* Posts by Dave 126

6078 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Hi! Up here! I'm your Amazon drone. Do you mind if I land now?

Dave 126
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Re: Prior Art

>"on the web" seems enough to validate many an existing piece of IP so ..

The patent examiners need documentation, so yeah, the web can be as good as print if its date can be verified.

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Facebook throws BlackBerry an HTML bone

Dave 126
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>

This strikes me of being more of a perception issue than a technical one.

Yep.

There are of course larger issues at play in this whole web Vs app question, such as data in silos and funding of web content in the age of adblockers (and thus the common blurring between editorial and advertising content).

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Dave 126
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>The only thing is that you don't get audio notifications of when you get a message

You can of course have Facebook send you an email when someone sends you a Facebook message. Depending upon your email client and provider, you can have such email use a different notification noise to other emails.

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Furious English villagers force council climbdown over Satan's stone booty

Dave 126
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Re: To be fair...

>Surround it with a traffic island, with the usual high-visibility signage. Job done.

That was my first thought, but modern street furniture is fairly ugly. The contrast twixt rock n road could be increased in a more attractive way - by painting the surrounding tarmac perhaps.

I like the look of small French towns. Instead of using yellow lines to denote where your can't park, they simply use cobbled areas to mark where you can park. Motoruists are credited with the common sense. The result is so much more attractive, and restful (your eyes aren't constantly taking in a "Oi, No!" signal).

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Dave 126
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Re: Move the bloody thing

That's a bit strong.

It caused no injury. Given its location, no car should be travelling fast enough to injure the occupants of the vehicle should they hit it. If people didn't have ridiculous, expensive colour-matched bumpers on their cars, the cost of repair would be far lower too.

Being purely pragmatic, it would be cheaper to paint the tarmac - or even fit solar LED road studs - around the boulder than it would to move it.

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Dave 126
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Re: The compensation culture at work!

The boulder is grey, the tarmac around it is grey... simple solution would be to paint (or apply that high grip coloured epoxy finish to) the surrounding tarmac, in order to enhance contrast. No need to paint the boulder, or to erect a fence.

For sure, the motorist erred, but one should design systems with human fallibility in mind.

I haven't found mention of what time of day or in what weather conditions the motorist hit it. There are a good number of motorists who don't use their daylight running lamps (use them in anything less than perfect visibility, and that includes on sunny days when in the shade of trees etc), or are late in turning on their headlamps towards dusk.

(Picture is on the BBC link in the article)

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IBM's 'neurosynaptic chip' to power nuke-watching exascale rig

Dave 126
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Informative comment from another site:

bluemellophone

3/30/16 11:49am

Alright, Ph.D. computer vision researcher here.

First off, TrueNorth is a great project. Our university has been able to get its hands on a few of these chips for testing - the folks working on these chips are about a 10 second walk down the hall from my lab. TrueNorth has turned the now-somewhat-routine computer vision research problem of image classification on its side by approaching it from a different angle: the hardware. This is great because nobody else is really doing this on a large scale except for IBM. TrueNorth could lead to some neat new insights on how to make our current solutions more computationally and memory efficient. In some aspects, it already has. That’s not to say that TrueNorth is limited to only computer vision applications, but it is why I’m curious about its recent developments.

That being said, TrueNorth has by no means the same level of reliability, accuracy, or scalability of the technologies behind Google’s self-driving cars or Facebook’s face detection or Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect. The latest research (http://arxiv.org/abs/1603.08270, http://arxiv.org/abs/1602.02830) indicates that TrueNorth has a difficult time implementing a particular operation called a convolution. Convolutions are important because it allows for a computer to take a large, complex image — of say, a cat — and boil it down to its most important conceptual components — like fur, cat ears, tail. There is evidence that our brains work in a similar way to deconstruct an image into its abstract concepts so that our brains can process what we see. This is a problem for TrueNorth because the cool, sexy computer vision applications making the recent headlines are pretty much all based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs). Specifically, TrueNorth implements a form of CNN known as a BinaryNet by Courbariaux et al. but with some pretty severe technical drawbacks.

Long story short, TrueNorth may someday make its way onto phones for select tasks, but take the GIF at the top of the story with a grain of salt. The development of this platform is in its infancy. Another platform to watch is Nvidia’s Jetson line, which has an architecture more akin with ongoing research in the field and thus can inherit state-of-the-art ideas easier. I’m interested to see where TrueNorth ends up in 5 years, but I’m not holding my breath for the field to adopt it en masse.

- http://gizmodo.com/this-supercomputer-mimics-a-human-brain-using-just-2-5-1767958119

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Dave 126
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Re: 2.5 watts ? Really ?

>So are we really talking about a mere 2.5 watts ? Not even enough to boil water, I'd wager.

How much water?

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Monster crowdfunding total raised for Sinclair ZX Spectrum Vega+

Dave 126
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Lemmings on the Speccy? Oh no! :)

Played it to death on the PC, jealous of Amiga friends who had the music and sound effects. Never played a version without a mouse. Just found this site, which has Lemmings level editors and fan conversions for HP and TI calculators, amongst other platforms:

http://www.lemmingsuniverse.net/downloads.html

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Dave 126
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Re: Nostalgia crisis

Dune 2 is available for free on the Google Play Store - it plays very well on an Android tablet. Well worth revisiting.

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Oculus Rift review-gasm round-up: The QT on VR

Dave 126
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Re: 'Stereoscopic tellys'.......sorry, sorry about that, i mean, '3D TV's

You are a twit.

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Dave 126
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Re: Article in brief

>I'm quitting the beer except for events and holidays, so gaming becomes all the more important.

And fair play to you too, AC. You don't need beer to be a good and interesting person. A change is as good as a rest, as they say.

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Dave 126
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Re: Halfway house to VR:

>One small problem: you have to turn your head to "look sideways" but you have to keep looking at the same spot (your monitor)

You are quite right, DropBear, I had that thought too. Then I remembered that these PC gamers often have two or three monitors side-by-side, or a very wide monitor with a 'cinema' aspect ratio (extra monitors are fairly inexpensive compared to enthusiast-level GPUs and fancy flight-sim controllers). Also, the IR trackers don't track eyeballs, so there is some margin. Plus, the movement of the gamer's head doesn't have to be translated in a linear fashion to the virtual avatar's head movement.

Like I said, I haven't tried IR head-tracking, but if I became a gaming enthusiast the low cost of entry means I might give it a go.

EDIT: I now see Gordon 10 has confirmed that the head tracking doesn't have to be linear. Hmmm, I wonder if people have tried using it for productivity software and having a very wide virtual desktop... :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Come on real time mocap

>VR will get amazing once real time motion capture

Hmmm, just wondering what the current latency of the MS Kinect's skeletal tracking mode is. Certainly it can do all you mention, with the possible exception of the very low latency required for VR.

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Dave 126
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Re: Lovely.

>[0] Side-note: Speaking of squinting ... what kind of ocular havoc will this cause with long-term use? I'm pretty certain that's a serious question ...

The military might have some data on that, because the Rift works on the same principle as Night Vision Goggles - that is, the image is presented to you as being around 1.3 metres from your eyes - which is where their focus falls without any muscles being used.

Contrast this with reading a book, or watching a television a few metres away - both activities require the eye to be actively focused with muscles.

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Dave 126
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Re: Having tried the Rift

Indeed, most of the reviews are very positive about the hardware, and the concerns voiced are those largely common to most MKI products. Most reviews also say to wait and see, because:

- You can't buy one yet anyway, and won't until the pre-orders have been fulfilled in a couple of months

- No available game yet makes a killer case for VR

- The Rift's handheld motion controllers won't be available til later in the year

- Competing products will be around by the end of the year or sooner (HTC, Sony, Samsung)

- It can only get cheaper

-It's going to be summer time soon, so you should be playing outside!

(okay, the last point is mine)

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Dave 126
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Halfway house to VR:

It was in a review of Elite dangerous that I first heard of IR Head Tracking for gaming.

Basically you play on a monitor as per usual, but using some IR lights on your head, and a modified web-cam, you can 'look' around your cockpit. If you're already wearing a gaming headset (or headphones) for audio, then it won't add any significant bulk to your head, and the cost of entry is low, especially if you roll your own:

http://www.maximumpc.com/how-to-build-your-own-ir-head-tracker/

I haven't tried such a system myself, but one of these days I might just build a gaming PC, play Elite and surrender my social life!

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Dave 126
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Article in brief

"In short: don't be an idiot and spend $600 on a first-gen [anything]" - a cheaper, sleeker more reliable version will be along in eighteen months.

Unless, of course, you have the so much money that you can afford to spend a bit here and there on novelties. In which case, fair to play you - I'd have spare cash too if I didn't spend it on beer (Augmented Reality?)

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Dave 126
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I don't want Virtual Reality...

...I do want virtual spaceships, alien worlds and explosions!

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Whatever happened to ... Nest?

Dave 126
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Re: I use me as the themostat

Well great. Any study of control systems would tell you that the simple on/off isn't the most efficient, or even best at maintaining a constant temperature. The only plus to such a system is that it is simple, and simple to understand.

Sorry, I thought that this was an IT site.

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Dave 126
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Re: Nest

>Labour or lack of DIY skill is why useless, insecure "wireless" burglar alarms and cameras are sold instead of cheaper and secure wired ones.

I'm more inclined to blame house builders - it would cost next to faff-all to run some CAT5 cable - or just general purpose conduits - between rooms in a house before the plasterboard is put up, yet I have yet to see it in a new build.

I've seen the interiors of several houses that were built after domestic broadband became the norm, yet none have such built-in cabling or conduits.

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Dave 126
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Re: Flawed concepts and surveillance hardware put me off

The Nest maybe overkill, but modern thermo-control systems definitely do save money. I'm thinking of the ones where you tell it at what time in the morning you want your house to be at X degrees, and it then achieves it in the mots economical way.

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Dave 126
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Re: There should be a law...

http://www.hooli.xyz/#inspiration

"HooliXYZ is Hooli’s experimental division. The dream kitchen. The moonshot factory. The laboratory of possibility. The midwife of magic. The womb of wonders.

"This group is led by beloved and universally distinguished Sole Head Dreamer Nelson “Big Head” Bighetti, who was co-founder, principal innovator and chief visionary of Pied Piper. He is just three credits shy of an undergraduate degree in computer science from the University of Oklahoma. He owns a boat."

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R&D white coats at HP Inc will make corporate ID into wearable tech

Dave 126
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Re: Can't be passed to another person?

To clarify, I meant iPhone-type fingerprint scanners can be fooled with readily accessible materials and techniques. I didn't mean all fingerprint scanners, and I didn't make that clear, sorry.

Spoof scanner, starting with photograph:

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/09/touchid-hack-was-no-challenge-at-all-hacker-tells-ars/

Spoofing scanner starting with an actual fingerprint:

https://blog.lookout.com/blog/2013/09/23/why-i-hacked-apples-touchid-and-still-think-it-is-awesome/

Gain access to an iPhone with a $5 wrench:

https://xkcd.com/538/

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Dave 126
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Re: Not really sure what's being said here

>There seem to be two entirely different points being made, neither of which appear particularly useful.

'Seem' appears to be the operative word - I found it quite a hard article to parse, with quotes interspersed by the Reg's comments, and I couldn't find a link to a source, or even a mention of the event or whatever at which these HP guys were speaking.

However, I personally didn't get the impression that they were advocating 'off duty' work ID badges. There was mention of replacing cards "with something we wear anyway" - suggesting something like a watch that generates RSA codes, or a bracelet with a RFID tag. Possibly. I for one would like a link to the source material to see if the HP quotes make more sense in a different context.

Orbital Mind: "Ah, you're closest. Could you inform the ambassador that he's talking to his brooch?"

- Iain M Banks, Look to Windward, in which someone at a party has left their clip-on terminal at home.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not really sure what's being said here

>"But seriously, current generation fingerprint scanners can be fooled with a photograph"

>>Most of them can't because they don't actually look at fingerprints at all, but rather the pattern of blood vessels underneath.

@Cuddles - you are quite right, I am sure that 'proper' fingerprint scanners can't be easily fooled. My comment was based on the iPhone-level of fingerprint scanner which demonstrably can be fooled with the method I referred to - probably because a trade-off was made against its security in order to make it small. Because we were talking about the possibility of a fingerprint scanner on a badge, I thought that the small scanners made for phones was a fairer comparison than scanners made for door panels etc.

I also expected below-the-skin scanners to make their way into phones in due course (the mouse/mousetrap game).

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Dave 126
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Re: @Dave 126

Hospitals are a good place to look at when thinking about ID. Like the military, uniforms are used to denote the role of the employee.

Also, hospitals are areas where vetted employees and members of public the mix. And hospitals have restricted areas (drug stores etc) and systems.

We also see special examples of traditional 'wearable technology': nurses wear fob watches, in order to make it easier for them to wash their wrists.

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Dave 126
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Re: Can't be passed to another person?

>Fingerprints are allegedly easily fooled by a picture.

My fingerprints can tell the difference between a real face and a photograph very easily, thanks! Do you suffer from vibration white finger? ;)

But seriously, current generation fingerprint scanners can be fooled with a photograph, but you do need a laser printer, acetate sheet, PCB photo-resist and a few hours. Plus a good clear photograph. However, the mouse/mousetrap game is such that next gen scanners will incorporate further hurdles - thermometers, perhaps.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Dave 126

Me too - it was just wasn't reinforced very often. On the other hand, some people did love filling in Abnormal Occurrence Notifications. To be fair, we did have turnstile gates to get access to site in the first place.

Other workplaces used badges to unlock doors, but people would often hold the door open for others - good manners again!

And then there were the workplaces with badge-entry doors, but if you yanked the door hard enough it would open for anyone. The Royal Mail postman knew this trick, which meant he didn't have to wait for a few minutes to be let in!

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Dave 126
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Re: So they want everyone on the planet to wear a badge ?

Whaaat? Where did they say that?!

All they are talking about is a badge or ID card that can authenticate it's proper holder, so that it is of limited use to anyone who finds or steals it. ID badges are common place in workplaces. Since ID badges are generally the same size as a credit card, any technology that works in an ID badge could potentially be ported to a consumer item like a credit card if there is a demand for it.

A credit card that requires input from its owner to be used? That would answer some fears consumers have about lost or stolen credit cards. Many people are already using the same concept - they can buy things using an object they carry (a mobile phone, via NFC or PayPal or whatever) but to do so requires their fingerprint or passcode to be entered first.

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Dave 126
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Re: "replace the badge with something you are already going to wear today"

Err, HP didn't mention garments.

FYI, the term 'wearable' in technology is generally taken to mean items that are worn similarly to jewellery (badges around the neck like necklaces or pinned to a shirt like a brooch, items worn around the wrist like a watch), or items such as spectacles or earphones. Whilst the term 'wearable' can encompass items of clothing, that is not its primary meaning in this context (and practically, electronics and washing machines are not natural allies)

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Dave 126
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> It could also be the firm is looking for a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.

Seriously? Irrespective of HP's 'solution', authentication of employees - or indeed of consumers accessing services - could be improved. The headache people have with passwords is an obvious place to start looking at this problem.

Obviously though, a name badge (designed to be visible to all) isn't the ideal place for an ersatz RSA dongle.

The biggest security issue around ID Badges though is cultural - I've worked on sites where we were told again and again to challenge anyone whose badge wasn't visible. Of course, few people did, because to do so would be bad manners...

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We wrap our claws around latest pre-Build Windows 10 preview

Dave 126
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Re: "and the Windows app store remains disappointing. "

>If there was only some sort of file, you could download, or heck even go out and buy and just with a click or two, it would be there on your pc.

Of the various ways of adding software to systems (app stores, apt-get, software managers, and whatever it is that OSX does), the traditional Windows' method is my least favourite.

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Ever wondered what the worst TV show in the world would be? Apple just commissioned it

Dave 126
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Re: Many have tried...

>And completely lacking in technical accuracy, of course. Magical compression - really?

Yeah... but but if the writers of Silicon Valley knew what the Next Big Thing was going to be, they wouldn't be writing a TV show about it - they would be seeking funding! The 'Magical Compression' is just a McGuffin, a stand-in for a hot property made by a start-up that the big players want to get their hands on.

It is a satire about a culture and people, not a documentary about technology. So the writers' only choices for their McGuffin were:

1 Something that no one knows the value of (this would confuse the audience).

2 Something that already exists (this would confuse the audience)

3. Something that is impossible but clearly useful ( the audience knows it's impossible but choose to go along with it's utility)

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Dave 126
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Re: show about developers

- http://www.hooli.xyz/#inspiration

: )

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Dave 126
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Re: Any show about developers

>The answer's obvious..... ...... BOFH, the movie.

So the pitch to the studio execs might be:

"The IT Crowd meets Reservoir Dogs and Zombie Land"

We need to Matt Berry and Ben Wheatley involved.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utopia_(UK_TV_series)

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Dave 126
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Re: Any show about developers

And cringing scenes where B-list rock stars have to fake enthusiasm for the developer conference they've been paid to perform at!

Oh, the Silicon Valley TV series has nailed that, and many other facets of developer culture!

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Dave 126
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Re: Many have tried...

>Many have tried... ...all have failed.

Actually, Mike Judge's Silicon Valley is really rather good, and unlike your 'hacker'-based examples it revolves around app developers and coders.

The well-received show Mr. Robot is about a hacker, and makes a fair bit of effort to be more realistic (of course there is artistic licence, and the story is filtered through a straight-up unreliable narrator.)

Still, if Apple is looking to what Netflix did with 'House of Cards' (an adaptation of a proven premise, lead actor Kevin Spacey always a draw), then myself I would have chosen a different topic. Still, it will be easier towait and see how it fares on Rotten Tomatoes than it is to prejudge it!

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Calm down, dear: Woman claims sexism in tech journalism

Dave 126
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I think it might be difference in approach... generally, women benefit more from encouragement than men, so a women's forum that was judgemental would soon be empty. It does mean that a forum where, at least initially, 'all opinions are equally valid' can appear daft to people who consider themselves objective and problem-solving, but it does encourage more people to participate. It does mean that more views are heard, and really you can't judge the merits or otherwise of an idea until you have heard it. This mottos is required, because it very common for people with good ideas to doubt themselves. As Bertrand Russell said: "Morons are cocksure, the intelligent are full of doubt".

Yes, men can benefit from encouragement too, but in so much of our society (I don't care whether 'tis nature or nurture here) men compete with each other, or value the sentiment "I'm shown myself this can work, so bugger the lot the of 'em I'm gonna do it anyway!". Sometimes this attitude is seen in successful women, too. Sometimes when a woman has experienced sexism early in her career it shows them that some people are just idiots and not to take any notice of them, and to instead to trust their own judgement. It is this trusting of one's own judgement that is often necessary to trail blaze. A lot of scientific advance has been made by rejecting - or at least questioning - the orthodoxy.

This competitive streak can also produce good results.

Okay, I'm massively over-generalising here, but that is inevitable. As a male on the edge of the Aspy spectrum, I value objectivity. And the lumping of individual females together as women (either by men, or indeed by women) has always seemed an odd approach, when its easier to know individual people.

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Dave 126
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Re: Ad revenue drying up is it?

Hard to call. I'd never heard of Gadgette before today. I quick look and it seems on a par with Gizmondo or Engadget or whatever. Even saw a gadget that I'd not seen elsewhere that I might find useful.

It was disappointing to see the some 'Trending topics' ads at the bottom (y'know, the ones "You wouldn't believe...' and '10 celebrities who came back from the dead sea thinner' etc.) However, that is far more to do with the state of online journalism (AdBlocker et al killing revenue, content confused with advertising) than it is to do with feminist issues specifically.

If the creation of a tech site for women is an admission that women might use some tech differently, then naturally tech vendors might send her different kit to review. The trouble is, there are some assholes on the internet (and they make a lot of noise), and if I as a man were to make an observation like "Women are more likely to carry a bag to work and the pub, therefore they might feel differently about the size of smartphone they use since a jeans pocket isn't always a limiting factor" my observation might be dismissed as sexist. Probably by a lunatic fringe, though. I'm pretty sure that nutters (and psychos, self-promoters, opportunists etc) can be of either sex.

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Dave 126
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Re: eh?

You misspelt 'masochistic' as 'mischievous'. Has your auto-correct got its undergarments in a twist?

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Dave 126
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Re: Call back

Eeek! Please everyone, make sure that Someone Else doesn't see this 'news' story:

http://www.theonion.com/article/no-one-in-womens-shelter-able-to-cook-decent-meal-5799

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Wait! Where did you get that USB? Super-stealthy trojan only drives stick

Dave 126
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Re: format before any use...

>HOW do you insert and wipe a USB stick without it running evil HID mode software?

Use a dedicated Linux/RecoveryOS box (a Raspberry Pi perhaps?) to format the USB stick. The Linux box itself is to be run from a fresh or read-only image every time it is booted.

Of course this doesn't help you if the USB stick pulls some more sophisticated shenanigans, such as presenting a different bank of storage after a pre-set period of time.

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Intel tock blocked for good: Tick-tock now an oom-pah-pah waltz

Dave 126
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Re: Stagnation...

>Let it not be said that all I do spew snarky quips and bring people down... behold the steering-assisted hand-held router.

Haha! Thanks for that DropBear! Genuinely, I had not seen that before! It just goes to show that the difference between me an a MIT student is that I brain-fart an idea onto the Register, and an MIT student actually builds something potentially useful!

: )

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Dave 126
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Re: Stagnation...

>...where the applications are pretty much limited to watching surround panoramas

Some are professionally produced. And in any case, the same hardware can be used to watch traditional video content on a virtual big screen. I seem to recall the Sony Walkman also started life providing in-flight entertainment to a rich and well-connected person (the then CEO of Sony).

>That would be nice - as it is, they cost an arm, two legs, half a dozen kidneys and some change.

Some do, some don't. The higher end models are pricey due in part to the GPU requirements - but GPUs will always be sold anyway; Sony's planning a PlayStation 4.5 for driving 4K televisions and the same grunt could power a VR headset. And hey, Nintendo made a killing with its Wii console that wasn't trying to compete with the graphical prowess of its rivals.

Not sure why you cite the £500+ flagship models of Apple and Samsung... every midrange phone today is a match for last year's flagship. All you've shown is that there are a fair few people out there who will spend £500+ on a gadget when a far cheaper gadget will do much the same job.

>Have you actually seen what one of those "360" multi-cameras aimed at enthusiats (not even pros) costs? Clue: almost a grand. Yup, aunt Jane will surely start shooting her holiday pics and videos with one of those one any day now...

I wasn't just talking about a 360 rig, but the sort of post-processing that lets people watch a sports match from any angle ( very fancy post-processing). The very technology that Intel acquired last week. The sports viewing market is huge, and will happily punt on a few new technologies.

I don't really want to watch Aunt Jane's videos, but Aunt Martha in Australia might want to virtually relive a family reunion. Really though, the £1000 price range was what half decent camcorders were a few years back, and they only seemed to be used for family parties and the like.

>Is that why only every single game studio who obviously promised VR support in their Kickstarter a few years ago is now wishing they haven't, going on about how even though the engine they use allegedly supports VR but actually making the game interface work half-decently in VR is much harder than they expected?

This old chicken-and-egg scenario has been played countless times in IT. Why bother writing software for a platform with no users? Why bother buying a platform with no software? It always resolves itself one way or another.

>Yup, I'm sure those supporting folks are working together in such a sublime harmony pushing all in a single direction, not at all the way ants "collaborate" by pushing the same thing from all sides simultaneously...

Even their rival efforts serve to raise public awareness of VR.

>Because I'm so not seeing it...

You're trying very hard not to see it. But have an upvote for taking the time to expand upon your views. I do not agree with you sir, but will defend to virtual death etc etc

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Dave 126
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Re: Beginning of the end for Intel?

Only some types of game benefit from anything more than an i5 CPU - it's the GPU that makes the difference. I don't know how much that might change with Vulkan, DirectX 12 and AMD's APUs.

So yeah, Intel CPUs get more power efficient but don't get much faster - though they do boast less useless integrated graphics.

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Dave 126
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Intel's competitor is yesterday's Intel

- in that my laptop is around 5 years old and still works fine for me (CAD, Photoshop etc). It is because the Intel chip in my PC is fast enough already that I haven't bought an Intel chip since.

Curiously enough, my laptop has roughly the same RAM and internal storage as an iPad Pro. I'm not championing Apple now, but just noting that an ARM-based system is now being sold that could fulfil all my needs if specific productivity software was available.

(I have no idea about how fast an iPad's Imagination GPU is compared to my aging nVidia 9600M GS with 32 CUDA cores, but I get the impression that the iPad can shunt polygons around cheerfully enough for many CAD purposes)

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Dave 126
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Re: Stagnation...

Okay, a Magic Workshop.

The easy shorthand would be 'Tony Stark's workshop from the Iron Man movies'. More immediate, my 'magic workshop' might consist of a Kinect sensor and a projector. The idea is to better integrate the designing (paper, CAD) and the physical making (mixture of hand and machine techniques) for greater efficiency, whilst aiding safety.

- physical measurements I make are instantly available in CAD, or used to define driving dimensions I've already defined.

- a projector can help me mark out cuts

- cuts off power tools if my fleshy bits get too close

- a self-correcting 3D printer. Parts are printed within a 3D scanner, so the printer can correct for alignment in real time.

- jigsaws with steering assistance

- mixing catalysts can be done with audio cues, so no measurement vessel is required.

I'm just brainstorming, purely to provide examples of interacting with computers without a mouse and keyboard.

An example of a 'smart desk' might be HP's Sprout desktop, which incorporates a 3D scanner, camera and projector, for rapid back and forth between physical media (pens and paints) and virtual (Photoshop, CAD etc).

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HP Inc won't shake you down for ink in 3D printer era, says CTO

Dave 126
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And check it out:

Solder that doesn't require heat at the point of application. The molten is contained within micro-spheres that contain no nucleation points - so the solder remains liquid at room temperature. Upon application, the spheres are broken and the liquid solder solidifies.

There ain't half been some clever bastards!

: )

http://cen.acs.org/articles/94/i11/Soldering-without-heat.html

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Dave 126
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Oi, don't knock the chemists! : )

But seriously, don't. They are always making the lives of people who make stuff easier. Not just in the 3D printing space, but in manufacture and construction. They go largely unsung, too.

It is just lovely to use two-part car body filler - it doesn't sag, can be carved before it sets, and can be sanded to an incredibly smooth finish with 15 minuses of application. It is just so handy.

It saves so many headaches to have a tube of moisture-cured polyurethane adhesive/sealant/filler. It can be applied in the wet, is waterproof, over-printable, remains permanently elastic, and can be given a good finish.

Yesterday I was looking at the wares of a company who make masterbatches (mixed materials) for injection moulding. Chemists are forever fine-tuning every variable for the benefit of their customers. A geeky example - plastic dyes that don't stick to the screws and niches of IM molds, so that switching production between different coloured parts is quicker, easier and more economical.

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