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* Posts by Dave 126

4075 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Nokia lets Lumia 820 owners 3D print their own case

Dave 126
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Re: Interesting Pre-cept

>There will be resurgence when the off the shelf tech gets to an affordable price point, but to me this is a cliche headline marketing bumpf.

Agreed, when the Nokia rep put out the idea, he suggested the user making "a waterproof, glow in the dark case with a bottle opener". No.

The home user is often better off with some epoxy for making little things that. Kydex is a handy formable sheet material- well suited for making dashboard cradles for phones etc. Loving Sikaflex at the moment- a very strong adhesive and sealant, remains permanently flexible after curing.

I'm still assuming that no more people will own a 3D printer than currently own that hobbyist's favourite, a Dremel hand drill. I can currently see more practical uses for a desktop laser cutter for thin materials than a 3D printer in the home- larger functional objects, stencils, jigs... and yes, bottle openers.

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Dave 126
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Re: Now that's real innovation.

>Now, is some someone going to print a prototype case with a chorded-keyboard built in or what?

Just found someone has done just that and implemented it. His blog is here:

http://srimech.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/chorded-keyboard-for-mobile-phones.html

He wouldn't need the external battery if he owned an Android phone with USB OTG support...

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Dave 126
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Re: Now that's real innovation.

>To give you a hint, it'll be several orders of magnitude higher than buying a moulded, third party case, via eBay.

That's very true, if thousands of other people buy the same case. Which they probably will- I can't imagine someone having case requirements that are so off-the-wall that they are thy only person who have them.

Now, is some someone going to print a prototype case with a chorded-keyboard built in or what?

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Dave 126
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Re: Hardware Piracy

>"How long 'till we see knock off lego."

You'd have a helluva job... Lego is injection moulded to very high tolerances. I did stumble across a tech website recently that plotted the standard deviation for Lego bricks made in different decades. Making Lego bricks is the very opposite of what you'd want a 3D printer for.

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Dave 126
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Re: I suppose

Eadon, this is thread about 3D printing... why the hell are you putting out your tired views about OSs here? It is the wrong thread, and the wrong website since everyone here has enough experience of their own not to be swayed by your simplistic rhetoric. You are getting very tedious. Instead of writing as many posts, consider writing better quality ones.

3D printing... oh yeah, Linux .... it's hardly the platform of choice for 3D modelling, is it? Sod off.

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First Google wants to know all about you, now it wants a RING on your finger

Dave 126
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This magical ring will work on my Android tablet too ? oh no, Google designed it without a USB port

Google haven't really designed the tablets, some are LG, some ASUS, IIRC. Many Android devices do have a USB host port, disguised as the standard microUSB port- that's why microUSB has 5 pins instead of USB A's 4: shorting the extra pin to ground tells the tablet to act as a host, so that thumb sticks, card readers and keyboards can be plugged in. See USB OTG

That said, one of the LG-built Nexus devices won't do it all, another needs persuasion.

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Dave 126
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Re: You have got to be kidding

Doesn't have to be a ring... this person has a chip implanted (but then so does my dog) to give him quick instant access top a child-proof gun safe:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxNjqN4Gdc0

Bit too far for my taste. It could easily be retrofitted to a wristwatch (or its strap) though. Yeah, I know that American commentards don't think that anyone wears a watch these days, but many of us in the rest of the world do.

With a ring, the logical conclusion is that any device you pick up temporarily becomes 'yours'. Pick up any phone, and it will be your contacts and emails displayed.

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Ballmer now flings out work rivals, rather than chairs, claims ex-Microsoftie

Dave 126
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Re: Cringe

>Don't insult Neanderthals - apparently, they were quite intelligent!

They were- they just weren't as nasty as us!

Still, some of us Europeans have up to 5% Neanderthal DNA... amazing really, that interspecies breeding went on before beer was invented!

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Dave 126
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Re: "Ballmer is the best person to lead Microsoft"

>You can criticize Ballmer for many things but "award themselves" isn't one of them. His salary's the lowest of any tech CEO (including stock options and other cheats) by his own choice.

Fair enough. Obviously the programme wasn't speaking about Ballmer, it was more generic than that... but the mention of acquisitions being a way way to be seen to be doing something did chime with a few tech firms in recent years. For all I know, Ballmer may be competent, but if so then it isn't communicated well... the message isn't as clear. And then all you have to do is throw a couple of chairs and it's all people talk about.

MS have had products that have been premature, or late to the game, or else haven't set the world on fire. Media Centre Extenders, the Courier (Sony have since used the form factor, Samsung the finger+stylus combo), using the Windows brand in a confusing way (8, 8 Phone, 8 RT etc), using the Surface brand for first a coffee table then a tablet, killing off HomeServer...

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Dave 126
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Re: Innovation

>"the tech world's lurch into tablets and smartphones, "

>How many times have Microsoft been in denial about the potential success of a technology only to finally produce their own (much) later on

MS have been doing smartphone and tablet OSs for years... they just weren't great. [XP Tablet Edition, 2002] [Windows Pocket PC]

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Dave 126
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Re: Balmer the Dr Evil villain

Target: missed, Eadon.

It is normally MS's licensing deals that raise your ire. The man responsible for those deals with OEMs wasn't Ballmer, but Kempin:

Under Kempin’s tutelage, Microsoft launched the Market Development Agreement (MDA) licensing concept in 1994. The drill for hardware makers went something like this: If OEMs wanted to license Windows 95 but didn’t promote or sell it, they would pay a fairly hefty price per copy. If they agreed to co-promote the operating system in ads or issue a Microsoft-endorsed press release noting they had decided to offer their customers Windows 95 preloaded on new systems, they got a better price.

-http://practical-tech.com/business/who-is-microsofts-secret-power-broker/

Kempin has been a problem child for Microsoft for years. This is a guy who lost his hunting license earlier this year for allegedly using his SUV as a weapon (as in ramming antelopes with his car instead of shooting them).

-http://news.cnet.com/Commentary-Good-riddance-to-Microsofts-problem-child/2009-1001_3-250044.html

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Dave 126
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Re: "Ballmer is the best person to lead Microsoft"

There was a good programme on the radio yesterday, In Business. Basically, the conclusion was that people get to the level of CEO by a mixture of politics and good luck, and sometimes by displaying a tiny pinch of good judgement. Once near the top, they come to believe that they deserve their status, and award themselves. They feel that they must be seen to be 'dynamic', and therefore indulge in things like acquisitions- which rarely add value but do make a lot of noise, cause a distraction and make them look like they are doing something.

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Entire Reg readership would fill 205 Olympic-sized swimming pools

Dave 126
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Re: Well blended

>Except volume != actual volume

Quite right, I mentioned 'Eureka' (finding volume through displacement, a la Archimedes), but that still wouldn't account for cavities such as the lungs, sinuses and the interiors of some commentards' skulls.

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Dave 126
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Re: Well blended

>I work that out as 1020.83 swimming pools.

That looks like false precision to me, unless you have data on the volume of all Reg readers! Have you installed sensors in our bath tubs? Eureka! : D

False precision:

"A guide in the museum tells visitors that this dinosaur fossil is 200 million and 4 years old... when asked, he says "Well, when I started working here they told me it was 200 million years old, and I've been working here for four years..."

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Dave 126
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If all Reg readers are together in 205 Olympic-sized swimming pools, I can only ask: "Where can I get 205 sharks with laser beams?"

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Another new asteroid-mining firm: 'First commercial space fleet'

Dave 126
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Buzz Aldrin's Cycler:

http://buzzaldrin.com/space-vision/rocket_science/aldrin-mars-cycler/

And in other news:

http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/10172449.Apollo_11_astronaut_Buzz_Aldrin_takes_to_East_Coast_trains_after_snow_cancellations/

And they put him in a standard class carriage.

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Dave 126
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Re: Right on Commander!

Piracy only works if there are some successful miners to rob first. Otherwise you're just in it for the rum, shanties and buggery.

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Dave 126
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Re: Space exploration is the only hope

Yeah, expanding into the solar system is our current economic model reductio ad absurdum.

Even then we would run out of habitable space eventually, though we could postpone that time a little more by reconfiguring our available matter into forms that have a higher surface area than rocks and planets - ie Ringworlds (AKA, Orbitals, Halos) or Dyson Spheres...

Hmm, it might be easier to just adopt a different economic system instead.

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Dave 126
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Re: JMC

>Wouldn't you rather contract out to Weyland Yutani?

No, I wouldn't. Red Dwarf looked more fun. Besides:

"Priority one

Insure return of organism for analysis.

All other considerations secondary.

Crew expendable."

-MOTHER

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Review: Infiniti M35h hybrid sports saloon

Dave 126
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Re: what's the point

Did you read the review?

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WTF is... Weightless?

Dave 126
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Lots of people would happily pay money to be free of that nagging thought "I am sure I turned off the gas hob?", as they are their way to the train station.

Another would be a telephone that turns down your TV or stereo when a call comes in (Bang and Olufsen do this already).

I can imagine many uses that this 'internet of things' will be put to have already been pioneered in making kit for disabled people (blinking lights to alert deaf people to their doorbell, for example)

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Dave 126
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Re: Doomed from the start

>utensil porn.

"Ohh-err, I don't half fancy that vibrating fork I saw at CES"

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Dave 126
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Says the toaster: "Whoops, I over did that"

Replies the fire alarm: "Okay, I'll hold on for a minute... can you ask the TV to bring this to the attention of the meatbag?"

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‘Anonymous’ hacks Oz Uni’s email to protest bulk iPad buy

Dave 126
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Re: Just consider one simple use case

>For any serious educational need, something that can handle a memory card & has full file access abilities & plenty of free apps for the poor student... something with USB OTG available, something that can be

The device the student uses for text input (i.e a laptop) will handle that sort of thing. You don't need those things on a textbook replacement. WiFi will be sufficient.

The Note's stylus would be useful in the classroom (I had a play its feature that recognises stylus input of mathematical formulae), but a device with the resolution of a Nexus 10 or iPad would be better for textbooks.

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Dave 126
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Re: hard to argue with what the anon guy said

>I'd agree that tablets are rubbish input devices,

Before eInk readers were cheap enough for consumers, they were used by pilots who are required to have a large quantity of documentation on board. This documentation was heavy and also subject to frequent updates, so justifying the cost of the device ($1,500 at launch).

From 2006:

http://www.engadget.com/2006/07/27/hands-on-with-arincs-iliad-based-eflybook/

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Dave 126
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Re: stop abusing and exploiting their student body

If Anon had been around in the eighties:

"It is scandalous that schools have bought overpriced BBCs when everyone knows Spectrums are better!"

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Dave 126
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Re: Best alternative is a Chromebook

ditto an Apple eMate 300! (Joking!)

A 1997 Apple Newton PDA with keyboard in a pre-iMac translucent clamshell, for schools only. Only saw one, my Design and Technology teacher had one to play with in an all Mac school - though a room adjoining the workshop in which we used drawing boards is now full of Windows SolidWorks workstations

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Dave 126
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Anon don't make actually bother making a rational case for which tablet to use instead... for textbooks, only the the Nexus 10 springs to mind, though f you took a hit on screen res, a Galaxy Note could be handy for annotations and presentations.

A quick web search reveals the existence of the Kuno, an Android tab aimed specifically at the education market (and only sold in bulk to schools, it seems), but with a 9.7”: 1024x768 16:9 screen. Not ideal. However, it is designed to managed centrally.

http://www.mykuno.com/index.html

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We trust computers to fly jets... why not trust them with our petabytes?

Dave 126
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I seem to remember reading in PC-Zone 'back in the day', about a flight sim enthusiast who got to look at the cockpit of an RAF jet for real. He gleefully noted that he knew what all the knobs and switches did, bar one little red micro-switch... "Whats's that?" he asked.

"That's to reset our computer when it crashes" the RAF pilot told him.

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This week's BBC MELTDOWN: Savile puppet haunts kids' TV

Dave 126
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I've just read the Wikipedia article to refresh my memory of one a sublime piece of satire on this topic. In fact, the outraged reaction was even funnier than the broadcast itself. Well worth reading for the IT angle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brass_Eye#Paedophilia_special_.282001.29

Highlights:

-Labour MP Syd Rapson related that paedophiles were using "an area of internet the size of Ireland".

-Richard Blackwood stated that internet paedophiles could make computer keyboards emit noxious fumes to subdue children, subsequently sniffing a keyboard and claiming that he could smell the fumes, which made him feel "suggestible". Blackwood also warned watching parents that exposure to the fumes would make their children "smell like hammers".

The reaction:

-MP Beverley Hughes described the show as "unspeakably sick" but later admitted she had not seen it, and David Blunkett said he was "dismayed" by it. It later emerged that he also had not seen the episode, because he is blind.

-The Daily Star decried Morris and the show, placing the story next to a separate article about the 15-year-old singer Charlotte Church's breasts under the headline "She's a big girl now" and using the words "looking chest swell". The Daily Mail pictured Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, who were 13 and 11, in their bikinis next to a headline describing Brass Eye as "Unspeakably Sick".

You couldn't make it up.

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Paging Dr Evil: Philips medical device control kit 'easily hacked'

Dave 126
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The second series of the TV show Homeland has brought the possibility of compromised medical equipment to wider awareness, though the details were unrealistic.

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Intel: Everything is absolutely fab-u-lous, particularly in servers

Dave 126
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Re: Ostrich Corp

>Are they in complete denial?

No, Intel are going to some lengths to communicate their efforts to tech blogs with a penchant for benchmarks. For example

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/atom-z2760-power-consumption-arm,3387-5.html

The jury is still out, but it would seem the race isn't over.

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What’s a computer? Eat yourself fitter!

Dave 126
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Re: Holy crap

It's based on sound theory and empirical evidence, but the implementation seems a inherently clumsy. The better way of moderating your eating speed is to alternate mouthfuls with a sip of wine and savour the flavours.

Only a few years back, it would take a French man twenty minutes to eat a MacDonalds meal, whereas it would take an American five minutes. This may have changed in recent years, where obesity is increasing in countries like France and Italy (though still short of the USA and the UK in second place). The body is like a warehosue- if a load of trucks arrive at once and their contents unloaded in a hurry, the warehouse is more likely to get untidy. Surface area is a factor as well, so finely ground wheat forces the body to ramp up insulin production more quickly than it would with more slowly absorbed courser grained cereal.

The only dedicated cutlery in our household is for my 8 month year old nephew for when he visits.

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Happy birthday, Lisa: Apple's slow but heavy workhorse turns 30

Dave 126
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Re: Icons and windows

Install a 3rd party replacement for the Start Menu. It ain't that difficult. But yeah, 'twas silly of MS to give people a reason to bash them, when it was so easily avoided. Still, they probably figured a lot of people are happy enough with Win7 and wouldn't upgrade anyway, so they thought they'd get a bit experimental with Win8.

Thinking positively, being able to choose from a few options for different parts of Window's Desktop Environment might work out better for the end-user... you could choose from a selection of File Browsers that are competing on quality, or are just better suited to the way you do things. Intermediate and Advanced users already use 3rd party software to give shortcuts to deeply buried settings, and many OEMs impose their own interfaces for audio options and the like on their customers. Logitech's Windows software gives the user a clone of the OSX's 'Mission Control: Show all Windows' feature which I find handy...

[Now, on the other hand that Ribbon Interface was very poorly handled... there was no reason why it couldn't co-exist with normal menus for a version or two. And it ate up too many vertical pixels when people have too many to begin with.... very silly MS. What really took the piss was that rather than provide a plugin that reinstated menus, they directed you to an interactive "Where the bleedin heck is that thing I'm looking for?" guide.]

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Dave 126
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Re: The problem with Jobs?

I remember Bill Gates reacting to Jobs accusation that he stole the Windows GUI from Apple. Gate's used an analogy along the lines of 'Imagine you had a friend who stole a TV set from his neighbour... now you go to the same neighbour and steal his other TV set, but your friend says you stole it from him...'

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Dave 126
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Re: >"rectangles with rounded corners [...] were “everywhere”."

An invention that exists only on paper is of no good to anybody (except patent trolls). Look at how much tech has been invented in the UK, and then look at how successfully they have been turned into money to reward the inventors. That observation alone should tell you that people who aren't inventors are required to turn ideas into products and money. That was Jobs' role.

What's yours, AC?

Even obvious and clearly superior ideas need to be championed, sadly. If you live the UK, look at the light switch on your wall- chances are that it is an inch-long switch with sharp corners sitting in the middle of a 4" plate, and it requires a firm press. Nasty. Now, look at the light switches that are commonly used on the continent- the switch is that same size as the plate, it has round corners and it can be easily tapped to switch between on and off.

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Dave 126
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Yep, I've heard from engineers older than myself that they went with IBM compatibles because whilst they liked Apples, they just couldn't connect anything to them.

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Dave 126
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Re: I loved this bit

>Relying on people remembering or using experience isn't a good way to design a human computer interface.

They won't be able to learn quickly if they have to remember strange keyboard shortcuts, but if they do the task often enough then their 'muscle memory' will make it almost automatic. This is why I like menus as a training aid- the novice can select File > Save with the mouse, or to give their wrist a rest they can use Alt > F > S (or use Alt > cursor keys), or when they are used to the system they can save time by using Ctrl+S.

What I don't like about menus is when they get nested, and it becomes a test of mouse dexterity to select an item 3 levels deep... Oh well.

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Pubic louse falls victim to eager Brazilian strippers

Dave 126
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Re: Is it good or bad?

Frank Zappa would recommend the Blue Lotion

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Spy romp Zero Dark Thirty: The tech behind the special effects

Dave 126
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The shame is that android David was superb, and the setup- with him watching an actor portray a complex man who described himself as 'serving two masters' - was absolutely brilliant*. But the dim as hell 'scientists' ruined it... as Ripley asks in Aliens: "Did IQs just drop sharply whilst I was away?"

>And whilst I'm sure Ridley Scott could pretty much do what he wanted, the inclusion of the alien at the end felt very much like a studio demand.

Actually, it was Fox who didn't want it to be a straight-up Alien prequel. But yeah, the alien at the end wasn't required, and its convoluted origin (infect boyfriend, boyfriend impregnates girlfriend, girlfriend has c-section) was Damon Lindlehof's fault. Speight was just going to have David hold her down and introduce her with to a face-hugger.

*I recently re-watched Inglourious Basterds, Michael Fassbender is superb in that as well.

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Obama calls for study into games ‘n’ guns link

Dave 126
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Re: @tkioz

Piss off AC

Don't use quotation marks for a sentence that tkioz did not use. He did not say 'compulsory'. If you want to quote someone, but believe the quote is missing a word, use [ ] to denote the words you have added.

We have enough straw men already, thank you.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Gav

>The interesting thing about your post is that you could replace every occurrence of "right-wing" with "left-wing" and it would just as true as it is now.

No, you can't just swap 'right-wing' for 'left-wing'. Here's why: http://www.ted.com/talks/david_pizarro_the_strange_politics_of_disgust.html

or teacher.edmonds.wednet.edu/edmondswoodway/jspears/documents/conservsatives_are_more_easily_disgusted_than_liberals.pdf [Warning: PDF] if you want the sources.

Gaz was referring to published articles. It is in fact you, AC, who is believing what you choose to.

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Dave 126
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Happy

Re: White House Accused of Lateral Thinking

Every games console should come with the game Flower - you play the part of petal, drifting in the breeze and bringing colour to the meadows of a gently rolling landscape. It certainly calmed me down after I discovered that the last ten years have left my reflexes too blunt to play WipEout HD!

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Dave 126
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Correlation =/= Causation

Playing video games makes you a killer - doubtful.

Playing video games and killing people because your parents didn't give you any time - plausible.

or

Playing video games because you don't get on well with people - plausible.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not the Games it's the culture

>Guns don't kill, people kill, people use whatever weapon they can get...

That's rather the point:

Pissed off Welshman in a transit van- kills two people.

Pissed off taxi driver with a shotgun- kills more people (but only killed that many because he was able to keep moving)

Pissed off youth with a hand gun- kills far more people.

"Guns don't kill people, people kill people. And monkeys kill people if you give them guns and throw themover the wall of Charlton Heston's house."

Eddie Izzard

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Iron Man to fly Chinese mobe-maker TCL around the world

Dave 126
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Re: Paid Product placement and El Reg

Whose IS that man? Fabulously wealthy and charismatic, somehow he finds enough time in between bedding beautiful women to tinker in his marvellously equipped workshop, the envy of all men who meet him... it can only be a Reg journalist!

Hmmm, I wonder what fizzy pop he drinks, and what car he drives? I want to drink that and drive like he does!

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Dave 126
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Re: SHIELD?

Yep, that would be his motivation!

In the first film he used some weird Samsung flip-phone which had a screen that rotated through 90º...

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Former CEO John Sculley: Apple must adapt or die

Dave 126
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Re: @Dave

>They did however introduce a range of smaller, cheaper iPods.

Very true, but rather than cannibalise sales from the iPod 'Classic', smaller players can complement it. The iPod may already have have docks etc, and use the Classic for the car or lounge, the Nano for the gym or journey to work. In any case, the technology changed- Flash players are now cheap and have far bigger capacities than the earlier HDD-based iPods. Only Apple, Archos and Cowon make HDD-based players these days, with the Archos not pocket sized.

>They've already done that with the iPad, no reason to think they can't do something similar with the iPhone.

Judging by the cost of the iPad Mini, they have margin enough on it. Again, big iPad for the sofa, iPad Mini for the car glovebox or handbag, or for those who won't stretch to £500 for a toy.

Both the iPod 'Classic' and big iPad are too heavy or big for all situations... thus leaving a convenient gap for a baby brother or two. The same isn't true of a phone, which has got to be portable and suitable for all but the most niche of activities (outdoor expeditions, for example, where weatherproofing and battery life are of prime importance)

I have considered the need for a smartphone if one always has a smallish tablet to hand; a dumbphone + tablet combo has a lot to recommend it (long phone battery life, low cost of phone replacement if lost, internet functions easier on a tablet by virtue of its size) but I can't imagine Apple making an dumbphone- an iPhone that doesn't do apps would reduce the clarity of their message.

Rather than spend money on a creating, testing, tooling up for and then communicating the benefits of a new iPhone design, its more efficient for Apple to just continue selling the previous version alongside the latest and priciest.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why does everyone assume there are only two smartphone price points?

>What's wrong with a $300 price point?

That it might eat into the sales of their iPhone 4 (with its higher margins) is a possible reason, plus the less immediate cost in terms of their image. If the $300 device is too clunky, ugly or feature-limited, it might put buyers off considering another iPhone in the future. True, Samsung have phones from £10 to £400 (though use 'Galaxy as a sub-brand for the pricer ones), but Apple benefit from keeping their message simple- as demonstrated by my dad pointing at any touch-screened phone and asking "Is that an iPhone?"

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Dave 126
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ooops

"ninetoes article" is a typo, and has nothing to do with mowing the lawn in sandals.

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