* Posts by Scorchio!!

1507 posts • joined 30 Jul 2010

Assange's cop chaperones have cost £10 MEEELLION to date

Scorchio!!

Re: idiot

@AC

" Re: idiot

Costs? He didn't ask for the siege."

Yes he did, that is why he is in the embassy; he thought/thinks he can outlast the expected siege. The siege and his thinking about it is predicated in his act of seeking shelter, he by definition a criminal on the run (he broke bail in order to reach the embassy). The act of seeking shelter - by a criminal with a conviction on 17 counts in his home country - makes no sense, unless he was evading arrest and thus the cordon that would be thrown around the embassy. This situation makes no sense otherwise. It is the latest act of a desperate man.

He absconded for the second time. He has again broken the law. As to cost, much of it is defrayed within the budget for the Ecuadoran embassy, itself contained within the diplomatic budget. This has already been explained as I'm sure you know. The poster used data cited by that paragon of political correctness, The Guardian. Impeccable, shorely.

However, Assange has broken UK law by jumping bail. He is a criminal with a high profile and a penchant for NATO secrets. Expecting anything less than the current situation is naive or disingenuous. To say the least.

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Scorchio!!

Re: h4rm0ny He's obviously dangerous

There will of course be prevarication, down ratings, quibblings, and such like. ;-)

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Scorchio!!

Re: He's obviously dangerous

Rape is not trivial, especially given the HIV problem. A German woman singer was jailed for having unprotected sex with a man, she knowingly having HIV. Sexual hygiene is apparently still not uppermost in the minds of people in the UK.

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Scorchio!!

Re: AC He's obviously dangerous

@Matt Bryant

"Twice it was ruled in an English court that what Assange is accused of would be rape under English law (http://www.newstatesman.com/david-allen-green/2012/08/legal-myths-about-assange-extradition)."

Indeed. Just as, inch by inch, this man's unsavoury character has been exposed in so many ways. For example, when I (accurately/correctly) called him a convicted criminal some twonk jumped up and down, performed the typographical equivalent to a rant. I produced the proof, but neither apology nor retraction resulted, though I don't mind; I'd rather these creatures expose themselves for the gullible fools they are, treating him as though he were some kind of messianic Neo, whilst being unable to back down when called out.

As to the rest of the truth, it is much like playing whack-a-mole. Deal with one untruth and another pops up and is treated as a truth. He placed the lives of Afghan informants at risk, right down to their GPS positions. His interesting behaviour towards women is on public record, starting with the way he ousted a journalist from his relationship, then throwing up his fists in mock pugilistic manner. If this reminds me of anyone, it has to be Max Clifford just prior to sentencing, behaving in a similarly eccentric manner. On a news report, no less.

I believe he's said that the things he did were not criminal. I may try to splice his words together in one long text. Just to help him on his way.

Anyhow, Assange is now a criminal again, for he has skipped bail. He fled Sweden almost as soon as his legal counsel discovered that he was to be arrested following interview at a police station, though some seem to think that the Swedish CJS should interview suspects they wish to arrest by video link, or in a British police station. Clueless.

In all Assange has developed a very interesting criminal profile. For skipping bail he should do bird. Then he can go to Sweden, where I am convinced he will do bird again. This man has already destroyed his public persona, and it would seem that he is teetering on the brink of going further down. The Ecuadorian government must be very ticked off with their last ambassador.

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Scorchio!!
Angel

Re: He's obviously dangerous

@AC

Re: He's obviously dangerous

>I see you are or were a cop at some point.

Me? No, though as a soldier I did work with a certain police force in the line of duty. After that I found myself drawn with what now seems inevitability to a professional forensic/legal perspective on life. It's safer you see!

BTW, it just occurred to me that Julie is indeed dangerous; the amount of bravo sierra dripping from his mouth constitutes a cholera threat.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Budget Leaks

@h4rm0ny Re: Budget Leaks

>>>"Have they done it on national television?"

>As I said and which you have now agreed with - it's not about right or wrong, but about government embarrassment.

Another non sequitur. It does not follow from the publicity attached to the case that the government is embarrassed. Indeed, they have nothing to feel embarrassed about; the man absconded from Sweden and then, later, a member of the judiciary - that is to say, a component of the executive in the face of good practise where giving bail to a known absconder (convicted on 17 counts in his own country) was considerably inadvisable did precisely that.

Do note at this point that it is an exemplary feature of western democratic government that the legislature (that's the gummint and the executive (they be people like the judiciary, the police, the fire brigade, social workers, probation and prison officers) are separated. This means that the gummint can't take exception to Julie and have him arrested and deported without due process. You see how this works? Even if they want to there is that little thing called the human rights act, and the ECHR - which, you should remember, enforces the EAW mechanism - and associated bureaucracies, national and EU wide, would take action against the Briddish gummint!

You see how that works? Sweden issues EAW to recover absconder, absconder who is now in the UK is given bail by an over liberal and forgiving judge, Julie absconds again! The mechanism that was invoked remains in action and this man, wanted for a serious offence in the country from which he formerly wanted citizenship so that he could escape the big bad Merkin Gummint,

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Scorchio!!

Re: Persona non grata.

@AC

> I estimate the chance of any US originated action pretty close to zero because the last thing they want is to somehow give Assange the chance to be a martyr. Leaving him alone was the smartest thing they have done IMHO.

Indeed. I would be enjoying the show, or at least watching the highlights. This will one way or another come to an end. Julie already has health problems, which he failed to turn to his advantage, and there will be more. If I can spare the time I intend to be around when he comes through the front door, to film him in HD and put the result online. That is, in the event that it is scheduled in any predictable manner.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Budget Leaks

@ h4rm0ny

>You can literally go to the station sometimes and in some places and tell them exactly where the person who threatened you is and they wont go round there.

This is both weak and disingenuous, to say nothing of the non sequitur nature of your argument [1]. This man is wanted on an EAW by another government in the EU, and that makes him an important fugitive; the EAW was issued merely because Assange absconded, and we allowed him to replicate this behaviour (not very bright at all) thus the EAW has quite a priority attached to it, especially in view of the celebrity status of the wanted individual (who now plays to the gallery from a balcony in Knightsbridge, presumably looking for a Romeo to rescue him) which, it should be noted, would result in a considerable amount of public ire and press condemnation in the event that the police and appropriate ministers did not pay good attention to arresting someone who is already an international absconder and has now absconded within our own jurisdiction, a man it should be noted who has possession of the state secrets of many countries and it would seem NATO secrets.

If you really do believe this stuff and are not behaving disingenuously then you would seem to me to be exceptionally naive or not very bright. Unless of course you are taking the micturition, which I suspect you are. HTH.

[1] That is, it does not follow from your argumenta, which have no bearing on the current case. Indeed were the legal system to accept your playground reasoning then many other offenders would be left free to roam the streets, but your reasoning is not fashionable in legal circles and, whilst many offenders are indeed roaming the streets freely - e.g. terrorists back from lopping heads in Aleppo, no longer held by the FSA - many others bemoan their bad luck, as their warders tuck them up at night. Should you find this hard to take I suggest that you are probably in for a hard life, with many shocks.

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Scorchio!!

Re: idiot

@ Hans 1; the US could have lifted him more easily from here than from Sweden, EAW excepted; note also that the EAW cannot be used to place a suspect in a jurisdiction from which a hostile power can easily lift him, further down the road.

Julie fled Sweden just after his counsel had been advised by the police they intended to interview him prior to charging him, for which his bar association said they would be interviewing him. He came here, which was pretty much like putting his head in the lions' mouth - on your analysis - except that we not only followed the letter and the spirit of the law, but we against common sense gave this absconder bail. Naturally he again absconded, as his behavioural history indicates he would.

Since his conviction on 17 counts in Australia he has gone from criminal strength to criminal strength. That he would be easier to lift from the UK than he would from Sweden is worse than disingenuous; he actually wanted to gain Swedish citizenship prior to this imbroglio (inconsistent with the US/rendition argument), because he felt them to be safer and more liberal, and ISTR that Wikileaks still has a server in an under ground bunker in that country!

Now that he is wanted for rape he feels they have banana republic levels of justice. Soon if convicted he will complain bitterly that he was not given justice; historically this is true, because an Australian judge let him off lightly and fed him the idea that he could stay out of jail if he played his cards carefully.

This man's speech is both glib and full of contradictions. He repeatedly applies failed strategies in the same domain and across others. When I read of his callous attitude to the Afghan informants whose precise GPS data he'd released (they knew what they'd gotten themselves into) and, later, that he 'snatched' a journalist's woman friend from him, practically under his nose, stopping, turning and then adopting a pugilistic stance as he made his way down the road with her, I realised that all was probably not as it should be in this paragon of virtue, this self appointed guardian of peace and freedom, this over paid (by himself) empire builder, this man who pulled out of a contract with a publisher and refused to return the considerable advance they'd made him, later jumping bail at the expense of those people who put up his bail, some supposedly his friends.

Hah. I am still amazed that people cannot see this (IMNSVHO) insect for what it is.

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Scorchio!!

Re: @Cliff... idiot

@Cliff; it was at the time said that releasing him on bail would be an error, since he was an absconding risk, and Julie has proved this fulsomely. Just as he proved the judge who convicted him on 17 counts in Australia was naive and let him go with a smack on the wrist, whilst telling him a repeat offence would result in incarceration. Julie took this to heart, and that is why Manning is inside, e.g.. Mind you... ...much could be said about that situation, including the folly of those tits who put their passwords on post it notes, stuck to their monitors.

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Scorchio!!

Re: idiot

>Re: idiot

>Costs? He didn't ask for the siege.

Oh but he did; he fled/broke bail (costing his friends a lot of money it should be observed) and then went to the Ecuadorian embassy, that bastion of freedom of the press which returned someone to Belarus, itself run by a Kleptocrat as vile and as dangerous as Putin.

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Scorchio!!

Re: He's obviously dangerous

@ h4rm0ny; more than slightly!

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Scorchio!!

Re: He's obviously dangerous

This has nothing to do with the US; the Swedes offered the US first go, they refused. He is now wanted under a EAW, and the conditions are that he can only go to the country who issued the EAW.

As to the nonsense about interviewing him here, he was wanted for arrest and, in Swedish law, he must first be interviewed in the appropriate jurisdiction. Everything else is just a silly red herring, dropped by Julie to confuse the issue. Julie is wanted for an alleged offence that a senior met officer said would merit a charge of rape in this jurisdiction.

However, feel free to define black as white and vice versa. You will as ever amuse those who know better. HAND.

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Scorchio!!

Re: He's obviously dangerous

@Ian Michael Gumby; Indeed. For jumping bail he is again a criminal. If, that is, he can ever be said to have freed himself from the designer labelette, criminal that he earned himself when he was convicted on 17 accounts, by a misguided Australian judge who felt his tuff life had to be taken into account... ...for hacking an Australian police system, in particular the one investigating his illegal activities, and for hacking a Pentagon air force system, among many other targets. IMNSVHO this man needs not so much the book flung at him, but to have it dropped upon him. All the while it has to be remembered that early offending predicts later offending; Julie has not by a long chalk finished, and he like many other offenders will characterise himself as behaving completely legitimately. I've seen it so many times, in so many different kinds of offender.

Of course the children in here will disagree and downvote, these things being to me an accolade and so, in advance of the activities of zit faced children I bow and say once again I thank you

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

Scorchio!!

Re: Lastpass

I use Mirek W's PINs: http://www.mirekw.com/ It's open source and has quite a few useful features, including a Blowfish 448 bit encryption algorithm, complex password generator (including symbols), a file eraser and an awful lot more. Because it can be run from a USB stick this means I can double protect it by using encrypting the drive or creating an encrypted container.

In the distant past I used Oubliette but it went into maintenance and then dead mode. I will never, ever let someone look after my passwords. It is still available, or was when I checked a year back.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Lastpass

@ Gotno iShit Wantno iShit. I agree on the matter of True Crypt, though there is the question mark, it seems the earlier version may be safe. However and in addition I use Mirek W's PINs package (http://www.mirekw.com/winfreeware/index.html) which is free and sits very nicely in an encrypted container. In the past I used another free package called Oubliette (French for 'forget' I believe), but it has not been subject to development for some years. Mirek has a forum, is in reach, and the package is OSI Certified Open Source Software. It has a lot of very useful features, including 448 bit blowfish encryption, and a very good password generator, reminders when passwords are out of date, and so on. Alternatively Gibson at grc.com has a funky password generator.

As to True Crypt, I keep an archive of all software that I use to enable reversion in the event of such problems. In addition I also keep backups of the appropriate *.tc files, on three separate systems, one my backup server the others being portable drives. When I travel I copy the True Crypt files to my notebook, and then back them up to the portable drives by rotation. I would use the massive USB drives that I have but don't have much faith in their longevity. That sort of traffic would probably cripple them.

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Assange's WikiLeaks: Give generously this Xmas – for STATUE of our DEAR LEADER

Scorchio!!
Thumb Up

Re: Standing on chairs??

I remembered this from 4 years ago (linked here http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/10/18/wikileaks_founder_julian_assange_denied_swedish_resident_permit/ ):

"Yeah...

...what you do is you go to a country (Sweden) that's at war in another country (Afghanistan), release a load of confidential documents with the potential to damage the Swedish/coalition effort whilst all the time complaining loudly about how Sweden is being manipulated by the USA to blacken your name and have you arrested... and then you can complain a bit more when they don't let you stay.

My heart bleeds."

and

"Goes With The Turf

I support freedom of speech and the people who make public what 'they' would rather be kept from us. But really, this guy shouldn't be surprised when this sort of thing happens.

If you're going to try and stick it to 'the man' then be prepared for the repercussions.

"Never get off the boat. Unless you're going all the way.""

After more than 4 years I found it interesting to revisit the sad affair, and feel these early reactions from Reg readers provide a stark contrast to Assange today, now allegedly a bit rapey, wanted by Sweden so they can charge him for an offence that a senior British police officer said would result in charges in this country. A man holed up in an embassy, reduced to trying to manipulate the world into taking his side. A man convicted in Australia on 17 counts for hacking government and other computers, including a USAAF network.

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£100m DMI omnifail: BBC managers' emails trawled by employment tribunal

Scorchio!!

Re: Public money

@ Ledswinger. The problem took off with a vengeance in 1997, when the Labour party took office and began to inflate the public sector at the expense of both tax payers and the private sector. With Dyke in place - in spite of his confrontations with the Labour party in government - the new policies were expansionist and wasteful. There was no longer any need to concentrate on quality, and so they concentrated on width. Thus, instead of generating good programming with genuinely talented actors and other 'artists', the Peeb gave us very expensive chat show hosts, vulgar phone calls to older actor's daughters, fixed game shows, footage edited to make it seem that the monarch had flounced out in a temper, and much, much more besides.

The Peeb will take a long time to recover, and probably one of the best ways to assist them in pursuit of quality rather than quantity is to cut their income. This began with the process of integrating the separately financed World Service into the main Peeb, thus making them entirely responsible for the new arm's budget, in the same way that Broon made the MoD pay for Labour's wars rather than using the contingency reserve. An utterly brilliant mirror stroke to the wasteful Labour years, for which we will probably pay for more than two decades.

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Scorchio!!

Re: At least it's not my money these buffoons are burning

@ I. Aproveofitspendingonspecificprojects. Yup, that's what I heard! The new head man says he wants to levy all our internet accounts to raise finance for the Peeb. Frankly I think he should look in his coffee, because it's clearly been spiked.

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Scorchio!!

Re: At least it's not my money these buffoons are burning

@keithpeter. It is my understanding that problems only arise when users watch programmes that are simultaneously being broadcast, for the first time. True, the Peeb wanted to levy all internet accounts as a source of income, but they are likely to find themselves cut rather than inflated any more. Their behaviour over the past nearly 20 years has seen to that.

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Edward Snowden's not a one-off: US.gov hunts new secret doc leaker

Scorchio!!

Re: People do not like to hear this but here it goes...

Yes, and your point is?

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Scorchio!!

Re: People do not like to hear this but here it goes...

The story is similar in Russia, where some 60 journalists have been assassinated, whilst former Soviet States Chechnya, Dagestan, Georgia, Ukraine, Trans Dniester and the like can hardly believe that the USSR has gone away. It is almost certain that Snowdon has divulged everything to his new owners.

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Snowden: You can't trust SPOOKS with your DATA

Scorchio!!

Re: Stop who?

"Your entire argument is a statement of "this is how it is, so learn to like it." I call that cowardly bullshit. You may be roughly accurate in describing how limited our options are - though I believe you are overly optimistic about how many options the average person realistically has - but we always have the choice to resist.

Perhaps you were addressing me, I don't know. However, and as far as the subjective material is concerned, you are reading a crystal ball that does not work. For one thing I do not recommend that you like it. How you respond is up to you. Hate it, love it, like it, dislike it, ignore it, I could not give a tinker's cuss; your projections and imagination are of no consequence nor of relevance. As to the cowardice, I have worked in dangerous occupations that have nearly killed me - including a year on active duty - and no one has ever accused me of cowardice, whatever that means; in fact, cowardice probably means something to the effect that an individual places its well being over that over others. Now the interesting thing here is that the group security that I outlined is the opposite of cowardice, because people are called on to make sacrifices, but I don't give a damn, and that is not surprising. I once nearly died of losing more than half my blood supply, never mind the narrow escapes, including one or two defending a country whose citizens are completely clueless when it comes to the meaning of the word 'freedom'; but there again, it's whatever wobbles your trossachs, whatever gets your rocks off, whatever helps you to vent your imaginary spleen, all the while ignoring the fact that coming together as a group a) makes you a target b) reduces the number of variables (degrees of freedom) that you have and c) requires you to do something that psychopaths cannot; follow rules, engage cooperatively, work as a group, something which probably emerged in human behaviour once the opposing thumb and forefinger evolved, thus encouraging hominids to develop the concept of working together.

Perhaps you don't understand that, but I could not give a farking damn. I certainly am untroubled by the silly notion that you seem to harbour that governments should bend for you, when in fact they are made to respond first to protecting the maximum number of people; that means your petty desires are unimportant whilst the bigger issues of the day exert greater pressure.

Meanwhile your 'I bow to no man' speech is belied by your failure to piss off into the bondu and look after yourself, independently and out of range of a government. That if anything is the message behind my words. It is of the shape up or shove off variety that I learned as a soldier. Now perhaps you'll go and find yourself an alternative; go on, be brave. Meanwhile I'll continue my own quest. The one which has nearly killed me on several occasions.

HTH.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Stop who?

"I can't opt out of my government."

Yes you can. You can fly to Ecuador, you can fly to Belarus (assuming they'll let you in), you can jet off to a country with a jungle and live there. Indeed you can, like Eddie baby, fly to Mother Russia and lose almost all of your 'freedoms' in exchange for living under an autocracy that is just barely better than the dictatorship that preceded it. If, on the other hand, you mean 'I can't opt out of my government whilst retaining the comfy life that I have, complete with electrickery, gadgets, organised health and welfare, police officers to prevent people from assaulting me, intelligence and security agents to intercept bomb plotters" you are probably right. We lose much in exchange for these things and, in case you had not noticed, you have an approximation to freedom only once every five years, when you put a X on a ballot paper. You may want to argue that that does not approximate very much to freedom, but that is about as good as it ever gets and is probably better than the 'freedoms' experienced by the like of Snorri Sturluson and others (and note that even Snorri Sturluson's 'liberty' and freedoms were curtailed by a murderer).

As to freedom itself, it is a myth. From a statistical perspective there are only degrees of freedom, meaning the choice between a limited number of alternatives, ranging from one set of outliers through the middle to the other set of outliers. Try living off the land in a place far away from government - the outback will do if you like - and see what freedom means.

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Putin to battle Snowden for Nobel Peace Prize

Scorchio!!

Re: Putin?

"For all his hard work in pro-gay relations? Or for his work invading the Ukraine?"

I laughed my arse off at his attempts to portray himself as a protector of Russians who means no harm to a 'brother nation':

http://www.holodomor.org.uk/

http://faminegenocide.com/resources/chicago2.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-25058256

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor

http://www.holodomorct.org/history.html

http://ukraineblogg.blogspot.co.uk/

In case anyone was wondering about Yanukovych, there is this little item:

http://en.ria.ru/world/20100427/158776856.html

In this country he would be called a holocaust denier, although of course he was denying a holocaust committed on the land whose president he claimed to be. Bah. Putin, he's worse.

What happened in the Ukraine is behind Putin's claims of 'facism'. He is using the same sorts of Soviet 'socialist' tactics to cow the Ukrainians as those used by the Labour party to cow people who opposed his clandestine immigration scam.

As a side note, Belarus is in the state it is because Putin and his satrap have made it thus. Ecuador have deported or intend to deport a journalist to Belarus, where he will probably quietly 'disappear'. Ecuador is Julian Assange's 'friend', he thinks; that they have squashed the press and human rights in Ecuador is apparently of no interest to a man on the run from charges for jumping bail in the UK, and from charges for sexual assault in Sweden.

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Facebook pays $19bn for WhatsApp. Yep. $45 for YOUR phone book

Scorchio!!

Re: hint

The NSA don't need 'WhatsApp'; they already have it.

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Scorchio!!
Unhappy

Re: A beelion users can't be wrong (can they?)

" 450m have given their telephone number to WhatsApp"

And the contents of their phone books. One day people like me will be known, simply because we will be among the few sheep that do not use this stuff. Perhaps I ought to go off grid and live in the mountains of some American backwater. Yeee haaaaaaaaa.

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Mars rover Curiosity snaps 'pale blue dot' image of Earth, Moon

Scorchio!!
Happy

Re: Size is relative

"The one with the Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy cassette tapes in the pocket"

I have them stored on an infinitely small MP3 player. You should get out more!

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Scorchio!!
Happy

Re: For Carl

"Commenting on the small blue dot, somebody once said to me "doesn't it make you realise how insignificant we are". I had to say "no, we built that spaceship, we sent it on it's way to the stars; insignificant, I think not".

Thank you Carl."

Indeed, and what magic he made on television and on radio.

Now to another IMNSVHO great man who influenced many things, including this medium [1], we are "[...]An invisible dot on an invisible dot. Infinitely small. [...]". I think that he was speaking through the character of the Total Perspective Vortex's guardian (Gargravaa I think).

[1] Though he used a Mac.

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Snowden saga scares Oracle away from spy-flick sponsorship

Scorchio!!
Devil

Re: I thought Edward Snowden was the oracle ...

"I think you'll find he's 'The One' - have a cookie."

He's properly known as Edward Sneowdon

Meaow. All bow to Bob, pra Bob.

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Snowden leak: GCHQ DDoSed Anonymous & LulzSec's chatrooms

Scorchio!!

>hackers

Correction; script kiddiez.

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A BBC-by-subscription 'would be richer', MPs told

Scorchio!!

Re: Oh?

You said "It's right there in the article, you just need to take a minute to read it before commenting:"

Quote snipped.

Say != do.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Oh?

" there is an ongoing and rapid switch to Netflix and Love Film. Neither have adverts and amongst student subscribers (where account sharing is rife) time spent watching BBC output is all but wiped out."

Account sharing is the modern analogue to newspaper and magazine sharing. Publishers frequently say that their readership is wider than their subscribership. For the BBC this is a significant danger. They've sat back on their laurels, sucking the licence fee cash cow pipe for too long and have become complacent. This will change and soon. It probably won't change in the way that any of us think, and may even involve an admixture of income sources. Whatever happens I both want to see us freed of the shackle of viewer taxation and dread the thought of the mess that might follow. I think the BBC are reliant on responses like mine. Certainly there is a strong chance that a drop in quality might follow.

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Obama reveals tiny NSA reforms ... aka reforming your view of the NSA

Scorchio!!

Re: "Having faced down the totalitarian dangers of fascism and communism"

What are you smoking? Remind me to avoid it.

At any given time the 'communists' of the USSR had some 11 million people in Siberian penal labour battalions. That's how Stalin financed his 'revolution' and kept the rest of the proletariat in check. As for the Fascists - do note the correct spelling, please - if you are ignorant of those facts, well heaven help us. Perhaps, as someone else snarkily observed, it's to do with the age of the average age of readers of The Register. Fascism and Nazism were spread like a rash across the European continent, even the Hispanic peninsula, and threatened to take over the world. They were every bit as bad as the 'Communists', and every bit as real.

Otherwise what a cliché ridden post.

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Clink! Terrorist jailed for refusing to tell police his encryption password

Scorchio!!

Re: The Golden Thread

"[...] terrorist attacks that killed, in this country, rather fewer than the number dying in road accidents in two weeks."

Yes, I know what you mean, and didn't Uncle Jo Stalin himself say that you cannot make omelettes without cracking eggs? So yes, fuck those who might die of terrorism, let 'em die with the words of a fictional character from a TV legal soap echoing in their ears, never mind all of the plots that were thwarted. I'm right with you; "let freedom ring".

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Scorchio!!

The appropriate venue to contest laws is in the legislature, not the executive.

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WikiLeaks Party meets Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad

Scorchio!!
Angel

Re: Tin hat time

The Pubic Triangle.

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Scorchio!!
Coat

"- no white cat to stroke (OK, he's got the beard now, maybe that's a substitute)"

No white cat to stroke? He sho nuff likes to stoke a lotta fagina! ;->

Oh, stroke. I'll get my coat then.

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Scorchio!!

'Assange has always been apprentice megalomaniac' - Have you noticed how Assange and Assad have something in common? The first three letters in their name indicate what asses they are.

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Snowden to warn Brits on Xmas telly: Your children will NEVER have privacy

Scorchio!!

Re: codeusirae Dear NomNomNom ..

"Nurse! Old man Bryant is out of bed again.

Please increase his medication."

Does your mummy know that you are posting again? Small wonder you are anonymous. Allegedly.

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Scorchio!!
Happy

Re: codeusirae Dear NomNomNom ..

"Producer3: "I know - Kim Chung- whatshisface, that guy from North Korea!""

Now that reminds me of one of the lines from a Brosnan Bond episode. Something along the lines of 'remind me to get a new anger management therapist'.

Merry Humbug to you. I'm sure the rest of the digiterati here will respond nicely too. Heh.

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Scorchio!!
Devil

Re: Dear NomNomNom ..

Son of David Icke. Watch out now, NSA lizard's gonna gitchya.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Yawn

I occasionally open a Facebook account and then 'nuke' it; I use it to track down and communicate with people I've not seen for some while. Facebook and the other social networking devices are insecure; forget the state, the threat comes from your fellow 'digital citizen'.

I've always had difficulty with social networking which seems to me like a perpetual narcisstic round robin. I don't have a blog and I've not had a web site for some 12 years or more. Perhaps I'll have another one soon, but that is as far as I will go. Anyone who communicates freely and without using encryption - unless their communications are bland and valueless - has a problem of their own making.

From very early on in my digital life (now on the 3rd decade of digital communication) I used PGP when I needed to keep the state and others out. I don't knowingly communicate with criminals of any sort, and I don't use the net for anything controversial, nor off line come to that. I read all of the hissy fits and I wonder if people realise that state surveillance in the pre-digital eras of intelligence and security was very common (the practise of steaming open envelopes has a very obvious digital parallel, and the post office was routinely used by the intelligence and security services of this country), and done to intercept and watch a variety of criminals, terrorists and spies from other states or private organisations.

Of course regulation is required, but you dear citizen are every bit as dangerous as that which you claim to abhor. The screaming and weeping that I observe is pure hissy fit, and my response to people is that they should grow up and use encryption, along with a battery of other security devices, too lengthy to list but definitely aired in the Reg time and again. The weeping and rhetoric is, well, pathetic and risible. Now arrow me down, you know that you'll get a kick out of it, and I'll be amused to hell at the evidence of children in the process of a fit of self righteousness.

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Scorchio!!

Re: Yawn

"My parents lived through two world wars - my mother in London during the Blitz. If she were alive now she would be reduced to tears at the betrayal of all they fought for."

My mother is 93, lived through bombing in Birmingham, Manchester and then Bristol, worked in precisely the sort of field in question and understands the importance of meta data. Many people interacting in this debate are behaving like Web 1.0 virgins, as if someone behind a web site is taking note of their every deed, and this is utter bunk. There are not enough people to pay attention to all of the communications in question, it simply is not possible. Analysis of meta data will certainly help uncover links between known suspects and others above and below them in the chain of command, and that is the point to intelligence and security.

"Yes, there's a lot you don't know."

Oh and you know it, right? Spare me the spooky rhetoric, it belongs on the Guardian's pages, along with the Web 1.0 virgins, 9.11 conspiracy theorists, bearded open toed sandal wearers and vegans.

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Re: Yawn

"We grew up in the cold war and with the IRA. Tell us something we don't know....."

Indeed. The irony of Snowden's hissy fits? They're made from that bastion of autocracy, Russia.

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El Reg's contraptions confessional no.5: The Sinclair Sovereign

Scorchio!!

Re: Sinclair calculator, pinhole camera?

My DSLR has a shutter button, as Wikipedia confirm ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_single-lens_reflex_camera ):

"Focusing can be manual or automatic, activated by pressing half-way on the shutter release or a dedicated AF button."

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Feuding fanbois in a flap over piracy haven in new iOS 7 jailbreak tool

Scorchio!!

My search failed, so please enlighten me; Blake?

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Re: Fair?

Thank you for expressing my thoughts so fully and accurately for me. You have outlined some of the thinking behind my irrevocable decision to not ever buy the fanoi toi.

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PayPal 13 plead guilty to launching DDoS attacks

Scorchio!!

Re: Personally Torn

"The ballot box is and has been fixed by the government and it's minions."

Wrong; the ballot box was fixed by the Lib-Dems, who at the expense of the Tories vetoed the findings of the Boundaries Commission.

Otherwise, if you want politics to work, get involved. Tell the 'gummint' what you want, band together with friends, join a political party, start a political party. Politics is not like a trip to the local take away, it takes effort, participation; you don't select number 23 from the 'menu' and expect it to be fulfilled, because in fact there are many thousands who want number 32.

Very often people complain about a government's failure to adopt their pet policy and overlook the fact that it is in direct opposition to the policy espoused by the majority of the population. You have to change minds, and it won't happen overnight; it took a long time for women to get the vote, for women to have property rights, for the laws on rape and homosexuality to be clarified, and so on. It didn't happen overnight or because someone picked a number from the menu. It took effort and, in some cases, people died (like the suffragettes, for example); it is never easy, and you have to participate.

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Scorchio!!

Re: @Scorchio!! - will the plea for clemency fall on deaf ears?

""clemency will only encourage further offending"

The Daily Mail comments page is over there ->"

Actually no, AFAICT no one from that rag would employ the principles of behavioural psychology, in which when an animal (human or otherwise) learns, by proxy/vicariously or by direct learning, that in committing an offence it can 'get away with it', it will compute the odds and behave accordingly. This kind of thinking is behind a great deal of so-called 'cyber crime', especially when the offenders are convinced they are 'anonymous'.

The point underlying my post is that it is not the place of a business or organisation that has been on the wrong end of this kind of offensive behaviour to plea; the point is that others have the right to expect that the law deals with these people appropriately. Clemency can only encourage them. That is the point of law and that is the psychology underlying the law.

If you wish to trawl the Daily Mail comments pages, well fine, but you will not find behavioural psychology there.

As to your remarks taken as a whole, I see the Beano is online; otherwise perhaps a crayon.

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