Down

Re: Why not just buy a fully converged and integrated stack from one Supplier?

The idea of buying converged systems from a single supplier is often pooh-poohed as "proprietary", especially by suppliers who don't have the three technologies needed in-house, and the main three suppliers in that position are Cisco, EMC and NetApp. Both EMC and NetApp are trying to attract the attention of Cisco, the great converged stack prize, and hoping to be chosen as its preferred partner.

I think that might answer your question.

The problem with the "converged stack" theory is that it's the mainframe redux: you're locked into buying giant units of equipment from a single vendor. Virtualization ameliorates this issue somewhat, insofar as you can easily move your processing workloads elsewhere, but storage lock-in is especially pernicious since storage is the hardest resource to move away from. The discerning IT equipment purchaser will look for the opportunity to retain flexibility.

Also, take your Huawei shilling elsewhere.

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Microsoft's Intel-powered Surface Pro to launch in February

Tom Maddox
Thumb Up

Re: Again, sort of want

So, Dave 126, what you're saying is that the HD 4000 is slightly less shitty than the HD 3000 but it still basically sucks. Thanks for backing me up!

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Tom Maddox
Facepalm

Again, sort of want

I could see really getting a lot of use out of this class of device. I could even live with the piddling RAM and storage. But Intel graphics? REALLY? If there's one thing I don't want in a tablet, it's a graphics processor which is slow yet hot and hungry.

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Paging Dr Evil: Philips medical device control kit 'easily hacked'

Tom Maddox
Trollface

There's your problem

Both the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) ICS-CERT, which normally deals with security issues involving industry control kit, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are reportedly taking an interest in the issue.

Clearly the problem is excessive regulation by the federal authorities. They shouldn't bother the poor manufacturer with their intrusive regulations and requirements; they should just let the free market sort it out!

(This is what some people actually believe.)

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Ten stars of CES 2013: Who made the biggest splash?

Tom Maddox
Go

Re: How much to play Monopoly?

I would totally buy that if someone made an electronic version of BattleTech or Car Wars to run on it.

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Microsoft control freaks Server 2012 clouds with System Center SP1

Tom Maddox
Meh

It's all about the workflow

After using SCOM 2012 for a little while, I appreciate its power, but the workflow is still extremely awkward and inflexible. If Microsoft have made it possible to do hypervisor and VM management with the same ease and simplicity of vSphere, then this might be interesting. Any other commentards care to weigh in?

Also, in before Eadon's bitching and moaning about the evil of Microsoft and how there's some OSS version that is faster, cheaper, and more stable, and which will simultaneously ease all your virtualization woes while massaging your prostate.

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HP maintains seat atop wheezing, spavined PC market

Tom Maddox
Stop

Re: windows 8 came out, sales fell 26%

As other commentards have noted, people buy what they need. The only place anyone cares about who makes the software is your mom's basement.

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'Mauro, SHUT THE F**K UP!'

Tom Maddox
Trollface

Re: Mauro should get a job

@ dogged:

Yes, but then he'd have to leave the comfort and safety of his bridge.

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Facebook continues to CONQUER THE WORLD

Tom Maddox
Trollface

STOP LIKING WHAT I DON'T LIKE

I predict many anti-Facebook comments which amount to the above.

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It MUST be the END of the WORLD... El Reg man thanks commentards

Tom Maddox
Pint

Re: Khaptain

The thing is that Trevor is not just doing technical writing. If he were putting together white papers for prospective client or technical documentation, I would agree with your criticism, but he's writing blog-style articles for a publication renowned for its ironic or sarcastic tone, so an injection of personal perspective is absolutely called for. I don't personally find him to be a know-it-all; I get the impression that he's genuinely enthusiastic about the technology he uses and proud of the solutions he creates for his clients.

YMMV, of course.

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Tom Maddox
Angel

Thanks, Trevor!

Despite having a similar title, you work in a very different world with very different tools, and I'm always enlightened to hear about what other options are out there. Keep the articles coming!

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Dotcom titan funds 'Mark Cuban Chair To Eliminate Stupid Patents'

Tom Maddox
Flame

Re: Hurray for rich nerds!!

My god, you're right! Cheap access to space will never benefit anyone! What possible use could it be to put things in space? And electric cars? Why even bother to innovate in that area? These rich guys should just take their money and spend it on giant impractical vanity yachts instead of trying to invest in the future!

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Fish grow ‘hands’ in genetic experiment

Tom Maddox
Mushroom

Re: If you inject the same gene...

Or they might become filthy, antisocial, neckbearded basement-dwellers with a propensity for condescension and self-righteousness. Then you'd have a peer group!

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FCC urges rethink of aircraft personal-electronics blackout

Tom Maddox
Thumb Down

HELLO? HELLO? YES, I'M ON THE PLANE!

The main reason I can think of to continue the ban is to retain some kind of peace and quiet on the plane. Screaming babies are bad enough, but the last think I want to endure on a 10+ hour intercontinental flight is drunks yelling into their cell phones. "HEY BRO, GUESS WHERE I AM!"

If I wanted to endure that sort of behavior, I'd go to the movies more often.

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'Build us a Death Star, President Obama' demand thousands

Tom Maddox
Thumb Down

Re: @ Michael Luke

"Why the down votes?!"

Because you've shown yourself to be utterly devoid of a sense of humor.

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