* Posts by Roo

995 posts • joined 21 Sep 2010

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Blueprints revealed: Oracle crams Sparc M7 and InfiniBand into cheaper 'Sonoma' chips

Roo
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Re: What I Think Is the Big Question

"At least, compare it with Intel chips designed for servers, not desktop/laptops..."

Kinda tricky to do CPU compare the last time I tried that from the published benchmarks. Case in point Oracle only publish SPECrate figures so I have no idea how well a modern SPARC will run the billions of lines of single threaded code out there.

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Roo
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Oracle already ship SPARCs and they already ship SPARC software. How many of those 400K customers actually run SPARC binaries ?

Taking my last 5 "bluechip" employers as an example precisely 5/5 of them ran Oracle, 0/5 of them ran Oracle on SPARC (2 of them migrated away from SPARC before I got there). Admittedly that's a very small sample - but I am be curious to know if you have seen a different picture.

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Roo
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Re: What I Think Is the Big Question

My guess is that an M7 might be about 1/4 of a kidney. x1000 prices won't happen because they won't yield enough in a month to collect that many together in one place. ;)

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Fugitive UK hacker turned ISIS recruiter killed in Syria

Roo
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Re: @ Roo

"All terrorists are muslims.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Islamist_terrorist_attacks"

That's not a complete list of terrorist attacks because it excludes attacks that were not attributed to "Islamists", so you can not honestly draw the conclusion that "all terrorists are muslim" from that list.

"You were saying about it not being true???"

It's still not true just because you produced a Wikipedia list of "Islamist" terrorist attacks that excludes all attacks that were attributed to folks who aren't "Islamists".

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Roo
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Re: @ Andy Non

"@Roo, I don't hate Muslims. I have contempt for Islam,"

Religions are a product of the people who follow/use them, unfortunately you can't logically split one from the other.

To paraphrase the gun lobby folks: Religions don't oppresses people, people oppress people.

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Roo
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Re: @ Andy Non

"but all terrorists (recently) ARE Muslims.."

That isn't true.

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Roo
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Re: @ GrumpenKraut

"> I’m sorry to say this but the spectacles of hate need to be removed."

"Please decide whether "spectacles of hate" refer to the comment thread we are looking at (to be removed, because baaad) or to some pretty fucking atrocious things done by ISIS?"

I read the post as applying to everyone - regardless of their creed, a rare glass half-full moment. I'm surprised you took it so negatively - which is why I reckoned you needed a long cold shower.

FWIW I haven't googled the foundation the poster suggested though. I guess that counts as a victory in the war on citizens forming their own opinion.

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Roo
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Re: @ Andy Non

"To be fair the bible has a lot of that sort of bollocks as well."

I suspect that many Islamaphobes don't give a toss, they usually ignore that argument because they are more interested in justifying their hatred of Muslims than peace.

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Roo
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@ GrumpenKraut

"> When we differ in our opinions, we shouldn’t be abusive or threatening.

Does "abusive" include rape, torture, maining, displacing, and killing at a huge scale? Please clarify."

What a bizarre question. You need a long cold shower IMO.

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Roo
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Without wishing to trivialize the the rights and wrongs of what that kid did... Given the amount of violence and insanity being attributed to ISIS I do wonder *why* a kid in his early 20s managed to rank as the #3 person the US authorities wanted dead. If the kid was a recruiter and important enough to merit a #3 on the kill list I'd be expecting them to take the kid alive and find out what he knows. I wonder if the reason for the kid's high ranking on the list was down to dear old Tony Blair or the Pentagon Twatterati nominating him for the #3 spot.

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Why is the smart home insecure? Because almost nobody cares

Roo
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Re: wireless networking built in ...

"nah, mobile data: it will bypass any of the owners (and/or neighbours) wifi restrictions."

That's why I was careful to say "wireless networking" rather than WiFi and suggest sabotaging their aerials rather than trying to convert one's home into a Faraday cage. :)

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Roo
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Re: *I* Care. And In My Home, That's All That Matters.

"I connected my new TV to the internet for all on 30 minutes. Just long enough to get a software update. That's it. I might connect is periodically just to do the same but in normal operations?

forget is sunshine, it ain't gonna happen this side of the second coming."

The problem is that a lot of this IoT shite is going to have wireless networking built in, and let's face it vendors are always finding new ways for software to phone home without asking the user first. Not sure what can be done about that aside from physically taking it apart and connecting any aerials you can find to 0v... Still no guarantee you'd find them all of course. :P

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Krebs: I know who hacked Ashley Madison

Roo
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Halloween ?

Blimey ! Is it Halloween already ? This is getting creepier by the hour...

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Motorola monsters Apple's swipe-to-unlock patent in German court

Roo
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Re: Great...

Quite a lot of years, which led to a lot of reputational damage, legal fees and lost sales. Happily Apple are cash-rich so they have enough money to cover the damage. ;)

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Boffins promise file system that will NEVER lose data

Roo
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"With a lot of "mathematically proven" systems you end up moving the problems/bugs from the implementation process to the initial specifications, which are often not 100% complete nor correct for anything of reasonable complexity."

I think "moving" is a bit misleading here. Providing the proof is correct (!!) the code will fully comply with the spec, therefore all the remaining bugs will be in the spec. ;)

Having said that I don't think I've seen a bug-free spec, formal or otherwise. Formal specs do have an advantage in that you can prove that stuff complying with the spec will have particular properties though. While this kind of work may be viewed as esoteric or irrelevant, it should yield a useful model for other folks to compare/apply to real world file systems.

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Windows 10 market share growth slows to just ten per cent

Roo
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Re: 99% of users don't know/care/have a choice

"I see. You say they don't know, and you're right."

He was responding to your own question.

"I say it's too obscure, and I'm wrong."

To be fair I didn't notice much in the way of violent disagreement with the 'obscure' assertion, there was plenty of disagreement with your claims of Linux being too difficult to use and install though.

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Roo
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Re: Recent Joys with Windows 8.1 and 10

Thanks for sharing Hans !

Seems like a bit of an awkward way to detect a drive, 'Nad needs 20 mins on the naughty step for that one. Thanks for the tip. I am a bit surprised that Dell's drivers failed at headphone/speaker detection - seems like a very basic thing to test.

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Roo
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Re: We must obviously agree to disagree

"Yet, if things are so simple and just a Google search away, then you tell me why Linux is not on 99% of PCs."

Perhaps it is because people don't know better because they listen to FUD from folks like yourself and (wrongly) conclude that alternatives are too hard to setup and use, and don't offer enough advantages to offset the pre-installed OS.

That said even if folks get past the FUD they may still have to rummage in the BIOS to allow a different OS to be boot.

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Roo
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Re: How delightful

"However, none of you have said anything that invalidates my statement."

Actually we have said plenty that invalidates your tired recycled FUD. The problem is that you are either too stupid to understand that or too stiff necked to concede the points.

"@Mr Roo : and how many people know how to make a bootable USB key, apart from your friends ?"

Presumably the answer is N - PascalMonett. What has that got to do with you giving Linux a shot and learning something instead of recycling second hand invalid FUD ?

"as a computer and programming specialist, know for the past 20 years."

You may well be a "computer and programming specialist" but your tired second hand FUD raises questions about your integrity, competence and objectivity.

"Sorry to burst your bubble, but the word "Linux" means nothing to 99% of the population."

That still doesn't excuse your FUD.

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Roo
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Re: An how much ...

"You are comparing an OS that has entrenched itself in public consciousness since the beginning of personal computing with an obscure OS that next to nobody uses, is compatible with nothing and requires a vast amount of technical understanding to get to use"

Unfortunately for your credibility relating to technical things, Linux doesn't qualify because it is compatible with lots of things right out of the box, and it requires as much technical know as a 4 year old kid possesses to use it (at least our kids managed just fine, but they continue to struggle with Win 8.1).

Top Tip: You don't even need to remove the coffee cup from your CD-ROM drive tray or install anything to try a modern Linux distro and see what you've been missing, you can boot it off a USB stick instead...

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Wileyfox smartphones: SD card, no bloatware, Cyanogen, big battery – yes to all!

Roo
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Re: QI charging and NFC?

"UniBUS.... OK, now we're just getting silly..."

UNIBUS would be silly, that's for big iron, you want QBUS for smaller low-power boxes.

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Microsoft will explain only 'significant' Windows 10 updates

Roo
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"or is he going to point out that re-training his 8,000 users onto a new O/S, rebuilding all 8,000 machines,"

If a CIO really believes that is a point of difference then the CIO is a cretin. That is the kind of CEO that is expecting to pay your wages using pots of gold misplaced by hapless Leprechauns.

"The phone-home stuff I don't like, but I can turn most of that off; meanwhile, the update stuff simply isn't going to be enough for me to convince my boss to not upgrade in twelve months"

The unannounced mandatory updates can switch them all back on again, or even add new phone home functionality. Presumably you enjoy playing EULA mandated whack-a-mole in addition to doing your day job. Each to their own I guess. :)

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OpenOffice project 'all but dead upstream' argues prominent user

Roo
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Re: Splitters!

"And then the apologists come after, pointing out how it's all about choice and trying to convince everyone the constant in-fighting is all part of the master plan for world domination, sometime before the heat death of the universe."

That is exactly what it's like working in a large multinational. Even Microsoft seems to suffer from constant in-fighting judging by the schizoid mess that is otherwise known as the Win 8.1 UI (can't comment on 10 because I haven't dared "upgrade" yet).

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Another root hole in OS X. We know it, you know it, the bad people know it – and no patch exists

Roo
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Re: Problem? really?

That was a quality bit of satire, have an upvote.

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Are you a digital leader or a high-maintenance digital dunce?

Roo
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"Those nasty laggards only spend their budget on maintaining what they've already got. So Booooooo to them, I say. Booooo!"

Yeah, all those laggardly people using -11s to run nuclear plants should be ashamed of themselves. HP should march in there and replace them with a nice shiny Itanium right now for free to show them what they are missing.

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Roo
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FAIL

Season with a pinch of cynicism.

The raw data for these conclusions is based on a "Survey", so there is a very strong possibility that all it is measuring is the amount of effort that people put into self-promotion and buzzword bingo. Did HP hand out dune cones to the folks who failed to promote themselves properly or buy lots of HP kit ?

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More UK broadband for bumpkins, but have-nots still ain’t happy

Roo
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Re: Still slipping

Spare a thought for the farmers working in a valley in the Penines who are expected by Her Maj's Cretins to file everything electronically, with get 25kbits worth of bandwidth out of a maximum of 512kbits (no mobile mast available either). BT have kindly offered to fix the lines & exchange for the village - but leave the farmers with their knackered cable and massive contention unfixed.

A 3rd party has agreed to lay fibre along the whole valley so *everyone* gets a decent connection, but they have to get the funding through BT to do it. I think you can guess the rest, although you may be surprised to learn that Councillors are advocating the BT solution *very* strongly despite the fact it will serve a fraction of the inhabitants of the valley - and it won't even be fibre.

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Rise up against Oracle class stupidity and join the infosec strike

Roo
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Re: Be careful out there kids....

"Sure, if you like being fired for insubordination. Yes, I was actually threatened with that where I work for refusing to do something my then tool of a manager wanted done but which wasn't actually possible."

I've got a story with a slightly happier ending (for me at least).

On my first job after graduating I was offered the opportunity of working a weekend with no pay or time in lieu on a hack intended to defy the laws of physics and common sense. The customer had already said that option wouldn't work, I agreed with the customer's assessment, so I refused. I had to refuse quite a few more times until the manager accepted that shouting at me was going nowhere.

Happily I didn't get fired, but I am pretty sure I would have been fired if I wasn't 50% of the coders who could use a C compiler. Since then I have turned down a number of immoral/dubious/questionable requests, but in each case I've been careful to nip it in the bud as early as possible so that the requester is disappointed rather than angry.

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Roo
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Re: Your vehement invective is pointless; there is only one fix for this malaise...

"And the cause? The FSF, and OSS."

That doesn't make sense because payware from multibillion dollar companies is routinely shipped with serious vulnerabilities, people choose to pay them good money for it too, and that was the case before Stallman escaped the lab and started banging lecterns for a living.

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Roo
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Re: Sue the directors

"I can see this up close & personal as the local network crew are on 7x12 hour days at the moment, rebuilding and reworking."

... So the work is being timeboxed to what can be accomplished by tired folks thrashing their way through 84 hour weeks. That probably won't end well. Best of luck with that.

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Roo
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Bellyaching & refusing to sign the cheques isn't enough on it's own.

"We need to agitate internally within our organizations to stop buying from vendors who don't have a strong public – and practical – commitment to security."

Techies agitating against shit solutions has always happened, and always will, and I don't think any evidence that it has had a significant impact on purchasing habits across the industry at large. At the end of the days while techies grumble the PHBs are out playing golf with the salesdroids and signing the cheques.

"We need to stop buying consumer gear from companies that refuse to pay more than lip service to security. We need to show that we will use our wallets with purpose, not merely convenience."

So you've stopped paying the vendor for crapware, are you going to close your business down while you wait for the vendor to produce something decent - or are you going to run an alternative ? For folks who like to stay in business the only answer is to find an alternative, so these people need viable alternatives, and they need to know they exist if change is going to happen. They also need less FUD in the form of articles telling people that there are no viable alternatives to sticking with the same flawed product lines they already use.

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Oracle pulls CSO's BONKERS anti-bug bounty and infosec rant

Roo
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Re: Your house belongs to the Oracle

"I am amazed by her inability to find a less awful metaphor."

The Oracle Chief Security Offiicer's post illustrated a depth of ignorance and willful stupidity that I would be amazed if they were capable of remembering to breathe by themselves. Mary Ann Muppet really should know better given that she's been dabbling in security biz at Oracle for 22+ years.

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RSA chief uncans insurance giant's mega IT infrastructure review

Roo
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Interesting that Price decided to be a leader and kicked off a migration to Win 8.1 while it has a tiny market share. I doubt that share will get much bigger either while Microsoft's is punting Win 10 adware to every Win 8.1 box that is listening in a bid to move everyone off 8.1. With any luck Microsoft and all the ISVs that Price purchases stuff from will support Win 8.1 until 2023 as promised, I can't see it personally, but I guess that Price will have moved on to something else more glamorous by then so it will be someone else's problem.

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Ubiquiti stung US$46.7 million in e-mail spoofing fraud

Roo
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Devil

Were all the "No People" fired, leaving poor defenseless "Yes People" to run the company ?

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Oracle waves fist, claims even new Android devices infringe its Java copyrights

Roo
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Re: I really wish that were true...

"Oracle are sharper and much bigger."

Oracle are so sharp they are at risk of cutting their own throats. Having Oracle sue you because you happen to write some code that looks a bit like one of their dumb APIs should be a huge red flag for anyone thinking of making money on the back of some Java code. Presumably they aren't suing banks using Java yet because they are paying through the nose for other Oracle crud.

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Update Firefox NOW to foil FILE-STEALING vulnerability exploit, warns Mozilla

Roo
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Re: Update Done

"You're mixing applications with Kernals / OS'"

He specifically said "Linux distros", so no he is not mixing apps with kernels/os.

"My FF is up to date with 0 clicks on a windows box."

Glad that works for you ... On the other hand some folks prefer to be asked if an update should be applied first. It's not as if broken updates are rare in this day and age...

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John McAfee cuffed by Tennessee cops, faces drug-driving, gun rap

Roo
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Re: Epic Mugshot

"It's a total "Yeah whatever haha" look on his face even though his been arrested.."

Johns wearing the Xanax face. Everyone whom I have known to take that stuff have failed (epically) to adhere to the dosage guidelines - even going as far as making Grapefruit their new favourite food. Tricky stuff, I reckon in a few years time it will become a serious health problem (if it isn't already).

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UK.gov issues internal 'ditch Oracle NOW' edict to end pricey addiction

Roo
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"I've been banging on at work to transition to EnterpriseDB for years. It's still massive amounts of work, money, training etc... Oracle really have you over the barrel once you've gone down that particular rabbit hole."

One day you will have to move on from what you have now simply because Oracle won't actually support it any longer - however much money you throw at it. You then have the choice of throwing more money at Oracle to help you move to another Oracle system or move on to something else. The *real* transition cost should work out the same either way because you are having to fund replacement of the system & retraining.

The sooner you make the decision to move to something else, preferably something that can be sourced from multiple vendors so you aren't held hostage to lock-in, the lower that transition cost will be.

Deferring the decision break the lock-in simply ensures that your profit margins and business decisions will be dictated by what suits the vendor. Meanwhile the vendor is aiming to maximise their profits, which in practice means charging as much as their customers can bear in return for delivering as little as possible. Of course if the vendor decides to cut you off because they aren't making enough money out of your organisation you are SoL.

Folks can argue about the details until they are blue in the face it doesn't change the big picture.

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Terracotta: The Chinese VPN that hides Beijing's hackers with pwned biz

Roo
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They've already declared that they don't like encryption because it somehow stops them from identifying & convicting kiddie fiddlers & terrorists. The fact that the terrorists & kiddie fiddlers were operating without encryption in and around Westminster for a few hundred years, and over the last few decades with mass surveillance in place doesn't actually seem to have made it as far as the public narrative yet.

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W3C's bright idea turned your battery into a SNITCH for websites

Roo
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Thanks for the tip ;)

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Roo
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Re: For those wondering why?

"That seems reasonable; no one wants a Windows 10 update to start just as a battery is going flat, and, just as it would be nice if local apps could take account of battery condition, why not the same for cloudy-based apps?"

The approach taken is dumb for the following reasons:

1) Not all batteries are made equal, so a remote application has no idea how to interpret the battery information.

2) The remote application has no visibility over the user's usage patterns or other applications running locally and can't actually predict them as well as the user can.

3) It's likely that users will have no control or visibility over how a website reacts to the battery info, their web browsing session will change on the hoof without warning.

4) The remote application has no --ing idea how power intensive it is to render a page - so how the fuck can it optimise for it ? Surely the browser is best placed to understand this - there's no need or benefit in offloading this to the remote servers or some ropey bit of code running in a Javascript sandbox.

5) There is a really simple way to accomplish the same goal of power saving without changing anything: Have the websites provide a "low-power" version of themselves and let the user navigate to it using a bog standard link. If users care enough about low-power they'll find the link and even better they will be in control.

Because it's such a bad fit for the problem at hand I suspect that automatically pushing low-power webpages isn't the main goal behind this particular piece of crap.

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Roo
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Re: Kill it with fire

Have an upvote for killing with fire. I'd like to add that the folks who thought this was a good idea should also be cured of their poor thinking by fire.

I trust W3C had a valid reason why they chose to facilitate remote access to local data over local users telling the remote site they want the low-power version of a webpage.

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Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations stalled until November

Roo
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Re: The TPP can best be served by...

"Though a BOFH-level locked-meeting-room-halon-system solution may also be effective in this case."

A silage pit and a pitchfork would be more cost-effective, ecologically sound and ensure that anyone involved won't repeat their mistake ever again.

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'Fix these Windows 10 Horrors': Readers turn their guns on Redmond

Roo
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Re: I'm sure for many of us…

"OK so I'm no spring chicken either. I still have a soft spot for the PDP11, after all."

I think -11s are more than worthy of a soft spot in anyone's heart. They were very good machines, even a grumpy old sod like me finds it tough to fault them. It's a shame that they weren't (successfully) pushed towards high volume markets.

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UK.gov wants to stop teenagers looking at tits online. No, really

Roo
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Re: Headline Grabbing Tosh

"Surely there must be a government advisor who understands this shit (and isn't afraid of saying no to shiney dave)"

I suspect those types are kept as far away from Ravey Davey as possible. Dave doesn't strike me as someone who would tolerate people telling him things he doesn't want to hear, hopefully I am mistaken. :)

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Roo
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Re: One ring to rule them all..

"and big business could present clean, safe, legal websites and then bid for access to the docile herd"

Presumably big business only because of an enormous amount of red-tape & bribes will be required to have one's website approved. Ravey Davey and his fellow school chums have often expressed their dismay at how the Internet allows anyone to publish stuff they don't like, so I suspect the end-game you propose is probably what Ravey Davey and the rest of the establishment is aiming for.

I think kids are a bit smarter today, only the old farts and technomuppet establishment types will fall for it.

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Roo
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"But enough about your penis, what do you think of this policy?"

I thought they were referring to Ravey Davey's Penis which appears to be making all his policy decisions these days.

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Windows 10: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE to Microsoft's long apology for Windows 8

Roo
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Re: Why call it Windows?

"That "cyber crime" set us back at least five years back then, and staying on the "major", yet third class OS, we're falling behind with every single day."

I lament the demise of Digital Research, and DR-DOS was indeed better than MS-DOS, but it was still very basic in comparison to other OSes out at the time. Jerry Pournelle running DR-DOS wouldn't have made the Chaos Manor articles in Byte less painful to read for folks who had tried alternatives to PCs running *DOS.

Case in point I remember being astounded by the stuff students were doing with UNIX workstations (Apollo Domain, Sun etc) in the late 80s - PCs running DOS weren't even at the races. I think nearly everyone knew that 386s were wasted running DOS, but it didn't actually become real for me until I got to try out an '88 vintage Sun 386i... It pissed all over faster, newer and more expensive DOS boxes in every department, but the best bit was I didn't have to screw about with HIMEM.SYS or memory expanders, extenders, TSRs or reboot the machine everytime an app went off the rails. If you *really* missed DOS PC experience you could run multiple DOS sessions, and it could even take ISA cards too. As lovely as it may have been DR-DOS really was not in the same league as SunOS on x86 hardware. :(

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Roo
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Re: Killer features

Ah, the usual two usual down-voters. By your down-votes I take it that you believe that 8.3 file names and 260 character path limits make it easier to manage files than all those crusty old OSes that supported > 11 char file names and deeply nested directories back in 1994.

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