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* Posts by Dave 126

4212 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed

Dave 126
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Re: Ded game?

The consensus amongst follow-up reviews seems to be that whilst it initially offered a fun and exciting take on PlayerVs Player FPS combat, there wasn't enough there to keep it interesting.

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Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

Dave 126
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Printer Daemon protocol?

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Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around

Dave 126
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Re: "Advanced Light Source Synchrotron."

You can buy them from Maplins for about £20, sold as 'Disco lights that pulse in time to your mp3 player'.

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Dave 126
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Re: assume "that a battery charges fairly uniformly"?

What Paul Kinsler said.

http://xkcd.com/793/ 'Physicists':

"You're trying to model the behaviour of a <complicated system>? Just model it as a <simple object>, then add some secondary terms to account for <complications I just thought of>. . . Easy, right? ... Why does your <your field> need a whole journal, anyway?"

[Liberal Arts majors may be annoying sometimes, but there is NOTHING so obnoxious as a physicist first encountering a new subject]

Sidenote: Randall 'XKCD' Munroe was interviewed on BBC Radio 4's 'Today' programme this morning - it was about 8:40 am for those who skip through podcasts.

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Dave 126
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Re: @ 'Faux' Science Slayer

I like my satirists to be smarter than me, well informed and skilled in their art. Chris Morris, Peter Cook, Steve Bell, Jon Stewart, Sacha Baron Cohen, Rory Bremner, The Onion, whoever...

People who adopt a cause - whatever it is - to merely promote themselves are a part of the problem, since they just add to the noise.

Maybe FSSlayer should leave the issues surrounding energy storage to engineers? Aside from issue of renewable energy generation, there are some solid reasons for smoothing out the supply and demand of energy over a day / week / year. Batteries of any chemistry will only play a limited role in this - I'm not surprised that FSSlayer is ignorant of pumped hydro schemes and the like.

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The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?

Dave 126
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Re: Time

How are you getting on with that EMP cannon you're building in your shed, herman?

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Dave 126
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Re: Phone Cameras...

Indeed there is such a tradition... Private Eye magazine often calls out the journos with the most outdated byline photos.

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Dave 126
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Re: Watches are for driving

Side note on cars and watches: one version of the Omega Chronostop was designed to be read on the inside of the wrist; its face was marked at 90º with respect to the strap (so the 12 o'clock marking is at 3 o'clock). This was to make it easier to read whilst driving.

http://www.hodinkee.com/blog/2010/1/13/hodinkee-explains-the-omega-chronostop-an-under-the-wrist-dr.html

* * *

Google and Apple announced their respective car-integration plans earlier this year - in effect, Apple's solution is to have an iDevice drive an integrated dashboard display, whereas Google's is based on a stand-alone car-based Android module.

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Dave 126
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Re: U2

>Remote controls are free and a replacement is under £20. I agree mostly with the sentiment ...

In the early 2000s, there were $200 universal IR remote controls with touchscreens and programmable macros from the likes of Marantz...

A mate of mine uses his tablet as a remote control for Youtube on his Playstation3. He wouldn't have bought the tablet JUST for this purpose, but it is very convenient (since entering text for searching is easier on a touchscreen than with a game controller). Another friend uses his LG G2 as an IR remote for his TV and various related boxes.

Similarly, a remote control for phones would be handy - function not worth $350 by itself, but if it did other things too (notifications, fitness tracking etc) it begins to make more sense.

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Dave 126
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Re: I just wanted to thank you

>No one likes the annoyance of putting a watch back on,

I don't like the annoyance of putting on my trousers in the morning, yet I still do.

Seriously though, nightly charging will prevent one use case for wearables - 24/7 namely heart monitoring for medical purposes. (I don't know how the accuracy of current consumer heart rate monitors compares to proper ones issues by doctors - if the consumer tech is up to scratch then I'll make the assumption that a week's worth of data is more useful to a doctor than 16 hours worth).

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Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts

Dave 126
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Re: I'll just move along

>I just don't see the point in it

Well, get yourself a stop watch and a clip board and conduct a time and motion study on the issue. If you are sat at a desktop computer for eight hours a day before getting behind the wheel of a car, then fair play, such a product might not be for you. For other people, there might be a demonstrable, empirical benefit to such a device.

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Dave 126
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> random Bluetooth disconnection

>>I imagine that BT LE, 4.0/1, whatever you wish to call it will help in this matter quite a lot. (The LE mean Low Energy.)

The Citizen Proximity and Casio G-Shock Bluetooth are both BLE devices, and in fact were released before BLE was supported by Android (though Samsung had made some Android devices that boasted Bluetooth LE hardware ahead of the OS support), yet the Citizen model still suffers from random disconnection. Both devices were 'iPhone only' - mainly because Android didn't support the protocol at the time.

It might be a traditional wristwatch vendor that gets into the market with a product that offers a different balance of functionality / battery life / form factor (I'm looking at you, Tissot).

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Dave 126
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Sony made a watch to connect to Android phones years ago. An issue it had, shared by the Moto360 according to some reviews, and by the Casio and Citizen bluetooth watches, is a random Bluetooth disconnection. One assumes that Apple are in a better position to troubleshoot this kind of issue, since the number of device combinations are smaller and controlled by them, and that they are more motivated too.

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Would Apple godhead Steve Jobs have HATED the Watch?

Dave 126
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Re: "a few secrets" or...

The first iPod cost £600 and only worked with Macs...

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Applelutely fappulous: Fashionistas bow down before the JESUS PHONE

Dave 126
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Re: Apple could be onto something here

'Measurable Utility'.

Okay. For sure, for the same price as a B&O stereo system, you could buy a better sounding system. However, the B&O system won't sound bad by any means, other people in your household won't object to its appearance, and it might possess some features that the competition lack (B&O produced multi-room audio kit years ago). Basically, once you bought it you didn't have to worry about hi-fi kit any more and could just get on with your life.

Right, I'm off now to see a friend who swaps his Decca cartridges around on his Garrand turntable, which sits atop a granite plinth atop a wheelbarrow inner-tube, connected to a valve amplifier of his own construction, connected by mains cooker wire to a pair of Voight corner horns each the size of a small wardrobe. Unless he's fiddled with the configuration in the last week.

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Dave 126
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Crossed wires?

I agree with most of what Mr Pott says, but I'm not sure what was objectionable in SuccessCase's original post, laden as it was with qualifiers such as 'a pretty good sign'. Observing a 'pretty good sign' is a prelude to the formal 'form a hypothesis and test it' scientific method.

'Quality' too is as fuzzy a term as 'cool' - an author of computer manuals wrote a book about it in the seventies. Perhaps 'fit for purpose(s)' would be closer to what we're getting at.

Pirsig became greatly troubled by the existence of more than one workable hypothesis to explain a given phenomenon, and, indeed, that the number of hypotheses appeared unlimited. He could not find any way to reduce the number of hypotheses—he became perplexed by the role and source of hypothesis generation within scientific practice. This led to his determination of a previously unarticulated limitation of science, which was something of a revelation to him.

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Dave 126
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Re: The Real Question...

Christopher Walken as Captain Koons in the movie Pulp Fiction:

So he hid it in the one place he knew he could hide something. His ass. Five long years, he wore this watch up his ass. Then he died of dysentery, he gave me the watch. I hid this uncomfortable hunk of metal up my ass two years. Then, after seven years, I was sent home to my family. And now, little man, I give the watch to you.

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Dave 126
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>Queuing is a real and tangible cost in time and comfort. So there is real and actual energy going in, for some reward real or psychological.

Everything costs time, so one has to consider what these people would be doing otherwise. Sitting at their work desks staring at a spreadsheet? It might be that the people in this queue are enjoying themselves in the company of fellow people. After all, a lot of time at festivals is spent just standing around in good-natured conversation with strangers.

The new iThingy just plays the role of a McGuffin, or as a souvenir. People will undertake the El Camino de Santiago de Compostela pilgrimage on foot, and will have a 'passport' stamped along the way to show that they ave done it.

There is a paradox here - the people in the queue are largely choosing to level their status to those queing with them ("We're all in this together") for a sense of camaraderie - whilst hoping to get a status symbol of sorts at the end of it.

As Obelix might say: Humans, they're all crazy!

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Dave 126
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Re: "I would say if you have people queuing outside your shops for weeks....."

> you are posting a comment about being cool on a, frankly decidedly uncool technology website.

Posting on The Reg is for each of us only a small part of of respective lives. It is 'cooler' to have some individual interests than it is be 100% trendy.

What isn't cool is talking about cool, or trying to be cool. Apparently. I didn't make the rules.

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Hawking: Higgs boson in a BIG particle punisher could DESTROY UNIVERSE

Dave 126
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Good news, everyone!

Prof Farnsworth:

"Why, to do what you are suggesting would require some some of DOOMSDAY WEAPON! Oh well, I supose I can spare one..."

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Moto 360: Neat gizmo – if you're a rich nerd

Dave 126
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Re: Eh?

All of AC's example use cases are valid... and none of them require a power-hungry colour screen.

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Dave 126
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Re: How about a watch that has the correct time?

Adjusting the time on a quartz watch is an infrequent chore, since they will only lose or gain a second or two per month. Frequent travellers might appreciate an automatic time-zone adjustment feature, though.

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Dave 126
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Features Vs [Power consumption and form factor]

Most of the speculation has been seemingly prompted by Apple iWatch rumours, and given substance by efforts from Samsung, LG, Motorola and - pre-dating the current smartwatch buzz - Sony. Samsung have taken the 'everything but the kitchen sink' approach, as have the other traditional phone handset makers with their watch efforts. However, not much is said about the existing Bluetooth LE watches that occupy another point on the features against power consumption graph.

Casio (G-Shock BLE) and Citizen (Proximity) make such watches, which give phone notifications, and allow you to 'page' your phone. Reviews suggest the concept (minimal 'connected' features in a traditional-looking watch with good battery life) is sound, but the implementations are not satisfactory (random breaking of the Bluetooth connection etc).

The other element in the mix are the type of device that some people have used for years - fitness trackers and heart rate monitors etc.

None of the above devices require a smartphone-class SoC or a colour display (The Moto 360 is criticised for using an OMAP3 SoC that is believed to be built on a 48nm process). Indeed, the Citizen Proximity watch uses only physical dials to show calls, SMS and email notifications.

The original iPhone was notable for what it left out (contemporary rival handsets had 3G cellular, copy and paste, 3rd party applications) as much for its multitouch UI... this might prove to be a good approach with watches.

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Jony and Marc sitting in a tree ... let's design Apple iThings, BUDDY

Dave 126
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>Gotta admit that it doesn't bode well when the PR dribble is about the (new) designers rather than the products.

Er, why would Apple put out PR stuff about new products before the launch event?

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Weekend reads: Perfidia, Fatherland and The Incredible Unlikeliness of Being

Dave 126
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Evolution

Stephen J Gould is for my money a better read than Dawkins. Gould's work is informative and interesting, but also very human.

He makes a cameo in the Simpsons (Lisa the Skeptic), taking money from a little girl for some scientific tests he had no intention of undertaking. +1 Boffin Points!

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Dave 126
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Man in the White Castle / The Minority Report mashup?

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Size matters – how else could Dell squeeze 15 million pixels into this 27" 5K monitor?

Dave 126
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Re: What's the point?

CAD users would benefit from this display, especially when working in wireframe, or creating engineering drawings.

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Dave 126
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Rampant Spaniel is correct...

... the usually quoted PPI figures for human vision are wrong, and are based on some assumptions. There are also situations where our eyes can resolve more detail on a VDU, such as a single-pixel wide diagonal line - of the sort often encountered when working with CAD.

http://www.cultofmac.com/173702/why-retina-isnt-enough-feature/

Basically, Steve Jobs based his 'Retina Display' figures on the assumption that we can resolve 1 arcminute, whereas most estimates place the figure at between 0.6 and 0.4 arcminute.

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You can thank Brit funnyman John Oliver for fixing US broadband policy, beams Netflix

Dave 126
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Re: Totaly unrelated

He wasn't born in the USA, so can't be President. However, his place of birth probably doesn't disqualify him for Ruler of Earth,

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Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy

Dave 126
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Re: Dieter Rams

It is Ive, not Ives

Deluded? He was joking with colleagues, something people often do when a project is nearing completion to their satisfaction. "Switzerland is fucked".

He hasn't copied any Dieter Rams design, but rather Dieter Rams' methodology - this requires hard work, as Dieter himself will tell you.

Switzerland doesn't rely on luxury watches.... again, Ive was joking.

Seriously Mage, if you want to talk about Ive and Rams, at least look beyond Wikipedia. Here is an interview with the man himself, for starters:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/8555503/Dieter-Rams-Apple-has-achieved-something-I-never-did.html

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Lenovorola TRIPLE-ola: New Moto G, Moto X and 360 wristputer UNZIPPED

Dave 126
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Good comment, points well made, reasoning shown.

A smartwatch would mitigate the 'dig phone out of pocket when it rings only to see that it is another PPI cold-call' shuffle. Socially, it is possible that smartphones might encourage more people to leave their phones in their pockets or bags when in company, and not have them sat on a table.

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Dave 126
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Define small, Bahboh.

Both the Sony Z1 Compact and Z3 Compact share the same footprint (146.5 x 72 x 7.3 mm), but the former has a 4.3" screen and the latter a 4.6" screen, due to smaller bezels. They have the same Snapdragon SoCs as most other high-end Android phones.

I have an older Android phone that has a screen roughly the same size as that on an IPhone, 4"... I get on with it well, but my close-up eyesight is fairly acute and my fingers aren't too sausage-like. It seems that most Android apps are designed for slightly larger screens, so your experience of Android on c. 4" screens might be less than ideal.

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You are here => Earth is in 'the suburbs' of an IMMENSE HEAVEN

Dave 126
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>A hundred quadrillion is about* a third of the number of water molecules in one-hundredth of a cubic millimetre of water. Does that help?

Thank you for your effort, but... I've never seen a molecule of water. Could you possibly scale that up to 'grains of sand in X number of swimming pools', or another other Reg-approved unit of volume?

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

Dave 126
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Re: So basically, MS says ...

>What if the hackers have heard about the gmail "+" trick? If they had, then they'd be able to write a script to defeat your countermeasure.

How?

They would have to brute force your username at the same time as trying to brute force your password. And as we know: lots x lots = shitloads.

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Dave 126
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Re: So basically, MS says ...

>if you re-use passwords from other sites, it only takes one of them to leak the password in a weak manner and all of your accounts are screwed.

In the article in which they discuss that, their advice is to reuse passwords across low-value sites - such as forums - and to reserve dedicated passwords for important sites, such as your email, shopping and banking services.

In addition, attackers have to know which email address you have used as your username for each site in order to use compromised password - if you use you+ebay7antelope@gmail.com for eBay and you+amazon4mountain@gmail.com for those respective sites, a compromise of one site's system won't reveal your username for another.

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Apple Fanbois (and girls) already lining up for NEW iPHONE

Dave 126
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Re: andyelliott@outlook.com

Self promoting? They're promoting some software, not themselves. And shit, sometimes you get a good atmosphere of camaraderie in queues... they can be more fun than many people's workplaces.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why?

From the linked article:

"While waiting, the Rays are promoting an app from VideoMedicine that allows patients to Skype with doctors."

The details of the deal between the Rays and the app developers aren't made clear, but there is more going on here than the Reg article suggests.

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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

Dave 126
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>But *everyone* needs to use secure passwords. At least for stuff they care to keep secure. It's not a complex concept, really.

Not a tricky concept, but a PITA in practice. Such is life! Some people advocate the use of password managers, though only last month The Reg reported of a security failure in a popular example of the breed.

Personally, I use the tiered approach, so might reuse the same password across low value sites (seldom-visited forums, for example) whereas email and banking sites get complicated (non-dictionary, UPPER lower case, !"£$, numbers, mixed up) passwords.

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Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015

Dave 126
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Re: increasingly @AC

>whereas health bands are probably a fad,

For younger people, maybe... but for older people with, say, heart conditions, 'tele-medicine' is going to pushed ever more by the NHS (and insurance companies) on cost grounds.

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Dave 126
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Re: increasingly @AC

>So the watch can wait... Besides, who really wears smart watches anyway?

Not many people at the moment. Still, before iPads and Android tablets I hadn't seen many people using touch-based keyboard-less computers (just the occasional surveyor or mechanic.)

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Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER

Dave 126
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Re: Does it matter??

>Put a dog turd on a strap, slap an Apple logo on it and the fanbois will still buy it, claiming that it's world changing technology.

If that were true, Apple would have just bunged some Bluetooth chip in the iPod Nano, and enjoyed some sales for the last few years.

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Dave 126
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Re: Quick Reader Poll:

I'd probably consider a monthly charging interval to be acceptable, though of course this depends on the usefulness of any 'smartwatch' features. This would allow people to travel without packing extra charging gubbins.

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Dave 126
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Quick Reader Poll:

Genuine question. What kind of charging interval would you consider acceptable for a 'smart-watch'?

Weekly, monthly, biannually?

Let us know!

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Dave 126
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Re: If Samsung can do it then surely Apple can...

My current watch:

Small, looks good in a plain way, tough, waterproof, years on batteries. Days, hours, minutes.

So, what 'smart watch' features would I find useful? And what comprises would I be willing to incur in order to have them?

Some features could be implemented without drastically affecting the appearance of the watch. I wouldn't want a Galaxy Gear, but a conventional watch that had a RGB notification LED or two, plus some simple media playback controls could be good. For that I might trade a 3-year battery life for a 6-month battery life, perhaps.

Citizen and Casio already make simple connected watches, but the implementations appear to be in the 'close but no cigar' territory.

Indeed, Citizen's effort is solar-powered:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Citizen-Proximity-Bluetooth-Chronograph-AT7035-01E/dp/B009LDL7TU

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Wetsuits, sunshine, bikini babes and a competitive streak: Epyx California Games

Dave 126
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Re: Reading the instructions = cheating??

>I had significant problems copying Spectrum games.

You needed a 'Romantic Robot' module, mate. It was designed to dump the Speccy's RAM to tape, so progress in games could be saved, but it had a side effect:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiface

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Another step forward for diamond-based quantum computers

Dave 126
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Re: eh?

>which means that to get acceptable accuracy the calculation may have to be performed many times in either parallel or series, which negates some of the advantages.

At least it's easy to check the results of the factorisation with a classical computer.

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PEAK APPLE: One MILLION fewer iPads sold this quarter

Dave 126
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Re: I wouldn't say it is Peak Apple

In support of your argument, I'd also suggest that people are more willing to overlook shortcomings in their tablets than they are in their phones. Most tablets tend to reside in the home, so are closer to a power point.... battery isn't as important. Weight isn't as big an issue, since they aren't carried around as often as phones. Because phones are carruied out and about, they are more likely to incur damage, cosmetic or otherwise.

If a phone runs out of battery, the user is put out of touch with friends and family. If a tablet runs out of juice, a phone can pick up most, if not all, of the tablet's duties.

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UK WhatsApp duo convicted of possessing extreme porn

Dave 126
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or a reference to:

-The Ring - Japanese horror film in which anyone who watches a certain videotape dies a week after watching it.

-Monty Python's The Funniest Joke in the World sketch, in which a joke is penned that causes anyone who hears it to die of laughter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gpjk_MaCGM

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Dave 126
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Re: Soooooo...

>Who's going to get off on a 48x48 icon...

Not that this changes one's impression of this case, but on a technical note:

What'sApp downloads a full-size picture to the phone when it is viewed in What'sApp.

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Dave 126
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Re: -Why did they not have solicitors?

Possibly due to cuts in Legal Aid. Dunno.

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