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* Posts by DanDanDan

154 posts • joined 17 Aug 2010

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GCHQ and Cable and Wireless teamed as Masters of the Internet™

DanDanDan
Headmaster

Re: money

Vive la revolution - (almost?) all words ending -tion in French are feminine.

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Holy cow! Fasthosts outage blamed on DDoS hack attack AND Windows 2003 vuln

DanDanDan

Re: What happened to cheap and cheerful?

"I find that mentioning anything to do with Microsoft tends to raise a similar reaction, lets not evaluate products on their merit, lets just go with whatever we THINK is best."

I don't hate Microsoft for their current product lineup. I hate them for their entire history of corporate nastiness. My memory is not as short as a couple of years.

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Broadband sellers in the UK are UP TO no good, says Which?

DanDanDan

Re: What counts as the reference number for "customers"

I live in the city centre of Manchester and even I only achieve half the quoted "up to" speed. And that's at off-peak times, without throttling.

It's about time the broadband companies were forced to publish the median speed achieved, not the maximum. Ideally with a 95%ile bracket to show the most likely slowest speed.

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WinShock PoC clocked: But DON'T PANIC... It's no Heartbleed

DanDanDan

Re: Easier to patch?

Agreed - Remote execution is much, much worse.

In addition, I find the line "Proof of concept released" followed by "Exploit will be hard to achieve", slightly odd.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: My well-known gayness is 'a gift from GOD'

DanDanDan

Good for him

I'm surprised he's taken this long to "come out". It's a real shame that some people care about this kind of stuff.

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Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'

DanDanDan
Terminator

Embrace, extend and extinguish

I was thinking more "You will be assimilated"

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Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM

DanDanDan
Linux

Re: Re-read the klingon software development guide

Is it just me, or does Klingon software development model remind anyone else of a certain Linux-related developer?

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

DanDanDan

Re: @AC

>"In the end we all benefit."

IFF Microsoft uses and expands, then distributes, the source code per the GPL. If it just nabs the idea, implements its own "intentionally" faulty version of whatever standard and then uses foul means to dominate the market, then no-one benefits. I'm torn between wanting software patents and not wanting them. I think a 2 year software patent would suffice in this instance.

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DanDanDan
Headmaster

Re: Embrace. Extend. Extinguish.

FTFY:

"Those who refuse to learn from History are doomed to repeat it."

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WOMEN, your 'SUPERPOWER' is ... NOT asking for a RAISE: Satya Nadella

DanDanDan

Gender agnostic is fine - but!

> The correct term should be: "People should get paid depending on their work, regardless of sex"

Agreed, but you have to realise that there *is* a gender pay gap and the only way to address it is to investigate gender as a factor to see *why*. It'd be great if we lived in a world where there were no biases, but that's not here yet.

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New Snowden leak: US and Brit spooks 'tap into German telco networks to map end devices'

DanDanDan

Re: I didn't believe the SCALE

@Hans 1: You forgot your towel!!

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It's a pain in the ASCII, so what can be done to make patching easier?

DanDanDan

Re: I will put up with the occasional reboot

"Your uptime represents the amount of time since you last tested your startup."

And my long term health represents the amount of time since I last tested my immune system. I don't want to get sick to test how good I am at getting better thank you very much.

I also don't want to lose all my data to test my backup/recovery process. Sure, I'll schedule it in on my own planned schedule; when it's convenient for me. Maybe I'll eat something a little bit "iffy" tonight to test my digestive system...

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DanDanDan
Linux

Re: Indeed

Why don't you just use Linux, it does everything and it's free. It even orders your round in at the bar while you don't even wait for the ticks, cause it's all fully hidden away and automated (if you like that sort of thing)

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YES, I have ridden the UNICORN: The Ubuntu Utopic unicorn

DanDanDan

Re: so many versions

You'll only get downvoted if people think your question is rhetorical.

Your main problem with lacking understanding of "What is Linux" comes down, probably, through lack of experimentation and experience of it.

Linux is, at its core, just a way of bringing together hardware interfaces with software ones. That's the kernel: it manages memory usage, separation of separate "programs", etc. It's all the invisible stuff that you don't think about. On top of that, you can place whatever you want.

Most people place free and open source (FOSS) software on top, which has sort of been known as "Gnu/Linux", since a lot of software that falls into this category and is used is made by Gnu. It was originally intended as a unix clone, but has now grown its own wings and deviated significantly.

A collection of different software and configurations is known as a Linux distribution ("Distro"), of which Ubuntu is one, Fedora is another, Red Hat is a 3rd, Debian, Gentoo, etc. They're all just subtly different ways of pulling together a whole system, which is useable by someone like you to run things like a Web Browser or Office program.

The main topic of this article was "Window Managers". These are what you would recognise as "The Desktop + Start Menu". There are a few of these about, the main traditional ones being KDE and Gnome. Basically, different people have different preferences, so they prefer different Window Managers. If you think about the difference between Windows 7 and Windows 8, the main differences that you see will be in the Window Manager used. Android could be argued to be another window manager, designed primarily for mobile application.

The best way to find what you like is to install a couple of versions (probably in a virtual environment for ease) and give them a go. You can even run many different versions from USB stick; no installation required!

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Brother, can you spare a DIME for holy grail of secure webmail?

DanDanDan

Re: Key management

Doctor Syntax - you may want to read up on the importance of authentication in asymmetric key crypto. i.e. How do you know you're sending the message to Alice and not Charlie? If you can't validate the authenticity of the public key (i.e. that it definitely *is* Alice's), then you're wide open to man-in-the-middle attacks.

The other thing is that quantum computing threatens to undermine the whole P=NP robustness of many asymmetric key crypto. And you can bet the NSA are somewhere in the frontline of getting this stuff working (if they haven't already).

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Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

DanDanDan

Re: Two factor ...

I have fingers, irises, retinas and DNA in my cells... Looks like something I have rather than something that defines me. I think I'm being overly pedantic here though.

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DanDanDan

Re: Correct horse battery staple

>> 'N^a&$1nG' could be cracked in approximately 3.75 days

>

>That was the most worrying part of the article!

Agreed, nearly crapped my pants when I read that. 17 years isn't much better. Time we switched to storing out private keys on a USB stick and using those for authentication. Or something else. I'm getting super paranoid right now!

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DanDanDan

Re: Two factor ...

What's the difference between Something you Have and Something you Are? [serious]

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Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!

DanDanDan

Re: Oh, OK - Odd, But OK.

"Yup... That sounds like me when I was younger. I remember sending a few absolute, er, 'gems' to usenet back in the day. I'm a bit more controlled these days."

Linus?

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

DanDanDan

Re: You repeat the same nonsense

"I'm sure there's a lesson there, but I can't quite find it."

You have to speculate to accumulate.

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DanDanDan
Headmaster

"people need to be rewarded compensate with their talent"

I believe you might have meant "commensurate with their talent", i.e. in proportion to.

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UK's emergency data slurp: IT giants panicked over 'legal uncertainty'

DanDanDan

Re: Overseas firms

Please excuse my piggybacking ignorance, but how is Huawei pronounced? At the minute, I've got Ant and Dec saying it in a thick Geordie accent and I'm not sure that's right?

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German government orders local CIA station chief to pack his bags

DanDanDan

Re: Anon Cluetard Friends ?

@Matt Bryant - I can't tell if you're trolling or serious. I'm gonna assume trolling, because the alternative depresses me too much.

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Say goodbye to the noughties: Yesterday’s hi-fi biz is BUSTED, bro

DanDanDan

Re: They want how much?

FM? To transmit audio in any sort of decent quality? Are you serious? It's maybe not as bad as just turning the music up louder so you can still hear it through the walls, but not much better.

There are a lot of ways that multi-room audio can be done on the cheap - this ain't one I'd like to use though.

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Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

DanDanDan

Re: Ahh, Asperger's

I thought that the quantum computing algorithms only worked against asymmetric keys? Or am I hugely mistaken?

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F1? No, it's Formula E as electric racing cars hit the track

DanDanDan

Re: Hmmmm

"Where do you park?"

Nice try, but my tank barely ever has more than £15 worth of petrol in it (that's a full tank by the way).

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DanDanDan

This could actually alleviate many of the problems with short battery life and long charge times. I had the idea of just using plug-n-play batteries, that you trade in at petrol stations; but then found out almost the whole car is made of battery. However, something like a hire-car scheme where you can pick up a car at a charge point and drop it off at one closer to your destination: that just might work.

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DanDanDan

Re: Hmmmm

"there's not a lot stopping someone from emptying your tank of petrol with a siphon, but that's still a bit of a rare occurence."

Uh... what? A lot of them have locks on these days. In addition to anti-siphon systems. And alarm systems that will probably go off... Have you tried it lately?

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DanDanDan

Your 1991 bike was around 100 years after the advent of the internal combustion engine (if not significantly more?)

Give 'em a bloody chance!

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Euro banks warned off Bitcoin as Canada regulates it

DanDanDan

Re: I'm not surprised

Please don't tell me you're one of the ones who paid for their own data due to crap security/backup practises?

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'Spy-proof' IM launched: Aims to offer anonymity to whistleblowers

DanDanDan

[Citation Needed]

"By their very point of being anonymous, these services are designed to be used for illegal activity" - There are probably many things people want/need/like to do without people knowing about it. Nose picking is the first thing I can think of.

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IDC busts out new converged systems charts, crowns Oracle as Platform King

DanDanDan

Is oracle is queen...

Does that explain why all its mistakes have been royal cock-ups?

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Cambridge Assessment exams CHAOS: Computing students' work may be BINNED

DanDanDan

Re: GCSE Computing still a joke????

"A level maths and physics don't have this diffuseness."

Uh... yes they do. Pick and choose which modules you'd like to do in maths/physics. In maths, there was a choice of stats, decision and discrete (i.e. algorithms, linear programming and graph theory), mechanics or numerical analysis. In physics, there was a choice of quantum, relativity or... something else that I don't remember. In addition to certain core modules (in maths, this was things like calculus and geometry and in physics this was things like mechanics).

Computing is (or rather should be) quite a tricky subject in actuality. Taking account of the limitations of teachers is just pandering to a lack of teaching ability. They should be hiring decent computer-literate people, not asking the maths teacher to teach a bit of computing on the side, in addition to their already full schedule. Computing is being treated like PE and we'll end up struggling as a result in the future, in a tech-oriented world in which we really could thrive.

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Cisco open-sources experimental cipher

DanDanDan

Re: Why not a stream cipher?

"What's the advantage of the added complexity?" - Easier to patent?

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Massive news in the micro-world: a hexaquark particle

DanDanDan

Re: Neutron decay

@Destroy All Monsters

While you might be right, you might also be wrong. It's been a while since I did much actual computation with quantum physics, but I remember Feynman's 3rd volume showing how the exchange of "Virtual" photons binds stuff together (he shows a lot with simple two state systems). It wouldn't surprise me if the binding force between neutron and proton was in some manner comprised of the exchange of the "virtual" electron contained in the neutron in an atom. This would lead to a lower energy state when they're combined and that would back up your claim of "The reason that neutrons do not decay... is because doing so would result in a nucleus with HIGHER energy".

Either way, it might be an interesting calculation...

EDIT: Ignore that - Heisenberg tried it already:

https://www.britannica.com/nobelprize/article-60744

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Rich bitch sorority girls actually more likely to put out than low-class 'sluts': Study

DanDanDan

Re: re: goat jam

"Which girl is going to be listened to?"

Probably the one that is likely to sleep with you if you support them.

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Robotics pioneer: Intelligent machines are 'scary for a lot of people'

DanDanDan

Re: More AI Fluff and emty promises

And the Eurofighter...

I can fully understand why you want your industrial robot to do the same thing time and time again in a well-defined model. As for the example in the text, I don't want my robot to drop stuff in the first place. If it does, that should be a special case scenario and it should just stop, waiting for an engineer to come along and find out why it didn't work as expected (broken sensor, lack of vacuum, something in the way?) There are an almost infinite range of possibilities that may be encountered by a robot (someone might have confused one of its sensors to bypass some normal behaviour for example) and it makes its decisions based on *its own interpretation of reality*. That sounds dangerous to me. Unless it can *know* that "something's a bit fishy here guys", then it's not safe for it to be making its own decisions.

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Achtung! Use maths to smash the German tank problem – and your rival

DanDanDan

Re: 1+1/E seems dubious for low values of E

There's no "lower bound" as such, but you want to have enough samples to be confident in your estimation of N.

You're looking for information on "Confidence Interval" Check out the best answer from the below page. It details how to find the confidence interval of the maximum likelihood estimators for "a" and "b", where a and b are the lower and upper bound of the distribution.

http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/20158/determining-sample-size-for-uniform-distribution

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DanDanDan

Re: Nice one again

If you liked this article, I can give you the web address of a website full of these things. This very article is an almost verbatim recreation of that site. Its name? Wikipedia. Check out the article on "German Tank Problem" over there and revel in awe at the similarities!

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Honey, the satnav app says you're to leave at 6am... Yup. I'll have that coffee off you

DanDanDan

This is another ad appearing as an article. I call them AaaA (cf. SaaS)

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Game of Thrones written on brutal medieval word processor and OS

DanDanDan

Re: You wouldn't give him a hard time if he was using a typewriter

I can't imagine the gains someone could make by adding a good version control system (git) and using a decent text editor (vim, nano, gedit) instead of "track changes" and word 2007/2010.

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Mozilla agrees to add DRM support to Firefox – under protest

DanDanDan

@boltar: Maybe it's not a dystopian future... seems like it has to be in the future for that to apply.

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Silly sysadmins ADDING Heartbleed to servers

DanDanDan

Re: holy fuck, three hours?

You're forgetting about research, diagnostics, documentation and testing, revoking and reissuing of certificates, forcing the reset of user passwords, etc etc yadayada...

The fix itself is a 5 minute (if that) job. It's the rest of the stuff that sorts the wheat from the chaff (and is exactly what this article is highlighting).

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Teen student texter busts 20-second tongue-twisty SMS barrier

DanDanDan

Re: Did he really beat it?

Obligatory http://xkcd.com/612/

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DanDanDan

Re: Optimise for awards

Just tried entering the text on my S4 and lo and behold, it has autocomplete options. As soon as I entered genera, it kindly suggested "Serrasalmus". Looks like you're right!

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Asteroids as powerful as NUCLEAR BOMBS strike Earth TWICE YEARLY

DanDanDan
Coat

Re: The odds are not too shabby

"The odds of hitting some urban area is about 1 in 50 or so."

But still they come...

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OpenBSD founder wants to bin buggy OpenSSL library, launches fork

DanDanDan

Re: My eyes!

One look at this specific change (below) had me agree wholeheartedly with you. Why hard code the size of a buffer (256 in this case), when the functions "sizeof()" does exactly that for you?! Performance gains? Wouldn't this be sorted by a semi-decent compiler?

http://anoncvs.estpak.ee/cgi-bin/cgit/openbsd-src/commit/lib/libssl?id=258edb6cb04cce27479a492e610b6bd1f535c9f3

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Whaddaya mean, NO REFUND? But I paid in Bitcoins! Oh I see...

DanDanDan

Re: Bitcoin is strongly deflationary

*I hate inflation and wish we'd stop trying to "promote" it

*It's the bubble that's the problem, not the "bust".

D'oh - not proofreading my own posts!

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OpenSSL bug hunt: Find NEXT Heartbleed, earn $$$ – if enough people donate cash

DanDanDan

Re: Open Source Funding...

The same thing that prevented forked OpenOffice (LibreOffice) from devolving... better project management by a better team, with more outside involvement and input. It wouldn't be easy to do (which is why it's not been done yet I suspect).

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