* Posts by Dave 126

6501 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Has anyone lost 37 dope plants, Bolton cops nonchalantly ask on Facebook

Dave 126
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Re: Oh, that's where I misplaced those.

I don't know why, but I up-voted 'jake'. Not because i think all plod are clueless, but because of the circumstances in which they work can make them appear that way. Also, I'm fairly bored of down-voting him.

A removed example: A bent accountant who commits millions of £$ of fraud will be far better incentivised than any official set to prosecute them. They will have spent years of experience and months of planning to commit a crime that the investigating officer might ojnly have weeks to look at - that is, if they even know there has been a crime to begin with.

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Boffins dump the fluids to build solid state lithium battery

Dave 126
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Re: Another week...

>I used to get eight hours out of four alkaline AA batteries in my Z88, back in the 1990s.

And how many AA cells did a Psion 5 run on? Joking apart, how much "useful human work" can be done on a charge? If the "useful human work" is proofreading a document, it could be accomplished on a e-ink screen. We now have laptops that weigh next to nothing, and will will see us through a full day of spreadsheets, websites and word-processing. The Psion would allow you to write documents for days on end.

Where a new leap in battery tech becomes more interesting is in areas where the physics is harder to cheat - such as electric vehicles and power tools.

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Dave 126
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Re: Another week...

> Another battery improvement presented which will never reach consumers.

This is a tech NEWS website. If you want to know what is available to buy now, check a retail website like Amazon.

The rest of us here know there is a significant lead time when/if concept leads to market.. it should go without saying.

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'Marshmallow' picked as moniker for Android 6.0

Dave 126
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Re: "Marshallow"

> "Marshallow" - Bland, soft, cloying, unsubstantial, can't take the heat without falling apart, and easy to poke holes in."

Well, they were thinking of calling it Marathon, but they got Snickered.

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Testing times as NASA rattles Mississippi with mighty motor burn

Dave 126
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Re: new technology...

>AFAIK the Drake equation is about whether intelligent life exists *on* other planets, not whether they are able to get *off* said planets.

The Drake equation contains this factor:

fc = the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space

If a civilisation that cannot reach orbit, the absence of communication satellites might affect the nature of ERM that they emit.

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Er, uh ... sorry! Project Ara will not launch this year after all

Dave 126
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Re: I can't see an use for this

I've uprated RatFox, but i also agree with pip25.

As a modular systems for just phones, it may prove to be a bit niche- many users might find that their needs are more simply met by owning a selection of traditional handsets and selecting one for twon and another for the woods.

However, if this modular system is extended to tablet screens, keyboards and more, the possibilities become more interesting. A user could create any of the following:

- 5" clamshell with a Psion 5 - style keyboard...

- ...or candy-bar with Blackberry-style keyboard if that's your thing.

- 12" tablet with pen digister and full size SD-Card slot for working with discreet cameras

- 7" e-ink configuration, with light-weight battery for comfortable reading

- physical controllers for games

- good quality camera modules, akin to Sony's QX-100

- laptop

- desk-bound workstation

- High-end audio interfaces / microphones, for musicians and journalists

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ANIMALS being CUT UP to make Apple Watch straps

Dave 126
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in other news, ursine creatures spotted defecating in arboreal areas.

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Big, ugly, heavy laptops are surprise PC sales sweet spot

Dave 126
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Re: Why now?

Gamers dont want certified workstations... the graphics drivers are optomised differently, the grahics hardware carries a premium price tag, and ECC ram does nothing for games.

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Re/code apologizes for Holocaust 'joke' tweet

Dave 126
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Re: Everything is personal in some way, to someone, somewhere.

An epilectic friend of mine has a wicked dark sense of humour - i might try that one out on her next i see her!

You're right, me doing so behind closed doors at people i know is not the same as broadcasting it to world plus dog.

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It's enough to get your back up: Eight dual-bay SOHO NAS boxes

Dave 126
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Just wondering...

were my computer to fall foul of one of these nasty 'ransom-wares' that encypt my files, would I still be able to access data that was backed-up to one of these NAS drives?

I'm assuming I could, since they run a different OS to my PC, but I'd like a second opinion. Also, does any of this ransom-ware cause my PC to instruct any connected NASs to delete/encrypt data? Cheers!

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Windows 10: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE to Microsoft's long apology for Windows 8

Dave 126
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I'll be making a system image backup before trying Windows 10.

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21st century malware found in Jane Austen's 19th century prose

Dave 126
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I cry foul!

It has been said of cryptic crosswords that the setter's aim is to lose [against the puzzle solver], but to lose slowly and with humour. Since I am not brainy enough for cryptic crosswords, I take some pleasure in deciphering hyperbolic headlines, be those in The Reg or New Scientist. However, I can't parse "21st century malware found in Jane Austen's 19th century prose" in any way that agrees with the actual article.

tl;dr I usually enjoy Reg Headlines, but this one wasn't in the spirit of the game.

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Today's smart home devices are too dumb to succeed

Dave 126
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Re: Some good points made

>agonising over the precise hue of a light fitting, FFS, certainly doesn't change that.

He wasn't talking about the precise hue, he wasn't talking about a massive difference in colour temperature. The wrong colour temperature can be agony, and worse can upset your circadian rhythms. There is plenty of peer-reviewed evidence that ill-considered lighting can damage your health, sleep patterns, concentration and has been linked to cancers.

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Ant-Man: Big ideas, small payoff

Dave 126
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Pint-sized superhero? Made me think of the 'Robo-Lister' from series 4 of Red Dwarf... the one where they are up against the rampaging chicken vindaloo monster because a DNA machine they tinkered with didn't behave as expected. JPEG below:

http://vignette4.wikia.nocookie.net/reddwarf/images/0/0e/Robolisterleopardlager.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140606010134

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EU probes Qualcomm over possible antitrust issues

Dave 126
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The El Reg nickname for Qualcomm is?

I guess Chipzilla is already taken.

Suggestions?

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iPod dead? Nope, says Apple: New Touch has iPhone 6 brains

Dave 126
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A lot of iOS app developers use iPod Touches as test-beds if they can't afford an iPhone.

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Dave 126
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Re: iPod

Agreed, an iPod Touch with a shitload of of storage for music would be a good thing. According to Anandtech, Apple use particularly fast flash memory in iPhones to reduce the loading time of apps - but a music-based device would be just fine with slower memory... just give us more of it (unlikely given Apple's focus on their new music streaming service)

>Has it got especially better battery life?

Most dedicated MP3 players have very good battery life.

>Is it suitable for small children you don't want to give a phone to?

Well, the sprogs can't call Thailand on it, delete your phone book or look at your naughty pictures. Beyond that, it was Microsoft who first implemented the obvious idea of a 'Kid's Mode' on a mobile OS.

>Now which pocket did I put my earbuds for my Sony Z1?

Can't help you. Are you talking about propriety Sony models with the stereo mics that use the Z-series phone's DSP for noise cancelling duties?

(Whooah, I've just given credit to Apple, MS and an Android vendor. Cool cool cool. )

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Microsoft boffins borrow smartmobe brains to give wearables 9x kick

Dave 126
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Re: this is cutting edge research ?

>I would of thought it was quite rudimentary.

Do have a read of the linked PDF.

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Smartphones are ludicrously under-used, so steal their brains

Dave 126
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> Car, well possibly provided it isn't for anything to do with the running or safety of the car.

It couldn't - drivetrain (all things to do with engine, steering and brakes) are on a different frequency on the car's network to infotainment, electric windows, aircon etc.

Yo're right, though: Apple's idea is to dock a phone and use it to power a display. Google's Android answer is to just embed an Android device in the car.

An analogy is Microsoft's "Make your phone a PC, your tablet is a laptop!" approach, whereas Apple use software to make the transition from phone to laptop more continuous.

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Dave 126
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Re: I love utopian views

>But the 3d scanner thingy does look cool even if I can't see a price-tag (and by logical implication cannot afford it)

Search Google for 'DIY 3D Scanner', and you'll find a few solutions, though will probably involve a bit of faff. Some just use a turntable and a line-level laser (of the sort you can buy for a few dozen £$ in hardware shops for marking horizontal lines) in conjunction with a webcam and PC.

Of course, swapping out the PC for for pocket-sized computing device makes the whole setup more portable.

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Dave 126
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>Low-end 3D printers already cut costs by offloading the workload to a connected computer. With a smartphone cradled into it, that same 3D printer becomes cheaper, smarter, more connected, and much more programmable.

Many current 3D printers don't need to be very brainy; they are just following orders in the form of G-code. What would be a step forward would be if the 3D printer used stereoscopic cameras or a laser or whatever to be aware of what it is actually primting, and thus correct any errors that have crept into the build. This would make the printer much easier to use for the user.

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Adam Smith was right about that invisible hand, you know

Dave 126
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I'm sure Tim knows this anyhows...

Similes are just metaphors with signs around their necks saying "Don't take me literally, I'm only a comparison!" [Metaphor]

Similes are like metaphors but with signs around their necks saying "Don't take me literally, I'm only a comparison!" [Simile]

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Google's Cardboard cutout VR headgear given away GRATIS by OnePlus ... SELLS OUT

Dave 126
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Re: Cardboard, just cardboard

Scam? $5 isn't too bad a price to pay to try the VR concept out for yourself, especially compared to an Oculus Rift-like device.

If I had a 5" phone I'd probably give it a go, got some architectural walkthroughs based on the Unity engine that might - or might not - benefit from being viewed stereoscopically. I don't know until I try.

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Did a SUPER RARE Sony-Nintendo PlayStation prototype just pop up online? Possibly, maybe

Dave 126
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Fun exercise...

Real or Fake? I can't work it out... The lower front panel is yellowed from exposure to UV light, with less yellowing under the Controller 1 socket, yet the rest of the case hasn't yellowed at all. This doesn't mean that it is definitely a fake - it might be that the yellowed lower front panel was modified by SONY from a production PC CD-ROM fascia, and the rest of the case made by prototyping process... possibly. Still, it's weird.

Apart from this front panel, the rest of the machine externally appears to be identical to the genuine 1990 SONY PlayStation concept, except for the area where the cartridge slots in. This concept was designed by Soichi Tanaka, with a logo designed by Masaaki Omuri.

The first PlayStation that was sold commercially was designed by Teiyu Goto, who later went on to found Sony's VAIO computers. The lilac colour of this PlayStation was to minimise the appearance of the inevitable UV yellowing.

Source for the factual stuff: ISBN 9780789302625

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BBC veterans require skilled hands to massage their innards

Dave 126
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How much would it cost to make a short production run of compatible machines? I'm think that having the components visible in a transparent case could only add to the educational value.

Another advantage is that once he PCB layout, BoM and whatnot is sorted, replacement machines could be built as needed.

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Apple's mystery auto project siphoning staff from other divisions

Dave 126
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Re: Lol - if I have to firmly press the indicator stalk

>exert any of their nonsense ui on me. I'm out.

'Force Touch' is only available on:

- Apple Watch. Isn't pushed on you unless you have bought an Apple Watch.

- Certain Macbooks. Isn't a compulsory part of the UI. Indeed OSX has a history of retaining UI elements such as Menus and Keyboard Shortcuts even when it adopts new ways of interacting, such as multitouch trackpad gestures. Compare to MS Office...

- A rumoured iPhone. Isn't pushed on you because it hasn't been released.

- An 18v power drill. Not made by Apple, was made in partnership with a British material company to demonstrate their piezo material that allowed great sensitivity to material stress with next to no strain. I haven't seen much of it since it appeared in IE magazine.

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Apple workforce touch up iPhones with Force Touch tech – report

Dave 126
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Re: Air touch is cooler

WIMP GUIs have long had [MouseOver] and [MouseClick] events. Capacitive 'multitouch' UIs haven't had this distinction (nor have they had the accuracy of a mouse ponter, but they in part make up for these disadvantages by employing multitouch 'gestures' for scrolling and zooming etc).

The Samsung function you mention - not unique to Samsung, some vendors call it 'Glove Mode - can't really be used to act as [MouseOver] because it requires the user to keep their thumb a few mm over the screen but without touching it, because that would be [MouseClick] according to your proposed grammar.

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Apple's iPhone 7 to come loaded with depth-sensing camera, supply chain spies claim

Dave 126
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Re: Handling....

Product Design, like Engineering, is all about choosing which compromises to make. The camera on a phone is often a secondary function, whereas a smooth pocket-friendly shape is a priority for a 'carry all the time' device.

Interestingly, one of the higher-end Nokia phones had a battery case sold as an ergonomic aid to the camera function. http://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/mobile/accessory/pd-95g/

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Who wants a classic ThinkPad with whizzy new hardware? Lenovo would just love to know

Dave 126
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Re: I'm gonna get flamed for this...

He wants a good touch-typing keyboard and a long lasting battery life - that's relevant, irrespective of the sector he works in.

Some of his other points are a bit confusing, though.

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Subaru Outback Lineartronic: The thinking person’s 4x4

Dave 126
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Re: nice pics

Agreed.

I was the malcontent who commented on the dodgy picture quality in some previous car reviews. So thank you Team Reg!

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Pint-sized PCIe powerhouse: Intel NUC5i5RYK

Dave 126
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Re: Noise?

Nofen Fanless Cooler - for chips up to 95 TDW. A big cooler, for big cases.

Otherwise, search for fanless industrial PCs - the whole case is a heatsink.

Otherwise, quietpc.co.uk earn a living by selling... you guessed it!

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Mum fails to nuke killer spider nest from orbit

Dave 126
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Re: She could always have taken the offending banana and throne it in the freezer....

> the bananas were fumigated once they entered the U.S.

In the early nineties, National Geographic reported that one of it's own New York-based staffers had discovered a new species of spider. It too had hitched a ride to New York on some fruit.

Perhaps not all U.S-bound fruit was fumigated then.

A friend of my family's was off work for months after being bitten by a spider at her workplace in England. She was working in the fruit and veg department of a supermarket. Its bite did her leg some serious damage.

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Stealing secret crypto-keys from PCs using leaked radio emissions

Dave 126
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>. It's also NOT interesting to hobbyists who are already aware of it all.

From the very first paragraph of the article:

"This is a well-understood risk, but as these guys have demonstrated, it can be done cheaply with consumer-grade kit, rather than expensive lab equipment."

I would have thought that the low cost of the equipment would make it of more interest to hobbyists

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Yep, it's true: Android is the poor man's phone worldwide

Dave 126
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Re: Apple is a Fashion House

I also know people who have disposable income, and still use their iPhone 4Ss. It does everything they want of a phone, it is compact by Android or modern iPhone standards, it is still in one piece, and for anything more they use a computer or an iPad.

I've never owned an iPhone, but the 4S seems pretty well put together, and the engineer in me suspects that it wouldn't have been felled by the incident that has just trashed my Xperia (which has a thin ABS bezel and not an aluminium one. My main gripe with Sony is the poor design of their official case rather than the phone itself)

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Dave 126
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Re: Rational decisions

>For $75 you can get a new phone that does basically the same stuff as any other phone.

The operative word is 'basically'. I could have a phone that takes a few seconds to register every input, and whist it is basically doing the same as a faster phone, it would be incredibly frustrating to use.

The functions may be 'basically' the same, but the experience won't be.

Of course, over time the phones sold for $75 will be fast and pleasant to use for any given function.

I'm not saying that you should go 'flagship' spec.

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Dave 126
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>This is silly. There are things you can do on Android which you simply can't do on iOS because it is too locked down.

I agree. Conversely though, there is stuff you can do with iDevices that is harder or impossible to do on Android devices. I'm mostly thinking of 3rd party peripheral hardware and 3rd party software.

[Insert link to Reg article about the spending habits of iOS users on apps]

[Insert list of iOS-supporting headsets, speaker docks, electric guitar cables, microphones etc]

I'm an Android user. If I highlight shortcomings in Android and its 'ecosystem', it is because I want Android to be better.

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Feature-rich work in progress: Windows Mobile 10 build 10136

Dave 126
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Truncated text in a developer beta?

Just by coincidence, another OS in developer beta is showing a similar-looking issue in its UI:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/9380/os-x-el-capitan-first-look/6

One it assumes its the sort of thing that will get sorted out in time.

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Sunday Times fires off copyright complaint at Snowden story critics

Dave 126
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Re: You know you've hit them where it hurts

>Private Eye

That their website doesn't have much content beyond "Just buy the magazine!" is a point in their favour. £1.80 from all good newsagents.

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Testing Windows 10 on Surface 3: Perfect combo or buggy embuggerance?

Dave 126
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Re: I almost feel sorry for Microsoft

>Hopefully UI designers (everywhere) will draw the obvious conclusion from this expensively won experience: design one UI for touch and a different one for Desktop. Don't compromise.

Yeah, well.... I'm currently using a UI that is designed for mouse and keyboard. It seems to be a compromise, because I need mouse AND keyboard to use it efficiently.

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Beats loudspeaker silenced by Apple after $3bn buyout, report claims

Dave 126
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Apple are already a Sonos competitor

Apple have a presence in multi-room audio - their Airport Express units have a 3.5mm analogue audio output.

It's not a system I have used, so can't comment on the implementation. My sister's fella (BlackBerry, Range Rover, shotguns etc) used a multi-room Bose jukebox thing, and now uses a Sonos system controlled by his iPad. It seems to suit him.

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Entertaining prospect: Amazon Fire TV Stick

Dave 126
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Re: Its all about the SP Factor (Shiny and Pointless)

My friend's Chromecast gets quite a bit of use. Multiple people in the room can use their iOS/Android phones and tablets to queue, for example, YouTube videos to the big TV. He also uses it to display streaming web video being played on his girlfriend's iMac from the next room.

Whether or not it is worth it depend upon your existing kit and your viewing habits. Much of the above functionality he already had, by controlling a PlayStation 3 YouTube app with an iPad. Occasionally his housemate connects a laptop to the same TV to watch football.

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Jurassic World: All the meaty ingredients for a summer blockbuster

Dave 126
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Mushroom

IT Angle

Does this new Jurassic film have a "It's a UNIX system! I know this!" moment?

The original movie also critiqued hardware product design:

Accountant: "Is it heavy?"

Children: "Yes!"

Accountant: "That means it's expensive. Put it down!"

Icon: Nuke the entire site from orbit etc

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Dave 126
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Haha! The 'handsome hunk' character, played by Joel McHale, in Park and Recs' sister show Community spent an episode in mock-bitterness at Chris Pratt's success with Guardians of the Galaxy:

"Chris Pratt is always out there, mocking me with his muscles and success!"

https://twitter.com/prattprattpratt/status/593289709293412352?lang=en-gb

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BlackBerry on Android? It makes perfect sense

Dave 126
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Re: Free OS is the Problem

Let's roughly break it down: What does BlackBerry have:

- Network

- Software

- QNX OS

- BB UI

- Hardware

The Network and Software can be charged for, on any platform if needs be.

BB 10 looks good, but how easy will maintaining compatibility with Android apps be in the future? Conversely, how difficult would it be for BB to bring their security to Android?

The BB UI could be brought to Android.

The BB hardware - the keyboards, basically - can be made Android compatible, or licensed out to Samsung et al.

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Scientists love MacBooks (true) – but what about you?

Dave 126
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>the motherboard issues, the graphics card glitches in whole batches of machines.

As happened to MS's XBOX 360, as happened to Dells machines. As happened to loads of makers because they didn't at that time know how to use lead-free solder. Legislators enforce a new material that nobody has much experience of using.

That was then. Now is now.

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Dave 126
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Re: News: "People buy computers that run the software they need"

>Isn't that why coders buy Macs?

Linus Torvalds says he uses a MacBook Air because it is quiet and it is lightweight. He has some opinions about Mac software, but then he would, wouldn't he?

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Dave 126
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-NT4: Great, snappy, fast, reliable. No USB, no drives over 8GB, no DirectX

-98: Crashed a lot.

-2000: Stable enough, but did some weird shit with Zip drives.

- XP: Had ShadowCopy, but no built in application for actually making system images.

-Vista: Would restart itself whether the user wanted it to or not, in order to install updates. No good then for any long render, calculation or simulation.

- 7: I'm liking 7. A few niggles.

I use Windows because I use CAD software - and the reason engineers don't historically use Macs was covered by the first poster on this thread. When I have played with Linux distros, I did notice how much scientific software was available.

Really, if you need a program, then the OS is merely to launch that program. If I was a musician or a graphic designer, I would use OSX.

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MIT bods' digital economy babblings are tosh. C'mon guys, Economics 101

Dave 126
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Re: Tax the robots!

Hi, my name is TX840, but my friends call me 01010101101010010101010101010001010010101001

I work 120 hours a week and earn enough to buy my batteries and have a service twice a year. I treat myself to a manual inspection twice a week. I'm saving for an upgrade...

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Dave 126
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Okay, that's true - after people have their needs of food and comfortable housing sorted, they will spend more on experiences, such as eating out or entertainment. And if robot combine-harvesters gather our food, and robot housebuilders/concrete-printers keep in shelter, then people will have time to spare to take pride in their burger/steak flipping and active leisure activities. Serving others becomes more rewarding and less like a chore. If nobody has to work more than twenty hours a week, and it doesn't materially affect the experience of the inevitably wealthy people, then all good. It sounds better than what we have now.

How can get to there from here?

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HTC reflects on Champions League iPhone cock-up

Dave 126
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Re: Happens all the time

I don't believe so. There are less expensive competitors to the ToughBook, but the durability of its name suggests the actual models are the go-to solution for many engineers.

It happens all the time. A TV advert for Nokia phones might be shot with Sony cameras. Until Apple made Intel-based Macs, they must have been using Windows or *nix workstations from other people for product design, since they use Unigraphics NX and AutoDesk Alias.

Source: an Apple job advertisement.

http://jobs.designengine.com/jobs/cad-sculptordigital-3d-modelers-levels-apple-nx-unigraphics-2/

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