* Posts by Dave 126

4340 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Multi Jet Fusion: THAT's HP's promised 3D printer, not crazy 'leccy invention

Dave 126
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Re: coming soon

HP and Stratasys were in bed together a few years back.

http://investors.stratasys.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=697147

"August 1, 2012

Stratasys and HP to Discontinue Manufacturing and Distribution Agreement"

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Dave 126
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Re: How to Sanity Test the over-hyped BS claims made by 3D Printer vendors

Fair play Jeff - the "3D Printing will revolutionise manufacturing and change the world!!!" crowd do puzzle me too.

Personally, I think a laser cutter - even a modest one only capable of cutting 12mm ply - in every garage/shed/den would be more likely a 3D printer, and a better fit for the scale of projects around the home - shelves, wine racks, stencils, jigs for routing work-surfaces etc,.

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Dave 126
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Re: How to Sanity Test the over-hyped BS claims made by 3D Printer vendors

Sanity Test?

FFS. You choose the method of manufacture that is most economical for the quantity of part you are producing. Injection moulding produces parts to incredible tolerances, and does so very cheaply - once you have invested in your tooling.

The major reasons one would use Additive manufacturing are:

1. Prototyping. Ten years ago, additive manufacturing was only ever referred to as 'Rapid Prototyping'.

2 Small production runs. CNC machining often sits in this space as well.

3. To produce parts that have a geometry that is difficult/impossible to manufacture by other means. Say you wanted a sponge-like shape made of aluminium - perhaps to use a catalyst substrate. You couldn't machine the inside, 'cos you couldn't get your cutting tool in there.

Your comments are akin to asking "How many components of your injection moulding machine are injection moulded?". Answer, next to sod-all. That doesn't invalidate injection moulding as a process.

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Dave 126
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Re: New Technology??

>So, how is HP's 'new' technology different from any currently available 3D printer???

Strewth.

Okay, normal Fused Deposition Modelling printers (almost all of the cheap RepRap, Makerbot etc machines) work by extruding plastic out of a nozzle. This plastic forms the model.

This HP method lays down a layer of powder across the entire bed, then selectively bonds it with 'glue'.

The bed shifts down a notch, another layer of powder is applied, the process repeats.

After all the layers have been 'printed', the loose material is removed and the model is cured with heat.

The use of powder is akin to Selective Laser Sintering, and the shared advantage is that one doesn't need to print a support structure for overhanging features. An additional advantage of this HP method is that the binding agent can be varied across the model, either to colour the powder or to adjust material properties such as elasticity.

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Dave 126
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Sprout

I'm sure the Reg is working on article about HP's 'Sprout' PC that was announced alongside the above 3D printer. One popular technology website completely missed the point in its coverage by describing it as merely a mouse and keyboard replacement, whereas it is a combination projector, virtual keyboard, 3D/2D scanner and 3D gesture interface... the devil is in the implementation, but the concept sounds very useful for blurring the line between hardcopy (take a newspaper and use your finger to select an article to scan, or trace an image with a stylus), or place a 3D object in front of it and scan it in.

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

Dave 126
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Okay Tatsu, so the Reg review doesn't agree with your expectations... oh dear.

Here is a partial review of the 5K Mac as a Windows gaming machine:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/10/the-retina-imac-and-its-5k-display-as-a-gaming-machine/

You're welcome.

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Dave 126
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Re: "... 256GB will soon feel rather small for multimedia projects."

Thunderbolt, let alone Thunderbolt 2, can shunt 4 streams of uncompressed HD video... basically, it can supply it faster than you can edit it. And that is just a single Thunderbolt bus. The MacPro has three of 'em.

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Dave 126
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Re: The display

>Where can I buy the screen (preferably in black), with VGA, DVI and HDMI connections.

>Also should cost about 1/3rd of iMac price.

You will be able to buy it from Dell for 5/6ths of the price of the iMac. Anandtech reckon it's a fair bet that it is the same panel as the iMac, too.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2841732/why-5k-displays-matter-the-one-spec-that-tells-all.html

I doubt that your graphics card will output 5K through VGA.

Why do you want a 5K screen for "Email + Web "?

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Dave 126
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Re: That is one hell of a nice monitor...

>And a machine of this class should have a pure SSD, not a "hybrid", which experience with these in an Enterprise environment has taught me are unreliable, finicky crap.

No Mac uses a hybrid drive. 'Fusion Drive' refers the combination of a Logical Volume Manager called CoreStorage (inspired by ZFS) baked into OSX, plus conventional SSD and HDD drives. OSX itself optimises what data is duplicated onto to the SSD for performance benefits. I can see why Apple calling it 'Fusion Drive' has confused you, but a 'hybrid drive' it isn't.

>My sausage-fingered friend uses Mac keyboards for his Windows PCs. Personally, I get on with Dell keyboards. Some people swear by mechanical keyboards.

I love by my Logitech MX Darkfield mouse on a Windows PC for CAD. I don't get on with SpaceNavigators - probably because I haven't persevered. My professional Mac-using friends use tablets and styli, even when video-editing.

Each to their taste.

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Dave 126
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Re: I work in PAL conversions

>Can anyone who does serious work in this area give us an idea of how much storage they need and of what form/location?

Short answer: Shitloads. Redundantly stored on external servers. Thunderbolt to the MacPro for editing.

My friend runs a video production company. Filmed footage is irreplaceable ( you can't return to your client and ask them to re-enact what you filmed in the first place), so all data is redundantly backed up as soon as possible - ideally as it is being shot, or at least whilst still on site.

Thunderbolt is happily fast enough to shunt it onto the editing Mac as required. There really isn't a need for large internal storage.

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Dave 126
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Re: Wotta lotta pixels

Pixel-wide lines at anything other than vertical or horizontal (Think Illustrator or AutoCAD) would benefit.

'Retina' is based on the fallacy that 20/20 eysight is average, whereas people's average vision is actually better. If if this wasn't so, some scenarios, such as the one above, still benefit.

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Watch out, Samsung and Apple: Xiaomi's No 3 in smartphones now

Dave 126
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@over the hill

>"and according to today's news Xiaomi have been caught sending IMEI numbers, phone numbers and text messages back to Beijing."

That was August's news, and today is in October. You raise a valid point, and if truth is on your side they why mislead us? http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2359714/chinese-android-smartphone-firm-xiaomi-caught-collecting-users-data

The issue - MIUI's cloud messenging service sending said data upon the start-up of the phone with an option for the user to opt-out - has been fixed. I'm not excusing them, but it is fair to put the claim in context. If you are referring to another, newer issue, please do supply a link.

[ I attempted to reply in-line, but was treated to this:

Gone

The requested resource

/post/reply/2343987

is no longer available on this server and there is no forwarding address. Please remove all references to this resource.

Apache/2.2.22 (Debian) Server at forums.theregister.co.uk Port 80]

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Big Retail's Apple Pay killer CurrentC HACKED, tester info nicked

Dave 126
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Re: @BasicChimpTheory

Thank you chr0m4t1c

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Dave 126
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Re: Concerns

>Apple Pay might struggle outside the US just because the rest of the world was already onto Chip & Pin, and now PayWave etc. anyway.

I dunno, but can the 'tap to pay' merchant terminals in the UK be adapted to work with Apple Pay - or a Google NFC system?

(A friend asked me why his Nexus5 phone was intermittently beeping but was displaying no notifications... it turned out his 'tap to pay' credit card was in his phone's wallet case, and he had accidentally turned its NFC a few days before whilst fumbling in the settings).

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Making an entrance: Remote door-opening tech

Dave 126
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More of this sort of article please!

I've often thought it curious that we take central locking on cars almost for granted, yet houses are some way behind.

Imagine the peace of mind that people could take from remotely verifying that all the doors are locked, windows are closed, gas hob turned off and iron unplugged.... such doubts can plague a person as they head for the airport.

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China set to be buried under mountain of surplus robots, warns biz chap

Dave 126
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Re: Forced automation is going to create a bubble no matter what

Well, to zoom out a little.... if robots built the roofs over our heads and farmed all our food, what really would be the need of human labour?

Psychologically, we get restless if we have nothing to do. We invent past-times like sport that mirror the activities that we once had to do to survive. We enjoy working with other people, and exercising our bodies and brains.

The advent of industrialisation didn't mean that the workers could merely work half days... it meant the the mill owners got richer - or rather they stayed as rich, since they were competing with other producers to produce goods at a lower cost to the consumers.

The Amish seem a happy enough bunch... they don't work too hard in building a barn because the whole community turns up to lend a hand, and it becomes a social event. Everybody works, but nobody works too much.

In Brave New World, no new sport was allowed to be invented unless it used more resources than existing sports.

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No nudity, please, we're GAMING: Twitch asks players to cover up

Dave 126
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Re: Pasties

Sidewalk, pavement

soccer, football

elevator, lift

chips, crisps,

fries, chips

pasties, nipple tassels

trash, rubbish

1st floor, ground floor

etc, etc

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Apple to PROTECT YOU from dreaded TROUSER EXPLOSIONS

Dave 126
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Re: Bigger bums??

Agreed.

A lardy arse deforms more than a toned or boney arse - it would spread aroudn the phone to make contact with the seat - so less of a chubby user's weight would be bourne by their phone than would the phone of a skinny person. The chubby person's phone would also be subject to a more uniform load.

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This is why we CAN have nice things: Samsung Galaxy Alpha

Dave 126
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If you're willing to forego a fingerprint sensor AC, the Samsung S5 Active will fit your requirements:

http://m.gsmarena.com/samsung_galaxy_s5_active-review-1093.php

Waterproof, removable battery, sdcard slot, other crazy Samsung stuff such as a heart rate monitor, barometer, ir sensor, eyeball tracking, kitchen sink etc

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Dave 126
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The Xperia Z3 / Z3 Compact seem to be the more relevant devices to compare this to than the iPhone.

So, do you want waterproofing, an SDCard slot and a very good battery, or do you want a fingerprint scanner and a removable - but only so-so - battery? Samsung's and Sony's varying degrees of Android skinning and bloatware might also be a consideration for some.

To be honest though, none of current flagship Android phones are bad...even the ones from a year ago, such as the LG G2, can still hold their own in the speed, battery life and camera stakes (and be found for a helluva lot less money)

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iPad Air 2: Vulture chews on new Apple tablet

Dave 126
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Re: Brighter screen, smaller battery?

>The iPads seem to get more fragile looking. The original iPad was a good solid device, when the contractors replaced the gas main in my road they visited each home and recorded some test details using an iPad. I doubt the current one would last a day.

Well, people who use the iPads in rougher environments have a range of cases to choose from- including some pretty rugged 3rd party designs. People who rarely remove their iPads from a plushly carpeted lounge may choose to keep their iPads unprotected.

It's up to the user.

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UNCHAINING DEMONS which might DESTROY HUMANITY: Musk on AI

Dave 126
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Re: "Thou shalt not make a machine in the likeness of a human mind."

Yowsers... references to the prehistory of Frank Herbert's Dune.

Sounds like Iain M. Bank's 'Outside Context Problem' - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excession#Outside_Context_Problem

The usual example given to illustrate an Outside Context Problem was imagining you were a tribe on a largish, fertile island; you'd tamed the land, invented the wheel or writing or whatever, the neighbors were cooperative or enslaved but at any rate peaceful and you were busy raising temples to yourself with all the excess productive capacity you had, you were in a position of near-absolute power and control which your hallowed ancestors could hardly have dreamed of and the whole situation was just running along nicely like a canoe on wet grass... when suddenly this bristling lump of iron appears sailless and trailing steam in the bay and these guys carrying long funny-looking sticks come ashore and announce you've just been discovered, you're all subjects of the Emperor now, he's keen on presents called tax and these bright-eyed holy men would like a word with your priests.

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

Dave 126
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Re: Why 400 days for men and 300 days for women?

>So it is not a population control issue. Long lived species eventually have to have a menopause or risk introducing so many flaky genes into the population, that the entire species suffers. Short lived mammals don't need menopause.

Exactly, but long life is not a given.

Natural Selection will only select for long life if it aids the survival chances of the descendents or family members of that individual. One can then assume that young whales benefit from having their grandmothers around, be it for protection and/or education.

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Dave 126
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Re: Another reason

>, As a > 6 foot male, I now have two reasons in one week to not go to Mars..

Yet Total Recall tells you that you have three reasons to go to Mars... three reasons found upon the chest of one woman.

And yeah, we already know about the radiation... how d'ya think she got three breasts in the first place?

NSFW: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/09/22/jasmine-tridevil-surgery-third-breast-total-recall-style_n_5859776.html

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Dave 126
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Re: Why 400 days for men and 300 days for women?

>This is why there is a menopause, only so many are made and then halted in Meiosis.

Very few mammals exhibit the menopause.... it basically just us and whales. Why would it be a evolutionary advantage for a female to stop producing offspring? Because she can play a role in caring for and educating her existing children and grandchildren, if she extends her life by not wasting resources by menstruating.

What does this tell us about the social life of whales?

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Forget the $2499 5K iMac – today we reveal Apple's most expensive computer to date

Dave 126
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Re: Cultism

>It was a fscking hobbyist thing!

So were the first bicycles - playthings of the wealthy. Over time though, they allowed almost anyone to travel over a greater distance.

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Dave 126
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Re: Now that's just going too far

>"Similar to what Henry Ford did with the Model T, Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs put technology directly in the hands of the people".

>>That quote applies far more to the work of Torvalds than anything the two Steves ever did. Without cheap LAMP servers, broadband internet would be too expensive to afford

Home computers were popular before the internet was popular amongst consumers. Anyway, the Model T Ford was a product, like the Apple I.... if you want to talk about infrastructure, maybe you compare LAMP servers to tarmacadam - a invaluable innovation for sure, but in a different category.

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Hey Apple, we're gonna tailor Swift as open source – indie devs throw down gauntlet

Dave 126
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Unlike Clang and LLVM, the Swift-specific parts of the compiler toolchain are not open source. Apple has the resources and influence to ensure the success of Swift even if it is the only company using it at scale (cf. Objective-C). Nevertheless, powerful factions within the company are undoubtedly in favor of making Swift an open source project. The push to release Yosemite and iOS 8 has likely taken precedence so far, but I expect this issue to be revisited.

- http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/10/os-x-10-10/23/#shape-of-the-future

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MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less

Dave 126
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Re: Women are smaller, and thus consume less

No logic escaped the author - she was drawing upon the conclusions of existing research. Why did you assume she wasn't? Other factors in women's favour include research into psychological suitability to be being cooped up with their peers for months on end.

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Dave 126
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Re: It definitely makes sense

Or even selectively breed some squid to be be very intelligent... They are smaller than us, have very good eyes, and their aquatic environment may help with high G-forces.

- Apologies to S. Baxter.

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Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?

Dave 126
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Re: Five Hundred and Forty Nine???

The Z3 Compact can be had for under £400, a fair saving on its RSP. No doubt the big Z3 can be had for less than its RSP too.

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Dave 126
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Re: Watertight charging

The official charging dock is around £20, but I've seen 3rd party versions for around £7. At least the headphone socket doesn't require any rubber bung.

Hopefully waterproofing will become a standard feature, just as is on wristwatches.

EDIT - Sony will sell you a Wireless Charging case, if you want one.

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Dave 126
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Re: Great battery

The review said the phone would get will into it's third day without a charge, and that it looped video for 12 hours.

The Compact version performs similarly, by all accounts - it has a smaller battery because it has a smaller, lower res (but still more than sharp enough) screen.

Apparently, the Z3 Compact is less slippery than it's bigger brother and more comfortable to hold. Many reviews consider it an even better device, and it'll be my next phone.

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Doctor Who and the Dalek: 10-year-old tests BBC programming game

Dave 126
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Re: FORWARD 20; LEFT 90; BEEP

The hardware to make a 'Turtle' is incredibly cheap these days. When I look at some Chinese websites that sell quadcopters, motors, sensors and the like, I keep thinking 'Now is a great time to be

an eight year old boy'.

I can't comment about 8yo girls, because I've never been one.

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Martha Lane Fox: YEUCH! The Internet is MADE by MEN?!?

Dave 126
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Re: I totally agree with mandatory voting....

Compulsory voting:

Candidate Bloggs stands as prospective MP for the Don't Vote It Only Encourages Them Party.

Candidate Bloggs gets all the votes of those who don't want to vote.

Bloggs becomes MP.

The point is that the introduction of compulsory voting would change the selection of candidates you could vote for - so saying the current crop of prospective MPs are all useless is not a water-tight argument against compulsory voting. There may well be valid arguments against, but that isn't one of them.

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Dave 126
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Re: Utopian drivel

>A more pressing concern is that not voting is a valid choice. I didn't have any acceptable choices for MP at the last general election, so I didn't cast a vote for any of the candidates.

Yeah, but then a consequence of compulsory voting might be that there would then be a candidate you could vote for.

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Dave 126
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Re: That explains it...

What Arnaut the less said.

And: Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell for his influence on logic, mathematics, set theory, linguistics, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science (type theory) and philosophy.

Also: Archibald Clark Kerr, 1st Baron Inverchapel for this classic letter:

"My Dear Reggie,

In these dark days man tends to look for little shafts of light that spill from Heaven. My days are probably darker than yours, and I need, my God I do, all the light I can get. But I am a decent fellow, and I do not want to be mean and selfish about what little brightness is shed upon me from time to time. So I propose to share with you a tiny flash that has illuminated my sombre life and tell you that God has given me a new Turkish colleague whose card tells me that he is called Mustapha Kunt.

We all feel like that, Reggie, now and then, especially when Spring is upon us, but few of us would care to put it on our cards. It takes a Turk to do that.

Sir Archibald Clerk Kerr, H.M. Ambassador"

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Aboard the GOOD SHIP LOLLIPOP, there's a Mobe and a Slab and a TELLYBOX

Dave 126
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>So the tablet has half the storage of the phone? Why?

Tablets, unlike phones, tend to live within range of a local network and media servers etc

One survey suggested that 3/4s of iPads rarely leave the owner's house. It seems reasonable to apply this finding to other tablets of a similar size, and surmise that the tablet can call upon media over the local network.

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Dave 126
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It would appear that Google don't hand over the keys to Lenovo until later this year. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motorola_Mobility#Acquisition_by_Lenovo

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Radiohead(ache): BBC wants dead duck tech in sexy new mobes

Dave 126
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Re: Dead ducks

My old man got hold of an amateur English translation of an old French cookbook. One recipe is priceless:

After skinning and eviscerating your badger, place it in a fast flowing stream for forty-eight hours to degrease it...

Meanwhile, back in Blighty, 'badger hams' were eaten until fairly recently on the banks of the river Severn. I cannot comment on how much cider one needs to have drunk beforehand.

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Vanmoof Electrified Bike: Crouching cyclist, hidden power

Dave 126
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Re: Like them

Suspension adds weight, true, but it allows for lighter wheel rims to be used, saving rotational mass. When tyres deform to absorb shocks, they increase their rolling resistance. The suspension will also help the mountings for the heavy battery last longer.

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Dave 126
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Front-wheel drive

I've had a go an electric push bike where the battery lived on the rear pannier rack and the motor was in the rear hub. My mate had removed any limiter it might have been sold with.

Due to the weight distribution and raw torque, one had to be careful not to pull a wheelie when starting off.

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Dave 126
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Re: Err....a fly in the lycra?

Yeah, UK legislation can get in the way of new takes on personal transport. For example, BMW made a scooter with a roll cage, the C1, the idea being that you didn't need the hassle of donning leathers and a helmet. UK law says that that a helmet is still a legal necessity when riding a C1, even though wearing a helmet would be dangerous due to risk of neck strain in the event of a collision.

Many countries deemed the use of seatbelts in conjunction with wearing a helmet to be unsafe. The added strain on the riders neck from the added weight of the helmet could cause significant injury to the restrained rider even in a low speed head-on collision. Germany, Switzerland, Italy, France, Israel and Spain authorities were quick to allow an exception to the helmet law for the C1. However, poor C1 sales in the United Kingdom may in part be attributable to the British government's refusal of BMW's request to change helmet regulations for C1 riders.

Some cities in the USA placed an onus on employers to provide off-street storage for bicycles - fear of theft deters some people from cycling to work.

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Jony Ive: Flattered by rivals' designs? Nah, its 'theft'

Dave 126
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Re: Hypocrite!

>I would've loved to have seen what Jonny Ive came up with if he only 'applied' Dieter's principles without seeing any of his work.

Ive was first known for the Bondi Blue iMac. It doesn't superficially resemble any of Rams' work, though it follows Rams' principles.

The iMac was a product of its time. 3D solid-modelling CAD and Simulation software matured so that more 'organic' forms, such as the iMac's case, could be modelled and manufactured. Without these CAD tools, the iMac's development time woud have been much longer.

Ive's first product to resemble a Ram's object was the iPod. The constraints were the two major internal components - the HDD and required battery. The back of it resembles a cigarette case, and the front is largely defined by the user interface, i.e the screen and wheel.

Anyway, Rams wasn't the only 'form engineer' of the 1950s... check out this Zeiss Jena Werra MK1 camera:

http://leavemehere.wordpress.com/2010/06/11/werra/

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Dave 126
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Re: Function, Form, Design

>function to a large degree has to dictate form.

> Very square corners may not be very appealing to look at and may catch on clothing so it's probably going to be rounded.

Basically, a cigarette case lays the template for items designed to be carried in a pocket.

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Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Ultrabook flexes new 'Watchband' BENDO hinges

Dave 126
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Re: Power and video signals

The mechanism means all links move equally, ensuring that the ribbon cables are never bent through too small a radius. A good image of it is at 15 seconds into https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouCmy-_OOEY Cunning.

Normal laptops prevent the cables from being pinched simply by using larger hinges.

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AndroidScript returns to Google Play Store: Ad giant YIELDS TO THE MIGHT OF EL REG

Dave 126
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Re: Droid®Script

Curiously, 'android' refers specifically to robots that are designed to look like humans (think Blade Runner, Ash or Bishop from Alien/s, or Asimov's R. Daneel Olivaw), yet the logo that Google and ASOP use is a very roboty-looking robot, like a Soviet-era tin-metal wind-up toy.

We prefer the term 'Artificial Human'.

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US astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson: US is losing science race

Dave 126
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Re: Seems Degrasse-Tyson is a bit unclear on what "science" is.

>Seems Degrasse-Tyson is a bit unclear on what "science" is.

>It's not product development. It's not even innovation of entirely new products.

Yeah thanks, the rest of here are aware already aware that science is not technology. However, we are also aware of the nuanced interrelationship between the two.

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Apple KILLS SUPER MARIO. And Zelda. And Sonic

Dave 126
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External controllers

Apple have been in a better position than most to create an add-on games controller for their devices (because there are more iphones of a certain model sold than any one Android phone) but they have never bothered. They have sold plenty of phones without needing to so sweeten the deal for gamers... though they make a song and dance about their graphics API 'Metal'.

You'd be better off with an Android device that can support PlayStation 3/4 BT controllers, if you really want to play old Nintendo titles.

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Brace yourself for a 12-inch Apple maxiPAD – probably... maybe... ish

Dave 126
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Unlikely, because it is a 'tool for a niche job' kit, but:

There is evidently enough of a market for Wacom to make a 123" Windows 8 digitiser tablet, aimed at people who are likely to be OSX users:

http://cintiqcompanion.wacom.com/CintiqCompanion/en/

The only OSX equivalent at the moment is an even pricier 'bring your own MacBook' Modbook:

http://www.modbook.com/

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