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* Posts by Dave 126

4046 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Razer uncages Core i7, GeForce megaslab for hardcore gamers

Dave 126
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Re: Does the thing run WOW?

Have a look at Tomshardware... they give the impression that multiplayer games like WOW are more taxing on the CPU than purely action games, but you'll have to chase down the details.

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Dave 126
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It just seems to me...

...that the better solution would be to have it just act as a display and controller for a desktop machine on your network. Okay, it wouldn't then be mobile... but then its limited by its battery life anyway.

Still, good to see it available; people can make their own minds up.

For really muscular forearms, there is a Nofan (nee Nofen) passive cooler good for CPUs up to 100W TDP (a bit overkill for this processor, I'm sure), that weighs 1KG. I imagine it protruding from the casing like a an air intake does from the hood of a 1970s American muscle car. Though be careful where you flash that quantity of copper... buggers thieve it round here.

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Making apps for touchscreen mobes? YAWN. Try a car instead

Dave 126
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Re: Or they could actually fit the Focus with something useful

Not just touchscreens... a silly number of car stereos have two buttons for volume, instead of a knob. The knob is safer, as it can be located by touch, and its quicker to use.

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Scientists snap first film of giant squid in action

Dave 126
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Or when they decorated maps. Google maps is lacking in this respect. Maybe someone has already created a "Here be monsters" overlay for Google Earth...

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Guitar-playing keys enable extremely thin keyboards

Dave 126
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Okay Dougal, one more time:

For two devices of the same external dimensions, the one with the thinner keyboard can have a bigger battery- or room for a microSD slot.

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Apple may debut low-cost iPhone for emerging markets in 2013

Dave 126
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>Oddly, one source claimed that the new iPhone actually has a larger screen than earlier models

Well, making it bigger could make it cheaper. Maybe if it had a larger chassis, a larger battery could be used to run less efficient and cheaper chips. Or maybe a larger screen easier to manufacture, since the pixel density is lower. Maybe a larger device would easier to assemble.

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Segway daddy unveils DIY weight-loss stomach pump

Dave 126
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Re: Wow, just wow!

>Anyway, proper clothing/shielding from the wind and rain is probably most important.

Don't even need that for as long as you keep moving. Nothing beats changing out of wet clothes into dry, and then sitting next to a pub fire / eating tea and toast.

I think my favourite singletrack has turned into streams this year, though, so might take up kayacking.

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Dave 126
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Nah, the British bloke who fell off the cliff bought the company IIRC, he didn't found it.

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Dave 126
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Re: Some people enjoy food more than exercise

You got there before me... The Baron, of course, had a heart-plug like every Harkonnnen except for Sting.

More seriously, one of the fat hairy bikers was on the radio the other day, saying that he had changed his diet, and that it amazing the quantity if medication prescribed to middle aged blokes - statins, wolferin etc - just to allow them to continue in unhealthy lifestyles.

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Dave 126
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Re: Alternatively...

And then there was an outside visitor to ancient Rome, and he noted by how much the locals talked about constipation and it's opposite. A result of a refined diet on their alimentary canals.

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Adobe offers free trip to PowerPC era

Dave 126
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> There are far more secure options out there as an alternative to almost every Adobe product.

Names please!

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Dave 126
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Re: Gimp Schmimp

To give GIMP the benefit of the doubt, people say it works better in a Linux GUI than it does it Windows. In Windows, GIMP's tool palettes obscure each other. GIMPshop used to crash on me.

The GIMP won't work with *.HDR or *.EXR files - for that you need a GIMP fork called CinePaint, but that hasn't been compiled for Windows. HDRShop might get you out of jam, but is 'interesting' to use to say the least.

My main issue with the GIMP is that I have never found the equivalent of 'free transform' + hold Ctrl, in order to reposition the corners of the selection rectangle... this is essential if, say, you wish to mock up a 2D design for a cardboard box.

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Sir James Dyson slams gov's 'obsession' with Silicon Roundabout

Dave 126
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He tried:

http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/james-dysons-bath-academy-scrapped/1892461.article

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Dave 126
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Re: We have a more fundamental problem to address

Okay, eugenics aside:

Its the same issue- we no longer have the high quantity of agricultural or industrial jobs that traditionally employed the low-skilled. Some people will never be too bright- not their fault, doesn't make them bad people with no feelings- but the bell curve on this issue is something that no politician can point out ("Never call the electorate stupid!"). Instead, New Labour had this strange idea that everyone could be educated into intelligence (it doesn't work that way) and play a part in 'a knowledge economy'.

Rather than just addressing the incentive for the benefits system gives for having more children, we do need to look at why smart women have fewer children- or even leave it too late to have any. The French model is that women tend to have children in their early twenties before embarking on a career- in Britain, women try to reach some threshold level of career advancement before taking a break, and then struggle to get back into it. Economically, I can't work out why childcare is so expensive- surely four women can look after two children as well as one-on-one... I mean, everybody needs to take a toilet break from to time.

Ultimately, designing new vacuum cleaners (or cars, or microwave ovens) to sell to people who already have vacuum cleaners isn't sustainable either.

Bertrand Russell- "The case for a leisure society"

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Dave 126
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Re: I appreciate some os his arguments, but hes also full of shit....

> It has filters instead of bags.

Bags do act as filters, but they also catch the larger particles of fluff, dog hair, lego blocks etc, a job which in cyclonic vacuum cleaners is done by the cyclone cylinder, not a filter. It is irritating to be using a vacuum cleaner with a bag and then have to stop because the bag is full and the cupboard is bare of spares.

Henrys work well, with a large surface area of 'filter'. It does benefit from being able to take it outside and whack it, though.

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Dave 126
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Re: When

>robot programmers and skilled engineering technicians

I know one- he troubleshoots the CNC machines that Airbus use. He says he absolutely loves his job.

>who actually build and maintain the assembly lines so much stuff is made on.

And then there is Renshaw based outside Bristol, who make metrology equipment, used in manufacturing when you really need to put a component in the correct place. Privately owned, the millionaire owner is still a hands-on engineer, its the only non-Japanese company to win certain Japanese manufacturing awards, the first company to be awarded Investors in People, numerous Queen's Awards for Industry, it employees engineers, programmers, assemblers, and six full-time patent lawyers, and recently expanded its operation to a massive former-Bosch site in South Wales, for the neurosurgery and dental divisions.

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Dave 126
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Re: Can we have a Silicon Snowdonia please (or Bangor if you want a university city) ?

I remember being told of 'Silicon Dell' and 'Silicon Glen' during geography lessons in the 90s!

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Dave 126
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Re: "The billionaire industrial designer, who also invented the blade-less fan"

The latter... but the 're-packaging' took a fair bit of effort. Also, if it were so obvious, why wasn't everybody already doing it? A few companies did try the "Let's copy him anyway, I'm sure he'll run out of cash to defend his patents soon enough" trick, but they underestimated his tanacity (and he sold the design exclusively in Japan for a while, to finance his patent battle). I assume the patents have expired now, since there are dozens of bagless vacuum cleaners on the market now.

I have seen a fair few of the older Dyson cleaners in skips, with broken handles and the like, but not so much the recent ones. (Skip diving: for fun, profit and education!) A mate of mine is building a collection of Henrys that he has found in skips, usually working.

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Dave 126
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Re: Hypocrite

>emerging economies will soon become self sufficient in designers and engineers.

Very true. We've held on to the design jobs because we are the market for those goods. Now that China is trying to sustain its economy by turning its own citizens into a consumers, we will lose that edge. That said, I can't think of any Chinese companies that trade on their industrial design... even Japanese products are mainly sold as being functional.

Ridiculous: When I was at college around 2000, we were advised to learn German, Hebrew or Japanese... because these countries were the only ones to produce high tolerance tooling for injection moulding. Any industrial designer now should be learning Mandarin.

Of course Dyson isn't responsible for wages being lower in the East. The even bigger question should be "Why is our economy based on limitless growth when we only have finite resources?" The first industrial designers were stage-designers recruited from Broadway... at the time that people first became 'consumers'. Prior to that, things just looked like what they were, and you only bought what you needed (unless you were wealthy and could commission an artisan). To pick on Dyson again:

"Why are they still in business? Surely everybody already has a vacuum cleaner!"

(Mine's a Henry... or a Karcher if it's been raining too heavily)

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Dave 126
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Re: Hypocrite

>Dyson products are made where, exactly? Clue: it's not in the UK.

No, but after they moved production to Malaysia, they employed more people than they had in the UK, only in higher-paying R&D jobs. Clue: Dyson can't get his hands on enough engineers.

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Hey Lenovo, want to kill Apple? Look to Samsung hitman for tips

Dave 126
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Re: thinkpads?

>1920x10280

Ooops! That was a typ... no it wasn't, it was my design for a monitor that can display graphs of hugely varying dependent variables without using logarithmic scales!

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Dave 126
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Re: Linux is the answer!

RE Lenovo, Linovo...

Cute, but runs the risk of confusing consumers who don't spot the difference, or think Linovo is a knock-off! : D

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Dave 126
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Re: Apple & Lenovo

>In my son words "I hate it when people touch my screen, i don't want to do it all the time, it's rubbish".

I eat my words: I've suddenly decided that I DO want a touchscreen on my laptop... purely so the next time someone prods it whilst discussing whatever its displaying, it flashes up a messages saying "Please don't touch the screen". That is all.

My last boss took a permanent marker to one of his monitors, and he was then surprised white spirit wouldn't shift it. I managed to find a can of deodorant before he laid his hands on his tub of acetone.

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Dave 126
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Re: Who's the Innovation Leader Now?

Yep: Rather than alienate existing users with a new UI, a la Win8 TIFKAM, Apple just added gestures to the trackpad, and retained keyboard shortcuts, context menus and, shock horror, menus. If you have a application that benefits from prodding a screen (a virtual mixing desk?) either use it standalone on an iPad, or use the iPad as a control surface for a Mac (Wireless MIDI was implemented from the first iPhone onwards).

Apple may yet be shown to be smart in skipping the touchscreen laptop fad if the Leap Motion device is half as good as everyone says it is:

https://leapmotion.com/product (like a tiny finger-friendly Kinect device for £50)

MS were talking about implementing Kinect technology in laptops, but it seems they may have missed the boat to do it themselves... still, it seems they have given thought to integrating this tech with future versions of Windows ("Buy Windows 9: You DON'T have to smear your monitor!")

The Leapmotion forums are an interesting place to have a look at, since they are still collecting ideas and application-specific dev teams.

(I'm not an Apple user, but I like new things implemented well. In the meantime, I'll hold onto my mouse with lots of buttons)

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Dave 126
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Re: Segmentation and bundling

>buy something cheap and replace the LCD panel.

A link to an Instructables.com tutorial please!

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Dave 126
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Re: Simle: make a genuinely high-end laptop and people will buy it.

Yep, that would be nice. At the high end, there was the Lenovo w700ds with two screens, a trackpad, nipple, and a Wacom digitiser. I wanted it, but it was never mainstream!

http://www.engadget.com/2008/12/21/lenovo-thinkpad-w700ds-dual-screen-laptop-details-and-pics-unear/

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Ten affordable mid-sized Full HD monitors

Dave 126
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Re: No portrait-mode?

>our field of view is wider than it is tall,

Yeah, I was having this argument with a mate who wanted a circular display like he'd seen in some 1960s TV spy series. "But our eyeballs are circular!" he said.

I decided to look it up, and all I found was an old NASA document, with a diagram that looked like the mask film-makers use to denote "protagonist is looking through binoculars" showing sharp areas, with a different shade of grey around the edges to denote more peripheral vision.

They say that the sharpest area we can perceive is equivalent to a thumbnail at arms length, so the solution is clear, gentlemen: We need a small sharp monitor that moves around according to the position of our eyeballs! (Joke, obviously!)

Of course the Xerox Alto had a portrait display, trying as it was to replace the paper office.

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Dave 126
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Re: Multiples of 1080

1200 vertical pixels is fine for films... you just get black bars top and bottom- not a bad place for your media controls to sit, as it happens.

You are often going to get black bars anyway, because some films are wider than 16:9. Plus, older TV content is more 4:3.

(smug, sat a laptop with a 17" 1920x1200 screen)

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Dave 126
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Re: Suggestions for next monitor article

I've just being trying to track one down on the net.. about a year ago a brand - can't remember if it were Hanns G or Hanspree or neither- released a monitor that used the same panel as the 27" (or maybe 30") Cinema Display for half Apple's asking price, but I can't find it. It was said to be good, but the backlighting was quite as consistent as the fruity one.

Can anyone jog my memory?

>Ones with win8 touch certification would be a bonus

Consider this, perhaps: Leapmotion.com/product a £50 Kinect-like controller, that traces your fingertips. Just an idea, wait for its release and in-depth reviews.

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Dave 126
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Anybody had experience of USB-driven monitors? Do they cope with video okay, are they better used for just increasing your productivity real-estate?

I was tempted by a 7" USB monitor for toolbars, but at around £70 I started to thing 'sod it' because 20" wasn't much more.

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Nokia chief Elop: 'Android? Hey, anything's possible!'

Dave 126
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Re: either

>Unfortunately just like the RX-100, none of these items is a phone so they don't make for a very good comparison.

You're quite right. However, both are on a sliding scale of compactness vs image quality, the optimum compromise along this scale varies for individual users.

There are some people for whom Nokia's Pureview is a suitable compromise along this scale for them, but other people won't mind more bulk if it allows them to take better quality images.

My point was that though the Pureview camera is good, it won't be a 'must have' feature on everyone's phone, especially if they carry a compact camera (side-by-side tests suggest the Pureview more than equal to the LX-5, impressive, but if casual wildlife photography is your thing neither have enough zoom to cut it).

Anyway, I'm still working through a lovely big truckle Godminster chedder at the mo... it ought to be a controlled substance it's that good!

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Dave 126
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>(but there's an S III Mini just out, so someone is listening)

The SIII Mini isn't just smaller, it has a slower CPU and a lower-res screen besides other things. You'd be forgiven for overlooking that, since calling it the SIII Mini is only going to confuse buyers.

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Dave 126
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Re: Hmmmm

>Had Nokia gone with Android, they could easily be where Samsung is now - maybe even above and beyond.

Er maybe, but then Samsung make screens, CPUs and memory. I'm sure that has helped them in some way.

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Dave 126
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Re: either

My Sony Xperia has very good reception, ta, and I live 'in the sticks'. Camera is reasonable, but I usually keep an LX-5 in the car. No complaints. Nokia's top PureView is very impressive, and is an elegant solution to lowlight vs 'zoom', but is so pricey... for less cash you can get a DSLR-sized sensor in a compact camera's body (RX-100).

We have an interest in Nokia because of nostalgic memories of things like the 6210i and dreams of what might have been- they way that Nokia had most of the ingredients needed to bring out an iPhone-like device before Apple did, for example, or a reasonable hard-keyboard.

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Review: Dell XPS 12 Windows 8 tablet-cum-Ultrabook

Dave 126
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Re: Docking Station...

Dunno, maybe someone hit the wrong button.

My laptop has 6 USB 2.0 ports... but sometimes I still want a little hub. Why? Because memory sticks stick out too much, and are easily knocked. The 'nano' receiver is okay, but its predecessor was too big, and had to be removed (and usually mislaid) between home and work.

What I envisaged at the time was a little USB hub within a pouch, that could be tethered to the Kensington lock socket, so my dongles and the like were kept safe and near, yet couldn't damage my USB ports in transit.

Next up: Modify my dummy ExpressCard so that it becomes a safe place to store SD cards. Who needs a 3D printer when you have glue and Duck tape?

(Heck, this laptop has such an abundance of ports and sockets... it must be nearly obsolete!)

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Dave 126
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Re: Stuff the lack of connectivity... a swivel screen? WHAT?

Yeah, that swivel... my gut instinct is that I prefer the Lenovo Yoga form-factor... nice and simple, fewer moving parts. I have no reason to think that this Dell will fail, though.

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Mega-res telly demand to boom, say ball-gazers

Dave 126
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Re: Time would be better spent improving gamma and dynamic range.

>At least 13 or 14 stops dynamic range should be the short-term target for digital image sensors so we can enter >the High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) era.

Easily done... just use two cameras and a half-silvered mirror at 45º. You can get cameras such as Canon's C300 that can capture video in situations we can barely see with our own eyes. The correct balance can then be worked out in post production. There was a good video demonstration of this technique featuring a welding torch, HDR'd to the max.

More dynamic range would be good, but I don't think it is necessary to create an image that is indistinguishable from a window, at least for narrative storytelling. Time will tell. Let's see how Peter Jackson's 48fps goes down with film makers and audiences.

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Dave 126
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Re: Seriously? A million units in 2015?

>These guys are crazy.

You are inummerate:

Capegemini, a financial consultancy, defines a millionaire as anyone with investable assets of $1 million or more – meaning that they actually have over a million dollars as that doesn't include the home in which they live, for instance. By this measure there are about 10 million millionaires on the planet, according to Capegemini and Merrill Lynch.

So even if just 10% of millionaires bought one each, that figure would be about right. You say lack of content? That is is so easy to fix, even with existing media- just use a HDD media server, doesn't matter if individual Blu-rays have to loaded onto it first (the butler can do it). Or, shocker, have a media server with 3 x Blu-ray ROMs, cos at £40 they will really break the millionaire's bank.

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Dave 126
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Re: TV boycott

JDX,

you don't understand. Eadon is on a mission to promote desktop Linux by telling everyone the alternatives are crap (instead of using his time to make Linux even better, which I naively thought was the whole point of the OS)

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Dave 126
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All 3D means is that it can go at 120Hz instead of 60 (or 100 / 50 depending on location) and many TVs did this even before the rise of 3D, plus a few pence spent on an IR device to sync the goggles.

If you don't want your new TV to be 3D enabled, just don't buy the glasses. Or poke an eye out, whatever suits you.

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Dave 126
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content medium

What was that recent Reg article? Oh yeah: If you buy one of Sony's £16,000 TVs they will lend you a HDD-based media server with a few movies on it...

If you wanted to be 80s retro about it, just imagine having a shop in every town, from where you can pick up a couple of movies on HDDs (VHS size, conveniently) on a Friday night, and drop em back Sunday. Blockbuster could see their share price rise, until everybody gets fibre broadband.... Be kind, de frag.... [Meanwhile, back in reality]

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Bendy screens are the future, screams maker of bendy screens

Dave 126
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Re: I want a roll-out screen like on Red Planet

Branded IBM, I note, just like the tablets in 2001 A Space Odyssey.

Was it Red Planet that had really quite stupid 'scientists' before Prometheus made them mainstream, or was that Mission to Mars? I get them confused.

Lt Ripley: Did IQs just drop sharply while I was away?

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Dave 126
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Re: Empty gestures

You forgot:

"Fold into paper aeroplane shape and hope that El Reg SPB don't get their hands on it"

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Dave 126
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Re: I can think of an application: Dynamic posters for CS Conferences

>In black and white? Dead cool.

I'll think you'll find that many mediums started out in monochrome before progressing to colour... printing (by various methods), photography, cinema, television, computer displays...

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Dave 126
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Re: Riiiiight

>How about some bendable spoons?

My baby nephew has one... silicone I think, so that whilst being spoon-fed there is no danger of bashing his milk-teeth should he decide to shift his head.

Larger flexible spoons, again silicone, are used for cooking, in particular for scraping the last of the sauce from the bottom of the pan.

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Dave 126
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Re: "alas"

Exactly, spending money on making a case to house the battery and CPU wouldn't help people to grok the screen tech any better, so they didn't bother.

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Dave 126
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>Bet Apple and Samsung are crapping themselves - LAUGHING.

Apple and Samsung employ people to look at this, and similar technologies, with interest.

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Dave 126
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>I guess its time you upgraded your OS to something that can.

AC, "test, don't guess".

I'm not knocking Linux, but suggesting that it is a universal panacea for all IT woes is just unrealistic, and could disappoint people who follow your 'advice', potentially putting them off Linux.

If the websites he visits use Flash, he might run into problems with hardware acceleration, too.

You don't know what other applications he was running, nor did you suggest he try another browser (an easier line of enquiry than installing another OS, don't ya think?) - on older XP machines with 512 MB RAM, I find Opera more usable than Chrome, for example.

I would suggest he get more RAM, but even that can have some pitfalls, depending on his hardware setup (Intel's advice for some issues is to remove the second stick, for example) so I won't.

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Dave 126
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Would be interesting to know what the minimum bending radius is...

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Dave 126
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Hey Jai,

No reason these things can't use tabs. Some tasks require concentration on a single screen, some tasks benefit from being able to compare two documents side by side.

Kudos to this company for considering different uses for flexible displays, and not just retrofitting them to existing devices. They could well be wide of the mark, but at least they have put the idea out there.

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