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* Posts by Dave 126

3893 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Chinese boffins crack cloaking tech for camouflage

Dave 126
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Re: Pink?

Burgundy? Maroon?

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DARPA shells out $194m for 'phase 6' of STARnet chip project

Dave 126
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Re: Whatever happened to...

They seem to be researching the building blocks of chips, rather than optimising chip layout and scheduling- which appears to be the focus of most recent papers on GA for chip design.

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Re: Is it just me......

D'Oh! I knew I missed an important one!

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Dave 126
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Re: Is it just me......

What, things like Tyrell Corp, Weylan Yutani, Ono Sendai, Omni Consumer Products, Cyberdyne Systems Corporation, General Forge and Foundry, General Products...

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Speaking in Tech: 'VCs hate open source because the path to money is longer'

Dave 126
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Re: What does the title even mean?

So you're commenting on a title without actually listening to the podcast, just because it contains the words 'open source'?

How does that make you look like someone worth listening to? Still, at least you're consistent.

Just looking at the list of topics - "Fighting over OpenStack" and "Open Compute vs OpenStack" - tells anyone with a brain that they are discussing storage vendors and hosting solutions. There is more to storage than just software- I'm pretty sure there's hardware involved somehow.

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Microsoft's Intel-powered Surface Pro to launch in February

Dave 126
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Re: I dunno....

2GB suggests a 32bit Atom chip... wait n see I guess!

The most appealing of this new breed is the Lenovo Yoga.

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Dave 126
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Re: Good luck Microsoft...

>It'll be interesting to see if their vision becomes a reality; merging the fondle tablet and keyboad/mouse desktop genres. Time will tell weather it flops or flies.

Throw in the wildcard of touchless human input- MS have researched this, LeapMotion are gathering interest (and have just signed a deal with Asus to incorporate it into laptops).

I say wildcard, cos it might be that people don't want to wave their hands in the air. Time will tell, as you say.

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Dave 126
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Re: ECT

'Strewth DestroyAM, that's pretty dense. You seemed to have compressed Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Enquiry into Values into the first paragraph, and it's follow-up Lila: An Enquiry into Morals into the second.

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Dave 126
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Re: Again, sort of want

And again:

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-HD-Graphics-4000.69168.0.html

Compared to the Intel HD Graphics 3000 in Sandy Bridge CPUs, the HD 4000 card was completely redesigned and offers improved DirectX 11 capable shaders, Hardware Tessellation, a dedicated level 3 cache... ...In the slower i7-3610QM and a dual core i5 it was on a similar level as the Radeon 6620G. Therefore, casual gamers that wont mind reducing the quality settings in high end games, may be happy with the performance of the HD Graphics 4000.

The integrated video decoder called Multi Format Codec Engine (MFX) was also improved and should allow even simultaneus 4K video decoding.

Another new feature is the support for up to 3 independent displays (depends on how the HD 4000 is used in the laptop - maybe only with a DisplayPort / eDP).

Due to the 22nm 3D Tri-Gate production process, the power consumption should be relatively low (the development was focused on performance per Watt).

Things do change, you know.

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Dave 126
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Re: Too fookin' heavy

The HD4000 integrated graphics allows most games at lower settings, decode 4K video and run up to three monitors... should be fine for most people other than gamers, modellers and CUDA-abusers, no?

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-HD-Graphics-4000.69168.0.html

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Dave 126
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>What happens when the system becomes so cripplingly slow that you have to nuke and pave? Will it reinstall all >your apps or is it going to be a PITA?

You make a disk image (clone) to an external disk (or network resource) once you have your system as you like it- settings, software installed, nice wallpaper etc. In the event of registry clog, theft, a nasty virus or an act of dog, you recover your system from that image.

What do you currently use?

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Dave 126
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Re: How can Microsoft get this stuff so wrong

> the kind of apps which need 8GB are not the kind of thing you should be running on a tablet.

>But then why bother with an Intel processor?

The quantity of software that requires Windows on an x86 processor but is very happy on 4GB or less:

Shitloads.

I've rarely come close to that limit, with multi-layered high res Photoshop documents, CAD, a rendering package and far more Chrome tabs open than I need.

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‘That’s not art’ says Apple as it pulls nudes from AppStore

Dave 126
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Re: what we all love.... I <3 BOOBS!

?

Jay and Silent Bob do know how to deal with internet trolls: (NSFW as if you had to ask- no nudity, just profanity and violence)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l1_8wefR7c

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Google v Microsoft mobile war: Who's REALLY to blame?

Dave 126
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Re: Who's really to blame?

It was interesting that a recent Reg article about proposed changes to the USPTO attracted far fewer comments about patents than you would find on any given story about Apple. Oh well.

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Dave 126
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Re: Microsoft tastes OWN medicine

>Windows on the desktop has huge marketshare still and nothing except OSX has really reduced that much.

True, but then people aren't using the desktop as much as they were for certain activities- there are now set-top boxes, games consoles, mobile phones and tablets too. These are mainly communication, entertainment, shopping and searching orientated tasks, though.

And agreed: WinPho isn't a threat to the Android user, and the competition and different thinking can cause future Android to be better still.

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WTF is... Weightless?

Dave 126
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Re: Deja-vu all over again

>How about a smoke alarm that shuts down all gas and electrical appliances (or their sockets) in the room its in when it detects smoke?

I'm probably just illustrating your point about these things being tricky- but wouldn't that example prevent owners of cordless DECT phones from ringing the fire service?

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Dave 126
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Lots of people would happily pay money to be free of that nagging thought "I am sure I turned off the gas hob?", as they are their way to the train station.

Another would be a telephone that turns down your TV or stereo when a call comes in (Bang and Olufsen do this already).

I can imagine many uses that this 'internet of things' will be put to have already been pioneered in making kit for disabled people (blinking lights to alert deaf people to their doorbell, for example)

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Dave 126
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Re: Doomed from the start

>utensil porn.

"Ohh-err, I don't half fancy that vibrating fork I saw at CES"

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Dave 126
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Says the toaster: "Whoops, I over did that"

Replies the fire alarm: "Okay, I'll hold on for a minute... can you ask the TV to bring this to the attention of the meatbag?"

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Nokia lets Lumia 820 owners 3D print their own case

Dave 126
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Re: Hardware Piracy

Ohhh, I see- 'adaptor bricks' to allow different brands of construction kit to be used together! Nice.

Yeah, making individual parts to be used with (or replace broken parts of) existing manufactured products is exactly what 3D printing is good for.

(though still not for making thousands of identical units, which is what I thought was meant)

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Dave 126
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Re: Missing the point of 3d printing...

It might be worth looking at a material called Kydex for phone holders... it most common hobbyist application is for gun holsters and knife sheaves- the sheet of Kydex is heated and formed around the object it will house. When cooled it retains flexibility and can be sanded etc.

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Dave 126
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Re: Interesting Pre-cept

>There will be resurgence when the off the shelf tech gets to an affordable price point, but to me this is a cliche headline marketing bumpf.

Agreed, when the Nokia rep put out the idea, he suggested the user making "a waterproof, glow in the dark case with a bottle opener". No.

The home user is often better off with some epoxy for making little things that. Kydex is a handy formable sheet material- well suited for making dashboard cradles for phones etc. Loving Sikaflex at the moment- a very strong adhesive and sealant, remains permanently flexible after curing.

I'm still assuming that no more people will own a 3D printer than currently own that hobbyist's favourite, a Dremel hand drill. I can currently see more practical uses for a desktop laser cutter for thin materials than a 3D printer in the home- larger functional objects, stencils, jigs... and yes, bottle openers.

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Dave 126
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Re: Now that's real innovation.

>Now, is some someone going to print a prototype case with a chorded-keyboard built in or what?

Just found someone has done just that and implemented it. His blog is here:

http://srimech.blogspot.co.uk/2012/02/chorded-keyboard-for-mobile-phones.html

He wouldn't need the external battery if he owned an Android phone with USB OTG support...

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Dave 126
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Re: Now that's real innovation.

>To give you a hint, it'll be several orders of magnitude higher than buying a moulded, third party case, via eBay.

That's very true, if thousands of other people buy the same case. Which they probably will- I can't imagine someone having case requirements that are so off-the-wall that they are thy only person who have them.

Now, is some someone going to print a prototype case with a chorded-keyboard built in or what?

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Dave 126
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Re: Hardware Piracy

>"How long 'till we see knock off lego."

You'd have a helluva job... Lego is injection moulded to very high tolerances. I did stumble across a tech website recently that plotted the standard deviation for Lego bricks made in different decades. Making Lego bricks is the very opposite of what you'd want a 3D printer for.

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Dave 126
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Re: I suppose

Eadon, this is thread about 3D printing... why the hell are you putting out your tired views about OSs here? It is the wrong thread, and the wrong website since everyone here has enough experience of their own not to be swayed by your simplistic rhetoric. You are getting very tedious. Instead of writing as many posts, consider writing better quality ones.

3D printing... oh yeah, Linux .... it's hardly the platform of choice for 3D modelling, is it? Sod off.

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First Google wants to know all about you, now it wants a RING on your finger

Dave 126
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This magical ring will work on my Android tablet too ? oh no, Google designed it without a USB port

Google haven't really designed the tablets, some are LG, some ASUS, IIRC. Many Android devices do have a USB host port, disguised as the standard microUSB port- that's why microUSB has 5 pins instead of USB A's 4: shorting the extra pin to ground tells the tablet to act as a host, so that thumb sticks, card readers and keyboards can be plugged in. See USB OTG

That said, one of the LG-built Nexus devices won't do it all, another needs persuasion.

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Dave 126
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Re: You have got to be kidding

Doesn't have to be a ring... this person has a chip implanted (but then so does my dog) to give him quick instant access top a child-proof gun safe:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxNjqN4Gdc0

Bit too far for my taste. It could easily be retrofitted to a wristwatch (or its strap) though. Yeah, I know that American commentards don't think that anyone wears a watch these days, but many of us in the rest of the world do.

With a ring, the logical conclusion is that any device you pick up temporarily becomes 'yours'. Pick up any phone, and it will be your contacts and emails displayed.

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Ballmer now flings out work rivals, rather than chairs, claims ex-Microsoftie

Dave 126
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Re: Cringe

>Don't insult Neanderthals - apparently, they were quite intelligent!

They were- they just weren't as nasty as us!

Still, some of us Europeans have up to 5% Neanderthal DNA... amazing really, that interspecies breeding went on before beer was invented!

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Re: "Ballmer is the best person to lead Microsoft"

>You can criticize Ballmer for many things but "award themselves" isn't one of them. His salary's the lowest of any tech CEO (including stock options and other cheats) by his own choice.

Fair enough. Obviously the programme wasn't speaking about Ballmer, it was more generic than that... but the mention of acquisitions being a way way to be seen to be doing something did chime with a few tech firms in recent years. For all I know, Ballmer may be competent, but if so then it isn't communicated well... the message isn't as clear. And then all you have to do is throw a couple of chairs and it's all people talk about.

MS have had products that have been premature, or late to the game, or else haven't set the world on fire. Media Centre Extenders, the Courier (Sony have since used the form factor, Samsung the finger+stylus combo), using the Windows brand in a confusing way (8, 8 Phone, 8 RT etc), using the Surface brand for first a coffee table then a tablet, killing off HomeServer...

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Dave 126
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Re: Innovation

>"the tech world's lurch into tablets and smartphones, "

>How many times have Microsoft been in denial about the potential success of a technology only to finally produce their own (much) later on

MS have been doing smartphone and tablet OSs for years... they just weren't great. [XP Tablet Edition, 2002] [Windows Pocket PC]

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Dave 126
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Re: Balmer the Dr Evil villain

Target: missed, Eadon.

It is normally MS's licensing deals that raise your ire. The man responsible for those deals with OEMs wasn't Ballmer, but Kempin:

Under Kempin’s tutelage, Microsoft launched the Market Development Agreement (MDA) licensing concept in 1994. The drill for hardware makers went something like this: If OEMs wanted to license Windows 95 but didn’t promote or sell it, they would pay a fairly hefty price per copy. If they agreed to co-promote the operating system in ads or issue a Microsoft-endorsed press release noting they had decided to offer their customers Windows 95 preloaded on new systems, they got a better price.

-http://practical-tech.com/business/who-is-microsofts-secret-power-broker/

Kempin has been a problem child for Microsoft for years. This is a guy who lost his hunting license earlier this year for allegedly using his SUV as a weapon (as in ramming antelopes with his car instead of shooting them).

-http://news.cnet.com/Commentary-Good-riddance-to-Microsofts-problem-child/2009-1001_3-250044.html

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Dave 126
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Re: "Ballmer is the best person to lead Microsoft"

There was a good programme on the radio yesterday, In Business. Basically, the conclusion was that people get to the level of CEO by a mixture of politics and good luck, and sometimes by displaying a tiny pinch of good judgement. Once near the top, they come to believe that they deserve their status, and award themselves. They feel that they must be seen to be 'dynamic', and therefore indulge in things like acquisitions- which rarely add value but do make a lot of noise, cause a distraction and make them look like they are doing something.

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Entire Reg readership would fill 205 Olympic-sized swimming pools

Dave 126
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Re: Well blended

>Except volume != actual volume

Quite right, I mentioned 'Eureka' (finding volume through displacement, a la Archimedes), but that still wouldn't account for cavities such as the lungs, sinuses and the interiors of some commentards' skulls.

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Dave 126
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Re: Well blended

>I work that out as 1020.83 swimming pools.

That looks like false precision to me, unless you have data on the volume of all Reg readers! Have you installed sensors in our bath tubs? Eureka! : D

False precision:

"A guide in the museum tells visitors that this dinosaur fossil is 200 million and 4 years old... when asked, he says "Well, when I started working here they told me it was 200 million years old, and I've been working here for four years..."

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Dave 126
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If all Reg readers are together in 205 Olympic-sized swimming pools, I can only ask: "Where can I get 205 sharks with laser beams?"

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Another new asteroid-mining firm: 'First commercial space fleet'

Dave 126
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Buzz Aldrin's Cycler:

http://buzzaldrin.com/space-vision/rocket_science/aldrin-mars-cycler/

And in other news:

http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/10172449.Apollo_11_astronaut_Buzz_Aldrin_takes_to_East_Coast_trains_after_snow_cancellations/

And they put him in a standard class carriage.

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Dave 126
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Re: Right on Commander!

Piracy only works if there are some successful miners to rob first. Otherwise you're just in it for the rum, shanties and buggery.

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Dave 126
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Re: Space exploration is the only hope

Yeah, expanding into the solar system is our current economic model reductio ad absurdum.

Even then we would run out of habitable space eventually, though we could postpone that time a little more by reconfiguring our available matter into forms that have a higher surface area than rocks and planets - ie Ringworlds (AKA, Orbitals, Halos) or Dyson Spheres...

Hmm, it might be easier to just adopt a different economic system instead.

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Dave 126
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Re: JMC

>Wouldn't you rather contract out to Weyland Yutani?

No, I wouldn't. Red Dwarf looked more fun. Besides:

"Priority one

Insure return of organism for analysis.

All other considerations secondary.

Crew expendable."

-MOTHER

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Review: Infiniti M35h hybrid sports saloon

Dave 126
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Re: what's the point

Did you read the review?

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‘Anonymous’ hacks Oz Uni’s email to protest bulk iPad buy

Dave 126
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Re: Just consider one simple use case

>For any serious educational need, something that can handle a memory card & has full file access abilities & plenty of free apps for the poor student... something with USB OTG available, something that can be

The device the student uses for text input (i.e a laptop) will handle that sort of thing. You don't need those things on a textbook replacement. WiFi will be sufficient.

The Note's stylus would be useful in the classroom (I had a play its feature that recognises stylus input of mathematical formulae), but a device with the resolution of a Nexus 10 or iPad would be better for textbooks.

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Dave 126
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Re: hard to argue with what the anon guy said

>I'd agree that tablets are rubbish input devices,

Before eInk readers were cheap enough for consumers, they were used by pilots who are required to have a large quantity of documentation on board. This documentation was heavy and also subject to frequent updates, so justifying the cost of the device ($1,500 at launch).

From 2006:

http://www.engadget.com/2006/07/27/hands-on-with-arincs-iliad-based-eflybook/

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Dave 126
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Re: stop abusing and exploiting their student body

If Anon had been around in the eighties:

"It is scandalous that schools have bought overpriced BBCs when everyone knows Spectrums are better!"

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Dave 126
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Re: Best alternative is a Chromebook

ditto an Apple eMate 300! (Joking!)

A 1997 Apple Newton PDA with keyboard in a pre-iMac translucent clamshell, for schools only. Only saw one, my Design and Technology teacher had one to play with in an all Mac school - though a room adjoining the workshop in which we used drawing boards is now full of Windows SolidWorks workstations

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Dave 126
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Anon don't make actually bother making a rational case for which tablet to use instead... for textbooks, only the the Nexus 10 springs to mind, though f you took a hit on screen res, a Galaxy Note could be handy for annotations and presentations.

A quick web search reveals the existence of the Kuno, an Android tab aimed specifically at the education market (and only sold in bulk to schools, it seems), but with a 9.7”: 1024x768 16:9 screen. Not ideal. However, it is designed to managed centrally.

http://www.mykuno.com/index.html

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We trust computers to fly jets... why not trust them with our petabytes?

Dave 126
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I seem to remember reading in PC-Zone 'back in the day', about a flight sim enthusiast who got to look at the cockpit of an RAF jet for real. He gleefully noted that he knew what all the knobs and switches did, bar one little red micro-switch... "Whats's that?" he asked.

"That's to reset our computer when it crashes" the RAF pilot told him.

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This week's BBC MELTDOWN: Savile puppet haunts kids' TV

Dave 126
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I've just read the Wikipedia article to refresh my memory of one a sublime piece of satire on this topic. In fact, the outraged reaction was even funnier than the broadcast itself. Well worth reading for the IT angle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brass_Eye#Paedophilia_special_.282001.29

Highlights:

-Labour MP Syd Rapson related that paedophiles were using "an area of internet the size of Ireland".

-Richard Blackwood stated that internet paedophiles could make computer keyboards emit noxious fumes to subdue children, subsequently sniffing a keyboard and claiming that he could smell the fumes, which made him feel "suggestible". Blackwood also warned watching parents that exposure to the fumes would make their children "smell like hammers".

The reaction:

-MP Beverley Hughes described the show as "unspeakably sick" but later admitted she had not seen it, and David Blunkett said he was "dismayed" by it. It later emerged that he also had not seen the episode, because he is blind.

-The Daily Star decried Morris and the show, placing the story next to a separate article about the 15-year-old singer Charlotte Church's breasts under the headline "She's a big girl now" and using the words "looking chest swell". The Daily Mail pictured Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, who were 13 and 11, in their bikinis next to a headline describing Brass Eye as "Unspeakably Sick".

You couldn't make it up.

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Paging Dr Evil: Philips medical device control kit 'easily hacked'

Dave 126
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The second series of the TV show Homeland has brought the possibility of compromised medical equipment to wider awareness, though the details were unrealistic.

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Intel: Everything is absolutely fab-u-lous, particularly in servers

Dave 126
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Re: Ostrich Corp

>Are they in complete denial?

No, Intel are going to some lengths to communicate their efforts to tech blogs with a penchant for benchmarks. For example

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/atom-z2760-power-consumption-arm,3387-5.html

The jury is still out, but it would seem the race isn't over.

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