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* Posts by DanDanDan

134 posts • joined 17 Aug 2010

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

DanDanDan

Re: You repeat the same nonsense

"I'm sure there's a lesson there, but I can't quite find it."

You have to speculate to accumulate.

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DanDanDan
Headmaster

"people need to be rewarded compensate with their talent"

I believe you might have meant "commensurate with their talent", i.e. in proportion to.

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UK's emergency data slurp: IT giants panicked over 'legal uncertainty'

DanDanDan

Re: Overseas firms

Please excuse my piggybacking ignorance, but how is Huawei pronounced? At the minute, I've got Ant and Dec saying it in a thick Geordie accent and I'm not sure that's right?

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German government orders local CIA station chief to pack his bags

DanDanDan

Re: Anon Cluetard Friends ?

@Matt Bryant - I can't tell if you're trolling or serious. I'm gonna assume trolling, because the alternative depresses me too much.

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Say goodbye to the noughties: Yesterday’s hi-fi biz is BUSTED, bro

DanDanDan

Re: They want how much?

FM? To transmit audio in any sort of decent quality? Are you serious? It's maybe not as bad as just turning the music up louder so you can still hear it through the walls, but not much better.

There are a lot of ways that multi-room audio can be done on the cheap - this ain't one I'd like to use though.

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Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

DanDanDan

Re: Ahh, Asperger's

I thought that the quantum computing algorithms only worked against asymmetric keys? Or am I hugely mistaken?

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F1? No, it's Formula E as electric racing cars hit the track

DanDanDan

Re: Hmmmm

"Where do you park?"

Nice try, but my tank barely ever has more than £15 worth of petrol in it (that's a full tank by the way).

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DanDanDan

This could actually alleviate many of the problems with short battery life and long charge times. I had the idea of just using plug-n-play batteries, that you trade in at petrol stations; but then found out almost the whole car is made of battery. However, something like a hire-car scheme where you can pick up a car at a charge point and drop it off at one closer to your destination: that just might work.

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DanDanDan

Re: Hmmmm

"there's not a lot stopping someone from emptying your tank of petrol with a siphon, but that's still a bit of a rare occurence."

Uh... what? A lot of them have locks on these days. In addition to anti-siphon systems. And alarm systems that will probably go off... Have you tried it lately?

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DanDanDan

Your 1991 bike was around 100 years after the advent of the internal combustion engine (if not significantly more?)

Give 'em a bloody chance!

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Euro banks warned off Bitcoin as Canada regulates it

DanDanDan

Re: I'm not surprised

Please don't tell me you're one of the ones who paid for their own data due to crap security/backup practises?

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'Spy-proof' IM launched: Aims to offer anonymity to whistleblowers

DanDanDan

[Citation Needed]

"By their very point of being anonymous, these services are designed to be used for illegal activity" - There are probably many things people want/need/like to do without people knowing about it. Nose picking is the first thing I can think of.

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IDC busts out new converged systems charts, crowns Oracle as Platform King

DanDanDan

Is oracle is queen...

Does that explain why all its mistakes have been royal cock-ups?

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Cambridge Assessment exams CHAOS: Computing students' work may be BINNED

DanDanDan

Re: GCSE Computing still a joke????

"A level maths and physics don't have this diffuseness."

Uh... yes they do. Pick and choose which modules you'd like to do in maths/physics. In maths, there was a choice of stats, decision and discrete (i.e. algorithms, linear programming and graph theory), mechanics or numerical analysis. In physics, there was a choice of quantum, relativity or... something else that I don't remember. In addition to certain core modules (in maths, this was things like calculus and geometry and in physics this was things like mechanics).

Computing is (or rather should be) quite a tricky subject in actuality. Taking account of the limitations of teachers is just pandering to a lack of teaching ability. They should be hiring decent computer-literate people, not asking the maths teacher to teach a bit of computing on the side, in addition to their already full schedule. Computing is being treated like PE and we'll end up struggling as a result in the future, in a tech-oriented world in which we really could thrive.

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Cisco open-sources experimental cipher

DanDanDan

Re: Why not a stream cipher?

"What's the advantage of the added complexity?" - Easier to patent?

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Massive news in the micro-world: a hexaquark particle

DanDanDan

Re: Neutron decay

@Destroy All Monsters

While you might be right, you might also be wrong. It's been a while since I did much actual computation with quantum physics, but I remember Feynman's 3rd volume showing how the exchange of "Virtual" photons binds stuff together (he shows a lot with simple two state systems). It wouldn't surprise me if the binding force between neutron and proton was in some manner comprised of the exchange of the "virtual" electron contained in the neutron in an atom. This would lead to a lower energy state when they're combined and that would back up your claim of "The reason that neutrons do not decay... is because doing so would result in a nucleus with HIGHER energy".

Either way, it might be an interesting calculation...

EDIT: Ignore that - Heisenberg tried it already:

https://www.britannica.com/nobelprize/article-60744

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Rich bitch sorority girls actually more likely to put out than low-class 'sluts': Study

DanDanDan

Re: re: goat jam

"Which girl is going to be listened to?"

Probably the one that is likely to sleep with you if you support them.

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Robotics pioneer: Intelligent machines are 'scary for a lot of people'

DanDanDan

Re: More AI Fluff and emty promises

And the Eurofighter...

I can fully understand why you want your industrial robot to do the same thing time and time again in a well-defined model. As for the example in the text, I don't want my robot to drop stuff in the first place. If it does, that should be a special case scenario and it should just stop, waiting for an engineer to come along and find out why it didn't work as expected (broken sensor, lack of vacuum, something in the way?) There are an almost infinite range of possibilities that may be encountered by a robot (someone might have confused one of its sensors to bypass some normal behaviour for example) and it makes its decisions based on *its own interpretation of reality*. That sounds dangerous to me. Unless it can *know* that "something's a bit fishy here guys", then it's not safe for it to be making its own decisions.

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Achtung! Use maths to smash the German tank problem – and your rival

DanDanDan

Re: 1+1/E seems dubious for low values of E

There's no "lower bound" as such, but you want to have enough samples to be confident in your estimation of N.

You're looking for information on "Confidence Interval" Check out the best answer from the below page. It details how to find the confidence interval of the maximum likelihood estimators for "a" and "b", where a and b are the lower and upper bound of the distribution.

http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/20158/determining-sample-size-for-uniform-distribution

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DanDanDan

Re: Nice one again

If you liked this article, I can give you the web address of a website full of these things. This very article is an almost verbatim recreation of that site. Its name? Wikipedia. Check out the article on "German Tank Problem" over there and revel in awe at the similarities!

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Honey, the satnav app says you're to leave at 6am... Yup. I'll have that coffee off you

DanDanDan

This is another ad appearing as an article. I call them AaaA (cf. SaaS)

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Game of Thrones written on brutal medieval word processor and OS

DanDanDan

Re: You wouldn't give him a hard time if he was using a typewriter

I can't imagine the gains someone could make by adding a good version control system (git) and using a decent text editor (vim, nano, gedit) instead of "track changes" and word 2007/2010.

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Mozilla agrees to add DRM support to Firefox – under protest

DanDanDan

@boltar: Maybe it's not a dystopian future... seems like it has to be in the future for that to apply.

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Silly sysadmins ADDING Heartbleed to servers

DanDanDan

Re: holy fuck, three hours?

You're forgetting about research, diagnostics, documentation and testing, revoking and reissuing of certificates, forcing the reset of user passwords, etc etc yadayada...

The fix itself is a 5 minute (if that) job. It's the rest of the stuff that sorts the wheat from the chaff (and is exactly what this article is highlighting).

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Teen student texter busts 20-second tongue-twisty SMS barrier

DanDanDan

Re: Did he really beat it?

Obligatory http://xkcd.com/612/

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DanDanDan

Re: Optimise for awards

Just tried entering the text on my S4 and lo and behold, it has autocomplete options. As soon as I entered genera, it kindly suggested "Serrasalmus". Looks like you're right!

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Asteroids as powerful as NUCLEAR BOMBS strike Earth TWICE YEARLY

DanDanDan
Coat

Re: The odds are not too shabby

"The odds of hitting some urban area is about 1 in 50 or so."

But still they come...

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OpenBSD founder wants to bin buggy OpenSSL library, launches fork

DanDanDan

Re: My eyes!

One look at this specific change (below) had me agree wholeheartedly with you. Why hard code the size of a buffer (256 in this case), when the functions "sizeof()" does exactly that for you?! Performance gains? Wouldn't this be sorted by a semi-decent compiler?

http://anoncvs.estpak.ee/cgi-bin/cgit/openbsd-src/commit/lib/libssl?id=258edb6cb04cce27479a492e610b6bd1f535c9f3

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Whaddaya mean, NO REFUND? But I paid in Bitcoins! Oh I see...

DanDanDan

Re: Bitcoin is strongly deflationary

*I hate inflation and wish we'd stop trying to "promote" it

*It's the bubble that's the problem, not the "bust".

D'oh - not proofreading my own posts!

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DanDanDan

Re: Bitcoin is strongly deflationary

"Moderate inflation is a good thing". It's good if you're in debt, yes. If you've worked hard for your money and saved a bit away for a rainy day (like a sensible person is advised to do), then it screws you over. It's a tax on savers. It encourages spending and debt and financial inability. I hate inflation and wish we'd stop trying to curtail it. If we start getting to a point where we're on the cusp of deflation, we can just print more money (like Japan did).

I don't buy the idea of permanent deflation either - I think it only lasts long enough to deflate whatever bubble has been building up for so long. It's the bubble that's the problem, not the boom. Bitcoin is one such bubble - it's a pyramid scheme by any other name. I don't understand why no-one else seems to notice this. Lack of transparency + technology seems to be the equation for bubble-building these days and it seems like the only sensible thing to do is to buy into it on the basis that govt. will support those who invest unwisely (as has been evidenced multiple times in the last decade).

Austrian economics is pretty much common sense when you think about it, I don't get why it comes under such fire (well I do, it's because Keynesian economics works on about the same time-frame as political voting systems). Traditional Austrian economics would *NOT* support bitcoin as you seem to suggest!

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OpenSSL bug hunt: Find NEXT Heartbleed, earn $$$ – if enough people donate cash

DanDanDan

Re: Open Source Funding...

The same thing that prevented forked OpenOffice (LibreOffice) from devolving... better project management by a better team, with more outside involvement and input. It wouldn't be easy to do (which is why it's not been done yet I suspect).

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DanDanDan

Re: Open Source Funding...

From what I hear, OpenSSL has a small (half a dozen) group of core developers who reject any and all outside contributions in terms of bug fixes, etc.

They also have a TERRIBLY HORRIBLE code base (think #if 0 everywhere), barely any evidence anything has been refactored and barely readable code, with feck all comments in it.

Frankly, it needs to be forked and the forked version needs funding from the megacorps who profit from the code. They can all benefit from open source by sharing the development cost and shared benefit.

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TrueCrypt audit: Probe's nearly all the way in ... no backdoor hit yet

DanDanDan

Re: Maybe

Look at OpenSSL!! Ha! Have you SEEN the code?!

http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/22o7kp/want_to_audit_openssl_you_sure_check_out_this_one/

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

DanDanDan

Re: Thank

While you're not exactly wrong here, the "msg" has a header declaring it's 64kb. So it was given 64kb and got 64kb back. The issue is that the message isn't 64kb.

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Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed

DanDanDan

Re: Simple solution

"But have they issued a patch yet?"

Uh, yes... Patched on the 8th of April, but compiling from source is not difficult either.

Confirming whether you're safe or not is as simple as:

# opkg list | grep openssl

Updating to the latest version is as easy as

# wget http://downloads.openwrt.org/snapshots/trunk/ar71xx/packages/libopenssl_1.0.1g-1_ar71xx.ipk

# wget http://downloads.openwrt.org/snapshots/trunk/ar71xx/packages/openssl-util_1.0.1g-1_ar71xx.ipk

# opkg install libopenssl_1.0.1g-1_ar71xx.ipk

# opkg install openssl-util_1.0.1g-1_ar71xx.ipk

# reboot

As far as "It was open source that caused the problem in the first case" - I don't even know whether to bother explaining the errors in logic. How does publishing the source code of a program cause it to be insecure? Either it's secure or it's not.

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DanDanDan

Re: Simple solution

Ask yourself:

•Can I easily find out if my router is running OpenSSL, and if so what version? (Answer: probably no)

- With OpenWRT this is pretty easy

•Can I easily upgrade to a secure version? (Answer: only if my vendor or the ISP that provided the hardware ships a firmware upgrade)

- With OpenWRT this is pretty easy

•Will old devices get upgraded? (Answer: probably not in a hurry and almost certainly not automatically)

- With OpenWRT this is pretty easy

•What can I do? (Answer: turn off remote management, if you can).

- Keep using open source router firmware? :)

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Monkey steals iPod touch, loses interest in minutes

DanDanDan
Meh

Re: That's a plus one for Apple.

Hmmm, upon re-reading, I now understand the ambiguity that might make this either: the new look makes iOS nauseous, or the new look makes the monkey nauseated... Huh.

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DanDanDan
Headmaster

Re: That's a plus one for Apple.

Or even nauseated.

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Shuttleworth: Firmware is the universal Trojan

DanDanDan

Re: Wow

Downvote from me for misunderstanding Open Source software on a fundamental level.

"Have-a-go amateur"? Almost all major open source projects are supported by commercial interests. The Linux kernel is contributed to in a very significant manner by big name corporations, not have-a-go amateurs.

http://www.linuxfoundation.org/publications/linux-foundation/who-writes-linux-2013

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Proper boffins make your company succeed, even if you're not very technical

DanDanDan

Re: Ah, but...

Will you give in with this bull**** nonsense about techies being basement-dwelling, neck-bearded, live-at-home-with-mum, single and lonely introverts? Please!

We have more than enough technical jobs "in this country", we also have a shortage of people trained up to do those jobs and willing to do them for the going rate - this will change once people fully grok the pros and cons of outsourcing. RBS, NatWest and Co. are doing a nice job educating people thankfully.

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Tiny heat-sucker helps keep Moore's Law going

DanDanDan

Re: Did they try just annealing it?

Did you try reading the article?

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Fee fie Firefox: Mozilla's lawyers probe Dell over browser install charge

DanDanDan

Re: Dell already install Firefox on Ubuntu

"Well it is Linux; what did you expect?"

The reason it was a complete failure is that it costs MORE to take Linux than it does to take Microsoft.

If you want Linux, chances are you don't want to pay £20-50 for someone else to install it, given you're perfectly capable of installation yourself. Add into the mix that you now have a spare MS Windows license to sell and Dell's Linux failure becomes clear.

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DanDanDan

Re: Are they blond?

I'm not a decision-maker at Mozilla. My main argument is that they're free to do what they want. IF someone was distributing MY software and making a tidy profit off it (I guarantee this won't be a break-even venture by Dell), then I'd want a cut of it.

IF they'd asked me, agreed to share a reasonable cut of the profits, yada yada, etc. then I'd be ok with it. As it is, Mozilla had NO IDEA that this was going on. I think it's cheeky of Dell to say the least. Whether or not it's "Good promo" for Mozilla, it should be done with their consent; as stipulated in their T&C's!

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DanDanDan

Re: Mozillidiots

Wrong. Coca-Cola(TM) DO enforce WHATEVER restrictions they want on the distributors of their drinks. Such as "You MUST NOT display pepsi-licensed drink products in the same area as Coke products, you must not use our vending machines, with our logo on, to sell Non-Coke products, etc".

If you charge a fee for installing Mozilla Firefox (TM) on someone's computer, then you're in violation of the terms of use of their software. If you don't want to install it for free, then you have the option of not installing it at all. It's tough luck that you can't profit from their (trademarked) branding.

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DanDanDan

Re: Are they blond?

I think Mozilla are perfectly within their rights to make any claims to the distribution of their own trademarked software.

There are 10 types of computing consumer: those who know how to install firefox and those who don't. Now, those who don't will see "alternative and costly browser". Or they can stick with the default (free). If anyone in future mentions Firefox to them, then that type of consumer will think "Oh no, I don't want to pay, I'm happy with IE".

I think this "service" would be damaging to the Mozilla trademark and that's why I think they're entitled to enforce such distribution restrictions.

If Dell want to strip all trademarks and compile their own version of the Mozilla browser (a la CentOS), then charge to install that, then that's fair game. They will only damage their own reputation.

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The browser's resized future in a fragmented www world

DanDanDan

Re: re - "Fragmentation is hurting the PC and the browser, yes"

I thought Safari was the desktop version of the browser. Oh wait, it's both? Oh man, how confusing! How would I distinguish between the two? Maybe I could call it "The iOS browser" to make it clear I'm on about the iPhone version of Safari, not the OS X version. Oh crap no, that would totally invalidate all of my arguments instantaneously!

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Plusnet goes titsup for spectacular hour-long wobble

DanDanDan

Spectacular?

Nothing particularly spectacular about it; I'm getting almost constant evening and weekend issues in my (city centre) apartment.

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New Flash vuln exploited (again). Adobe posts emergency fix (again)

DanDanDan

Re: Infinite loop

void fixbug()

{

fixOldBug();

createNewBug();

}

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Google warns Glass wearers: Quit being 'CREEPY GLASSHOLES'

DanDanDan

Re: In a C-shell ...

"How social you are"

You mean "Conform or leave"?

Who wants to be part of a society where individuality is shunned?

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Tired of arguing with suits? Get ready to argue with engineers!

DanDanDan

Re: If it ain't broken ...

The problem comes when the supplier goes bust. Then, you just have to pray that that box in the corner doesn't die too! All the while frantically commissioning a new system (IF the guys upstairs will sign the cheque!)

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