* Posts by Dave 126

6264 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: sounding rocket?

The term was new to me until today - when I read it in another Reg article.

According to Wikipedia, it means the same as 'research rocket', and 'sound' means to probe...

Hence the 'Lambda Sond' (Lambda sensor) grill badge on some older Volvos.

1
0

World goes SIM-free, leaving Sony and HTC trailing behind

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Any advice?

Thank you for your suggestions and feedback guys!

I'll see how well he adapts to a landscape keyboard first - then try a swpye keyboard. Then a new phone.

Some people have enjoyed using 'swype' keyboards using the Galaxy Note's stylus, according to one forum thread I've just read.

Despite having a number of compact cameras, his phone has become his main photographic device, so there is a case for him to get another phone anyway. A Galaxy Note 4 seems to have a well-regarded camera, big screen - and who knows, maybe he'll find the stylus handy.

Samsung's strange swapping of Android's [Back] and [Menu] keys will be fun for him!

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Any advice?

My old man is getting frustrated with his Nexus 5 (5" screen) because his sausage fingers make typing difficult, so wants my advice in getting a new phone. Has anyone here with sausage fingers found that a 6" phone makes typing easier?

Thanks in advance!

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

I just bought a £45 phone...

...and it ain't bad at all! Seriously, it hasn't annoyed me once yet!

I needed a phone that day (having punched my painfully slow £25 (unlocked, from Sainsbury's) Alcatel Pixi 3 in the screen for refusing to read an SD card properly the day before) and went to an EE shop. I didn't want to spend much because I have a fancy phone in need of expensive repair. The price tag said £90 for a Huawei Y560, but the manager had a ring-binder and said I could have it for £45.

I'm really happy with it. Within 5 minutes of opening the box - it shipped with the battery at 50% charge - I'd popped in my EE contract SIM, restored my contacts from Google and had a fully functional phone. It's snappy and doesn't pause or lag for normal tasks (the Snapdragon 210 gets warm during modest strategy games, no matter), it's 4G, Android Lollipop, has a camera flash, GPS, 1GB RAM... I really can't find any major shortcomings with it. SD card slot, replaceable battery, it's all there. At its list price it has some competition, but at £45 it is amazingly good value.

If you do buy a budget phone, the important thing isn't the internal storage (most have SD card slots) but the RAM - shockingly, some Android phones are still sold with less than 1GB of RAM which is just asking for frustration.

(Meanwhile, the quoted repair cost for my Sony Z3 Compact remains £85. It's like when my mate's Hitachi disc cutter died and rather than pay £80 to fix it he bought one from Lidl or £50 with a 3-year guarantee)

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "SIM free" ?

Also, if you buy the phone outright you are covered by the Sales of Goods Act ("This phone has failed, please give me my money back now!") as opposed to having the use of a phone that remains property of EE/O2 until the end of your contract period ("What do you mean I have to wait a fortnight for you to send it off to be repaired?!").

In addition, you can ring your network operator at any time and say "You competitors are offering me the same tariff for less. Please knock a few quid off my monthly bill or I'll leave you for them!"

12
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: IPhone fatigue?

Sadly, the trashbat.co.ck website seems to be down... but I have found one image of the Wasp T12 Speechtool, though alas it doesn't show the T12's fold-out twin jogdials for one-the-go MP3 mixing, or its integrated business card printer.

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8641/16615827980_f8ca763638.jpg

https://musicfashionperv.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/nathan.jpg

Now, that's a phone!

I'm hoping that George Lucas decides to make Special Edition of Nathan Barley, by using CGI to add hipster beards and sailor tattoos to the characters.

5
0

Would we want to regenerate brains of patients who are clinically dead?

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: That icon ?

>The trick is knowing what icons, and the names thereof, that are still lurking on the server.

Have you found the angel/demon Jobs/Gates icons?

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Braiiinssss

>It seem to be more probable to me that this is a treatment for people who were just over the brink after a slightly late resusication than doing a frankenstien.

There are cases of brain damage occurring in a clinical environment - for example brain swelling some hours after admission to hospital. There are even cases of pregnant patients whose brains are dead whose bodies are kept alive for months until the baby they are carrying can be delivered by Ceasarian section.

The article's discussion of people surviving after spending time without breathing was to illustrate the point that 'death' isn't as easy to define as once it was - indeed, last month's National Geographic had an article on this very subject.

You raise a good point about the importance of CPR training. Ideally, the first responder will shout for someone else to call the emergency services whilst they administer CPR immediately. Hollywood and TV gives the impression that five minutes of passionate CPR might revive the patient, but that isn't the case - it's usually done continuously until paramedics arrive, and then only improves the patients chances.

Can anyone provide input about the 999 services being able to pinpoint a mobile phone - in the scenario that the first responder is alone with a patient?

2
0

New solar cell breaks efficiency records, turns 34% of light into 'leccy

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Barking in the wrong forest.

>Until someone thinks up a way to spray pv on its not a good enough solution for most available locations.

Installation costs... not sure that spraying would save that much time. I imagine most of the installation labour costs are those associated with working at heights - erecting scaffolding, basically. This cost could be shared if it is combined with other maintenance work - or the installation of external insulation on the walls of the house (popular in Germany, I'm told, though I've seen it done in England).

Hmmm... I could imagine a cherry-picker hoisting a rolled-up array of solar panels above the apex of the house, and it could then be unfurled downwards.

Or a modular array of smaller PV panels, each lifted into place by a few robotic quad-copters, such as these: https://www.ted.com/talks/vijay_kumar_robots_that_fly_and_cooperate?language=en

0
0

Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not?

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Stupid masochists.

I think you may be right, EddieD. My confusion may stem from Mr Ploppy featuring in the episode 'Head', in which other body parts were lopped off.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Stupid masochists.

Oooh, you don't want to have a good idea. My grandfather had a good idea once and his toes fell off.

?

Yeah, he thought it would be a good idea to trim his toenails with a scythe.

- Mr Ploppy, Blackadder II

10
0

Got $130,000 down the back of the sofa? Great. Grab an HP 3D printer

Dave 126
Silver badge

The use of 'a' or 'an' depends upon the pronunciation, not the spelling of the following noun. Because the correct pronunciation of 'h' is 'aitch', then 'an' should be used before 'HP' , as in "An HP engineer explained to us..."

We do the same with 'm' ('em'), as in "A Minister of Parliament was caught in an hotel room with..." versus "An MP was caught in..."

'Hotel' may be pronounced without the 'h' being stressed, so both 'a hotel' and 'an hotel' are commonly used. 'Heirloom' is always 'an', 'Hangman' is always 'a'.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Over-hyped stupidity

>Over-hyped stupidity

>Neat and useful technology yes.

Er, so whcih one is it? Make your mind up!

>People have actually claimed "3D Printed Car"

So, you managed to find the words of some idiots on the internet... well done Jeff, that must have been hard! :) Meanwhile, the people who actually make cars, Ford, BMW et al, are interested in this - as they always have been in CAD and prototyping tech.

For sure, 3D printing has been over-hyped in the past - by idiots - but this HP process has my attention. It's worth noting that they bided their time - they bought Stratasys (fused material deposition) quite a few years back before letting them go without any HP product being released.

It ain't going to change the face of manufacturing, but it will be a consistent way of bringing products with short production runs (up to 10,000, say) to market.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: 10 bob

Many parts of HP's printer are 3D-printed. HP aren't making tens of thousands of these things, so 3D printing is a suitable manufacturing process.

In any case, the plastic bits of the printer aren't likely to be those that wear out and need replacing.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "The market is forecast to rise from $4.1bn in 2015 to $16.2bn by 2020"

>upwards of £30,000 per seat for CAD, and that didn't include the workstation.

>>Don't they still pay at least that much for CAD?

Actually, yeah, they do - but since I only introduced it to make the point that in some industries any advantage is worth a lot of money, I didn't see the need to stretch the credulity of the general Reg readership. Bless them.

Rhino 3D, 3D Studio Max are in the £ hundreds

SolidWorks, Alias, Siemens NX, etc are £ thousands

Catia etc £ tens of thousands

The pricing in part came about from a time when the hardware to run the software cost £ millions. It started to change in the mid nineties when desktop-class hardware, most famously by Solidworks, the start-up capital for which was raised by card-counting in Las Vegas casinos - the founder was one of *those* MIT blackjack students they made a film about.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: This article lacks technical detail.

More info here:

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3071035/emerging-technology/hp-begins-selling-its-jet-fusion-3d-printer-says-its-50-cheaper-10x-faster-than-others.html

Fused powder bed

Nylon

Colours and conductive parts

Bed size 16-in. x 12-in. x 16-in.

2
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Oh, I'm quite interested in what this might be...

RepRap and Makerbot cost £500 are aimed at hobbyists that might not even know what they want them for.

If you are just about to spend £120,000 on something, your job depends upon reading the data sheets and justifying to your finance department why it is a good investment - who will not accept "I liked the name" as a good enough reason.

5
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "The market is forecast to rise from $4.1bn in 2015 to $16.2bn by 2020"

>19% annual rise of almost entirely cheap crap toy printer shipments somehow predicts a 400% rise in revenue over the next 5 years?

No, it doesn't, nobody said that will be cheap printers that will drive the market up to $16 billion - the Reg writer just left those two sentence together when he assembled his info from a research report. Whilst far more cheap printers are sold than expensive ones, the expensive ones are effing expensive.

The figures are fairly sensible, especially when you consider that a *mature* 3D printer can be economic at producing parts in fewer numbers (say tens of thousands) than injection moulding - it is a device for manufacture, not just prototyping.

The powder bed deposition method ( as opposed to stereolithography or fused material deposition - the basis of cheap hobbyist printers) which HP is using prints in nylon with conductive parts if needs be. Pretty darned useful.

The automotive industry are all over this - anything that saves time. Remember this is the industry that until a couple of decade ago would be paying upwards of £30,000 per seat for CAD, and that didn't include the workstation.

2
1

Politician claims porn tabs a malware experiment, then finds God

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Ivone

Or a Yahooing, in the case of this politician!

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

They had some great articles. Its hard to think of a significant American author who hasn't written for Playboy.

These days, the writers have passed away, and Playboy doesn't do nudity. Oh well.

12
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Wrong shaming

>Shouldn't the real shaming be that he's using Yahoo! in the year 2016?

I came here to say that! Well done, well done.

2
0

Adpocalypse 'will wipe out display ad growth' by 2020

Dave 126
Silver badge

And who pays the wages of people websites? Where does the revenue come from? For sure, the joy in the nineties was reading websites created by, and for, enthusiasts as their hobby - but at the time it was a supplement to magazines and newspapers. In reality, I spent a lot of pocket money on dead tree magazines, like PC Zone and later (thankfully I expanded my hobbies beyond gaming) Mountain Biking UK, the latter worth it for the beautifully painted full-colour artwork*.

Yeah, everything was more awesome in the 90s, but paying £14 for a CD album wasn't so much.

The buzzword back in the '90s was 'micro-payments' - it didn't take off at the time, but the idea was to make it easy to pay website you like a few pence per visit. Now one can imagine paying a modest subscription to read content from a group of websites. Some tradition journals now have apps or subscriptions available through tablets (primarily iPads). The tradition of having full access to a website if you have a subscription to a dead-tree magazine is long established (New Scientist, Which?)

It might not have escaped your attention that the focus of stories on The Register is changing slightly, with more stories about storage, since these are of interest to the people who might just buy the goods and services advertised.

*Nice picture: http://www.thisiswhy.ip3.co.uk/thisiswhy/index.html I do note that the hand-written text is often too small to read on a 1920 x 1200 display, but it looked lovely on the glossy page of a magazine. It would look good on a high-res tablet, though.

1
10

5% of drivers want Nigel Farage to be their in-car robo butler

Dave 126
Silver badge

Four paragraphs about Stephen Fry? Tch,

Okay, we get it... he's earned a lot of money from his pen (er, succession of Macs and a non-Word word-processors), his columns for newspapers have been collected and published in book form, his novels best sellers, he was a close friend of the much championed constructive critic of technology Douglas Adams, he's spent a lot of money of gadgets and cocaine...

One can only assume that Mr Orlowski watches too much UK television if he is that irritated by Stephen Fry. I say this kindly: someone get him a PVR, or Kodi with extensions, or Netflix subscription or whatever... it's the 21st century FFS, you can do this with a £20 dongle and your phone these days! We do not have to put up whatever falls into your gogglebox over the airwaves anymore (I'm assuming Mr Orlowski has broadband internet). One can only assume passive over-exposure to Stephen Fry is the reason behind his animosity, because it would be impolite to ascribe it to the jealousy of one writer for another.

I like Stephen Fry, his writings, his performances in Black Adder and Jeeves and Wooster, his journey towards self-acceptance, his presenting of suitable TV shows even. I don't watch QI or advertisements, though. I'm not adverse to people taking the piss out of him, but since such people have included Clement Freud et al on Just a Minute it seems a bit redundant here.

7
1

The Windows 10 future: Imagine a boot stamping on an upgrade treadmill forever

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: You shouldn't be

@Bobchip + LDS

You might be arguing with @redpawn at cross-purposes... his comment seemed pretty ironic.

5
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

For some people, sure.

Some applications, in finance, engineering and content creation are still tied to Windows, though VMs and and WINE are sometimes viable options. For some of these applications, I see them becoming platform-agnostic before they become ported specifically to Linux - though the end result (no barrier to using Linux as primary OS) will effectively be the same.

A curious driver that I haven't seen much comment on - some organisations using fleets of old, second hand (but still perfectly fast enough for office tasks) PCs, where adding Windows and Office licenses would multiply the cost of the machine by a factor of four or five. (though I can't be arsed to find to find the info and do the sums to factor in the power consumption cost of using Pentium 4-era PCs over more modern efficient machines)

0
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: @Trevor

If only cancer could be cured by restoring from a known-good (genetic) system image!

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: So...

>"those still struggling to get rid of IE & ActiveX crap are in for a massive re-wire effort either way."

>>Which gives them the opportunity and reason to make a long-term decision.

I get the impression that whatever one uses to replace IE5 and ActiveX is platform-agnostic. That is, people having learnt their lesson about getting stuck in the mud before will not make the same mistake again, and make the decision to keep their options open in future. I'm no expert, but it seems that if even productivity software such as 3D CAD can now be run through a web browser, the actual OS of the desktop computer (er, terminal?) doesn't matter so much any more for many tasks, so long as it's secure and reliable.

2
1
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: RE: Will be used to download Android desktop

Android really isn't suitable - each OS update requires input from various OEMs. That's why Google developed ChromeOS.

However, many of the people who might move to ChromeOS - i.e those not dependant on Windows applications - may well have already moved to some mainstream flavour of desktop Linux.

1
1

Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Ruskies robbed!

>a plot-line about the Eurovision Song Contest being rigged by Aliens or the CIA?

That actually is the plot from an episode of Father Ted.

My Lovely Horse!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzYzVMcgWhg

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Ugh, it's in Innopolis

>as far as I can see, Innopolis is pretty much in the middle of nowhere

Zoom out dear boy, zoom out from the link you provided, and you'll see that Innopolis is about 15 minutes car journey from Kazan, a city with over a million residents. Indeed, Innopolis appears to be nothing but a technology park on the outskirts of Kazan, as the name suggests. A quick Google confirms Innopolis was created in 2012 as Special Economic Area.

I can't spot Kazan night clubs from the air, but they seem to have some massive civic buildings, an imposing a university, a huge basketball stadium... I get the impression that your entertainment tastes can be catered to, whatever they are.

Wikipedia then confirms that Kazan is one of the foremost cities in Russia for science and for sport.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazan

Thank you, I had not heard of the place before!

4
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

>Such a simple CPU would be small enough to be understood by a single person so it can be audited easily.

I don't doubt what you say, but of course the handset/terminal is but one part of a chain... any audit would have to extent to all the systems the handset interacts with. Already this week the Reg has reported that the identity of GSM handsets (and thus Telegram, Whatsapp users et al) can be easily spoofed.

1
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: "Trusted"

In support of @foo_bar_baz's comment:

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/a-post-modern-dictatorship3f/5752628

(Page has link to mp3 podcast, no transcript, sorry!)

Peter Pomerantsev argues that the one great difference between historical Soviet propaganda and what Russians see today, is that for the Soviets, the idea of truth was important—even when they were lying. Today's regime displays its indifference to and playfulness with the truth.

It's an interview with Peter Pomerantsev, TV Producer, essayist for the LRB and The Atlantic. The host of the radio show is Philip Adams, a former film producer, advertiser, farmer and self-proclaimed 'old leftie'.... and he's been sacked by Rupert Murdoch twice. He's interviewed everyone from Monty Pythons to Mikhail Gorbachev.

6
1

Art heist 'pranksters' sent down for six months

Dave 126
Silver badge

I had to scan the article a couple of times too. They didn't pretend to kidnap a random member of the public, the 'hostage' was actually an accomplice:

Later that same day they staged a similar "prank" at Tate Britain - this time appearing to take a female hostage, although she too was part of the team.

And whilst I'd like to think I'd jump to the rescue of someone being kidnapped (if I could without further endangering the victim), you never know how you react in these situations until they happen.

A friend of mine has been 'phoney kidnapped', but that was all above board - it was part of a training course he was sent on before working for an NGO in some troubled countries.

8
0

Inside Electric Mountain: Britain's biggest rechargeable battery

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: It's not a battery

'Battery' comes from the Latin 'the act of beating', and so organised groups of artillery became known as batteries. This usage was extended to other arrays of similar things, so a group of power cells became known as a battery. In fact today we often use 'battery' for mere single cells, as 'AA' often are - by contrast, square 9V 'PP3's are batteries of lower voltage cells. This power station is a battery of valves and turbines.

And should you be standing in the wrong place at the wrong time, it would certainly batter you, like an egg in a food blender!

27
0

Aussie wedges spam javelin in ring spanner

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: How impressive?

Spanners are drop-forged then case-hardened, that is they are hard on the outside and tough on the inside - else they would deform when used or shatter if dropped.

Instead of cutting it off, they could heat the spanner, then rapidly quench it and then twat it with a large hammer, thus shattering the spanner and liberating the man's tool... oh, wait... well, I guess he wouldn't do it again!

18
0

Curiosity find Mars' icecaps suck up its atmosphere

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Forget and don't worry about dumb space rocks, Dave 126

>Better to have the ability to haul any potential asteroid-mitigating technology inro orbit, and / or wirk towards a self sustaining extraterrestial colony.

>>Genuine question: Why?

Well, y'know, it's good to have a hobby!

>the only real benefit would be some kind of political escape/hermitism to break away from the main cluster of civilization.

That and having some form of redundancy of habitat for our species. And if you see our future as being VR/Brain-Computer link/ Uploaded Conciousness or whatever, then what matters if our inert bodies / brains in jars are on a terrestial Eden or in orbit around the sun?

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: New Orderly World Orders AI …. for Live Operational Virtual Environments ‽

That's all well and good, but it'd only take one lump of space rock crashing into Earth to wreck any dteams of a terrestial utopia.

Better to have the ability to haul any potential asteroid-mitigating technology inro orbit, and / or wirk towards a self sustaining extraterrestial colony. Once wehave assured our survival we can tgen work towards making it a fair and beautiful survival.

3
0

Italians rattle little tin for smartmobe mini lenses

Dave 126
Silver badge

Sounds like geckos' feet

Medical bods have been interested in a non-adhesive but very grippy surface for a while - potential applications include holding back skin during surgery.

Geckos achieve this by having an extremely high surface area of their pads - a surface which sub-divides many times.

https://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ronf/Gecko/

0
0

Auto erotic: Self-driving cars will let occupants bonk on the go

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Windows

You can already buy LCD-based films for windows, that will switch from transparent to translucent at the flick of switch.

It's available as a self-adhesive film for easy retrofitting to windows, apparently.

http://www.invisishade.com/

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Blobby cars?

Look back to the past...

The only product known to have been bought by what is to believed Apple's car division is a 1959 Fiat 500 Multipla:

http://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/gallery/FIAT-600-Multipla-2342_18.jpg

It doesn't look completely dissimilar to the Google car, but is more attractive. The use of interior space is good too, and could be further advanced with an electric drivetrain.

Who knows, it's all conjecture. Jony Ive is known to be a Fiat fan, though his daily vehicle is a chauffeur driven (at his bosses' insistance) Bentley Mulsanne

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Fatal flaw in self drive?

Indeed.

Volvo believes that Level 3 autonomy, where the driver needs to be ready to take over at a moment's notice, is an unsafe solution. Because the driver is theoretically freed up to work on email or watch a video while the car drives itself, the company believes it is unrealistic to expect the driver to be ready to take over at a moment's notice and still have the car operate itself safely. "It's important for us as a company, our position on autonomous driving, is to keep it quite different so you know when you're in semi-autonomous and know when you're in unsupervised autonomous,"

Volvo's Drive Me autonomous car, which will launch in a public pilot next year, is a Level 4 autonomous car — this means not only will it drive itself down the road, but it is capable of handling any situation that it comes across without any human intervention. As a result, the human doesn't need to be involved in the driving at all. If something goes wrong, the car can safely stop itself at the side of the road.

- http://www.theverge.com/2016/4/27/11518826/volvo-tesla-autopilot-autonomous-self-driving-car

(Please don't take this post as a recommendation of Volvo's products - I'm no expert. However, their approach does strike me as being safer. There was a racing video game called WipEout which featured a 5 second autopilot 'powerup' - resuming control of the racing craft always gave me nervous, and would occasionally result in me crashing my virtual vehicle. )

3
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: If you are required to be available to take over

@DougS

This is exactly the point that Volvo are making. They claim they are making a system that can drive in all situations, and they are critical of Tesla's system that still requires a human driver to suddenly take over in the event of something unexpected occurring on the road.

Also, the size of a Volvo is more amenable to horizontal dancing than a Tesla... I think Volvo's marketing department has missed a trick by not making more of this!

3
0

Wi-Fi network named 'mobile detonation device' grounds plane

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Lots of lateness

People have said on forums that they give their phone's WiFi hotspots names like 'FBI Surveillance Van' to deter leeches, and 'Ebola Response Unit 2' just for the giggles, but just for when they were in earth-bound cafes - none of them advocated silliness on a plane.

3
0

SpaceX adds Mars haulage to its price list

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Less than $200 an ounce

According to this still from the documentary 'Total Recall', Trump has already been to Mars:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7114/7423325574_33f7ee54aa_b.jpg

10
0

Watch it Apple: time has come for cheaper rivals' strap-ons

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Android wear

Good to her that the Sony Smart Watch 3 is working well... Sony actually had a connected watch years, but their first attempt didn't receive great reviews (would too often lose connection, apparently).

Another Sony gadget that makes some sense - and could be considered a 'wearable' - is their usb-stick-sized Bluetooth Headset. It can clip to your top like small MP3 players, and can be held to your ear to make calls or you can plug wired earphones into it, as you would a phone. It includes media controls, for playing back music from a phone, or can function as an FM radio independently of the phone. It also has a monochrome display for phone notifications. It makes sense for people with big phones, or for people whose phones live in the bottom of a bag.

I'm not recommending it here - you can find your own reviews - but I'm mentioning it because it is curious that so much coverage and discussion of 'wearables' omits devices like this.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Too late to market...

This was a nice thread until you came along with your ad hominem attack. Everyone was showing consideration for other's points of view, even if they didn't agree with them. Well done.

Most of the people on this thread either don't wear a watch, or don't want a smartwatch to do as much as an Apple Watch - so its strange that you should feel threatened by one comment in support of it.

6
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

>Only annoyance is the Citizen only seems to work with iPhone.

When it was first released, it, like the Casio, only worked with iPhones because Android didn't support Bluetooth Low Energy at that time (though a some Samsung handsets had the hardware).

Sadly, there still appears to be no Android version - and a plea on XDA has gone unanswered. Maybe Citizen didn't sell enough of them, so haven't invested the time into an Android version?

0
0

Q. What's the difference between smartphones and that fad diet you all got bored of? A. Nothing

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: No Choice

>In a bygone era there was a wide choice of different style phones with differing specs.

Indeed. The picture used to illustrate the article is of the Xperia Go, which was ruggedised and waterproof (sadly it was crippled by too little RAM, and couldn't cope with the version of Android Sony updated it to). Since then, Sony haven't asked you to choose between a fast flagship phone and a waterproof phone.

1
0

SpaceX: We'll land on Mars in 2018 (cough, with NASA's help)

Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Why send it empty?

>as many rolls of gaffer tape as will fit!! And a few packs of chewing gum and maybe a ball of string for good measure.

According to 1950s Sci Fi B-movies, it's the underwires from ladies' bras that are used to fix some critical machine, for some odd reason. It would seem technology has moved on since then!.

0
0
Dave 126
Silver badge

Re: Why send it empty?

A manned mission would require a much larger spacecraft, so the addition of what little you could fit in this Dragon module won't be super helpful. Then you have the problem of the retrieving whatever useful gear the dragon is loaded with - a manned mission might land dozens or hundreds of miles away.

I'm sympathetic to your point though... how about some scientific equipment, or a rover?

1
0

Forums