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* Posts by Dave 126

4048 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Microsoft Xbox gaffe reveals cloudy arrogance

Dave 126
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Re: > steam sale type prices (Always Online Required)

>It is far more likely to boost sales of the PS4 than the console it's designed for.

Yep, and given that there would appear to be less difference between the next generation of XBOX and PlayStation than between their current models, silly decisions like this on MS's part could have more of a negative impact on them.

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Apple handed victory in Samsung text-selection patent case

Dave 126
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Re: Bullet proof, but not B.S. proof.

>I think it is hilarious that they tried to patent the "detection of a a microphone or other device is plugged into a device's input jack"

They haven't. They've tried to patent a METHOD of doing so... the merits of which are a different question. You've confused means for end.

Shimano didn't try to patent the idea of putting brakes on a bicycle, but they did patent the idea of using a cam to increase the mechanical advantage throughout the travel of the brake lever so that the brake pads initially move quickly.

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Movie bosses demand Google take down takedown notices

Dave 126
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Re: Quality

Good for you, but we didn't have a break down of how much many copies are downloaded 'as soon as possible' i.e movie cams, screeners and TV shows, and how many are DVD/BluRay rips which come later.

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The healing hands of guru Dabbs

Dave 126
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It's the same old combo of Sod's Law, Murphey's Law and Tucker's Law. Searching for the latter is NSFW, btw.

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Norkoshop: How Pyongyang well and truly forked Adobe

Dave 126
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>They have nuclear devices capable of creating a detonation. That's not the same as a nuclear weapon. They could still be the size of a truck and not in any way weaponised.

An ICBM, it is true, does allow you to place the 'kaboom!' on your enemies and not on yourself (a rough and ready definition of weapon), but a boat would do the trick as well- albeit slower and open to interception.

If a bloody large wooden horse is off-loaded in a US port with a tag reading "To honour our victorious enemies, love and kisses, Kim Jong Un"....

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Dave 126
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>El Reg has nukes?!

Yeah they do, but for peaceful purposes. The SPB has yet to finish proof-reading their report on their efforts, though:

Having sourced material from smoke alarms processed on a conventional gas hob, they intend to put a plymobilenaut into orbit by launching a succession of bombs behind the launch vehicle.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Orion_(nuclear_propulsion) for more details of this principle.

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Dave 126
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I did like the spoof Facebook status update:

Kim Jong Un: I really really mean it this time!!!

[America likes this]

China: What's up, hun?

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60-inch Apple iTV to be controlled by iRing remote?

Dave 126
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Galaxy? In more of a spiral shape, but the visual innuendo still holds.

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Dave 126
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Re: And exactly what is supposed to power the ring?

> another is that the consumer will often be part of a family

Good point, and it has given me an idea- with more devices capable as acting as a remote control (traditional IR, phones and tablets over Blutooth, WiFi, whatever) there is more scope for conflicting instructions being issued to the TV/Set Top Box. My solution? When a multi-user command conflict is detected, the users are thrown into a quick bout of Tetris/Tekken to decide who has 'the power' for the next half hour.

I use the word 'solution' in the broadest sense etc...

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Dave 126
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Re: And exactly what is supposed to power the ring?

>Rechargeable, so it needs to spend time on an induction pad every few hours?

You missed the Reg article on Apple's patents on selective wireless charging with a range of around a metre

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/02/apple_wireless_charging_patent/

Besides, it might be the size of a wedding band, or it might be more like one of those little ring mice people use for presentations, or it might be complete bunkum.

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Dave 126
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Re: Won't someone think of the children?

>found buried in dust inside a heating vent or deep in the crack between dishwasher and drawers.

Losing it seems only of the chief issues. The best remote controller I saw was the size of a house brick and painted hi-vis orange - a remote for a overhead gantry in a factory. That looks great, I told the fitter, no way that can get easily lost like a TV remote.

"You'd have thought so," he replied "but some cnut always manages to hide it in his toolbox"

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Dave 126
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Re: Consider it..

>Consider it.. ...a badge of ownership.

A little bit like the Bang and Olufsen key-fob remote control:

" With it you are able to turn on the radio, TV and lights as you step through the door and switch everything off again as you leave! " though it strikes me, for the same functionality, you'd be better off with a wall-mounted unit next to your front door.

-http://www.beoworld.org/prod_details.asp?pid=734

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Lasers capture 3D images from a kilometre away

Dave 126
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>New gap in the market for new range of stealth clothes

[Insert picture of Kylie Minogue in her sequin dress] Though it might be more conspicuous in many scenarios.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why no shoes?

>Why no shoes? What's up with that?

Good question. I don't know, but I note that there are no metal zips, watches, spectacles or watch buckles visible on the subjects, either. Perhaps there was a risk lace eyelets on shoes upsetting the laser?

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Wanna put your toaster and fridge online? Over to you, Ofcom

Dave 126
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Re: What? @Shasta McNasty

Oh, and the terminally forgetful or OCD would like the reassurance of confirming that they have indeed turned off the iron, as they are en route to their holiday.

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Dave 126
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Re: What? @Shasta McNasty

>What is the obsession with everything having to be online and interconnected?

The argument for the fridges being connected is that they could be instructed to turn itself off during events such as the proverbial "millions of kettles put on during the Coronation Street advert break", thus reducing the load on the National Grid. The thermal mass of a fridge or freezer is such that being turned off for five minute would not result in any appreciable change in temperature.

Most of the time the grid functions well below its maximum capacity, and only approaches it for short peaks. Which means it has to be engineered to cope with loads that are rarely required. To cope with spikes in demand, things such as gas turbine generators have long been used, since a conventional power station can't react quickly enough to meet them.

Of course there are security concerns, but having simple measure in the end device - such as only responding to power-off commands for ten minutes in any hour, for example - would go a long way to limit any malicious intent.

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Dave 126
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Re: Red Dwarf

"...until he [Talkie Toaster] was involved in an 'accident' involving Lister and a 14lb lump hammer"

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Gaming's favourite platters get another stir of the pot

Dave 126
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Re: Cake and pineapples

The cake is a lie.

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ARM, TSMC tape out 64-bit Cortex-A57 chip on 16 nanometers

Dave 126
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Re: 16 nm!

Hehe. With these modern razors, I can't get that little bit of stubble right under my nose, and have to resort to a plastic Bic. 'Movember' be damned, I'm leaving moustaches to Errol Flyn, David Niven, WW2 RAF pilots and other dashing fellows!

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Dave 126
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Re: A ARM-PC?

Apple only switched to Intel after it had demonstrated its advantages over rivals for a few years- AMD was a bit hot at the time, Power chips more so - and their hand was forced. Besides, not all of the ARM architecture's power savings currently translate for desktop/laptop purposes, certainly not enough to go through all the bother of causing 3rd party developers loads of work. So, I would image Apple will continue with a 'wait and see' bet-hedging strategy, using this new ARM in one of their more niche products first (like an Apple TV) first, if at all.

Or I'm completely wrong, and Apple will appeal to their traditional power users (those whose tools often emulate pens, knobs and sliders - i.e graphics, video and music) and bring out a Wacom-threatening iOS super iPad designed more for productivity than consumption (I don't really think so... such people can already tether their pad and use it as a control surface if they want to).

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Ancient website from 1999: By Mark Zuckerberg aged 15¾

Dave 126
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Pint

Re: The Web

Personal websites...

In the days before mobile phones were totally ubiquitous (yet WAP was beginning to rear its monochrome head), I was tempted to create a site to let people know what pubs I would be in at various times that evening. Back then, it wasn't uncommon for a group of people to say "We'll be in the Red Lion 7.30 til 8.30, then the Tavern til 11, then the Parrot Club" and stick to it, so the idea had some legs. As it turned out, I was too busy drinking to be bothered.

There must have been thousands of people around the world at the time who had similar 'social networking' concepts, but were too busy socialising to do anything about it.

By the time I had graduated, sites skin to Myspace but for product designers had appeared, so there didn't seem to be much point.

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Dave 126
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From the website:

"However, it is fairly uncommon for a person to have an effect on the Internet without going through the long and tedious process of creating a website."

Surely he must have heard of Pamela Anderson? She had a bit of an impact on the net in the '90s.

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Dave 126
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Re: Java applets

-Daddy, what's Java?

-Well, son, it is a program that throws up frequent notifications from your task bar demanding to be updated, then tries to install a search bar onto your browser. Beyond that, I don't really know.

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Review: Intel Next Unit of Computing barebones desktop PC

Dave 126
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Re: Not a Pi rival, more a Mac-mini clone

>Thunderbird option is interesting though

As would Stingray, Scarlet and Fireball sockets! Now I know what my laptop has been missing! : D

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Scottish SF master Iain M Banks reveals he has less than a year to live

Dave 126
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Re: No need to drag politics in please - Non M

I think Transitions was 'M' in the States, but not over here... or vice versa... which is kind of appropriate for the book! I enjoyed The Steep Approach to Garbadale, published a few years back, the first 'non M' I'd read in a while.

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Got a BlackBerry? It may be telling your friends when you watch pr0n

Dave 126
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Dawson Bros did this, a Social Networking / Grumble Site crossover spoof:

'Jizzedin'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4FVFOekln4

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Obama seeks $100m to unlock your BRAIN's secrets

Dave 126
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Re: *Actual* use for this project will be

I only drink it when I have the shits in foreign countries.

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Dave 126
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Re: It's always easy...

I would recommend reading this transcript to a lecture given by Mike Lazaridis, a co-founder of RIM, to the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Vancouver

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/mike-lazaridis----the-power-of-ideas/4053180

An excerpt:

"Over 90% of the time on the venture capitalist model you'd be losing your bet. But a few percent of the time you'd be making breakthroughs, because that's the other thing trailblazers do, they discover things that are utterly new. We need a system for scientific research that allows researchers to get lost exploring, maybe even encourage them to get lost exploring, because you know what? It's worth it. It's the path to breakthroughs. That is the kind of science that will give us the next generation of truly fundamental breakthroughs, things on the order of Maxwell's unification of electricity and magnetism, or Einstein's notion of space-time, or quantum mechanics.

"I'm talking about physics because physics is my passion, but of course we need breakthroughs in every major scientific area. And the impact of breakthroughs? History has taught us that it's impossible to say, even the discoverers can't say it. Brattain, Shockley and Bardeen came up with the transistor while trying to figure out how quantum mechanics worked in solids. They figured their new invention would probably be important to, say, the hearing aid industry. They had no idea what their discoveries would mean to the world."

And he is putting his own money into it.

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Dave 126
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Re: "Jump-start a sagging economy"

>Not sure how researching brains will help the economy, create new jobs, and "make the best products". Just saying.

I think a suitable test subject has just identified themselves. Oh wait, my mistake: they haven't because they posted as AC.

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Dave 126
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Re: It's actually a very inventive backronym

'Stuff Happening In Technology' is as reasonable a name as any other for an IT news site (and is recursive too, if one uses a common colloquialism), except people mistake it for an offshoot of Ars [Technica].

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Card skimmers targeting more than ATMs, says EU

Dave 126
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Re: Funny Stuff

>From the very inception of the "Pin Code" we have been laughing at how insecure this system is.

That's all well and good, but the risk has to be compared to the alternatives. I haven't done the sums on the risk of losing money through card fraud versus the risk of losing money through losing your wallet, or having a £20 slip from your pocket.

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Steve Jobs to supervise iPhone 6 FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

Dave 126
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Re: 'Poll' position

>Will we shortly be told that Jobs' birth was heralded by a double rainbow and a shooting star in the sky? And that he scored 11 holes-in-one during his first and only round of golf?

Kim Jong Un is becoming the new Chuck Norris...

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Dave 126
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Re: This is not unusual

We were told on our product design course that car manufacturers would have several design teams; working on the cars to be released in one, three and five years time. The constraints for phones are different, and the time-scales probably shorter, but yeah, there's nothing surprising here.

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Playboy submits to Apple with nudity-free 'Pornography 2.0' app

Dave 126
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Re: Heh.....

>"Unporn"

"Tried to de-stimulate him with a dog carcass"

- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q_mOf4kJ7dE Chris Morris' Blue Jam.

NSFW

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Dave 126
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>If Apple allowed other app stores, then that is fine, but as its a locked down ecosystem, it is pure censorship...If Apple allowed other app stores, then that is fine, but as its a locked down ecosystem, it is pure censorship...

Er, the thing has a web browser, y'know. You might want to reserve that phrase for when iDevices only connect to a limited number of websites on an Apple whitelist. Another solution for you would be to transfer a load of pictures from your computer to the iDevice- and saving your data allowance, too. Unlike news and emails, it matters not if the playmate picture is a month old (the picture, not the playmate).

If the owner has the know-how, they can 'jailbreak' the iDevice and use the Cydia app store. If they don't have the know-how, then maybe it isn't the worst thing that the device limits what the user can do to it.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shel Silverstein used to write stories for Playboy

I knew they used to publish a lot of stories. The following list of writers published in Playboy between 1960 and 1990 is from Wikipedia, but it appears realistic enough:

Saul Bellow, Sean O'Faolain, John Updike, James Dickey, John Cheever, Doris Lessing, Joyce Carol Oates, Vladimir Nabokov, Michael Crichton, John LeCarre, Irwin Shaw, Jean Shepherd, Arthur Koestler, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Bernard Malamud, John Irving, Anne Sexton, Nadine Gordimer, Kurt Vonnegut and J. P. Donleavy, as well as poetry by Yevgeny Yevtushenko.

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Review: Jabra Revo Wireless headphones

Dave 126
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Re: Gapless = correct

Gapless Playback - a need shared by classical music, Pink Floyd albums and dance music mixes.

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Dave 126
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I was going to ask the same (though I'd have to take a soldering iron to a spare Sennheiser cable to really make it worth while)- what's the audio quality like with modern Bluetooth standards/dongles? I read somewhere that some protocols can just punt your source mp3 file to the 'phones, without transcoding to a different format on the way... An Idiot's Guide To wireless audio would be handy : D

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Lotsa lasers an option for the Next Big Physics

Dave 126
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Re: Awesome

Many smaller sharks, more widely distributed. In practical terms, this allows them to be contained across several lakes, as opposed to one big ocean.

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Patent shark‘s copyright claim could bite all Unix

Dave 126
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Re: April Fools!

I thought something about this story smelt a little fishy... so I did a Google Nose search on the odour, and my suspicions were confirmed.

http://www.google.com/intl/en/landing/nose/

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Apple files patent for iPhone with wraparound display

Dave 126
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Re: Mmm... wobbly...

A rubber case?

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Dave 126
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Re: Dear Apple

Had 'm a d r a' achived a calmer state, he might have supported his point by noting that Android devices allow a 3rd party keyboard to be used system-wide, whereas 3rd-party iOS keyboards can't be used all the time.

I have mixed feeling about how much control to allow a user... I like having as much control as possible, in case my use-case has not been fully envisioned by the original designer.... at the same time, I wish some of my friends' systems were locked down, so I didn't get called upon to repair the damage they themselves did.

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Dave 126
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Re: Nooooooooo!!!!11!11!!!

>The current fad for high gloss finish glass displays is already a PITA in all sorts of lighting conditions.

My understanding was that OLED displays were less prone to this issue. Anyway, don't worry, it's just a patent application, not a product implementation.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sony and Samsung invent it...

>"Haha hahaha im gonna patent air then u cant breath lololol

Your post infringes Ben Elton's IP : D http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1060812.Gasping

The script of Ben Elton's first play. A satire on big business, the media and product exploitation. Designer air proves to be the marketing phenomenon of the decade, but as demand outstrips supply, Lockheart Industries plunders the Third World for resources. The world is starting to gasp, and only the biggest suckers survive.

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Dave 126
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Re: What a good idea

>Not that anyone will care, it's a crap idea.

The devil is in the details, so I'd find it easier to judge the implementation than the concept.

The fact that many of mates who bought lower-end touch-screen phones ending up regretting it (due to unresponsive screens, no proximity sensor so ones cheek would end a call, a poor lock system so the phone would make 'pocket calls') reminds us that what seems a cool product in the shop can be exasperating after a week of ownership.

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'I've read all the Harry Potters - and I'm proud to have done so for adverts'

Dave 126
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> slightly beholden to Adam Curtis in style,

Nvidia and other are working on facsimile animated faces resembling real people... when a voice-synthesizer can do the same perhaps we can feed AO's articles through a 'Curtisizer' (accompanied by large bold text, of course). This might entertain for five minutes before one installs the Sylvester the Cat voice-pack...

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Dave 126
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Re: Twat?

@Wize

I noticed that - I posted a few comments, mostly factual hurdles to the few who wanted to take an unobstructed swing at Mr Fry, but one was held back.

This moderation - though of course the prerogative of the Reg - left a bad taste in my mouth because it wasn't in keeping with the spirit of article, as it showed precious little moderation itself.

Still, it is the Reg, it is their rules in their house, and there are many other sites for me to read on the internet.

As for Mr Fry, the main oversight in his response was not recognising Reg Commentards have a healthy disrespect for Reg hacks, and the opinions of one Reg contributor did not reflect that of most of its readership.

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Furious Stephen Fry blasts 'evil' Reg and 'TW*T' Orlowski

Dave 126
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Re: None are so clearly upset ...

It's worth noting that Orlowski's response to the the genuine humble request from a comentard for him to clarify exactly what in Stephen Fry's take on Turing's contribution was "You're having a stupid moment".

Orlowski was down voted more than two dozen times, and no other commentard could provide a concise answer either, so the absence of AH's explanation means that this match defaults to Mr Fry.

Anyway, sod all this, I want the following (spoof, d'uh) to be bought to the small screen:

The Alan Turing Adventures

Mark Gatiss, fresh from the success of his adaptation of HG Wells’ The First Men In The Moon, has been given a lavish (by BBC 4 standards) budget to create this pilot for a proposed series of lavish new detective stories, in which he stars as the titular hero. Based upon a never filmed script by recently deceased BBC veteran Ted Vaaak, The Alan Turing Adventures is set during an alternate history Second World War. Turing here has been re-imagined as a dashing and flamboyant secret agent careering around behind enemy lines in a desperate attempt to steal and decode Hitler’s childhood diary, en route to which he gets locked in a deadly game of cat and mouse with Nazi rocketeer Wernher von Braun (Benedict Cumberbatch).

- http://www.essexterror.com/blog/index.php/2011/03/21/film-review-the-alan-turing-adventures/

Maybe some luvvies can be found to appear in it. Despite Nvidia's recent efforts, we still need them.

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Dave 126
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Re: I thought Fry liked pedantry

>dose of heavy weight pedantry.

Pedantry is usually in the form of "Man said ABCDF, man should have said ABCDE [as any fule kno]"

What we had on Friday wasn't that, but something closer to "Man said ABCDF, screw him, screw his friends, screw the miserable hag he rode into town on"

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Review: Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2

Dave 126
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Re: muddying the waters with Windows RT

>Bear in mind Intels persistent failure to deliver on power consumption promises.

Why bother when you can read up on the latest power consumption benchmarks before you make your purchase?

"Officiating x86 Vs. ARM Using Hard Data" - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/atom-z2760-power-consumption-arm,3387-5.html

So far, they can't declare a winner and note the race is far from over.

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