* Posts by Roo

885 posts • joined 21 Sep 2010

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

Roo
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Windows

Re: Goodness.

Have an upvote...

Take note Phoenix50:

Positive end user experience leads to "Linux fansite" horror.

I've seen this sort of thing happen before, remember Win95, WinME (yes, seriously), little ole' XP and 7 ? Seems fair to let everyone have a shot at the limelight. ;)

There can be more than one winner tbh, as long as punters get a choice and people share ideas and good practice freely everyone is a winner. It's a head adjustment, instead of viewing competition as war competition can be viewed as an essential part of evolution that supports solutions for the mainstream and the niches.

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Roo
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Re: Goodness.

"If Windows 10 gets anything near this positive a review on this site next month - bias or not I'll show my arse in ASDA."

I will award an upvote if you do indeed show your arse in ASDA. Has to be in front of the frozen veg section, and there must be pictures or it didn't happen.

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OPM data breach: Looking at you, China! National Intelligence head stares out Beijing

Roo
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With security so lax it strikes me that lots of different organizations could have stolen that data, and the feds wouldn't have a clue who stole what when. McCain should be asking if he's ready to leave the investigation & remediation to the people who have a clue and the skills to fix it.

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Layoff-happy Capita charges staff to use cutlery in canteens

Roo
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Spare a thought....

... for those of us who don't have a canteen at all ...

It does seem petty to charge for cutlery, but most canteens these days seem to be run by catering firms. If that is the case with the canteens on those sites then it's hardly surprising that the firm(s) decided to stop giving cutlery away.

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Bank of England CIO: ‘Beware of the cloud, beware of vendors’

Roo
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Re: heh

"If you are one of these posters, and are aged over 40, then I hope you have already paid off your mortgage."

Weirdly some cloud-skeptic posters over 40 are the only people in their organizations who can keep the show on the road when* the cloud stuff goes tits up. A few of them worked in firms that *rented* time on remote hosts back in the day, so they have some direct experience of the pros and cons of hosting compute & data on someone else's iron.

Note: that's when, not if. Stuff doesn't work forever.

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Roo
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Re: Actually, this is pretty sensible

"What's so crazy about taking the good parts of the "cloud", namely virtualization and flexible provisioning, but not handing your data over to a disinterested third party?"

The problem is there is no such thing as a "disinterested" third party when it comes to buying a platform (or anything else), the third party will want to take as much money off you as possible while spending as little as possible to deliver the product. For that reason it would be very naive to assume that their motives and goals are compatible with your own.

You only have to look at the continual battle to get vendors to fix product defects to see how that works in practice.

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Roo
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Re: Sounds like a bigoted, stereotyping git to me

"I'm not sure how it works in England, but most highly-compensated bank employees here in the US are drawn from the Ivy League old-money crowd"

I think it's fair to say that the something similar applies here in the UK too, although I suspect very few of the "old-money" crowd would do something as boring as working for a bank, the "new-money" folks seem to be well represented though.

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GCHQ: Security software? We'll soon see about THAT

Roo
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Re: on the other hand

"The alphabet agencies cannot protect government data, cannot help corporations protect their data, and apparently cannot knock barbarians off the internet. Perhaps we over estimate them."

Nah, I think they are oversold by people who want to eliminate privacy.

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Roo
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Re: Doesn't this fit nicely

Indeed.

The down voters won't present a rational counter-argument because they don't have one.

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Re: Errrr WTF?

"Makes me want to avoid Sophos and McAfee at all costs, though, conversely. Perhaps their marketing conspiracy just collapsed?"

I would be hugely surprised if you weren't already avoiding McAfee. :)

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Roo
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Re: Prioties

"Bravo chaps, well played. What's next? While cracking down on pornographic material coming in from Europe you miss a massive paedophile ring in Parliament..."

You may be being unfair there. There is plenty of evidence to support the hypothesis that the establishment were are actively suppressing any investigation and prosecution of themselves. I am surprised that our allegedly free press and democratically elected MPs have not made more of the fact that evidence and investigations are being systematically buried until the day after the perps are buried.

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Roo
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And yet we still have people making assertions such as the following found in an el Reg comment section just 9 days ago:

"But plainly turning off our anti-malware software today is nonsense."

It is now official: switching off AV software is the first step to securing your system...

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Donatelli's Oracle arrival leaves Fowler in corporate no man's land

Roo
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Nice one Jack & Matt, you both get an up-vote !

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Roo
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Re: The end of Fowler will finally mean the end of SPARC

Oracle and their fanboys keep telling us how earth shatteringly great the M7 will be, I can't believe that Larry would pull the plug on sure-fire money spinner like the M7...

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Brace yourself, planet Earth, says Nokia CEO – our phones ARE coming back from mid-2016

Roo
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Ash vs Nokia

Is it a coincidence that the Ash vs Evil Dead sitcom is slated for release in 2015 ?

I'll get my coat, the one with a ratty Samsung SIII in the pocket.

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Graphene sheaths could boost processor signal speeds by 30 per cent

Roo
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Re: Re Cell phones

"And it's a brilliant material because the His Royal Highness Cameron is investing loads into it and I totally trust his judgement with tax-payers cash."

In the interests of calibrating my sarcasm detector...

Would that be the same David Cameron who decided that drug policies should not be guided by evidence gathered from scientific studies because he personally disagreed with the conclusions ?

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Farewell then, Mr Elop: It wasn't actually your fault

Roo
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Re: Don't burn the platform you're standing on

"Although it's fair to say the writing was on the wall long before Elop turned up, it was the idiot who leaked that memo who doomed his colleagues and destroyed any future the mobile division might have had up until that point."

I think that's putting it a bit strong, I'd say the memo was just another nail in the coffin. ;)

Any punter could see Nokia weren't interested in selling anything they wanted to buy *before* the memo was leaked, and that was the problem that Elop inherited and he failed to fix it.

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'No evidence' Snowden was working for foreign power says ex-NSA boss

Roo
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Re: So much for all that oversight then...

"haven't you noticed we ARE at War - Cyber-World War I or World War III take your pick"

I haven't noticed any declarations of War yet. I have seen lots of dick-waving and wankers trying to earn a buck from making more heat & noise though.

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Roo
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So much for all that oversight then...

Hayden has mades a mockery of the oversight by going on the record with "I would not have thought twice, I would not have asked permission".

He's talking about hacking records in China so there's a chance the oversight bods won't give a toss, but the flip side of the coin is that the superpowers have declared that such activities are an act of war. I find it disturbing that the leaders of a world superpower lack the authority to deter heads of intelligence agencies committing acts of war simply because they can.

Fair play to the man for laying his cards on the table though.

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Sunday Times fires off copyright complaint at Snowden story critics

Roo
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Re: You know you've hit them where it hurts

"This current business I put down to where it all comes from. A Murdoch owned rag in cahoots with the Tory government. I would really like to see what the quid pro quo was for this."

That's just crying out for a Freedom of Information Request. :)

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Innocent Spaniards roasted by experimental napalm mead

Roo
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Re: Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum

"It works surprisingly well in Mojitos, as well as shots"

You are right it does make a cracking Mojito. :)

Shame on Norway !

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Roo
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Wray & Nephew White Overproof Rum

"I've always assumed that the point of brewing was to create an alcoholic beverage that was actually pleasant to imbibe. I'm obviously missing something (but I don't think I'll miss it very much)."

I think certain distillers aim higher and wider than that lofty goal. For example I found that Wray & Nephew's White Rum pretty handy for sipping, swilling with 'Ting', lighting BBQs, and dissolving grunge.

I recommend treating it with respect, especially around naked flames (that is not a joke).

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It's 2015 and Microsoft has figured out anything can break Windows

Roo
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Re: So all it does...

"But plainly turning off our anti-malware software today is nonsense."

That's way too broad. There are situations where "anti-malware" software is counterproductive and it is in fact more sensible to switch it off rather than suffer the consequences... The most obvious example being when bad AV updates are crippling otherwise perfectly healthy systems.

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Roo
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"So in conclusion..

Good sys admins provide secure machines regardless of the OS"

Good sys admins will provide insecure machines if the hardware and/or OS is insecure by design.

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Roo
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Re: Just Use Linux

"Every single time I am balked because Linux cannot do something that I want to use my PC for, or it would take a significant learning curve for me to configure it to do something that I can get running on my Windows PC in 10 minutes"

I have had the same problem with both Windows and Linux down the years, but in latter times I'm finding that it happens with Linux far more rarely that Windows. Installing Windows 8.1 (on 3 different machines) 3 months back took over double your 20 minutes to install (excluding the mandatory massive update & reboot), and I was unable to watch a DVD at the end of it. To watch the DVD I had to install a bunch of third party drivers to make the motherboard, network hardware and graphics hardware work. By contrast a Linux Mint default desktop install came up roses without any third party guff (on the same boxes) and let me watch a DVD straight away in under 10 minutes.

IMO your point about hardware support is valid for Linux and Windows, but in Windows land because it's only a tiny proportion of the user-base who has to go through that pain because vendors do it for them. Windows bare metal installs really haven't changed much since XP: you still have to install a bunch of 3rd party drivers for motherboards, chipsets, graphics, audio, network interfaces and USB ports. Personally I find this intolerable because I don't see any reason to trust code I don't have the source code for and can't build, so there is no way I want that code running with Admin/Kernel/Root type privilege.

I believe that the current state of affairs with opaque 3rd party binaries running at ring 0 is NOT sustainable in a connected world where criminals, companies & nations trojan machines as SOP. MS have some smart people working for them, I'm sure they're aware of the drawbacks and the risks they force Windows to take, the question is whether they'll fix it or not. Extending the reach of AV software really doesn't fix the fundamental security problems at the lower levels of the stack.

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Roo
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Re: Just Use Linux

"If you really want to do Linux a favour, stop making yourself, and everybody else proposing a solution based on it look like an unprofessional hippie with the reasoning skills of a five year old."

That approach has worked brilliantly for Microsoft (and Apple).

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Roo
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Re: Rewrite!

"History is written by the winners, but the winners are not always the best of breed, they're simply those who happen to be in the right place at the right time."

In that case Microsoft have already lost, legends of Sir Tim and HTML will outlive .doc. ;)

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Roo
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Re: Surely...

"If there's one thing that modern software development has learned, it's that you don't start from scratch without a very good reason."

I take issue with you scoping things down to "modern software development", it was true when I started hacking 6502 assembler >30 years ago. It's common sense. :)

With that said the original poster may have a valid point because some vulnerabilities stem from the design and usage of an OS, and in some cases you may well *have* to start from scratch because there is a design fault that simply can't be worked around effectively. To MS's credit they have taken this approach in the past.

However, in this case MS have added code that will have privileged access to the address space of any app that makes use of the API. In addition that code's behavior will be driven by a bunch of virus signatures so the security & safety of that complex code will be a function of the signatures and time. In essence they've added another set of attack vectors are a function of an arbitrary opaque dictionary of virus definitions that changes over time. They've made AV software more invasive, when they really should be working to make it obsolete.

Personally I would have preferred MS to have looked at the known attack vectors and tried to design them out of the OS (ie: re-write bits of it or the whole thing). :)

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Sysadmins rebel over GUI-free install for Windows Server 2016

Roo
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Re: Ok, Ok, Ok..

"Yes you can script this and that, yes you can install server with no GUI, but why?"

I'll bite... Because you have ~2K boxes/images to admin and you really don't want to have to do the login and clicky dance on every single one individually... This *should* enable an admin to look after more boxes, reducing the TCO as well...

Microsoft wants to play in the big leagues where admins look after hundreds boxes / images. I suspect that Azure has shown that the current GUI centric model just does not scale well for system administration and will never be able to compete alternatives that do support remote administration out of the box.

The only problem here is that MS is biting the bullet about 23 years too late, the time to do this kind of shift would have been before they released NT 3.51 - before app developers & and sysadmins had a chance to develop bad habits. :)

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Milking cow shot dead by police 'while trying to escape'

Roo
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Re: Roo Natalie Twitpants Just for you townies...

"".....The police could have had a hunt around for a farmer (any one will do) to give them a hand,...." Really?"

Yes, really.

"So it would have taken only seconds if the cow had decided to charge into traffic, risking a fatal accident or an even worse pile-up,"

It's something they could have done while they were waiting 20+ mins for the hit squad to arrive.

"yet you think they should stand around and do nothing on the off-chance they could find a farmer in suburban Newcastle?"

No, I don't think that the Police should stand around doing nothing. That should be clear from the posts that you are responding to. It appears that are have nothing useful to contribute to the debate, so you are falling back to your usual practice of making shit up and putting words in other people's mouths.

"do you really think anyone is going to put your suspicions down to anything other than ignorance and anti-plod bias?"

I am biased against people behaving stupidly and/or dangerously (whether they are plods or otherwise). As it happens I did grow up on a dairy & sheep farm so I have some experience of dealing with livestock (on and off the road), and I don't like seeing livestock being mistreated whether it be through ignorance, malice or stupidity. I'm not out to have plods hanged for shooting Cows, but I do believe that they *should* be capable of finding a safer, simpler, cheaper and quicker solution than calling out a hit-squad.

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Roo
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Re: Roo A cow is actually quite dangerous

"Yeah, because a bag of cow feed is standard issue in all city-based cop cars, right"

Firearms aren't standard issue for the Northumbrian plods either, despite your best efforts Matt.

"Do you want to suggest the coppers should have risked public safety by waiting to find a local pet store that stocked cow feed"

That's your lame brain stawman Matt, so no, I wouldn't make such a suggestion. Besides in this instance the Police took the time to summon some firearms officers and try to set up in someone's bedroom before they shot the cow, I reckon they could have collected a farmer from a local farm/called a vet in the same time or quicker.

As for preventing a traffic accident, policemen slow/stop traffic around obstacles all the time... It's not rocket science.

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Roo
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Re: Natalie Twitpants Just for you townies...

"How sadly predictable you lot are" - same goes for you MB.

The police could have had a hunt around for a farmer (any one will do) to give them a hand, in about 99.99% cases that would have been cheaper, easier & quicker than calling in the hit squad, and funnily enough that is exactly what *used* to happen if some cattle was found to be roaming her majesty's highways.

I suspect that they panicked the cow first by beeping their car horns/sirens, shouting and hitting the thing without bothering to seek advice and then decided to shoot it rather than lose face by inviting the local vet to witness their incompetence and abuse of livestock.

In this case I hope I am wrong, but sadly my experiences of how ignorant and frightened people deal with cattle indicates the abuse of panicking animals scenario is far more likely.

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Roo
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Re: A cow is actually quite dangerous

"Want it no to walk on your toes ? move away from its path. Want to force it back to the barn ? Use a stick."

You don't have to hit them or shout at them. Cows, contrary to popular opinion, are rarely stupid or deaf. Shaking a bag of feed will usually get a Cow's attention, and it'll usually head towards the bag of feed at a rate of knots. Hope they tried that before flying in helicopters and armed policemen because it would have been a lot easier & cheaper.

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Microsoft's certification exams: So easy, a child of six could pass them. Literally

Roo
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Re: Certificates and Degrees - Seal of Dogma Approval

"There's a reason why all the tech giants were founded by college dropouts - they discovered the education to be either incomplete or obsolete. "

Err, here's a few of examples of "tech giants" that were NOT founded by college dropouts: Intel, Google, IBM. Oracle was founded by some graduates plus Larry. :)

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""The BBC reports that his parents want Hamza to become the next Bill Gates, but the youngster has other ideas, fancying himself as a pilot instead"

Yes. Ignore the pushy parents and do what you want to do."

Good call...

Bill Gates isn't really a great role model unless your parents are happy to splash a few $m to help a college drop out start a business. Also to be Bill Gates you need parents who know some big cheeses at IBM so you get a shot to pitch a hacked up executive that you licensed from a shop down the road for a the price of a 3500 sqft house.

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Law changed to allow GCHQ hacking ... just as GCHQ hauled into court for hacking

Roo
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I sincerely hope that our legislators have nothing to hide...

... because if they do have something to hide they won't be in a position to deliver on their manifesto (as if they gave a toss anyway).

On the bright side it looks like Dave & Theresa have saved me bother of wasting 10 minutes voting in ~4-5 years time.

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Windows 10 bombshell: Microsoft to KILL OFF Patch Tuesday

Roo
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Windows

A Welcome Rearrangement of the Deck Chairs

I guess the Titanic reference is inevitable, but I like think of Microsoft as being a bit like a battered old cruise liner full of hard-bitten G&T junkies & hard working staff on a tour of the Far East. They've done the Pacific, they want to move on to somewhere more exotic where the cool kids get their kicks. ;)

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Roo
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Re: Peer-to-peer trusted system updates?

"Because you've forgotten about the possibility of digital signing?"

Nah, those are there to make required to make patches from the feds look legit. I suspect that won't even qualify as a joke within 12-24 months after release of Win 10. Soon every home will have it's own Stuxnet. :)

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Roo
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Re: Just like Windows Phone

Behind the GUI, Windows Phone 7 was essentially a different OS - an evolution of the Windows CE Kernel. Windows Phone 8 was based on the NT kernel. Asking MS to upgrade all 7.x devices to 8.x would have been somewhat akin to Google telling all Chrome OS users to upgrade to Android"

That doesn't actually explain why MS could not have released WP8 for WP7 hardware. I suspect the real reason is down to the way MS set the spec for the hardware and that spec changed from 7->8, and MS really don't want to expend any effort supporting > 1 hardware cfg.

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iPhone case uses phone's OWN SIGNAL to charge it (forever, presumably)

Roo
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(Re) Corner Reflectors

"You can build a reasonably effective corner reflector for mobile phone out of a couple of cornflakes boxes and some tinfoil. If you make it to a reasonable standard, you can gain 1-2 dB of signal on 900 Mhz. But obviously it's directional."

I was torn between clicking the 'report abuse' link and up-voting. :P

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Welcome, stranger: Inside Microsoft's command line shell

Roo
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Re: Which is to say...

"LDAP is the king"...

Sure, and it's been available for UNIX boxes forever...

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Roo
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Re: Which is to say...

"More accurate to write: "slowly reseparating". Recall that Cutler's team started with text-mode before Bilge ordered the GUI bolted on regardless."

As good as some of Cutler's work has been and as smart as he is, I feel people are a bit too quick to put him on a pedestal when it comes to WNT.

1) I would fully expect WNT to development to have started out with "text-mode" - simply because developing all those graphics drivers, GUIs and supporting libraries would have taken a very long time. I would *expect* Cutler et al to have debugged & interacted with those early kernels via "text-mode" over a RS232 port, or perhaps via VGA card (text only - natch).

2) When Cutler was hired & developing NT, GUIs were the thing people wanted to buy, therefore he should have known up front that a GUI would be the main way of interacting with the new OS, he would have to have been deaf dumb, blind and terminally retarded not to see which way the wind was blowing at Redmond. To give Cutler his due, I am fairly certain he would have had a big problem with a lot of aspects of the bits outside of the Kernel on WNT, and would agree that WNT would have looked totally different if Cutler had full control over it's development... Pretty sure he would have strangled Win32 in it's cot for starters. ;)

The reason why OSes & drivers were often developed in "text-mode" is driving an RS-232 interface or VGA card doesn't require much in the way of code and there is very little to go wrong with it. For those reasons a lot of UNIXen, their admins & users have carried on using "text-mode". That said I fully expect pretty much any Linux distro to boot into a GUI and work by default these days. ;)

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Roo
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Re: config.sys/autoexec.bat fail!

"I remember spending Christmas morning struggling with config.sys and autoexec.bat to get 'Magic Carpet' to work on our 386 computer. It had been a present for 10 yr old son; after about 3hrs I just got it to work, by which time son was totally disillusioned."

Funnily enough I'm still going through that nightmare with our < 10 year old kids at the moment. I installed Win 8.1, dutifully slotted in a Disney DVD and waited for it to play... OK, so there's no DVD playback, kicked off a VLC download and figured I'd put on some music from the DLNA server while we waited... Ah of course Win 8.1 doesn't support FLAC presumably because Microsoft can't afford to pay someone nothing to bundle it... As with most prior Windows installs it turned into a really boring afternoon packed with disappointment.

It looks like I've been spoilt by Linux distros. :)

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Roo
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Re: Discovery

"I always thought about the admin at 3am in the middle of an IT crisis in mind. I thought about the desperation that person would feel if they were trying to understand what had occurred and opened up a PERL script and needed to understand it. When that person opens up a PowerShell script, they will be able to read it and understand what happened."

People can write unreadable code in pretty much any language out there, and at 3AM the chances are groking anything is going to be harder than usual... So instead of forcing people to learn new tools, syntax and conventions at 3AM how about just using presenting them with something familiar & well proven - like Python packaged with a bunch of libs to facilitate doing tasks on Windows boxes ?

I'm guessing it's down to our old friend "Not Invented Here".

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Roo
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Re: Cygwin

"Anyone else remember that Windows NT originally came with a POSIX-subsystem?"

Yes, I do. I mainly remember because it wasn't actually shipped with the POSIX subsystem in working order (as of NT 3.51), you had to install it off an extra CD. The advertising was very misleading. In my experience that feature was successful at convincing mentally defective PHBs that NT could run code currently running on UNIX boxes than it was actually doing it's job...

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Roo
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Re: Powershell - I knew it well

"It seems that the Powershell designers have taken the worst bits of DCL (Digital Command Language) from VMS and used them. After years and years of using VMS even I find the syntax frankly *******."

I'm glad someone else has had that thought. I spent a couple of years using DCL, tried bourne shell and never looked back... Until I tried PowerShell, which reminded me why I didn't go back to DCL. ;)

For the record I didn't actually mind DCL when I was using it - but then again I didn't know what I was missing until I get a couple of weeks of Bourne shell under my belt...

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MIPS quietly bares its processor architecture to universities

Roo
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"Why can't I buy a decent quality ATX form factor UltraSPARC board, with enough slots for two or three network cards?"

Ask Larry Ellison. Hint: Before asking the question you'll need to distract him from rolling around in huge piles of cash freely given to him by his hostages^wcustomers.

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Beowulf Gods — rip into cloud's coding entrails

Roo
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"Although not really the same thing, does anyone remember working with transputers back in the 1980s"

Well, not the 80s - but I did get a heavy dose of Transputers in the early 90s. Nice chips, very easy to work with (hw & sw) - going back to 386s & 486s felt like a huge step backwards afterwards. That said 386s & 486s did have MMUs - I wish INMOS had found the time & money to produce something like a T801 with ECC & MMU at some stage.

OCCAM continued to be developed by UKC and others after INMOS' final demise too. Transputers & OCCAM still provide a useful reference model for distributed apps.

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Sony tells hacked gamer to pay for crooks' abuse of PlayStation account

Roo
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"A good password is a pretty good protection, this fool should look in to one."

A good password is only as good as your luck and how well Sony take care of it. Besides it's possible that the account could be compromised without the need to crack a password if the attacker has broken into Sony's internal networks (which has happened repeatedly).

I'll get my coat, it's the one with a copy of "passwords are for dummies" in the pocket.

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CSC tells execs to stay quiet on Australian bribery scandal

Roo
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Re: Crap & crapper

"Yet somehow they are an even more massive company now. WTF!?"

There's not WTF to worry about; pretty much any 15 minute slot of news will demonstrate that willful avoidance of due diligence, bribery & denying responsibility = profit.

Sadly there is an infinite supply of bullshit out there, which means that it is infinitely more profitable to pedal bullshit to suckers & corrupt minions than actually deliver something useful.

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