* Posts by Dave 126

6495 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

7 million Apple Watches just buried the competition – Canalys

Dave 126
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Re: Fitness band for me

I've seen two Apple Watches since their release, but then I drink in pubs a lot.

I can't remember (drink) at what point in 2006 I saw my first (battery-compromised) iPhone either - but now every phone looks basically the same.

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Dave 126
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Re: Early days yet

>Are you suggesting some quantum leap in overcoming form-factor limitations is waiting in the wings? Direct display in the cerebral cortex perhaps?

Don't be a pillock.

Stevie, you seem to have stuck in your head that a 'smartwatch' is a battery-guzzling colour-screened lump. The definition isn't set in stone. For a couple of years now both Casio and Citizen have offered smartwatches without said display, and they look like normal watches and each boast year + battery lives.

Basically, there are a few points on the functionality / form-factor / battery life graph. Clear?

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Dave 126
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Re: Bah!

The display of my analogue watch is, arguably, 'data'. I prefer to think of it as the time and the date, with an ever-so convenient (rotate bezel) reminder of when I bought my parking ticket.

Your comment seems to have been written in ignorance of offerings other than Apple, Android and Pebble efforts. That's fine, but don't condemn a category unless you know what it consists of.

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Dave 126
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Re: Now this IS interesting

>TAG are very similar to Apple. Both useless as a time keeper.

TAG quartz are on a par with any quartz movement that isn't updated over the airwaves. TAG automatics, likewise, are on a par with their automatic peers.

Apple Watch are updated over the airwaves (via the iPhone) so will be accurate to within the second. Which makes your assertion bollocks.

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Dave 126
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Re: Web blurb is meaningless

>The web site is all marketing and no substance,

I hadn't bothered to look at their website, but at another technology review website. Of course there are different potentially viable points on the function / form factor / battery life graph, and Fossil are aiming at a couple of them.

EDIT: And yeah, Fossil watches are a bit too gaudy for my tastes.

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Dave 126
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Re: Now this IS interesting

>TAG should be able to significantly bite into their iWatch market.

TAG have stated that their smartwatch 'will be upgradable', and teaser images suggest it will look similar to a sports chronograph - circular with numbers around the bezel.

TAG watches, like all their rivals at various prices levels, are nicely made. Details, such as the clasp being machined (not stamped) and then deburred, do make a difference. Apple too though, even according to watch nerd sites like Hodinkee, have the quality of finish and tolerances spot on.

That is all good. However, at the moment every smartwatch with a colour screen* incurs a massive penalty in battery life, so it will be for the individual consumer to weigh the pros against the cons. Some people may find the Apple ecosystem offers them more.

* As opposed to watches from Citizen and G-Shock which give phone notifications and not much else - they last a couple of years on one battery, or indefinitely on kinetic energy.

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Dave 126
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Of course, that should be 're-entered the fray':

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil_Wrist_PDA

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Dave 126
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Fossil have already entered the fray; some of their Q line of smartwatches went on sale late October.

Of their line-up, only one is an Android-wear model, the others have conventional analogue watch faces, and using little LEDs in the buckle to distinguish different types on notification (call, sms, email etc) on the connected phone. Far fewer functions than an Apple Watch or Android Wear, but a valid balance of form and function.

How they perform 'in the wild', I don't know.

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GCHQ's CESG team's crypto proposal isn't dumb, it's malicious... and I didn't notice

Dave 126
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Re: I love the way A.N.Other hack thinks GCHQ are dumb

I'm upvoting boltar, for showing willing this week.

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Dave 126
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Re: IP Phone Home

>Be great if GCHQ had a neat little app I could look myself up on. Save a lot of bother with KeePass2 and Evernote ...

That was what the Welsh philosopher and drug deal Howard Marks did. When asked how, as an inveterate dope smoker, he was able to be so clear about dates in his autobiography, he replied that just submitted an FOI to the FBI.

[He was busted because someone he trusted was turned against him, something no amount of encryption can save you from. ]

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MacBooks are so hot right now. And so is Mac OS X malware

Dave 126
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Re: been saying it for decades...

@Grikath

1. You started it. We don't know why.

2. Fitz used the word 'Fuck' as a verb, specifically in the imperative mood, and not as an adjective. It seems you didn't grasp that.

- Dave 126 ( not an OSX user myself)

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Dave 126
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Re: Impeccably dishevelled

You spend time looking at the Instagram accounts of OSX malware authors? Oh well.

Also: How considerate of them to identify themselves publicly!

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Encrypt voice calls, says GCHQ's CESG team ... using CESG encryption

Dave 126
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The Register has published its public key before, but I can't find it now either.

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Dave 126
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>"Simply knowing a user’s phone number is enough to establish a secure communications link with them”.

Eh? Presumably this is not referring to the standard 07xxxxxxxxx type numbers doled out by network operators (nor would a user have to use a network operator-provided number for VoIP). I assume that to be a public key, the user has to generate it themselves - then give it out to contacts or publish it to a directory.

Have I missed something?

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Ransomware scammers: Won’t pay? We'll put your data on the internet

Dave 126
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Re: interesting new twist

>For example, confidential company spreadsheets could have the exact values altered, rendering them useless for accounts, but useful enough to expose the financial working of the company in question.

That would be a lot of effort for the scammers. Even just looking through these TBs of data looking for something that *might* be embarrassing, and then somehow advertising it to a very bored internet would be a lot of effort for very little chance of reward.

As the researchers suggest, it is mostly an idle threat meant to scare people into giving them coins. It is far, far easier to make the threat than to carry it out.

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'I posted winning race ticket in Facebook selfie ... and someone stole it!'

Dave 126
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Re: Rule #1 peoples:

... and you've left the casino without being stopped by the burly man at the door.

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Dave 126
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Facebook could really benefit from an 'Acquaintances' option, since people use it as a contacts directory.

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Dave 126
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Re: Obviously intelligence is not involved in either betting or boasting.

>Obviously intelligence is not involved in either betting or boasting.

It seems it's easily done: only a couple of years ago a Reg writer included a photo in an article in which his credit card details could be read (except of course for those numbers on the back by the signature strip). I won't speculate on whether the bank account or credit limit of Reg hack is worth ripping off! : )

I guess credit cards could be printed with a pattern such as https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EURion_constellation which would then cause a camera to blur the surrounding area.... Yes, I know that's an overly complicated and tech-heavy solution to a problem that could just be avoided with some care, but hey, that's why I read the Reg.

EDIT: Even easier solution for things like betting stubs and gig tickets - print half the required information on the reverse side.

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Sennheiser announces €50,000 headphones (we checked, no typos)

Dave 126
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>I'd point you at a basic primer on how genetic inheritance works but I suspect it would be futile..

Or, rather, redundant.

I was attempting to highlight the wit of the editor who derived Muphy's Law from Murphey's Law, and then deriving my own humour from drawing parallels with typos and the random mutation (which is then naturally selected) of DNA - as a call back to the question of whose cousin is it? viz an individual could be a cousin of the Rev Sod, Dr Murphey and Mr Muphy.

Like I said, it was an attempt at humour, but evidently not a success! : )

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Dave 126
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Re: We can't afford one but...

Audiophiles can dance? I thought that would introduce unacceptable vibrations to the turntable...

Maybe they wear special audiophile dancing slippers, with inflated bladders and MCU elastomer dampers.

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Dave 126
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50,000 Euros for the [Headphones+Amplifier]. It is likely that they have to be used together.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tube Amp

Seems @frank ly's guess is correct, since the product page makes mention of " the Orpheus is the first electrostatic headphone with a Cool Class A MOS-FET high voltage amplifier integrated into the ear cups. ".

Other techie stuff from the page:

"it also accepts high-resolution PCM and DSD data. Music data is converted to analogue signals using the 8 internal DACs of the ESS SABRE ES9018. Four channels in parallel are used for each stereo side to enhance accuracy and decrease distortion and noise level."

I tried to look at the ESS website, but all I got was the message "Waiting for available socket". Many of us feel like that from time to time, but we don't feel the need to broadcast it over the web.

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Dave 126
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How can I tell it's a luxury product?

...Because its webpage takes a minute to load and has unnecessary sound and visual effects.

(Only difference to this tradition is that Sennheiser are using WebGL instead of Flash).

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Dave 126
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Re: Hand-crafted in Germany

In the early eighties, when Walkmans were a new thing, the front cover of a UK comic book the Beano had a lad walking along with his headphones... then he spots Richie Rich strolling down the street with some hi-fi speakers, suspended from a helicopter, on each side of his head. I can't the picture on-line, but this one amuses me (and if I post it here I can find it again for the next Smart Watch article):

http://flickrhivemind.net/blackmagic.cgi?id=7160108497&url=http%3A%2F%2Fflickrhivemind.net%2FTags%2Frichkid%2FTimeline%3Fsearch_type%3DTags%3Btextinput%3Drichkid%3Bphoto_type%3D250%3Bmethod%3DGET%3Bnoform%3Dt%3Bsort%3DDate%2520Taken%252C%2520new%2520first%23pic7160108497&user=&flickrurl=http://www.flickr.com/photos/59414209@N00/7160108497

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Dave 126
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Muphrey - haha, not a cousin of Murphey, but a typo of him... still, what is the difference between cousins other than copying errors (in the DNA of their forebears?)

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Dave 126
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"We checked, no typos" proclaimed the headline to this article. Which of course means that there will be a typo.

There is probably a law which describes this phenomenon, likely named after a cousin of Mr Sod.

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Dave 126
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The Orpheus HE90s date from the early nineties, not 2013 (that is when Gizmodo reviewed them, which might explain the error)

Yeah, they cost £16,000, but have sold for several times that since on eBay, so Sennheiser know there is a market for these new ones.

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UK's super-cyber-snoop shopping list: Internet data, bulk spying, covert equipment tapping

Dave 126
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Re: Cautiously optimistic

>Speak for yourself, government lickspittle.

I think you'll find he was. Be polite now, being rude doesn't advance your valid point - i.e Previous surveilance laws ended being used by local councils for trivial civic offences.

At the time of the GDR, they didn't try too hard with documents to defend their spying. Whereas at the time in the UK we didn't even admit to the existence of the MI5 (although every taxi driver in London knew the headquarters), which would obey no law but the 11th commandment.

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Samsung S6 Edge has 11 nasties, says Google Project Zero team

Dave 126
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Re: @ xj650t

A new Android OTA update has to bounce around the chipset manufacturers, the handset manufacturers and sometimes the network operators... There isn't much Google by themselves to make this faster, except to use their Nexus devices as examples to the other parties.

More of what was the core Android OS has been absorbed into Google Play Services (or whatever it's called this week) which can be updated like any other app. But still, every device needs a custom build of Android.

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Music lovers move to block Phil Collins' rebirth

Dave 126
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Re: Gated reverb is luvverly (especially with a bit of reverse)

>The 1980's was not a kind decade to most people

Yep, even Miles Davis had a 1980s album with a drum machine. There was just something pervasive about that '80s' production sound.

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LOGITECH - TECH = 'LOGI' ... that's non-Logitech tech, is it?

Dave 126
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Re: absurdly expensive ... wear out very quickly

I wouldn't use anything other than a Logitech MX 'Anywhere' mouse with the spinny scroll wheel now. It's just lovely. On glass it feels beautifully smooth.

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Windows 10 is an antique (and you might be too) says Google man

Dave 126
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Re: Sherlock

>"Touch on a conventional laptop is shit "

By which I meant the position of the screen on a conventionally-hinged laptop will always be sub-optimal. I stand by that. Devices like Yogas and Surfaces however, allow a more ergonomic, tablet-like position.

In my ideal world, I would have the two devices, but far better integrated.... i.e the tablet can work as a second monitor or stylus digitiser for the main laptop, or else be taken into the next room for sketching or watching a movie.

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Dave 126
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Re: For Ed.

>And listening to site like Engadget is the error MS is doing with Win10 - the last user you want to listen to is the gadget-addict needing always a new toy to play with.

Palm had already done the vast bulk of the development work by the time the Engadget letter was published - therefore Engadget didn't actually influence Palm. but did provide a concise over-view of what was wrong with Palm's line-up - bulky handsets, low-res displays, no Wi-Fi.

ANYWAY - it's a moot point because WebOS was only raised in this thread in order knock its UI designer, which isn't directly related to WebOS's backward compatibility. The few people I knew with a Palm Pre though its UI was good.

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Dave 126
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Re: Can't resist this bandwagon..

Maybe things don't come across well in messages of 150 characters or less.

>- He thinks that a user interface defines how a computer *works*.

If we make that a user interface defines how a computer system *works*., then the statement is largely true, since the user is part of the system.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Richard 12: Note on Windows 8

>On a similar note, we have a Lenovo 8.1 lappy with a touch screen, which suits our needs very well indeed, if Apple had something similar with a touchscreen we probably would have bought that instead...

@Jay. Hiya!

I could ask you how you use your Lenovo, and why you find it easier to convert it to a tablet instead just picking up a separate device. But I won't, because it is very hard to distil the behaviour of real people into bullet-points. This is why UI/UX design is so expensive.... many hours of testing, videoing the the test users, that sort of thing.

It might be that you travel a lot and don't want the extra weight of a separate device, and that 'touch in tent mode' is great for casual browsing and watching movies on airplanes.

It might be that the OSs and software aren't optimised for working together.

It might be that you want touch input married to x86 software.

It could be a lot of things.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sherlock

>Touchscreen first interfaces in 8 meant that all future Windows laptops will be loathe not to include that feature (something even Macs lack today).

And for good bloody reason. Touch on a conventional laptop is shit - though 'convertible' devices like the Lenovo Yoga are good for some use-cases (such as watching movies in bed, though that's something a tablet could do). .

Apple are taking the approach of having users buy a Macbook *and* an iPad. If you want touch input on a MacBook, say for Photoshop tool palettes - then you download an Adobe app and use both devices in tandem. Down the line, Apple are betting on developers like Adobe making iOS productivity apps - the iPad hardware and APIs won't be a limiting factor - and making it easy to shunt your workflow back and forth 'tween Tablet and Mac if necessary.

Credit to MS though on their Surface Book.

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Dave 126
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Re: For Ed.

>WebOS? The one who killed Palm?

That's not what killed Palm. The only problem with WebOS was that it was too late to arrive.

The 2007 Engadget Open Letter to Palm - written before the Palm Pre and webOS were announced - outlines why people were turning away from them:

We know you're working on a Linux-based mobile OS to succeed Palm OS Garnet -- which was already REALLY showing its age two years ago -- but we're sorta worried that you're going to just port the old UI to a new kernel. It's too late for that.

Like when Apple introduced OS X: it made a serious gamble that the stability and features they were offering in their new OS outweighed the compatibility with older apps and user interface comfort which already existed. They took an old, once great, but very dated OS (sound like anyone we know?) and trashed it. And it worked for them.

If you've demonstrated any true wrongdoing in the way you've sustained your operating system, it's been your inflexibility in cutting ties and moving forward. Believe us when we tell you that's not an attitude embraced by a culture of techno-fetishists -- your core customer. So don't be scared to kill backwards compatibility, or threaten a little bit of what users are used to in order to gain important advances for your OS and devices. Sometimes you have to tear down to rebuild, and honestly, you have a lot to tear down.

So if Palm, which has been around for around 15 years, doesn't have the user interface design and OS engineering expertise to pull this off, then you should just get out of the game right now. Seriously, if this new OS you're going to introduce is just the old Palm OS with some slightly fancier graphics, your customers will just come to resent you all the more. Respect their intelligence.

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Dave 126
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Re: Windows 10 has been designed 'together' with the user

>When you hear a notification sound, you have to dig to find out what app the notification came from.

Go to the app in question, say Email. Go to Options. Go to Notifications. Change it to a noise that doesn't sound like a text message.

True, you might think you would just go to the >main phone options and >notifications and manage it from there, but this way makes just as much sense.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Davie Dee

I'm with Paul - what you remember is what you remember, and at the time the chief advantage of Win2K was to me was USB support. Previously I had been forced to dual-boot a PC with '98 and NT 4.

Direct X didn't bother me - that was what the PlayStation was for.

Win 2K wasn't without some horrific bugs when it first arrived.... deleting the contents of a ZIP disk and replacing it with a cached copy of the *previous* ZIP disk was one of the stranger ones...

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Star Trek to go boldly back onto telly, then beam down in streams

Dave 126
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Re: #WeWantWorf?

>that feeling of "We can be better than we are" but would also allow more dark storytelling because you'd be seeing that from the outside.

Then sod it, let's just have Iain M Bank's The Culture adapted for screen, big or little. In accordance with his wishes, and I quote, it should have "a fucking big budget!".

Much of the Culture novels explored the limits of what a utopia could be, and where it clashed.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Alien8n

I heard some social theory the other day that future dystopias are popular because if we have resigned ourselves to the future being shit then we don't need to change our damaging behaviour.

I haven't fully decided about the truth of that yet. It might just be that future dystopias make good settings for violent -and thus fun! - video games!

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Dave 126
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Re: Trek: The unrebooted series!

>Despite being more than a third of the world's population, India, China and other South-East Asian nations get barely a look-in in Star Trek.

"Black and white lived in perfect harmony, and ganged up on green." (Terry Pratchett)

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Halo 5: Overhyped, but still way above your average shooter

Dave 126
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Re: Rating

>4 and a half stars for a game that doesn't live up to it's hype? You should have given it 3.

It is possible for a game not to live up to its hype and yet still be helluva blast to play!

Other reviews have suggested that Halo 5 is closer to Halo 3's on-line multi-player than any Halo game since... and that bodes well. Unlike Halo 3, Halo 5 has dedicated servers and not a peer-based system - so no 'lag cheaters', which is very welcome news.

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Ice 'lightning' may have helped life survive Snowball Earth

Dave 126
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Re: What has biodiversity got to do with it?

Why do you think it is a mono-culture?

The second sentence of the article is "Sections of liquid water beneath and inside the ice provide a habitat for a genetically diverse variety of microbes." and contains a hyperlink in blue to an abstract:

"Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada.

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Dave 126
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Re: Splitting water without leccy?

>Splitting water without leccy?

Creating glaciers is possibly not the most efficient means of doing so!

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Dave 126
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Re: Interesting

Indeed, the possible implications for life on other planets is one of the motivations for studying terrestrial microbial life in environments the we humans would find extreme.

Deep sea vents, arsenic-rich lakes (though it turns out that a bacterium can't substitute arsenic for phosphorus after all, as was originally reported), glaciers etc

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We're not killing Chrome OS ... not until 2020, anyway – says Google

Dave 126
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Re: Nobody likes change

if I had a chromebook, I'd like ability to run Android apps... no reason they couldn't run in a sandbox on Chromebook-level hardware, is there?

Similarly, there doesnt seem to be any reason that Abdriud devices couldn't run browser-based 'apps' a la Chromebooks.

For sure, there will be some hiccups along the way, but more laptops touchscreens, phones get bigger and people connect BT keyboards....

Seems a degree of convergence is inevitable bigger an

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Yamaha unleashes motorcycling robot

Dave 126
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As the 'robot's voice' in video says: "Rossi, I was built to surpass you, but at the moment I'm not as good as the five year-old you. "

How many times has Rossi crashed in the course of finding out where the limits are? Plenty.

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Cops use terror powers to lift BBC man's laptop after ISIS interview

Dave 126
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Re: @AC (the naive one) Works for me

@AndyS

>Is The Reg's readership really sinking to the same level as the Daily Mail?

Don't worry mate. If you have a quick scan of responses and up/down votes on this thread, you'll be able to answer your own question.

Cheers!

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Dave 126
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Re: "Yes, go on kiddies, mod me down"

>Ad hominem - the usual response of the those of the left leaning persuation.

Says the person who kicked off this thread with a pre-emptive ad hominem attack ('Go on Kiddies')on anyone who might downvote him!

You couldn't make this up! : )

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