* Posts by Roo

856 posts • joined 21 Sep 2010

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Milking cow shot dead by police 'while trying to escape'

Roo
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Windows

Re: Roo Natalie Twitpants Just for you townies...

"".....The police could have had a hunt around for a farmer (any one will do) to give them a hand,...." Really?"

Yes, really.

"So it would have taken only seconds if the cow had decided to charge into traffic, risking a fatal accident or an even worse pile-up,"

It's something they could have done while they were waiting 20+ mins for the hit squad to arrive.

"yet you think they should stand around and do nothing on the off-chance they could find a farmer in suburban Newcastle?"

No, I don't think that the Police should stand around doing nothing. That should be clear from the posts that you are responding to. It appears that are have nothing useful to contribute to the debate, so you are falling back to your usual practice of making shit up and putting words in other people's mouths.

"do you really think anyone is going to put your suspicions down to anything other than ignorance and anti-plod bias?"

I am biased against people behaving stupidly and/or dangerously (whether they are plods or otherwise). As it happens I did grow up on a dairy & sheep farm so I have some experience of dealing with livestock (on and off the road), and I don't like seeing livestock being mistreated whether it be through ignorance, malice or stupidity. I'm not out to have plods hanged for shooting Cows, but I do believe that they *should* be capable of finding a safer, simpler, cheaper and quicker solution than calling out a hit-squad.

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Roo
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Re: Roo A cow is actually quite dangerous

"Yeah, because a bag of cow feed is standard issue in all city-based cop cars, right"

Firearms aren't standard issue for the Northumbrian plods either, despite your best efforts Matt.

"Do you want to suggest the coppers should have risked public safety by waiting to find a local pet store that stocked cow feed"

That's your lame brain stawman Matt, so no, I wouldn't make such a suggestion. Besides in this instance the Police took the time to summon some firearms officers and try to set up in someone's bedroom before they shot the cow, I reckon they could have collected a farmer from a local farm/called a vet in the same time or quicker.

As for preventing a traffic accident, policemen slow/stop traffic around obstacles all the time... It's not rocket science.

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Roo
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Re: Natalie Twitpants Just for you townies...

"How sadly predictable you lot are" - same goes for you MB.

The police could have had a hunt around for a farmer (any one will do) to give them a hand, in about 99.99% cases that would have been cheaper, easier & quicker than calling in the hit squad, and funnily enough that is exactly what *used* to happen if some cattle was found to be roaming her majesty's highways.

I suspect that they panicked the cow first by beeping their car horns/sirens, shouting and hitting the thing without bothering to seek advice and then decided to shoot it rather than lose face by inviting the local vet to witness their incompetence and abuse of livestock.

In this case I hope I am wrong, but sadly my experiences of how ignorant and frightened people deal with cattle indicates the abuse of panicking animals scenario is far more likely.

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Roo
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Re: A cow is actually quite dangerous

"Want it no to walk on your toes ? move away from its path. Want to force it back to the barn ? Use a stick."

You don't have to hit them or shout at them. Cows, contrary to popular opinion, are rarely stupid or deaf. Shaking a bag of feed will usually get a Cow's attention, and it'll usually head towards the bag of feed at a rate of knots. Hope they tried that before flying in helicopters and armed policemen because it would have been a lot easier & cheaper.

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Microsoft's certification exams: So easy, a child of six could pass them. Literally

Roo
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Windows

Re: Certificates and Degrees - Seal of Dogma Approval

"There's a reason why all the tech giants were founded by college dropouts - they discovered the education to be either incomplete or obsolete. "

Err, here's a few of examples of "tech giants" that were NOT founded by college dropouts: Intel, Google, IBM. Oracle was founded by some graduates plus Larry. :)

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Roo
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""The BBC reports that his parents want Hamza to become the next Bill Gates, but the youngster has other ideas, fancying himself as a pilot instead"

Yes. Ignore the pushy parents and do what you want to do."

Good call...

Bill Gates isn't really a great role model unless your parents are happy to splash a few $m to help a college drop out start a business. Also to be Bill Gates you need parents who know some big cheeses at IBM so you get a shot to pitch a hacked up executive that you licensed from a shop down the road for a the price of a 3500 sqft house.

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Law changed to allow GCHQ hacking ... just as GCHQ hauled into court for hacking

Roo
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I sincerely hope that our legislators have nothing to hide...

... because if they do have something to hide they won't be in a position to deliver on their manifesto (as if they gave a toss anyway).

On the bright side it looks like Dave & Theresa have saved me bother of wasting 10 minutes voting in ~4-5 years time.

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Windows 10 bombshell: Microsoft to KILL OFF Patch Tuesday

Roo
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Windows

A Welcome Rearrangement of the Deck Chairs

I guess the Titanic reference is inevitable, but I like think of Microsoft as being a bit like a battered old cruise liner full of hard-bitten G&T junkies & hard working staff on a tour of the Far East. They've done the Pacific, they want to move on to somewhere more exotic where the cool kids get their kicks. ;)

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Roo
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Re: Peer-to-peer trusted system updates?

"Because you've forgotten about the possibility of digital signing?"

Nah, those are there to make required to make patches from the feds look legit. I suspect that won't even qualify as a joke within 12-24 months after release of Win 10. Soon every home will have it's own Stuxnet. :)

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Roo
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Re: Just like Windows Phone

Behind the GUI, Windows Phone 7 was essentially a different OS - an evolution of the Windows CE Kernel. Windows Phone 8 was based on the NT kernel. Asking MS to upgrade all 7.x devices to 8.x would have been somewhat akin to Google telling all Chrome OS users to upgrade to Android"

That doesn't actually explain why MS could not have released WP8 for WP7 hardware. I suspect the real reason is down to the way MS set the spec for the hardware and that spec changed from 7->8, and MS really don't want to expend any effort supporting > 1 hardware cfg.

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iPhone case uses phone's OWN SIGNAL to charge it (forever, presumably)

Roo
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(Re) Corner Reflectors

"You can build a reasonably effective corner reflector for mobile phone out of a couple of cornflakes boxes and some tinfoil. If you make it to a reasonable standard, you can gain 1-2 dB of signal on 900 Mhz. But obviously it's directional."

I was torn between clicking the 'report abuse' link and up-voting. :P

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

Roo
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Re: Which is to say...

"LDAP is the king"...

Sure, and it's been available for UNIX boxes forever...

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Roo
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Re: Which is to say...

"More accurate to write: "slowly reseparating". Recall that Cutler's team started with text-mode before Bilge ordered the GUI bolted on regardless."

As good as some of Cutler's work has been and as smart as he is, I feel people are a bit too quick to put him on a pedestal when it comes to WNT.

1) I would fully expect WNT to development to have started out with "text-mode" - simply because developing all those graphics drivers, GUIs and supporting libraries would have taken a very long time. I would *expect* Cutler et al to have debugged & interacted with those early kernels via "text-mode" over a RS232 port, or perhaps via VGA card (text only - natch).

2) When Cutler was hired & developing NT, GUIs were the thing people wanted to buy, therefore he should have known up front that a GUI would be the main way of interacting with the new OS, he would have to have been deaf dumb, blind and terminally retarded not to see which way the wind was blowing at Redmond. To give Cutler his due, I am fairly certain he would have had a big problem with a lot of aspects of the bits outside of the Kernel on WNT, and would agree that WNT would have looked totally different if Cutler had full control over it's development... Pretty sure he would have strangled Win32 in it's cot for starters. ;)

The reason why OSes & drivers were often developed in "text-mode" is driving an RS-232 interface or VGA card doesn't require much in the way of code and there is very little to go wrong with it. For those reasons a lot of UNIXen, their admins & users have carried on using "text-mode". That said I fully expect pretty much any Linux distro to boot into a GUI and work by default these days. ;)

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Roo
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Re: config.sys/autoexec.bat fail!

"I remember spending Christmas morning struggling with config.sys and autoexec.bat to get 'Magic Carpet' to work on our 386 computer. It had been a present for 10 yr old son; after about 3hrs I just got it to work, by which time son was totally disillusioned."

Funnily enough I'm still going through that nightmare with our < 10 year old kids at the moment. I installed Win 8.1, dutifully slotted in a Disney DVD and waited for it to play... OK, so there's no DVD playback, kicked off a VLC download and figured I'd put on some music from the DLNA server while we waited... Ah of course Win 8.1 doesn't support FLAC presumably because Microsoft can't afford to pay someone nothing to bundle it... As with most prior Windows installs it turned into a really boring afternoon packed with disappointment.

It looks like I've been spoilt by Linux distros. :)

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Roo
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Re: Discovery

"I always thought about the admin at 3am in the middle of an IT crisis in mind. I thought about the desperation that person would feel if they were trying to understand what had occurred and opened up a PERL script and needed to understand it. When that person opens up a PowerShell script, they will be able to read it and understand what happened."

People can write unreadable code in pretty much any language out there, and at 3AM the chances are groking anything is going to be harder than usual... So instead of forcing people to learn new tools, syntax and conventions at 3AM how about just using presenting them with something familiar & well proven - like Python packaged with a bunch of libs to facilitate doing tasks on Windows boxes ?

I'm guessing it's down to our old friend "Not Invented Here".

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Roo
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Re: Cygwin

"Anyone else remember that Windows NT originally came with a POSIX-subsystem?"

Yes, I do. I mainly remember because it wasn't actually shipped with the POSIX subsystem in working order (as of NT 3.51), you had to install it off an extra CD. The advertising was very misleading. In my experience that feature was successful at convincing mentally defective PHBs that NT could run code currently running on UNIX boxes than it was actually doing it's job...

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Roo
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Re: Powershell - I knew it well

"It seems that the Powershell designers have taken the worst bits of DCL (Digital Command Language) from VMS and used them. After years and years of using VMS even I find the syntax frankly *******."

I'm glad someone else has had that thought. I spent a couple of years using DCL, tried bourne shell and never looked back... Until I tried PowerShell, which reminded me why I didn't go back to DCL. ;)

For the record I didn't actually mind DCL when I was using it - but then again I didn't know what I was missing until I get a couple of weeks of Bourne shell under my belt...

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MIPS quietly bares its processor architecture to universities

Roo
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Windows

"Why can't I buy a decent quality ATX form factor UltraSPARC board, with enough slots for two or three network cards?"

Ask Larry Ellison. Hint: Before asking the question you'll need to distract him from rolling around in huge piles of cash freely given to him by his hostages^wcustomers.

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Beowulf Gods — rip into cloud's coding entrails

Roo
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"Although not really the same thing, does anyone remember working with transputers back in the 1980s"

Well, not the 80s - but I did get a heavy dose of Transputers in the early 90s. Nice chips, very easy to work with (hw & sw) - going back to 386s & 486s felt like a huge step backwards afterwards. That said 386s & 486s did have MMUs - I wish INMOS had found the time & money to produce something like a T801 with ECC & MMU at some stage.

OCCAM continued to be developed by UKC and others after INMOS' final demise too. Transputers & OCCAM still provide a useful reference model for distributed apps.

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Sony tells hacked gamer to pay for crooks' abuse of PlayStation account

Roo
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Coat

"A good password is a pretty good protection, this fool should look in to one."

A good password is only as good as your luck and how well Sony take care of it. Besides it's possible that the account could be compromised without the need to crack a password if the attacker has broken into Sony's internal networks (which has happened repeatedly).

I'll get my coat, it's the one with a copy of "passwords are for dummies" in the pocket.

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CSC tells execs to stay quiet on Australian bribery scandal

Roo
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Re: Crap & crapper

"Yet somehow they are an even more massive company now. WTF!?"

There's not WTF to worry about; pretty much any 15 minute slot of news will demonstrate that willful avoidance of due diligence, bribery & denying responsibility = profit.

Sadly there is an infinite supply of bullshit out there, which means that it is infinitely more profitable to pedal bullshit to suckers & corrupt minions than actually deliver something useful.

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And the buggiest OS provider award goes to ... APPLE?

Roo
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Care to elaborate on the reason behind the down vote or are you simply trying to bury bad news for a shilling ?

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Roo
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"For example, unlike Windows, the Linux Kernel can be upgraded independently of the rest of the operating system; therefore it is hard to link Linux Kernel vulnerabilities to a specific Linux distribution or Linux distribution version."

If Florian gave a fuck about producing an accurate or useful picture for the punter, all he had to do was pick a distribution, and take an inventory of the kernel revisions that got punted with that distro over the year. It's not hard, the information is in the public domain.

Instead, Florian has decided to use a methodology that produces a figure that isn't representative of what a real world Linux user would encounter (because in practice distributions ship a small fraction of the kernel revs that are out there), but just happens to be the biggest possible value he could arrive at with the least amount of effort.

He really shouldn't have bothered.

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MP resigns as security committee chair amid 'cash-for-access' claims

Roo
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Gimp

"Note if you watch the video by the way Mr Rifkind (he doesn't deserve the Sir), says he actually earns no money. If that's the case whats happening to the taxes I paid in for his wages (81K he gets a bonus for being on def and intel commitee (14K) ) and expenses. Bastard."

I have a hypothesis that may cover that glaring "inaccuracy", sorry I mean blatant lie. Perhaps Mr Rifkind views the money he earns as part and parcel of being an MP as "gifts", whereas the money he has to get off his arse to earn/swindle from Her Majesty's Long Suffering Tax Payers and lobbyists as earnings.

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A truly SHOCKING tale of electrified PCs

Roo
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Re: Sabena?

A BA's lunch served to me over 30 years ago still stands out in my mind. The menu said "Omelette", but I think they actually meant Omelette boiled in brine. Impressively awful, I suspect that much of the derision heaped upon British cuisine may well be caused by BA's Omelettes being so bad that visitors to blightly can't remember anything else when they get home.

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Your hard drives were RIDDLED with NSA SPYWARE for YEARS

Roo
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Windows

Re: but the '...w.dll' - Could be time to IPL with Toggle Switches. ;)

"Anybody involved in this would go out of business very quickly - all their trust keys would be revoked and they'd be *extremely* lucky to have anybody ever accept them again."

Vendors are compelled to comply with the law - regardless of how stupid or counterproductive it may be.

Besides I'll bet that most people would choose to have their machine boot with the NSA malware in place than not boot at all.

At least the greybeards with old PDP-11s running V7 UNIX in the basement can bootstrap via toggle switches, so the world hasn't ended yet. ;)

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HTTP/2 spec gets green light: Faster web or needless complexity?

Roo
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Re: i can see myself

"@Roo : The real question is: Are you using Erlang?"

No I am not using Erlang... It wouldn't make any difference if it were the right tool for the job because the people with the gold specify what tools their minions can/can't use - despite having zero knowledge, experience or interest in the mechanics of distributed apps. I offer my advice, and then I do what I'm asked to do. I write more efficient code more quickly than the Java & thread junkies, and I get paid for doing it, it keeps the family clothed and fed and it helps minimise the amount of time I waste giving unwanted advice on parallel/distributed apps. :)

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Roo
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Re: i can see myself

"The bottleneck in my experience is in the apps, not in the network or protocols."

My experience differs - but my perspective is that of someone who has been paid money to write REST services. Here's some things where HTTP 2.x is likely to help me write more efficient REST based systems:

1) It's not uncommon for REST services to run out of file-descriptors before they run out of compute & memory. HTTP 2.x will definitely help with this...

2) Where compute power is at a premium you can burn hundreds of thousands of cycles processing the headers alone, which really kicks you in the nuts when you are trying to address thousands of small objects (this is the majority of cases in my experience)... HTTP 2.x's use of a binary format will improve this a little.

3) head-of-line blocking really hurts performance in a lot of REST apps. The classic work-around is to address multiple addressable objects with one request, and then overload the HTTP reponse codes and bodies in weird and wonderful ways - which breaks the REST model. This very day some poor sod was forced to explain why they had decided to return a 200 when their now-non-REST request partially completed... HTTP 2.x's multiplexed connection will bin the head-of-line crap and allow us to spam the server and let it sort out the best order in which to process the requests - rather than slavishly processing them in FIFO order. People reckoned that out-of-order execution was a good thing for processors & hard drives - it's a win for REST services too.

4) header compression. K, you don't give a stuff about network bandwidth because you can throw wider pipes at it as time goes by, but the thing is wider pipes don't automatically reduce latency. Reducing the amount of data you have to transfer & the amount of effort to parse that data *does* reduce latency. Another win for HTTP 2.x.

I won't begrudge you looking at kitty pictures with HTTP/1.x, by the same token it would be nice if the wannabe luddites out there spared a thought for the poor sods (like myself) who are forced to use HTTP in high performance distributed apps. ;)

Anyway, we'll see how HTTP 2x works out, hopefully my lack of cynicism will be rewarded just this once...

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Evolve: A shoot-em-up full of scary monsters and super creeps

Roo
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Re: Evolving playable monsters?

I enjoyed some epic games of Natural Selection back in the day, there weren't enough hours in the day ! I really liked how a match could take unexpected turns, it was never the same twice. Seeing expert Fades at work was something else. I wasn't surprised that it didn't catch on though - it wasn't really possible to have a quick blast in the same way as Counterstrike et al, which pretty much eliminated the casual gamer.

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O2 notifies data cops 'for courtesy' ... AFTER El Reg intervenes in email phish dustup

Roo
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Re: Who says it's a breach

"Maybe O2 just sold the data?"

In practice the phone companies use third parties to do their surveys/advertising, there's a very good chance that one of their suppliers simply misappropriated the details O2 provided them with...

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Sly peers attempt to thrust hated Snoopers' Charter into counter-terror and security bill

Roo
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Windows

" Can't say I'm surprised to see Council Tax listed as one of the things they'll stop you leaving the country for, given they already charge you council tax for the period that you're in prison for failing to pay said council tax...."

I suspect an awful lot of old money would get clobbered by that process if it were to be applied universally, and I have no doubt that there will be a number of people who get have their travel restricted due to an administrative error or good old fashioned fraud... I suggest you hunt for an old school tie in your local charity shop before setting out for the airport. ;)

If this policy is administered badly enough the only people left in this country will be the poor & fraudsters...

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Panicked teen hanged himself after receiving ransomware scam email

Roo
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Happy

Re: @Roo - Wait a minute

"I think your Irony Detector isn't working..."

It's working fine, I was embellishing your post. :)

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Roo
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Re: Wait a minute

"Well obviously the Security Services just need *MORE* snooping powers..."

Tell that to McKinnon et al.

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Roo
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Re: Sad, and not good enough

"Well maybe his senior colleagues need to bloody well try harder, instead of wringing their hands and saying "oh what a pity"."

The fact that a detective can trot out this bullshit, yet we see plods track down folks who crack US Navy boxes with default passwords without breaking a sweat tells exactly how much his senior colleagues care about ordinary citizens.

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NSA: We're in YOUR BOTNET

Roo
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@ MB (Re: amanfrimmars1 No one should be surprised.)

" So you missed the bit where Communist Vietnam signed a trade deal with The Man waaaay back in 2001"

It appears that you are overlooking the 50+ years lost to weapons of mass destruction. Fair play to Vietnam though, they are making rapid progress.

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Roo
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Re: TrustNo1

"But where do Alice, Bob and Carol fit in to all this?"

In this case you should be on the look out for Larry, Curly & Moe.

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Go Canada: Now ILLEGAL to auto-update software without 'consent'

Roo
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Windows

Who do I bribe ?

To have this law applied retrospectively after being forced into installing Windows Genuine Advantage in the UK ? :)

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CIA exonerates CIA of all wrongdoing in Senate hacking probe

Roo
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Re: Sir

"Shame we can't recreate Westminster on a small island and have him come back, to it, at night. Just leave a sign on the door saying we all emigrated."

That is an excellent plan, and probably a lot cheaper than Cameron's 24x7 surveillance society, and even better it respects human rights and doesn't willfully kill people. Cameron could learn a thing or two from swampdog - assuming of course that Cameron could take his head out of his rear echo chamber for 10 minutes or so and pay attention.

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Roo
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Re: Bless

"You've really got to admire their cojones."

You don't have to be brave to take the piss when you know there will be zero consequences.

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MAINFRAMES are SO NOT DEAD: IBM's launched a new one

Roo
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Re: Burroughs beat IBM by over a year with the B5000.

"Computer scientists may wet themselves over clever architectures, but at the end of the day the IBM 360 was successful because it was affordable and there were programmers available"

"Affordable" as opposed to offering better price/performance ? :)

I suspect IBM's *existing* dominance in the market place, Lawyers, FUD and marketing muscle had a fair amount to do with 360's success. For folks to succeed in the face of that kind of opposition they need to offer a performance/price ratio that far exceeds other offerings (at least 5x better).

The B5000 was a cracking piece of work - it does make the opposition of the time look terminally retarded. I can't help but wonder if the industry as a whole would have been more productive over the past decades if something like B5000 had become ubiquitous. Even without IBM et al dominating it would have been tricky though - I think they would have had to have cannibalised their high margin business to do so - few companies are capable of biting that bullet. DEC actually started out by punting small low-cost machines, and they shipped the LSI11 (a 4 chip processor) in 1975 and followed up with the F11 (1979). Then they went backwards with the VAX-11/780 - they built it out of 74 series TTL and 'shipped' it in 1977. :(

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Roo
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Re: After the election comment

"I have sent an email to the Office of the Prime Minister - I'm retired and they can't make trouble for my company - spelling out why their universal backdoor policy will not work and would in fact backfire on UK business"

You appear to be under the impression that the Office of the Prime Minister gives a toss.

In my experience when an outfit is going ahead with a blatantly stupid idea despite being given a metric shitload of reasons why it's stupid, the chances are you don't understand their goal. In this case the goal may well be totally insane from a rational proletariat point of view, but from the point of view of keeping Dave, his school chums and their sprogs in safe and in power forever it may make perfect sense.

Besides if they do destroy the UK, it's pretty easy to emigrate these days, even Idi Amin managed to retire somewhere sunny...

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Roo
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"when this bleeder suddenly tries to take over the world you just open the window and shove her out, problem solved BOFH style!"

"Never trust a computer that's too heavy to lift" - can't recall where I first saw that one, but it has served me well. ;)

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Oracle data centre offers its back end to banking upstart

Roo
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Windows

Mortgaging your bollocks.

I struggle to see how handing your gonads over to Larry Ellison is a sound business decision. Were the non-exec directors sleeping off a huge lunch at the time that decision was taken - or had they already had their gonads removed ?

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Microsoft patch batch pre-alerts now for paying customers ONLY

Roo
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Windows

Re: foot shooting

"WIndows Phone 8.1 and Denim firmware update were promised for last quarter 2014 - so far it's only been put on new phones"

Microsoft do have some form in that particular area ...

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Roo
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Windows

They haven't really thought this through have they ?

The third-party vulnerability reports will still be there for the public to peruse, but they won't be able to see if Microsoft has bothered to fix them now... I can't see how making Windows look like an abandoned legacy OS is going to help market share.

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US kills EU watchdog's probe into EU cops sharing EU citizens' data

Roo
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Windows

Re: The "Real" Reason is......

That could well be true, but I don't see much of a reason for the plods to actually help cover that up, unless they are corrupt themselves of course... Nothing to hide, nothing to fear and all that. ;)

In essence it seems far more likely that the plods are simply refusing to play ball because they know they've been breaking the law/rules.

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Cryptowall's ransomware's tough layers peeled

Roo
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Windows

Re: Anti VM my foot

"An honest question - does it matter whether the share on the other machine is writable or not?"

If you're unlucky enough to be running NT3.51/4.x on your file server you could see compressed files on read-only shares get corrupted by clients attempting to write to them (same happened even if the files were also marked read-only on the read-only shares). They *should* have fixed that one by now, but I wouldn't bet my data on it. ;)

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Morgan Stanley fires rookie for stealing thousands of fat cats' financial files

Roo
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Windows

Confused.

That is so dumb I can't decide whether the crooks and/or financial institutions are getting dumber.

Curious to find out why this person chose to dox 350K clients.

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Snowden leaks lack context says security studies professor

Roo
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Windows

Re: Disagree

"Tapping fibre at the bottom of the sea? With robots or in scuba gear, through an armoured cable, and all without being noticed? And they didn't fuck up once and get caught? "

Err, the not getting caught thing would be quite easy, there's a lot of water to hide in out there. Also you seem to have overlooked the fact that submarine cables seem to break as a matter of routine and they are repaired by private companies. I can't see those companies saying no to getting paid for some lawful work.

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Re: worse @ streaky

"When all this comes to pass what do NSA/GCHQ do? Nothing - they effectively cease to exist because they have no real-world capability and all the money has to go where it should be going anyway, into humint."

The vast majority of that encrypted traffic will still be vulnerable - they can lean on certificate authorities, service providers (not just ISPs, folks like Google et al), and carry on with their man in the middle attacks. It's not rocket science.

The fact is mass surveillance has been their goal from the outset, they've spent a lot of money on it, they have the law on their side and they'll find a way and a lot more money to carry on doing it. As to why they are doing it, the hunting down criminals reasons don't make much economic sense to me unless they view the majority of the population as being criminals.

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