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* Posts by Dave 126

4138 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

The browser's resized future in a fragmented www world

Dave 126
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Re: TBL is MS!

>Once you unleash DRM you'll regret it. It won't be applied sensibly.

Er, last I looked DRM is already unleashed. Websites are already able to frustrate attempts to copy text (to check reviews of a product they are selling, for example). An example of silliness can be seen on the Currys site. Just try copying text from the webpage below:

http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/clearance-photography-1902-commercial.html?intcmp=home~Camera-clearance~clearance~r4~half~c7~cp1902~070314

But hey, people are free to shop with someone else.

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Dave 126
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Re: TBL is MS!

>So T B-L is going to personally ensure that every DRM system is implemented on Windows, OS X, iOS, Android, Firefox OS, Tizen, Blackberry, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora.... is he?

Look it up [that is the joy of the connected web]:

TBL was only ever talking about DRM in relation to an API in HTML 5 for discovering and using DRM systems.

The alternate situation is one in which content providers only release content through propriety applications that only run on a small number of OSs, such Windows, OSX, iOS and Android.

In real life, people are free to make agreements with each other. I can choose to sign a Non Disclosure Agreement. If I choose not to sign it, I accept that I won't get to see the interesting McGuffin that the other party might have shown me.

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Dave 126
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Re: re - "Fragmentation is hurting the PC and the browser, yes"

>The IOS web browser is by far the worst one out there, maybe because there is no 30% Apple tax on the web.

Websites, say IMDB or eBay, release free apps. Hold on a moment whilst I do the maths... 30% of $0.00 is... lets see now... um... yep, I got it: $0.00. What figure did you arrive at AC?

What is irritating is that number of websites that throw up a 'Install our app!' when accessed through a mobile browser... but this annoyance is common to both iOS and Android.

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Dave 126
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Re: TBL is MS!

>DRM is anti-freedom, anti-openness, anti-user. It should not be encouraged.

You've confused the current flawed and propriety implementations of DRM with the concept itself.

All T-B-L suggested was that if DRM is to be used, it should be cross-platform and sensibly implemented. Then content creators will have the freedom to choose whether to implement it, and users will be free to engage with it or not. The user may choose not to, in which case the content creator can choose to reassess their business model. Choice and freedom.

Most users are quite happy to pay for a DVD or Blu-ray. Most people consider their Netflix subscription to be fairly priced. If there is a legitimate way to watch paid-for protected content on a portable, off-line device, most users wouldn't have a problem with that either, as long as it is reliable, easy and device-agnostic. User friendly.

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Finally! Some actual, novel tech: Apple patent to revive geriatric gear

Dave 126
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Re: Prior art

Er, that's the case with most most ECUs. For that reason, the ECU firmware is specific to the vehicle, not the model.There, making a modification to it requires the mechanic clone the firmware, alter it, and then re-flash the ECU.

But prior art? Read the penultimate paragraph of the article.

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Does Apple's iOS 7 make you physically SICK? Try swallowing version 7.1

Dave 126
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Re: Date-castrophe

I'm with you there, SonderTwyful.

I've had Samsung feature phones and Sony Android phones that think that spinning wheels are a suitable form of date/time input.

Why?! To remind that I'm setting an alarm and not using the calculator?

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Dave 126
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Context, AC, context. Appelbaum was talking about an NSA tool for compromising iPhones, and his suspicions that Apple were aiding them.

Not even Blackphone are claiming their offering is NSA proof.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sensible keyboard

> I find it rather disconcerting that the iOS keyboard just stays stuck looking the same.

The letters on my laptop's keyboard are in caps all the time.

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Snowden: You can't trust SPOOKS with your DATA

Dave 126
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Re: I know the Reg hates Google but @Howverydare

>I doubt what I do on the internet really interests them that much. And if you think your internet activity is that interesting to them, might I suggest a room with nice, soft walls and a big jacket?

True, what I do as an individual doesn't interest the NSA. However, it gets insidious when you consider that political groups are monitored - The US gov has been happy to subvert democracy in the past by undermining legitimate political groups that have been deemed to be 'un-American'.

Of course, one man's political group is another man's bunch of nutters. And one man's political group can be painted as a group of nutters if that serves another man's interests.

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Projector on a smartphone? There's a chip for that

Dave 126
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Re: This one *is* different

"We could put this in your phone" is often just a shorthand way of saying "smaller / fewer moving parts / lower power consumption than the existing way of doing things".

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Not just for Glasswipes: Google to drop SDK for all Android wearables

Dave 126
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lmgtfy is 6 letters, so I can't be arsed to patronise him.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Dave 126
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Re: Is it that time already?

24 bit describes the dynamic range of each sample point, and khz how many thousand sample points each second. We use the same unit, hz, for describing pitch, but it is a different thing.

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Dave 126
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Re: Another one?

Fair dooes! My late mate's solution was to have, in addition to his separates and 12" for his own use, a real jukebox loaded up with 45s for use during drunken parties- Rolling Stones, Hendrix, Kinks, Small Faces etc - and a tray of old-size 10p coins for guests.

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Dave 126
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Re: “high resolution” albums

> Almost no one seems to care, most people just use their phone now.

The LG G2 can playback 192khz 24bit FLAC files natively. Reviews I've read of its audio performance are subjective, as you would expect, but generally positive.

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Dave 126
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Re: Another one?

Your vinyl will wear with time, and then there situations when perhaps you don't want to handle your precious discs (drunken parties etc). There is some software that captures vinyl at 192 khz before the pre-amp, and then applies the RCA curve on playback, but it's OSX only.

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Dave 126
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Re: Am i being a numpty

It can do lossless compression. It can also compress 192khz 24bit audio. There are already online stores that will sell you music in this format, as well as some blu-ray discs.

To play it back in the home doesn't require anything too exotic- a good quality external DAC, or some AV receivers. On the hoof, there is the Colorfly player, or the LG G2 phone.

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Why can’t I walk past Maplin without buying stuff I don’t need?

Dave 126
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Re: Cured !

I almost bought a load of cheap cheerful junk from China last week, but I took so long assembling my order that the website cleared by virtual shopping basket. I escaped!

I haven't yet placed an order - let alone be in a position to recommend them after receiving my goods - but banggood.com is somewhere I can waste a lot of time just looking at things.

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Dave 126
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Re: stuff that is plugged in with 13 amp plugs draw less than 300mA anyway.

>Or did you have something else in mind?

Sorry, I wasn't very clear. I meant energy lost in the cabling between the end device and the step-down transformer.

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Dave 126
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Re: Maplins real purpose...

Haha!

Eleanor Shaw of Bristol, whose husband is a Maplin regular, said: “I knew he couldn’t need that many external hard drives. Deep down, I knew it.

“It even has pulsing disco lights in the window.”

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Dave 126
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Re: stuff that is plugged in with 13 amp plugs draw less than 300mA anyway.

>No-one has too many adaptors and never will until someone standardised a low voltage home rail circuit

You do realise that the lower the voltage the larger amount of energy is lost as heat?

At least a good number of my 'wall-warts' are USB-based these days, so phones, mice, tablets, ereaders etc are catered for. Half the time you don't need the wall-wart because there will be a device (PC, TV, stero etc) near by that has a USB socket.

A 12v standard would be nice, but to be honest I don't have much in the way of 12v kit... and in any case, I guess 12v kit might vary too much in the amount of current it draws.

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Dave 126
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Re: Great headline!

I spent an hour wandering around Maplins last week - again, I didn't actually need anything. After inspecting spray cleaners and lubricants (IPA yes, acetone no, alas), flashlights, something called Sugru, and some self-adhesive magnetic tape, I came away with a USB-OTG cable, three little keyring screw cannisters for storing small things, and a microSD card which was, amazingly, very reasonably priced.

I did notice that they were selling microHDMI > HDMI cables for £45, whereas an independent computer shop near me sells them for £6.00.

Still, being able to get parts for a project the same day is often invaluable.

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Windows 8.1 Update 1 spewed online a MONTH early – by Microsoft

Dave 126
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Re: Brilliant

>Applying updates with no description of what the update is supposed to be doing. And with no idea if these are the final, official updates, or some kind of beta or internal rc release. And no idea if they have any impact on your drivers.

Well, there is only one way to find out, hey?

Seriously though - the sort of people who are keen for these updates would make an image of C:, and just restore it if things go pear-shaped. No problem.

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Bugger the jetpack, where's my 21st-century Psion?

Dave 126
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Re: Drifting OT ... one thing I recall

If you want a Chorded Keyboard case for smartphones with Bluetooth, throw some money at this lad - or encourage him to get on Kickstarter:

http://www.srimech.com/chorded-keyboard-for-mobile-phones.html

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Dave 126
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Chorded typing!

Maybe Qwerty keyboard are inherently unsuitable for writing text on the hoof? [Discuss! : D]

Chorded typing, a la Microwriter, is fairly quick with one hand, or so I have been led to believe. Has anyone here any experience of it?

This lad has knocked together an Arduino prototype of a chorded keyboard case for smartphones:

http://www.srimech.com/chorded-keyboard-for-mobile-phones.html

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Bloke rattles tin for giant 3D two-headed beast

Dave 126
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>someday I'll be able to e-mail a file to my local 3D fabbing shop for either pick-up or delivery.

You can today, just as you have been able to do so for years.

In the last couple of years we have seen websites such as Ponoko.com aimed at 'hobbyists', whereas previously such services were aimed at, though not exclusive to, commercial users.

Alternatively, search the web for your local 'maker group' and negotiate a price.

3D CAD software has had 'File'> 'Print to...'> [3D printing bureau] for a few years now. Otherwise, STL files usually come in at under the max size allowed by most email services.

Hell, even my local timber yard offers CNC cut materials at around £100 per hour (but their machine is so fast that in reality this service only adds around 20% to the cost of 4' x 8' plywood or MDF).

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X-rated Android antics: Motorola's Moto X puts boot in chunky brother

Dave 126
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@Craigness

You're right, most phones have gyroscopes these days. What many phones don't have, but the Moto X does, is a dedicated low power co-processor that can constantly monitor the gyroscopes and microphones for input... if it validates a signal as a deliberate human input it can wake the main CPU.

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Dave 126
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> [ Shaking the phone ] a surprisingly quick and easy way to fire the camera up. It’s not a feature I recall coming across on a mobile phone before which, on reflection, I find surprising.

I would have thought that this feature was a by-product of the same low power chip that also monitors the microphone for 'touchless voice commands', and so is not seen on other phones because they lack the hardware. I might be wrong, but if you are going to include an always-on chip to wake up the main CPU in response to sensor input, this seems a good use of it.

Apple have implemented an always-on low power chip for similar purposes - capturing accelerometer data without waking up the rest of the (new) iPhone.

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Reg reader rattles tin for GoPro camera 'Stubilizer'

Dave 126
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Re: In software instead?

Rubbish In, Rubbish out.

He covered this in his first post... to stabilise digitally would require a lot of cropping.

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Alcatel unveils 'cheaper-than-Chromebook' Lapdock-alike phablet-powered laptop

Dave 126
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Re: The Future

I'm not sure that a hub exists that will be let you use MHL and USB-OTG at the same time. Maybe a Bluetooth keyboard is your best bet: (scroll to near the bottom of the thread)

http://androidforums.com/samsung-galaxy-nexus/457427-simultaneous-otg-hdmi.html

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Dashboard Siri! Take me to the airport! NO, NOT the RUNWAY! Argh!

Dave 126
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>Really why would a manufacturer design a dash around what seems basically to be a screen that will work only with one type of phone?

It is only being offered as an 'option' on cars - the buyer pays their money, they take their choice. Honda and GM are part of both Apple's 'Carplay' *and* Google's ' Open Automotive Alliance' efforts.

Google is working on a rival system, but one that doesn't require a phone - all the 'brains' are integrated into the car. One can imagine just plugging a Android 'black box' into this Apple-led system to turn it into a Google system.

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Apple investors fall for CEO Cook's product-presentation prank

Dave 126
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Re: This article bore no resemblance to the actual news

I've met/known a few very wealthy individuals... one of them, worth billions, comes into work everyday at the engineering company he founded. Before Christmas each year, he spends two weeks travelling to all his sites and greeting every employee - and he listens. He asked one junior assembly worker who didn't recognise him, if anything could be better, and the reply was "Yeah, the f$%king computers are a bit shite". The middle managers, who had failed to escalate the issue, squirmed where they stood, and IT services were in that assembly cell a day later, installing new kit.

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Open source 3D sensing libraries kiboshed, maybe by Apple

Dave 126
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The code will remain available, so in essence all this news means is that PrimeSense are no longer supply staff and hosting for the website. It was already known that they would stop selling their sensors.

The Kinect 2.0 already uses a different technology, as does Creative, Intel and others. I don't know what that 3D sensing Google phone (for developers) uses.

http://community.openni.org/openni/topics/future_of_openni

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Apple fanbois DENIED: Mac Pro deliveries stalled until April

Dave 126
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Re: American QA?

Its a little unfair to use this example to compare Taiwan and Texas, since the manufacturing processes are different.

Assuming that delay is not due to component suppliers like Intel or AMD, my guess would be that it is the deep-drawn aluminium enclosure that is causing the delay, only because it is a manufacturing process that takes some fine tuning.

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Frenchman eyes ocean domination with floating, mobile Bond villain lair

Dave 126
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Re: Already been done

Whilst we're all geeking out on things deep:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/02/the-exosuit-a-wearable-submarine-for-visiting-deep-water/

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Dave 126
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It's just assumed that the Rolex in the books is an Oyster Perpetual, since the first book was published a year before the Submariner was released.

Come the first Connery film, Rolex wouldn't lend the production a watch, so they used a Submariner belonging to the film's producer, Cubby Broccoli.

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Dave 126
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Re: Rolex?

Bond had a few Seikos in the 1980s, between his Rolex and Omega periods. One of them printed out messages, another had a camera and a display - which 007 uses to snap a picture of a lady's décolletage. Looking at the Seiko G757 Sports 100 (device for tracking Fabergé eggs not included), I'm reminded of the Samsung Galaxy Gear watch - especially the four crosshead bolts on the face.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shurely Shome Mishtake?

Looks more like the Operation Hennessey Underwater SeaLab from the film the Life Aquatic.

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Apple's Windows XP moment: OS X Snow Leopard left to DIE

Dave 126
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> Apple asks you to buy new hardware for its whole cost because your six years old one is no longer supported, quite not as bad as MS.... ooooh, Apple is so nice to customers....

You're talking about hardware that struggles to play back HD video, FFS... most people have moved on by now.

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Lenovo banks on $1 BEELLION Moto turnaround in SIX quarters

Dave 126
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Re: If Lenovo do to Motorola what they did to ThinkPad

The only vendor of laptops with 16:10 screens is Apple.

If I'm wrong, PLEASE do include a link!

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Dave 126
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Eh? The Moto G already runs stock Android, KitKat.

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Pine trees' scent 'could prevent climate change really being a problem'

Dave 126
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Re: Why the fuck would he bother?

You must have missed Lord Lawson on BBC Radio 4's 'Today' programme, then.

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Steve Jobs statue: Ones and ohs and OH NOES – it's POINTING at us

Dave 126
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Re: Art for Art's sake

>You can always rely on a sculptor to be so arrogantly fixated on their own idea of 'Art' that the subject matter gets completely ignored.

That's not really a problem if you have lots of sculptors submitting proposals for the same commission... it is then the selection panel that chooses the final piece.

Infact, one would use a sculptor *because* they have their own idea of art (you wouldn't expect them to fixate on somebody else's idea of art, surely? It's not as if there is a public consensus on what art is, either); otherwise you'd just use a 3D scanner and a 3D printer to create a mold for casting.

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NASA could have averted near DROWNING TERROR in SPACE

Dave 126
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A prison in space?

"Lock Out" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1592525/

A rather fun 'Futuristic prison in Spaaaaace' film, written by Luc Besson wearing his competent 'B-movie' hat (so its more comparable to 'Transporter' or 'Taxi' than it is to 'Leon', 'The 5th Element' or 'Angel A')

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Samsung and Apple BEWARE: Huawei is coming to eat your lunch

Dave 126
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Re: Jockeying to be top Android phone vendor

Not so much in the Chinese domestic market. And who knows, maybe Samsung will continue its bet-hedging strategy and collaborate with others on providing an alternative to Google's proprietry bits of Android - app store, map service, APIs etc.

That said, Google have recently smoothed some ruffled feathers by selling Motorola.

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Dave 126
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Re: Pronouciation

Fascinating:

Goto (1971) reports that native speakers of Japanese who have learned English as adults have difficulty perceiving the acoustic differences between English /r/ and /l/, even if the speakers are comfortable with conversational English, have lived in an English-speaking country for extended periods, and can articulate the two sounds when speaking English.

Japanese speakers can, however, perceive the difference between English /r/ and /l/ when these sounds are not mentally processed as speech sounds. Miyawaki et al (1975) found that Japanese speakers could distinguish /r/ and /l/ just as well as native English speakers if the sounds were acoustically manipulated in a way that made them sound less like speech (by removal of all acoustic information except the F3 component). Lively et al. (1994) found that speakers' ability to distinguish between the two sounds depended on where the sound occurred

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_speakers_learning_r_and_l#Perception

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0028393271900273 (Abstract)

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Dave 126
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Re: Pronouciation

>You tease, you. So how do you say it?

Probably in a way that can't be expressed using the English alphabet. There are symbols for expressing things like rising tones - see http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/05/IPA_suprasegmentals_2005.png - but it might just be easier if you find an audio clip on the interwebs.

Even then, there is never any guarantee that hear an audio clip in the same way as a native speaker, specifically if your ears were exposed to the difference between 'rip' and 'lip' during a short period in your infanthood, you will never be able to distinguish them in adulthood (hence many racist jokes about Japanese pronunciation of European words).

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Dave 126
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If anyone else here was wondering, as I was, what the heck 'nano injection moulding' was:

The grain structure of conventional steel tools has placed a lower limit on the size of features than can be injection moulded. Using metallic glasses to make injection molding tools, one can cheaply produce plastic objects on the centimetre scale, with sub-micron surface features.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1369702112700925

"Micro-injection molding is widely used to form plastic components rapidly and precisely. Current tools for injection molding rely largely on steels for their strength and durability. The finite grain size in traditional crystalline metals means it is challenging to produce tools with features < 10 μm (Fig. 1b). However, the need for plastic components with increasingly smaller features is recognized, particularly for information storage and bio-analytical applications.

"Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), having no limiting microstructure, can be machined or thermoplastically-formed with sub-micron precision while still retaining often-desirable metallic properties such as high compressive strength. These novel materials thus have enormous potential for use as multi-scale tools for high-volume manufacturing of polymeric MEMS and information storage devices. Here we show the manufacture of a prototype BMG injection molding tool capable of producing centimeter long polymeric components, with sub-micron surface features."

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Samsung brandishes quad-core Galaxy S5, hopes nobody wants high specs

Dave 126
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Re: I agree on the HR monitor

Casio used to be fairly clear about their definitions... water resist didn't mean waterproof. Most of their watches (the calculator model aside) were at a minimum 30m water-resistant, and the manual said not to use the buttons whilst it was under water. Then come the 50m models - using the buttons underwater us just fine, apparently - then 100m and 200m waterproof G-Shocks. Of the G-Shocks, some were advertised as being specifically mud-proof, which always puzzled me (maybe mud can get stuck behind the buttons and stop them working?).

There used to be a range of G-Shock phones about ten years ago, but they seemed to for be Japan only.

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Say WHAT? Qualcomm, MediaTek scrap over who has best 'marketing gimmick' octocore

Dave 126
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Would someone tell me how this happened? We were the fucking vanguard of shaving in this country. The Gillette Mach3 was the razor to own. Then the other guy came out with a three-blade razor. Were we scared? Hell, no. Because we hit back with a little thing called the Mach3Turbo. That's three blades and an aloe strip. For moisture. But you know what happened next? Shut up, I'm telling you what happened—the bastards went to four blades. Now we're standing around with our cocks in our hands, selling three blades and a strip. Moisture or no, suddenly we're the chumps. Well, fuck it. We're going to five blades.

- http://www.theonion.com/articles/fuck-everything-were-doing-five-blades,11056/

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DARPA wants help to counter counterfeits

Dave 126
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Re: "SHIELD, Supply Chain Hardware Integrity for Electronic Devices"

>A better question though is, how do we know that this wont be used to spy on....well everyone, who has a device with one of these embedded in it?

Because this system requires either contact with a probe, or close proximity to it.

We citizens already often carry non-contact chips that can identify us - passports, some bankcards, Oyster cards etc, NFC tags - so I'm not sure why this article concerns you so.

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