* Posts by Dave 126

4975 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Quantum computers have failed. So now for the science

Dave 126
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Re: Simply fascinating...

I imagine that the links in the article contain some maths. The article was merely an overview.

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Oi. APPLE fanboi! You with the $10k and pocket on fire! Fancy a WATCH?

Dave 126
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Re: Devices....

There are watches that have 2G/3G/4G radios, but really the radios only consume yet more power. They tend to be bulky, compromised products.

Quite a few smart watches have local storage and Bluetooth, so can be used to play music.

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Dave 126
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Re: What, no Douglas Adams quote?

'I have a well-deserved reputation for being something of a gadget freak, and am rarely happier than when spending an entire day programming my computer to perform automatically a task that it would otherwise take me a good 10 seconds to do by hand.

'Ten seconds, I tell myself, is 10 seconds. Time is valuable and 10 seconds' worth of it is well worth the investment of a day's happy activity working out a way of saving it.'

Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See, published 1990,

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Dave 126
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I'm no blind fan of Apple, but I too would prefer sensible discussions about certain topics (especially product design and user experience) without the tribal name-calling.

Apple have their business model, which enables them to do some very interesting things (and frustratingly limit their products' functions on occasion). It is inevitable therefore that they will be cited in conversations across a range of topics.

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Dave 126
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Re: Really?

I once read somewhere that many CEOs of Fortune 500 companies wore Timex watches, the implication being that they were there to make money, not spend it. They were not pretending that they are Edmund Hilary (Rolex), Steve McQueen (Heuer) or James Bond (Omega, usually).

I've also read that many members of the Russian government have watch collections worth many times more than their annual salary...

There is an appeal to a reliable, accurate and inexpensive watch... it is no more or less than it needs to be. It shows that you know what you need and how to get it without being ripped off. Really, EMP blasts aside, there is little downside to a Quartz watch over a mechanical movement - the mechanical watch will require servicing every few years just, as many quartz models will require battery changes.

There is also an appeal to more specialist watches. And mechanical watches have a fascination to me, the same part of my brain that loves LEGO Technic and taking things apart.

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Chappie: The AI tale that’s about heart, not intelligence

Dave 126
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Re: Nice review...

Generally, just a rough idea:

Robot: Mechanical device, including bipedal humanoid types. Aka Droids, drones. Dewy and Huey from Silent Running, R2D2

Android: A robot designed to resemble a human, some indistinguishably. StarTrek's Data, R. Daneel Olivaw, Yule Brynner, The Terminator, Cylons from BSG, Replicants, Ash, Bishop, Call and David, Artificial People

Cyborg: A man/machine mixture. Cybermen, The Borg. Robocop.

These aren't hard-and-fast categories, though.

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Dave 126
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Blomkampf hired a conceptual artist for a proposed Alien film.

http://io9.com/neill-blomkamps-secret-alien-movie-looks-so-good-were-f-1677082116

It seems to be official now, with Sigourney Weaver talking about it, and Michael Biehn signed on to reprise his role as Corporal Hicks.

The conceptual art suggest that Blomkampf at least recognises what was great about Alien and Aliens, and what the issues with Alien3 were. He's obviously a fan of the first two movies, just as James Cameron was of Alien. This bodes well. Alien 3 and Resurrection suffered from studio interference, and directors who didn't produce the screenplays.

I'm cautiously optimistic.

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Storm in a K-Cup: My SHAME over the eco-monster I created, says coffee pod inventor

Dave 126
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Re: Smart kettle and an Aeropress

I only have a normal kettle and a digital thermometer - but now I can recognise when the kettle has got to around 80 degrees C. by the noise.

Aeropress is great - i used one to sort a dozen friends out with espresso-like coffees whilst camping at a festival.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not sure why people do not just use an espresso machine instead.

Before I switched to an Aeropress, I used an espresso machine. It was good, but a bit of a faff to clean and to load evenly with ground coffee.

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Dave 126
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Re: Bah ... philistines

The Aeropress is my coffee tool of choice. Takes espresso or filter-ground coffee. It's based on a cylinder and a rubber plunger - the spent grounds are ejected as a hockey puck, so a quick rinse is all it takes to clean it.

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Lost WHITE CITY of the MONKEY GOD found after 500 years

Dave 126
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Re: WTF is this?

Explorers will attempt to uncover extreme wealth even if there isn't any extreme wealth to find. Does that answer your question?

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Dave 126
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Re: I always thought...

Nah, it's in Peru

http://www.peruthisweek.com/travel-visit-the-white-city-of-arequipa-peru-103259

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Dave 126
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You are a wise-cracking intergalactic smuggler, on the run after being wrongly accused of murdering your wife, who tracks down rogue replicants and I claim my fiver!

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Dave 126
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A. Coatsworth deserves my upvote... but I had to use the internet to find out why!

('Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family', a H.P Lovecraft story concerning explorers and a city of white apes)

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Dave 126
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Re: Don't tell Steven Spielberg

I didn't mind the jungle setting in Crystal Skull. It was the Erich Von Daniken influences that spoilt it for me.... that, and that fridge.

Indiana Jones at the Mountains of Madness, anyone?

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Dave 126
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Re: White City of the Monkey God

1 Infinite Gloop

White City of the Monkey God

MMOFJ (Miles and Miles of F'ing Jungle)

Honduras

If out, please leave parcel with Mrs Trellis at Number 3.

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Nvidia waves 4King big Android Shield at games console warzone

Dave 126
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Re: Shame..

>Shame.. About the whole controller thing.

What do you mean? You can use PS3 and PS4 controllers on Android devices.

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Saygus aims buffed up V2 Android mobe at Samsung

Dave 126
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Factual info: Current Lollipop is buggy, update isn't here yet. Citations:

Bugs in Lollipop 5.0:

http://fieldguide.gizmodo.com/the-worst-bugs-in-android-5-0-lollipop-and-how-to-fix-t-1663090445

http://www.androidpit.com/android-5-0-lollipop-problems-and-solutions

Lollipop 5.1 release:

http://www.ibtimes.co.in/android-5-1-lollipop-update-nexus-4-nexus-5-nexus-7-nexus-10-coming-next-month-report-624657

I wasn't trolling Android - I use KitKat myself. Indeed, I'm happy with it so I'm not fussed if Sony take their time rolling out a stable version of Lollipop for my phone.

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Dave 126
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Saygus revealed an Android QWERTY phone in 2010, but it never materialised. Let's hope they fare better with this effort. http://www.engadget.com/2014/11/11/saygus-v2-smartphone/

Even if it doesn't work out, perhaps it will prompt Samsung to release an 'Active' (read: ruggedised) variant of the S6 with a removable battery. Whilst we're at it, a phone with a swappable battery would ideally have a small auxiliary battery to provide power whilst the main battery is being swapped over, so no restart is required.

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Dave 126
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>Lollipop is in the works, but the company refused to be drawn on exactly when.

Because Google hasn't yet released a bug-free version of Lollipop, maybe? It wouldn't be of any advantage to Saygus to draw attention to Google's misstep, either.

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£280k Kickstarter camera trigger campaign crashes and burns

Dave 126
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Re: The case

Too right - it ain't easy. Any cost and headaches involved with making a small flat part are only going to be many, many times greater with large 3D part. This product didn't warrant a costly bespoke case, IMHO.

The blanking plates could be ABS, steel or aluminium*. Prototypes could be cut by hand, or CNC drilled or laser cut. Small production runs could be laser or water cut. Larger production runs could be stamped out, after investment in a tool.

The plates could then just be assembled into an 'off the shelf' moulded enclosure, for which the cost of tooling has already been shared amongst previous customers.

*ABS might suffice for when you want holes for sockets and buttons, steel or aluminium could be better for tripod mounting threads.

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Dave 126
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The case

Creating injection moulding tools is expensive. The Ada could be based on an already manufactured case design, such as this Instrument Enclosure:

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/container-instrument-enclosure-custom-instrument-cases-project-box-207-103-37mm-8-15-4-06-1/1215651145.html

Note the blanking panels. These are far cheaper to manufacture to a specific design (they are a 2D components that can be moulded, stamped or laser cut, depending upon the production run) than the entire 3D enclosure. This way, the TriggerTrap team could still have had the ports where they needed them.

I can't see why Ada required a custom case, with all the expensive prototyping and tool machining that such an approach required.

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Curiosity rover RENDERED ARMLESS by short circuit

Dave 126
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Re: Remote Power Control Interfaces and their Shortcomings

Short ARM? I thought it used a Power chip!

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Chasing pennies, Sony, Microsoft and smartphone biz rivals retreat to mid-range

Dave 126
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About the Chinese...

Xiaomi are on the rise. They are pushing their brand in the US with a media tour, but aren't selling their phones there just yet. One review describes their new flagship as a cross between an iPhone and a Galaxy Note, with very good tolerances and build quality:

http://www.theverge.com/2015/2/26/8107087/xiaomi-mi-note-review

I've heard good things about Xiaomi's MIUI version of Android - it's available as a ROM for handsets from other vendors - but I've personally never bothered unlocking my bootloader and messing around with custom ROMs.

Heck, it wasn't that long ago that few of us had heard of HTC.

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Dave 126
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Re: Z3

We're agreed then - Sony make an excellent phone! You'd do your battery life time a favour by topping it up daily, ideally (but unrealistically) keeping it between 80% and 90%. The beauty of the long battery life is that it is easier to avoid deep cycling. I've had a look at the Z3C on iFixit though - eventual battery replacement is gonna be a PITA.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sony who ?

Very much so, but Sony sell more in Europe than they do in the US. They have very good battery life, waterproofing, SD card storage and an Android skin that isn't far from stock. More niche features include integration with Playstation, and a 5-ring audio jack which allows the use of stereo microphones and on-phone noise cancelling with some headsets.

HTC's USP is large speakers.

Samsung's USP is a removable battery... Oops, scratch that!

LG's USP is a power-hungry quad-HD screen. Oh, and a 192Khz 24bit DAC. (Dear LG - you're making a phone, not a home cinema system!)

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Dave 126
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Re: Z3

>Other facts missing is that the M4 has a plastic case, not glass + metal, and a lower spec CPU

C'mon Petur, the article did say the M4 had 'slightly less swanky components'. I don't think the article was incorrect in any way. Regarding battery life, I'm very happy with my Z3 Compact, but the largest single factor is how much an individual user uses their phone.

I use the less aggressive Stamina mode all the time (I won't get email notifications etc until I unlock the phone but I see that as a bonus). I think I have the very aggressive power savings set to kick in at 25% - though it doesn't realise if you are actively using the phone for navigation and will turn off the GPS anyhows.

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Ford to save you from BIKE FITNESS HORROR

Dave 126
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Re: all the wheels?

>The pro version is designed to fold into a Transit van with the wheels removed.

What, so if you don't remove the wheels from the bike then you can't fit it in a Transit? Just how big is this bike?

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Pebble Time Steel ready in May. Plus: Now you can strap on sensors, GPS ... Geiger counter

Dave 126
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Re: Light years ahead of competition

The competition have more features. If you want a connected watch with fewer features than the Pebble, there are Bluetooth watches that last over a year without charging or a battery change.

It's up for consumers to pick their own sweet spot on the features against battery life graph.

You've found yours at five days - and I agree that only charging every couple of days (so leaving yourself a couple of days margin) doesn't sound like too much hassle - and that's good.

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Dave 126
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Re: A Minor Quibble

Agreed - this Pebble just reminds me of a c.1984 CRT monitor.

If you don't mind the 'Sports Watch' look, and you only want some limited functionality, you might look at the Casio Bluetooth Watch or the Citizen EcoDrive Proximity. Battery life is 1 year for the Casio and forever for the Citizen.

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Dave 126
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I like the company...

...but I just can't get on with the sharp cornered screen within a rounded black rectangle design. It looks like something from a mid-nineties tech demo video. Oh well.

Off topic: *This* is a watch:

http://www.hodinkee.com/blog/just-because-the-omega-seamaster-chronograph-ref-st-176001

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Dave 126
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Re: Battery in straps

And of course a USB plug would be integrated into the strap buckle...

The downsides to having the battery in the strap are:

- Prevents customisation of the watch by using different straps

- Limits the strap design - So NATO, leather or Milanese straps are out.

- The volume available for a battery is fairly small.

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Dave 126
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Overhead lights. The photo was taken at the World Mobile Congress - a trade show.

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Here comes Vulkan: The next generation of the OpenGL graphics API

Dave 126
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Re: Waiting for Blizz to pull all this into WoW

AMD are likely to back this because, like Mantle, it reduces the load on the CPU. This suits AMD because their CPUs aren't as quick as Intel's.

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Dave 126
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Re: Great...

>Not many people care about Linux when Open GL runs faster under Windows with identical hardware.

That's likely to be a GPU driver issue. Vulkan should make it quicker for AMD and nVidia to get drivers out, because Vulkan asks the game engines to do what used to be the job of the graphics drivers.

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$250K: That's what Lenovo earned to RAT YOU OUT with Superfish

Dave 126
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Re: Just goes to show....

>. Sony are out due to rootkit

> Samsung are out due to ad injection & voyeuring via your TV

Er whatever.

Sony stopped making laptops last year and sold the VAIO brand. New VAIO laptops are coming soon.

Samsung stopped selling laptops in Europe last year.

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/laptop/3573470/samsung-exits-laptop-market-including-chromebooks/

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Out of time: Huawei, LG unveil watches nobody wants to buy

Dave 126
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Re: I just want...

>Because designing my own watch face would be great fun, besides, nice looking watches cost a lot of money.

It seems to me that you'd be better off with a colour e-ink display, since they only require power when changing state. The only issue is that they only seem to boast 150 Pixels Per Inch (modern phone screens have PPI above 300). An LCD or traditional watch hands can be placed above the e-ink display.

An illuminated LCD display would consume too much power - a Bluetooth LE chip can be powered by normal user movement. Citizen have Bluetooth watches that are powered in this way - no battery charging or battery changing required.

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Dave 126
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Re: Battery life

> battery sucking smart watch... ...not some cheap bit of tat with a plastic strap or plated metal that wears off.

A Bluetooth watch that never needs a new battery or charging, has a leather strap and stainless steel case:

http://www.citizenwatch.com/en-us/watches/watch-detail/?model=AT7035-01E

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Dave 126
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Re: What am I missing?

>essentially serves no new purpose.

You see no benefit that is worth the cost (cost being daily charging, bulky size, and money etc). So we're looking at a cost benefit analysis.

What if someone could offer you an EcoDrive watch that was the same as yours, but just had a button to help you find your phone? Citizen do:

Introducing Proximity, a perpetual calendar chronograph with second time zone, 12/24 hour time, power reserve, sporty leather strap with a nylon backing, 46mm case & 100M WR. This timepiece is Bluetooth 4.0 compatible and just like the watch this low energy Bluetooth is powered by Eco-Drive technology. Through the Bluetooth 4.0 connection with your iPhone®, you can be alerted to incoming calls, emails, messages, reminders, and alerts.

- http://www.citizenwatch.com/en-us/watches/watch-detail/?model=AT7030-05E

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Dave 126
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Re: I just want...

>A face that's always on, and it's design can be changed via a USB connection. Just a simple watch.

Why would you want that?! If you want a different watch design, just put on a different watch. Seriously - accurate, reliable quartz watches are available for so little money.

The connected part of connected watches isn't a major power draw, as Casio and Citizen have shown.

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Phabba-dabba-do: Samsung hypes up Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge

Dave 126
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Re: Meh

>Another big plus with a removable battery is you can hastily yank it if your (non-waterproofed) phone goes pint-diving or takes a spill, and if you're quick enough you may just save it (managed that with an accidentally inundated laptop recently).

That's one solution, I guess - though not necessary for some Samsung and Sony phones. I'd rather waterproofing was a standard feature across all phone vendors (as it is on wristwatches, more or less).

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Dave 126
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Re: Meh

>It should be no different to iPhone, where if the battery starts to show its age then you just get a £20 replacement which takes less than 5 minutes to install.

Let's wait for the iFixit teardown and 'repairability score' before we pass judgement!

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In Barcelona, no one can hear you scream ... HTC, Valve unleash Giger-inspired VR headgear

Dave 126
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Re: "Sony isn't really Sony as much as it used to be"

>I will never buy another piece of Sony hardware again, period.

Are you sure? I mean Sony camera sensors are used in kit from quite a few vendors.

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Dave 126
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Re: Hololens isn't VR...it's AR..

The developers have to have some hardware before they can really get stuck into creating some great AR applications.

Sony have taken the approach of making some developer-only AR goggles.

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Acer enters Windows Phone fray with cheap Liquid M220 mobe

Dave 126
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I use an Android phone. That said, it seems that 80% of the time, only 20% of the Apps are used.

Really, I like the home-screen on Windows Phone - Phone, Email, Maps, Text, Internet.

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Just want a simple, low-power GPU for your smart-gumble? Try using your Imagination

Dave 126
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Re: WTF??

A watch probably doesn't, but that doesn't mean that there aren't applications that sit in the region of the graph defined thus: Medium resolution, high frame rate 2D interface, low power consumption.

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MEGA PATENT DUMP! Ericsson, Smartflash blitz Apple: iPhone, iPad menaced by sales block

Dave 126
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Re: oIrony

>This lawsuit is nice, but better yet, someone needs to go back to ~2001 and figure out how a company that had almost shit for spending wound up spending so little to create so many products so quickly

Basically, Apple read Wired.com's advice '101 Ways to Save Apple', and did the opposite on almost every point:

http://archive.wired.com/wired/archive/5.06/apple_pr.html

But seriously, Jobs returned to Apple in '97, the iMac was announced 18 months later. The iPod was released three years later in 2001, the iPhone 6 years after that... that's not a breakneck speed.

Remember that Apple's problem in the mid nineties was too large a product portfolio. They already had a talented design team - with experience of ARM-based hand-held devices - that wasn't being fully used by upper management.

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Dave 126
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Re: RE: The wheel

The rounded corners thing was a 'Design Patent' - which is not what we would think of as a real ('Utility') Patent - it's more akin to Aston Martin protecting the shape of the grills on their cars, for example. Whilst a Design Patent has been granted to Apple for the specific corner radius and ratios, it may be too broad to enforce and it hasn't yet been tested in court.

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/ac/ido/oeip/taf/patdesc.htm

http://www.theverge.com/2012/11/7/3614506/apple-patents-rectangle-with-rounded-corners

Next!

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HTC One M9 hands on: Like a smart M8 in a sharp suit

Dave 126
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Re: Sounds good!

If you buy outright, then you are covered by the Sales of Goods Act, so you can demand a replacement or a refund (your choice) if the phone proves unfit for purpose.

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Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

Dave 126
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Re: They're not TVs anymore.

>"Judging by the comments often made on Reg articles, we suspect It'd have a winner on its hands if it did the same again now."

Isn't that idea the norm now, separating the panel, sound system and 'tuner'? The tuners and speakers of many LCD sets go unused by many owners. The inclusion of speakers in LCD sets rarely makes the set bigger - instead the compromise is in the sound quality because the expectation is any user who cares audio will use multiple external speakers.

Satellite and cable receivers, PVRs and streaming video boxes are often used instead of the TV's internal tuner.

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