* Posts by Dave 126

6272 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Sennheiser announces €50,000 headphones (we checked, no typos)

Dave 126
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50,000 Euros for the [Headphones+Amplifier]. It is likely that they have to be used together.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tube Amp

Seems @frank ly's guess is correct, since the product page makes mention of " the Orpheus is the first electrostatic headphone with a Cool Class A MOS-FET high voltage amplifier integrated into the ear cups. ".

Other techie stuff from the page:

"it also accepts high-resolution PCM and DSD data. Music data is converted to analogue signals using the 8 internal DACs of the ESS SABRE ES9018. Four channels in parallel are used for each stereo side to enhance accuracy and decrease distortion and noise level."

I tried to look at the ESS website, but all I got was the message "Waiting for available socket". Many of us feel like that from time to time, but we don't feel the need to broadcast it over the web.

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Dave 126
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How can I tell it's a luxury product?

...Because its webpage takes a minute to load and has unnecessary sound and visual effects.

(Only difference to this tradition is that Sennheiser are using WebGL instead of Flash).

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Dave 126
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Re: Hand-crafted in Germany

In the early eighties, when Walkmans were a new thing, the front cover of a UK comic book the Beano had a lad walking along with his headphones... then he spots Richie Rich strolling down the street with some hi-fi speakers, suspended from a helicopter, on each side of his head. I can't the picture on-line, but this one amuses me (and if I post it here I can find it again for the next Smart Watch article):

http://flickrhivemind.net/blackmagic.cgi?id=7160108497&url=http%3A%2F%2Fflickrhivemind.net%2FTags%2Frichkid%2FTimeline%3Fsearch_type%3DTags%3Btextinput%3Drichkid%3Bphoto_type%3D250%3Bmethod%3DGET%3Bnoform%3Dt%3Bsort%3DDate%2520Taken%252C%2520new%2520first%23pic7160108497&user=&flickrurl=http://www.flickr.com/photos/59414209@N00/7160108497

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Dave 126
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Muphrey - haha, not a cousin of Murphey, but a typo of him... still, what is the difference between cousins other than copying errors (in the DNA of their forebears?)

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Dave 126
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"We checked, no typos" proclaimed the headline to this article. Which of course means that there will be a typo.

There is probably a law which describes this phenomenon, likely named after a cousin of Mr Sod.

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Dave 126
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The Orpheus HE90s date from the early nineties, not 2013 (that is when Gizmodo reviewed them, which might explain the error)

Yeah, they cost £16,000, but have sold for several times that since on eBay, so Sennheiser know there is a market for these new ones.

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LOGITECH - TECH = 'LOGI' ... that's non-Logitech tech, is it?

Dave 126
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Re: absurdly expensive ... wear out very quickly

I wouldn't use anything other than a Logitech MX 'Anywhere' mouse with the spinny scroll wheel now. It's just lovely. On glass it feels beautifully smooth.

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Windows 10 is an antique (and you might be too) says Google man

Dave 126
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Re: Sherlock

>"Touch on a conventional laptop is shit "

By which I meant the position of the screen on a conventionally-hinged laptop will always be sub-optimal. I stand by that. Devices like Yogas and Surfaces however, allow a more ergonomic, tablet-like position.

In my ideal world, I would have the two devices, but far better integrated.... i.e the tablet can work as a second monitor or stylus digitiser for the main laptop, or else be taken into the next room for sketching or watching a movie.

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Dave 126
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Re: For Ed.

>And listening to site like Engadget is the error MS is doing with Win10 - the last user you want to listen to is the gadget-addict needing always a new toy to play with.

Palm had already done the vast bulk of the development work by the time the Engadget letter was published - therefore Engadget didn't actually influence Palm. but did provide a concise over-view of what was wrong with Palm's line-up - bulky handsets, low-res displays, no Wi-Fi.

ANYWAY - it's a moot point because WebOS was only raised in this thread in order knock its UI designer, which isn't directly related to WebOS's backward compatibility. The few people I knew with a Palm Pre though its UI was good.

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Dave 126
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Re: Can't resist this bandwagon..

Maybe things don't come across well in messages of 150 characters or less.

>- He thinks that a user interface defines how a computer *works*.

If we make that a user interface defines how a computer system *works*., then the statement is largely true, since the user is part of the system.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Richard 12: Note on Windows 8

>On a similar note, we have a Lenovo 8.1 lappy with a touch screen, which suits our needs very well indeed, if Apple had something similar with a touchscreen we probably would have bought that instead...

@Jay. Hiya!

I could ask you how you use your Lenovo, and why you find it easier to convert it to a tablet instead just picking up a separate device. But I won't, because it is very hard to distil the behaviour of real people into bullet-points. This is why UI/UX design is so expensive.... many hours of testing, videoing the the test users, that sort of thing.

It might be that you travel a lot and don't want the extra weight of a separate device, and that 'touch in tent mode' is great for casual browsing and watching movies on airplanes.

It might be that the OSs and software aren't optimised for working together.

It might be that you want touch input married to x86 software.

It could be a lot of things.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sherlock

>Touchscreen first interfaces in 8 meant that all future Windows laptops will be loathe not to include that feature (something even Macs lack today).

And for good bloody reason. Touch on a conventional laptop is shit - though 'convertible' devices like the Lenovo Yoga are good for some use-cases (such as watching movies in bed, though that's something a tablet could do). .

Apple are taking the approach of having users buy a Macbook *and* an iPad. If you want touch input on a MacBook, say for Photoshop tool palettes - then you download an Adobe app and use both devices in tandem. Down the line, Apple are betting on developers like Adobe making iOS productivity apps - the iPad hardware and APIs won't be a limiting factor - and making it easy to shunt your workflow back and forth 'tween Tablet and Mac if necessary.

Credit to MS though on their Surface Book.

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Dave 126
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Re: For Ed.

>WebOS? The one who killed Palm?

That's not what killed Palm. The only problem with WebOS was that it was too late to arrive.

The 2007 Engadget Open Letter to Palm - written before the Palm Pre and webOS were announced - outlines why people were turning away from them:

We know you're working on a Linux-based mobile OS to succeed Palm OS Garnet -- which was already REALLY showing its age two years ago -- but we're sorta worried that you're going to just port the old UI to a new kernel. It's too late for that.

Like when Apple introduced OS X: it made a serious gamble that the stability and features they were offering in their new OS outweighed the compatibility with older apps and user interface comfort which already existed. They took an old, once great, but very dated OS (sound like anyone we know?) and trashed it. And it worked for them.

If you've demonstrated any true wrongdoing in the way you've sustained your operating system, it's been your inflexibility in cutting ties and moving forward. Believe us when we tell you that's not an attitude embraced by a culture of techno-fetishists -- your core customer. So don't be scared to kill backwards compatibility, or threaten a little bit of what users are used to in order to gain important advances for your OS and devices. Sometimes you have to tear down to rebuild, and honestly, you have a lot to tear down.

So if Palm, which has been around for around 15 years, doesn't have the user interface design and OS engineering expertise to pull this off, then you should just get out of the game right now. Seriously, if this new OS you're going to introduce is just the old Palm OS with some slightly fancier graphics, your customers will just come to resent you all the more. Respect their intelligence.

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Dave 126
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Re: Windows 10 has been designed 'together' with the user

>When you hear a notification sound, you have to dig to find out what app the notification came from.

Go to the app in question, say Email. Go to Options. Go to Notifications. Change it to a noise that doesn't sound like a text message.

True, you might think you would just go to the >main phone options and >notifications and manage it from there, but this way makes just as much sense.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Davie Dee

I'm with Paul - what you remember is what you remember, and at the time the chief advantage of Win2K was to me was USB support. Previously I had been forced to dual-boot a PC with '98 and NT 4.

Direct X didn't bother me - that was what the PlayStation was for.

Win 2K wasn't without some horrific bugs when it first arrived.... deleting the contents of a ZIP disk and replacing it with a cached copy of the *previous* ZIP disk was one of the stranger ones...

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Star Trek to go boldly back onto telly, then beam down in streams

Dave 126
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Re: #WeWantWorf?

>that feeling of "We can be better than we are" but would also allow more dark storytelling because you'd be seeing that from the outside.

Then sod it, let's just have Iain M Bank's The Culture adapted for screen, big or little. In accordance with his wishes, and I quote, it should have "a fucking big budget!".

Much of the Culture novels explored the limits of what a utopia could be, and where it clashed.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Alien8n

I heard some social theory the other day that future dystopias are popular because if we have resigned ourselves to the future being shit then we don't need to change our damaging behaviour.

I haven't fully decided about the truth of that yet. It might just be that future dystopias make good settings for violent -and thus fun! - video games!

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Dave 126
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Re: Trek: The unrebooted series!

>Despite being more than a third of the world's population, India, China and other South-East Asian nations get barely a look-in in Star Trek.

"Black and white lived in perfect harmony, and ganged up on green." (Terry Pratchett)

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Halo 5: Overhyped, but still way above your average shooter

Dave 126
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Re: Rating

>4 and a half stars for a game that doesn't live up to it's hype? You should have given it 3.

It is possible for a game not to live up to its hype and yet still be helluva blast to play!

Other reviews have suggested that Halo 5 is closer to Halo 3's on-line multi-player than any Halo game since... and that bodes well. Unlike Halo 3, Halo 5 has dedicated servers and not a peer-based system - so no 'lag cheaters', which is very welcome news.

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Ice 'lightning' may have helped life survive Snowball Earth

Dave 126
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Re: What has biodiversity got to do with it?

Why do you think it is a mono-culture?

The second sentence of the article is "Sections of liquid water beneath and inside the ice provide a habitat for a genetically diverse variety of microbes." and contains a hyperlink in blue to an abstract:

"Molecular evidence for an active endogenous microbiome beneath glacial ice.

Here, using RNA-based approaches, we demonstrate the presence of active and endogenous archaeal, bacterial and eukaryal assemblages in cold (0-1 °C) subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada.

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Dave 126
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Re: Splitting water without leccy?

>Splitting water without leccy?

Creating glaciers is possibly not the most efficient means of doing so!

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Dave 126
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Re: Interesting

Indeed, the possible implications for life on other planets is one of the motivations for studying terrestrial microbial life in environments the we humans would find extreme.

Deep sea vents, arsenic-rich lakes (though it turns out that a bacterium can't substitute arsenic for phosphorus after all, as was originally reported), glaciers etc

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We're not killing Chrome OS ... not until 2020, anyway – says Google

Dave 126
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Re: Nobody likes change

if I had a chromebook, I'd like ability to run Android apps... no reason they couldn't run in a sandbox on Chromebook-level hardware, is there?

Similarly, there doesnt seem to be any reason that Abdriud devices couldn't run browser-based 'apps' a la Chromebooks.

For sure, there will be some hiccups along the way, but more laptops touchscreens, phones get bigger and people connect BT keyboards....

Seems a degree of convergence is inevitable bigger an

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Yamaha unleashes motorcycling robot

Dave 126
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As the 'robot's voice' in video says: "Rossi, I was built to surpass you, but at the moment I'm not as good as the five year-old you. "

How many times has Rossi crashed in the course of finding out where the limits are? Plenty.

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Dave 126
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Re: Under The Skin (2013)

The role of the motorcyclist was played by Jeremy McWilliams, a former MotoGP racer with podium positions to his name.

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Dave 126
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Re: Under The Skin (2013)

...and you thought Scarlett Johanssen's character was really a woman? : )

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Dave 126
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Under The Skin (2013)

...for an updated robot motorcyclist.

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Cops use terror powers to lift BBC man's laptop after ISIS interview

Dave 126
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Re: @AC (the naive one) Works for me

@AndyS

>Is The Reg's readership really sinking to the same level as the Daily Mail?

Don't worry mate. If you have a quick scan of responses and up/down votes on this thread, you'll be able to answer your own question.

Cheers!

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Dave 126
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Re: "Yes, go on kiddies, mod me down"

>Ad hominem - the usual response of the those of the left leaning persuation.

Says the person who kicked off this thread with a pre-emptive ad hominem attack ('Go on Kiddies')on anyone who might downvote him!

You couldn't make this up! : )

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Dave 126
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Re: Yes, go on kiddies, mod me down.

>You don't think the BBC is after ratings too? Please.

FFS!!

Ratings are not the chief 'selection pressure' on BBC news. Their current affairs output is subject to regular review by the BBC Trust, as well as navel-gazing and viewer feedback... see the Radio 4 Media Show for examples.

The BBC isn't perfect, but it leads to an infinitely better state of affairs than in the US, where Fox and CNN dominate, and a comedy show is considered the most trustworthy news source by many.

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Dave 126
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Re: So what?

>"Obviously, you don't care much for democracy."

>>Since when have newpapers ever cared about it? Trial by media is one of their favourite pastimes.

FFS Boltar. You write a strident post about the BBC, then when challenged you use the behaviour of some newspaper to justify your comment.

Hey, we have no problem with you having contrarian views, but you do get a bit slippery when asked to expand upon them. Y'know, not citing sources but demanding them from others, that sort of thing.

And yesterday, you made a tit of yourself by objecting to people being polite. http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/2/2015/10/28/oracle_sparc_m7/#c_2678947

Are you having a bad week?

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Dave 126
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How short is your memory?

The BBC does things like dispute the "45 minutes WMD" dodgy dossier that was given as justification for our war in Iraq. And only last week it was confirmed that what we all suspected was true - the Tony Blair was Bush's side even before the House of Commons had debated the issue.

Oh, and the source was found dead.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Kelly_(weapons_expert)#Contact_with_Andrew_Gilligan

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We're getting kick-ass at seeing through walls using just Wi-Fi – MIT

Dave 126
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Re: Denim blockers?

>They've got flat arms and heads?

Yes, in relation to the frequencies of RF used. From the MIT paper:

The challenge in using RF to capture a human figure is that not all body parts reflect the signal back to the sensors. Specifically, at frequency ranges that traverse walls, human limb curves act as ideal reflectors; hence, they may deflect the signal away from the sensors rather than back to them. (This is because RF signals that traverse walls have a wavelength of multiple centimeters, which is larger than the surface roughness of human body parts, causing each part to act as a perfect reflector [Beckmann and Spizzichino 1987].)

So, it is the geometry of the body, not the presence of blood vessels etc that this system works on.

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Dave 126
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Re: If this system fired ping-pong balls at the subject

>They've got flat arms and heads?

There are flatter, harder parts of the head that are facing the sensor, yes.

The hands show up when they are held facing the camera.

>The image 'hot spots' around blood rich areas like the head and chest,

The head and chest are also thicker than the limbs. Shoes show up well.

>If this system fired ping-pong balls at the subject they'd bounce off the wall. That's the point of the research, it "sees" through walls.

Okay, you took the analogy too far. I was trying to convey the basis around which 'stealth' vehicles are designed... it's about the shape. If you drop a ball onto a flat floor, it will come back to your hand. If you drop a ball onto a curved surface, it will likely bounce away. Legs are Cylindrical, chests and heads present some flat area facing the sensor. Flat, thin hands show up better than thicker rounded arms.

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Dave 126
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At least then you can knock-together a receiver that tells you when a police car is outside your house!

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Dave 126
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Re: Denim blockers?

>None of the images seems capable of tracking their legs, and they all seem to be wearing jeans.

Legs are curved. The areas of the body this system 'sees' most clearly are flat and head-on to the sensor.

Did you notice that the people in the video all held their hands open, with fingers together and facing the camera? That clinched it for me.

If this system fired ping-pong balls at the subject and counted the ones that came directly back to it, the resulting heatmap wouldn't look too different to this team's images.

Good work!

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Finally, with W10, Microsoft’s device strategy makes sense

Dave 126
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Re: Ergonomics?

>"What the world really needs is a simple, consistent and reliable operating system onto which appropriate interfaces can be grafted to match our hands, eyes and ears to the various new devices that are supposed to enhance our lives."

>>What? Like the Symbian OS?

That sounds like Linux plus your GUI-of-choice paradigm... dunno why you assumed Symbian.

What is harder is getting developers of applications (for Windows, or indeed Linux) to play ball. For example, it's 2015 and Photoshop still doesn't support ultra high resolution displays on Windows (Adobe blame MS, I wish I could knock their metaphoric heads together til they reach a solution).

Apple's history is a bit different - they have always published guidelines for 3rd party application UIs. Indeed, MS Office for OSX still has, gasp, real menus!

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Dave 126
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Re: The iPad Pro?

>The iPad Pro, though, has an A9X processor - it runs, therefore, iOS, not OS X, so it can't run real Macintosh software, only tablet and smartphone apps.

It can't run OSX apps, but there is nothing stopping developers from creating 'Pro' applications for it. Indeed, Adobe have been working on some even before the iPad Pro's announcement.

It will find a place in some content creator's workflow.

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Dave 126
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Re: Ergonomics?

>Here's an idea: perhaps the basic premise is stupid and wrong?

Maybe. But maybe the truth lies in the middle?

Some of your productivity apps have a place on a tablet - especial things like Photoshop (stylus) for roving photographers, or a slider-heavy work space in Ableton (multi-touch). Indeed, maybe your workspace is spread across a PC monitor and a tablet, as Photoshop and DAW applications already support?

Interesting times.

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Dave 126
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Re: @Peter R.1 - This just in

@JustaKOS

This would appear to be what Peter was referring to:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gordonkelly/2015/10/13/microsoft-windows-10-new-upgrade-rules/

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Dave 126
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Re: Obvious MS surface ad

The Reg has also reported on Macs, Chromebooks ( and has done so in this very article, FFS!) and today has reported on a possible Linux laptop from Xiaomi.

The nicest thing that this article said about the Surface Book was that "The Surface Book has a decent chance of becoming a successful device in its own right", which is not an unreasonable assessment.

If other laptop vendors follow MS's example - which is the gist of the article - we consumers will have a greater selection to choose from. As it is, most of them only offer 16:9 screens, whereas the Surface Book has 3:2.

You might prefer 16:19, you might prefer 3:2 or 16:10, whatever; choice is good.

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Microsoft's 'Arrow' Android launcher flies into Play store

Dave 126
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Re: Auto adjusting to what the user does often

The devil is in the details....

For example, on a desktop machine I like programs to stay in the same place on the Start Menu. However, it's handy when a program's File Menu presents a list of the most recently saved documents.

The point is, 'Recent Documents...' doesn't replace 'Open', but complements it.

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Flickering screens turn Microsoft Surface Books into Microsoft Surface paperweights

Dave 126
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Re: Maybe the flicker is...

>Microsoft's candle waning and getting close to extinguishing itself. We can only hope.

There is just too much software tied to Windows platforms for that to happen overnight. Those of us thus tied to the platform will continue to be constructively critical of MS decisions where deserved, but also give credit where it is due. Bashing MS for past sharp business practices or whatever isn't too helpful.

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Dave 126
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Re: Multipurpose

@g00se

could it be that you are thinking of the existing MS Surface (tablet with attachable keyboard)? I'd expect an Intel i5/i7-powered tablet to radiate more heat than any ARM-powered tablet.

This article is about the newly released Surface Book (laptop with detachable screen).

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Dave 126
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Re: Maybe the flicker is...

The Surface Book hardware actually appears to be very good. The full list of weird symptoms users have reported all seem to be software/driver related.

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Dave 126
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Re: Discrete GPU

The GPU is offered as an option.

For those of us who do CAD work, it's nice to see a GPU on a laptop of this form factor, especially if one's workflow can benefit from stylus input.

Also, this 3:2 laptop seems to be the only one available, other than Macbooks, that doesn't use a 16:9 screen. If I am wrong about that, please, please supply a link!

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Dave 126
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Re: I would have thought it was hardware

>What surprises me is that this is apparently software, I would have thought it is a screen ribbon or something.

For sure. However, other reported symptoms suggest that it is indeed software, for example some owners have videoed the colour temperature changes as they scroll down a website - on both the Book's own screen and a connected monitor. I can't think of a hardware cause for that!

I'm sure that this will be a very compelling product, so it just seems daft that these issues were not dealt with before launch.

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DEFCON 1 to DEFCON GONE: One of NORAD's spy blimps goes missing

Dave 126
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Re: Tracked by F16s?

Their contingency plan was to shoot it down, slower training planes unlikely to be armed. Besides that, the F16s probably have fancier systems for detecting and tracking aircraft.

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Oracle's Larry Ellison claims his Sparc M7 chip is hacker-proof – Errr...

Dave 126
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Re: Ze

Well that's just plain offensive to people with poor comedy French accents!

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