* Posts by Dave 126

6134 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Paper wasps that lie to their mates get a right kicking, research finds

Dave 126
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Re: The cost of cheating

>Poor method, poor control = Totally invalid experiment.

>>the whole basis of the "experiment" seems flawed to me, they don't even mention if they had a control group of unpainted vs unpainted wasps fighting to compare traits with.

Strewth. The paper hasn't been published yet, and it is in that - as opposed to a press release or a 'chat' with the Reg - in which you would expect to find the details of the methods used in this study.

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Obi Worldphone MV1: It's striking, it's solid. Aaaand... we've run out of nice things to say

Dave 126
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Ah well.

Obi do a low-mid-range phone too, but without the swappable battery (cheaper phones seem more likely to have swappable batteries these days... ).

Strangely, the 'Obi Origin Story' posted on their website contains an Ali G reference "Big-up to the Slough massive though!" (both in http://www.obiworldphone.com/global/story as well as http://www.obiworldphone.com/uk/story ). Odd, because when I think of Ali G and mobile phones, it because he passes a Nokia to lady and says "Set to vibrate and finish yourself off" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVTRX7lp9uo

EDIT:

I had written the following, but I have removed it from the above post because it upon re-reading the website, it appears I imagined it:

"Beyond the styling, nothing really jumps out at me, except for the 'floating display', which means that the screen isn't taking the full mass of the phone if it is dropped. This simple concept appeals to the mechanical engineer in me - though of course a Mech Eng would want to do a lot of destructive testing, naturally, before retiring a verdict."

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Florida man sues Apple for $10bn, claims iPod, iPhone was his idea

Dave 126
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Re: HHG2

>Has Apple got anywhere with the Electronic Thumb yet?

Not yet, but Uber and Lyft have.

It's also worth noting that the Dynabook and the IBM-branded tablet from Kubrick's 2001 (1968) predate the HHGTTG. Douglas Adams died before playing with an iPod, let alone an iPhone.

If you want to go further back, HG Wells pushed for a global encyclopedia (which is effectivily what the HHGTTG is) in the thirties, though he took a step back from it because he thought his political views wouldn't help the project.:

In 1936, before the Royal Institution, Wells called for the compilation of a constantly growing and changing World Encyclopaedia, to be reviewed by outstanding authorities and made accessible to every human being. In 1938, he published a collection of essays on the future organisation of knowledge and education, World Brain, including the essay, "The Idea of a Permanent World Encyclopaedia".

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._G._Wells#Writer

- http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/hg-wells-author-who-imaged-a-future-based-on-scientific-achie/7463446

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Dave 126
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Re: Newsflash: Nebuchadnezzar cliams prior art on rounded corners!!

The 'rounded corners' is what we in the UK would call 'trade dress' - like the shape of a Coca-Cola bottle or the shape of an Aston Martin's grill. In the US it is called 'design patent' and is not we call a patent in the UK.

Apple's objection was that Samsung used the same specific corner radii, making their phone look very similar to the iPhone, potentially confusing customers. It was never about a device having any rounded corners.

Regardless of who you side with, I think it's best if people understand exactly what the dispute was about.

Kind regards

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Dave 126
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Re: Many of Apple's ...

Apple didn't just draw a picture of a Newton/iPhone in the early 90s, they invested in ARM to help make it happen.

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Dave 126
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Re: Many of Apple's ...

>The iPod was copying Creative and iRiver with a case and silly control inspired by Dieter Rams' stuff for Braun.

I think you've got your dates muddled, Mage! :)

- The iRiver H120 wasn't released until 2003, two years after the 1st gen iPod. It used the same Toshiba HDD and battery as the iPod, but featured analogue recording.

-The iPod took its dial interface from a 1990's Bang and Olufsen telephone and from Sony AV gear, not Braun. The control mechanism on the iPod was superior to the iRiver. I had the iRiver H320 - it was a very good machine, but without a scroll wheel it was PITA to navigate long lists.

-The pre-iPod Creative player used a laptop HDD and as such it was the size of a CD-Walkman. It was not pocket sized.

In short, Apple got to market first with the right combination of size, convenience and capacity. Had they not, somebody else would have done - the essential part, the HDD, was available to anyone to use. It's worth noting that the iPod was $600 dollars when first released, and was FireWire and Mac only - indeed, most PCs at the time didn't have FireWire, and USB 1.0 wasn't fast enough. The 1st gen iPod wasn't a massive seller, but it got Apple's foot in the door.

It was a strange time - the first MP3 players were from unfamiliar names like Rio or LG, and the Japanese, though they had done much research in the area, hadn't got involved. Some were sold with only enough capacity to store a few songs. There were still competing formats of memory card, too, before we largely standardised around SD. Until I got an iRiver, I didn't bother with MP3 and stuck with my Sharp MiniDisc player (1999, with scroll wheel).

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You can be my wingman any time! RaspBerry Pi AI waxes Air Force top gun's tail in dogfights

Dave 126
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Read in depth

The humans were at a numerical disadvantage.

The mission analyzed in this document features two blue fighters

vs. four red. The red aircraft begin over a defended coastline and

the blues are 54 nautical miles due west

The white paper itself is fascinating though! Go to page two:

http://www.omicsgroup.org/journals/genetic-fuzzy-based-artificial-intelligence-for-unmanned-combat-aerialvehicle-control-in-simulated-air-combat-missions-2167-0374-1000144.pdf

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Dave 126
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Re: I S'Pi with my little eye...

So, to boil your post down to its essentials: You're asking why it is possible for some software ( game playing in the realm of physics) has been developed for an ARM chip which is better than that written for some other chip from a year or two back...

I'd say it's plausible. The thing about software is that you can never know if your algorithm is the fastest that can be written. Also, the last few years has seen a lot of work down on autonomous vehicles - there is more prior work to draw upon.

If you've ever tried to swat a fly then you will know that the hardware to control some damned good flying doesn't have to be big - if the software is good enough.

[You've used the wrong icon. If you hover your POINTER over the ICON it will tell you when it should be used. If you don't have a mouse or trackpad - i.e you are using a phone or tablet - then it might be best if you don't use any Reg icons, since the lack of MouseOver means you won't know what they mean.]

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Dave 126
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Re: Hopefully this will mean cheaper planes

>The first thing to employ would be nuclear weapons to clear the skies, followed by anti.aircraft missiles...

I'm assuming you mean the EMP effects of nuclear explosions. That'd do it.

Research into EMP blast is ongoing - both in the offensive ("can we make an EMP 'cannon' without a nuke?") and defensive ("How do we protect our shit if our enemy uses EMP?")

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Dave 126
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Re: "forces to be deployed without human loss of life"

Years ago, I watched documentary about cats.

They said that cats rarely fight, because of displays of power - the weaker cat would soon realise it was the weaker cat, and thus bugger off to hiss another day.

This documentary, Tiger on the Tiles* by Desmond Morris IIRC, doesn't fully inform my armchair strategic thinking.

Nor does that episode of Shatner Star Trek, the one when a star system's internal battles were simulated by a computer and the virtual causalities calculated - then each side would have to kill a corresponding number of its own citizens. It was neater - no infrastructure damage.

I guess the film The Last Starfighter, is now out of date. (In this film, a young 1980's American lad proves to be very good at an arcade video game. It turns out that the video game arcade cabinet was a plant by aliens involved in their own war, and that they were recruiting pilots from uncontacted planets. )

WHOOAH! I've just Googled the above film - It turns out Seth Rogan has been wanting to remake it, but he tweeted that Steven Spielberg told him that not even he has been able to get the rights - the film's writer won't give it up. Probably a canny move - the film might be more powerful in a few years time if recreational Human Interfaces (VR, HUD, AR etc etc) come closer to military gear.

*Yeah, I was watching cat video before broadband internet.

** I like Ricard. Not Picard, Ricard. Which I have been drinking tonight. With water, obviously; I try not to be a jerk. But I may be off topic ish.

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Magnetic, heat scanners to catch Tour de France electric motor cheats

Dave 126
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Re: Tech

>Let's face it. Bikes need some new technology besides weight shavings and hipster wood paneling.

We all want new super-duper energy dense batteries for our phones, cars and power tools, so when Tesla, Dyson, Samsung or whoever mass produces them, electric bikes will benefit.

Weight savings, suspension and vibration control have been the areas that have evolved the most over the last thirty years. Adding a motor changes things

Round in these hilly parts, there are quite a few electric bikes in the pub car park. The result is that the bikes are no longer designed with weight savings as the main focus - instead, panniers or pillion seats are incorporated into the frame- making the bicycle more suitable for day to day ('nip to the shops') use than perhaps a traditional racer or mountain bike would be.

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Thunder struck: Apple kills off display line

Dave 126
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Real issue is the interconnect:

Apple's iMacs have had 5K displays for a couple of years now, but there is no way for most current Macs to drive an external 5K display.

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Dave 126
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FireWire was still used on camcorders which recorded in AVCHD, which was a compressed format but of good quality. In fact the decoding of AVCHD carries a processing overhead, so Macs would convert it to the larger-file sized (but less CPU intensive) Apple Intermediary Codec as footage was transferred from the camcorder.

FireWire was never a failure. It was used for years and years, but only by people who needed to use it. This Shaun Nichols person seems to have gone full Anna Leech.

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Maplin Electronics demands cash with menaces

Dave 126
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>That might work if they weren't so insistent on selling £3 HDMI cables for £30.

Where you find a Maplins, there is normally a Tescos or an Asda nearby who will definitely have HDMI cables, external HDDs, 3.5 mm > 3.5mm/phono etc

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Dave 126
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Re: dorky looking weirdos

The origins of electronic music owe much to surplus WWII kit. In the UK it became muzak for radio commercials, on the continent it was considered avant garde art.

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Dave 126
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Tricky.... Maplins serves the overlap between people who are into hobbyist electronics and PCs, and people who don't order stuff over the internet. It's not a big overlap.

Also, their alternate business model has been eaten into by the gay hook-up app Grindr, if this story from the Daily Mash is to be believed:

http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/society/maplin-is-where-men-meet-for-sex-2014013183134

“But tell the wife you’ve got to nip to Maplins for a phono audio to HDMI converter and she never asks any probing questions.”

Eleanor Shaw of Bristol, whose husband is a Maplin regular, said: “I knew he couldn’t need that many external hard drives. Deep down, I knew it.

“It even has pulsing disco lights in the window.”

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Utah sheriffs blow $10,000 on smut-sniffing Labrador

Dave 126
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Re: Bag of chips?

>As an aside, my estimate is that you would need 228 metric tonnes of punched cards to store a DVD

I was thinking that 228 tonnes would make a big flip book for naughty animations.... I went looking online (Rule 34), but all i found was this [car] porn for Subaru. Basically a mile long wall with image cells, the car is driven past and the door pillars act as shutters:

Safe For Work link:

http://www.ufunk.net/en/insolite/une-animation-flip-book-geante-de-1km-de-long/

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Dave 126
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Re: TOP TIPS #53

Ah, so that is where the Youtube series "Will it Blend?" originated! Here was me thinking the reducing of electronic gizmos to dust was just a promotional series for a brand of food processor!

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Huawei taps ex-Nokia devs for 'secret phone OS project'

Dave 126
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Re: maemo

http://cdn1.computerworlduk.com/cmsdata/slideshow/3378839/03_Tizen_mobile_OS_thumb800.jpg

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Holy kittens! YouTube screens go blank

Dave 126
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Re: "Funny" error messages

Lately? They've been around for as long as I remember.

"Windows is checking for a solution to the problem" always has me in stitches!

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Not smiling for the camera? Adobe's Creative Cloud suite can fix that

Dave 126
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Re: The spirit of Zelig lives

>this will increasingly devalue photographs as a source of future historical record

Patented in 1947, may I present this photo-retouching table?

It vibrates the photographic negative that the artist is working on, so that brush strokes are rendered invisible:

http://petapixel.com/2014/10/19/adams-retouching-machine-helped-old-school-photoshoppers-retouch-negatives-hand/

Before we used the term 'photoshopped', we would talk of people being 'airbrushed' from history.

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Apple pollutes data about you to protect your privacy. But it might not be enough

Dave 126
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Re: Sick and tired

>Does Google map thing replace an A to Z?

It can do. Other mapping and navigation solutions are available.

As an added bonus, Google Maps will show areas of slow-moving traffic in real time, and so suggest routes that are quicker at the time. It will also show you where you are on the map, and be up-to-date with business address and even show you photo so you know when you are there. It will also tell you the opening hours of a public house, and at what times it is typically busy.

Of course the downsides are that you need some battery life in your phone (though most cars can be fitted with a phone charger) and either a data connection or the foresight to pre-load map data onto your phone.

In fact, this is very good example of the 'herd benefit' of using anonymous data from many users - Google know when their is congestion because some Android phones will be sending speed and location data to Google - so if everyone on a particular road is going at 40 Mph when an hour earlier they were doing 70, Google knows there is an accident or roadworks. Of course, Google being Google, they do have your identifiable location data too unless you opt out of it, but it still stands as an example of the concept.

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Dave 126
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Re: Sick and tired

>Odd that no one has mentioned that stupid Beacon rubbish thing that Apple were punting.

No one, except for the Bluetooth SIG in their specs for Bluetooth 5.0, which will have 8x the bandwidth for 'connectionless traffic' than previous versions.

http://www.informationweek.com/mobile/mobile-devices/bluetooth-5-five-things-for-it-to-know/a/d-id/1325970

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Dave 126
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Re: as Apple hasn’t been on reliant on digital advertising

>On the other hand there are undoubted benefits from Google's mining if, like me, you live a life unlikely to attract the attention of either the police or criminals but suffer from increasingly failing memory.

The drug smuggler Howard Marks was once asked how he, a man who smoked a lot of hash, could remember enough of his past to write a best-selling autobiography, Mr Nice:

"Oh, that was easy, the FBI had me under surveillance for years... I just asked them for their file on me under their Freedom of information laws."

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

Dear Camilla,

I believe you may have confused Apple's differential privacy with something they implemented in OSX Safari a few years ago.

It was the the feature in Safari that would make advertisers believe you had visited sites that you hadn't - presumably websites drawn from a pre-compiled whitelist (so no KinkyStuff.com or ISISareCool.org).

Differential Privacy is different, so take a few minutes to scan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_privacy

At this stage, exactly how Apple will implement it is not known, but the concept is that Apple will have data about all their users, but can't reverse engineer that data (because of maths) to identify anything about an individual user.

Of course it goes without saying that the implementation key.

Kind regards

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

>IOW, they probably already have ways to differentiate differential privacy.

Akin to encryption, it depends upon how the differential privacy is implemented in the real world. From what I understand, it is built upon proven mathematical ideas.

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Dave 126
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>Google can read all my email if it so desires; but as that's an informed choice I don't see the problem. (I see it as the price for the convenience of Gmail).

Also, Google have not suffered any massive security breaches, a la Ashley Madison, Sony et al... Google seem to be capable of keeping your data out of the hands of blackmailers and extortionists.

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Dave 126
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Re: So what happens....

Eh?

The agencies don't just use one data point to identify would-be terrorists, the chances of injected noise giving you - and no other Apple users - the profile of a terrorist are practically non-existent.

In any case, this data would have to captured by the agencies in transit, because the whole point of differential Privacy is that you can't be identified from Apples data.

Differential Privacy has been developed by academics for years. Most technical experts welcome its adoption by Apple, but of course they look forward to seeing the actual implementation before passing any judgement.

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Rejoice, fatties: Giving chocolate electric shocks makes it healthier

Dave 126
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Re: From comments around the internet

You've not been to the United States, have you?

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Kremlin wants to shoot the Messenger, and WhatsApp to boot

Dave 126
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I really don't think that Snowdon thought that Russia was all sweetness and light before he sought asylum there.

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Dave 126
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Re: This is a good thing!

>Without the proprietary biggies, the public will then turn to open communication platforms following open communication standards that no country can control.

Sadly I suspect your thinking is wishful: the average user won't bother. For evidence, look at how many people use Facebook Messenger.

Sometimes it can be better to to side with the big corporations, since they aren't as easily cowed by governments. Sometimes, that is. I'd sooner trust Apple - since their business model is to empty my pockets for hardware - than I would Facebook, which has both Ayn Rand-ian ideologies around privacy and an advertising-based business.

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Microsoft joins battery-saving browser bandwagon with Edge claims

Dave 126
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Re: ad blocking > all

Edge suspends Flash content on tabs that aren't visible. Chrome doesn't do that by default.

The video tests MS conducted were based around streaming Netflix. I tried to find further info about the tests, but couldn't. However, it wouldn't be worth MS fudging the tests because of the backlash should they be found out. (And in any case, their findings reflect independent results).

Curiously, Netflix is only available in 1080p on Edge and IE on Windows, and on Safari on OSX - all other desktop browsers are 720p, and both HTML 5 and Silverlight are used.

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How's your driving, Elon? Musk tweets that Tesla Model S 'floats'

Dave 126
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Re: I would like to know

Just to clarify:

If you are driving on a road that is flooded to a foot or two and there are other vehicles using it, don't go fast just because you are in a Chelsea Tractor - the resulting wave has fucked* the engines of smaller diesel cars and vans that would have been just fine had you not shown up.

If you are crossing a river in the back of beyond in a 4X4, then for sure, do want you your training and experience tells you is best.

* This was the term our mechanic used - I assume it is technical.

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Dave 126
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Re: Incomplete article

Exactly.

The Reg article points out that "There is no serious suggestion that Elon Musk crashed his Tesla Model S or otherwise accidentally drove it into a body of water.", but doesn't mention the tweet Musk made immediately before, linking to an article about a Kazakh man driving his Tesla through a flooded tunnel.

https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

http://electrek.co/2016/06/18/tesla-model-s-driving-swimming-flooded-tunnel-video/

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Dave 126
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Re: I would like to know

The car floats, so the depth of the water is not an issue. What is an issue is the speed of the water, since the wheels won't be powering the car very efficiently. The tweet from Musk was in response to a news story - someone in Kazakhstan had driven their Tesla through a flooded tunnel, where the water wasn't flowing very quickly (compared to a river).

http://electrek.co/2016/06/18/tesla-model-s-driving-swimming-flooded-tunnel-video/

It does look like the driver was a pillock though - he was moving quickly enough to create a bow wave that could cause water to enter and damage the engines of the other people's cars. Some 4x4 drivers have been know to do the same on flooded roads.

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Apple's 'lappable' iPad Pro concept is far from laughable

Dave 126
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The Surface Pro's thin stand or the iPad's Smart Keyboard?

Horses for courses. :)

For the needs you have outlined, there are plenty of machines to choose from in the 'mobile workstation' or 'gaming laptop' categories - so happy days! And hey, better stuff is yet to come, with the promise of external GPUs and fast interconnects that blur the line between internal and external storage (if one's data is valuable, then having it stuck on one device is not the greatest idea anyway).

However, you are a roving tech blogger or journalist and don't need the power, you might be glad for a lighter 'ultrabook' machine.

I like that there are a few approaches being explored at the moment. Lenovo, MS, Apple, ASUS and others are all trying various form factors. Some people might want one device to do everything and perhaps accept some compromises, others might be happier to carry a couple.

This was an interesting article because it was assessing a device against tasks which weren't its main focus.

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Dave 126
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Tools for the job... The iPad Pro wasn't designed to replace the MacBook, which would clearly be a better device for writing lots of text. The iPad Pro has it own strengths, but this article was about using the iPad for MacBook-like tasks 'in a pinch'.

In short, it sounds like an iPad Pro might suit you if you mainly work with images and graphics away from your desk, and only occasionally need to write a report or use a spreadsheet.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shock Horror - A positive review of an Apple 'thing'

It wasn't a formal review, as the story was tagged 'Road Test'. It gave one persons view of the iPad Pro for their particular workflow when travelling. It could be a useful accompaniment to the more formal reviews of the iPad that can be found elsewhere on the internet.

The Reg will occasionally have articles tagged 'Hands On Review', which are first impressions.

The proper reviews are tagged 'Review'.

Generally - and feel free to go through past Reg articles to confirm this - the Reg is snarky about Apple when reporting rumours, launch events and the like, but generally gives good reviews of Apple kit itself.

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Apple and Android wearables: What iceberg? It’s full steam ahead!

Dave 126
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Re: Author seems strangely unfamiliar with Apple Watch

Aye.

Other reviews of Watch OS 3.0 suggest that it makes things simpler for users, in part by making less use of the 'digital crown' and using touchscreen more - actions that are already familiar to iPhone users.

For my taste, the Apple Watch does too much - but that's me. A small, tough watch (stainless steel and sapphire ) with an oh-so-useful rotating bezel does me fine. If something similar with some discreet LED for notifications was made, I might be tempted.

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Safari 10 dumps Flash, Java, Silverlight, QuickTime in the trash

Dave 126
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Re: That is all well and good but...

> So when I use Firefox on OSX why does nothing play? Safari is nowhere in sight.

Really? You found it quicker to type a question than to visit the links posted above? Tch.

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Dave 126
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Re: Auto user agent charge?

>so it baffles me why those sites cannot default to that method of delivery.

Apparently the 'iPad' method of delivery is HLS, which doesn't currently allow full iPlayer functionality without more effort from the iPlayer development team. They don't want to make that effort for just one browser, since they are keen to get HTML 5 delivery working across all devices.

The dev team say that OSX Safari is missing something called AVC3, which is required for HTML 5 iPlayer delivery. I don't know, but maybe their assumption is that it wouldn't be that hard for Apple to add it to OSX Safari (since it's in iOS Safari already).

In the mean time, their unofficial advice to OSX users seems to be ' pretend to be an iPad or use Opera 32'.

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Dave 126
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Re: That is all well and good but...

>So they can show content without flash but for some reason are stubbornly using flash as their default.

The BBC team give their reasons here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/entries/8be5501d-43e7-4bf6-8f1e-e7037980a0f0

Something to do with OSX Safari not supporting AVC3, and HLS not allowing the full iPlayer functionality. Mac users can use Opera 32 instead to access BBC HTML 5 content, though (and I'm no expert) it would seem more sensible if Apple could tweak Safari.

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Dave 126
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Re: BBC and Flash

The BBC is moving away from from Flash, having had a HTML5 player in Beta since September:

Apple iOS, Windows 10 Mobile and BlackBerry users will get the HTML5 player by default, as will compatible desktop browsers where Adobe Flash is not installed or enabled.

...

However, the only OS X browser it works on is Opera 32. ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/html5 ). The reason the BBC give is that "Safari on Mac OS X doesn’t support AVC3 via its Media Source Extensions implementation. It does, however, support HLS, and whilst we could offer HLS streams to Mac OS X Safari users (some of you have noticed that you can pretend to be an iPad and you get a working player) we’ve deliberately not enabled it during the trial. " Apparently trying to achieve the full capabilities of iPlayer (HD programmes, Live Rewind etc) in HLS would be too much effort for just one platform, and slow the complete switch away from Flash.

( http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/internet/entries/8be5501d-43e7-4bf6-8f1e-e7037980a0f0 )

So, I don't know how this works, or even what AVC3 is, but could it be that tricky for Apple to implement? It doesn't affect me, but can somene make a 'feature request' to Apple? Or do all Mac users watch content through iPads and iTVs instead?

Still, it is encouraging that the BBC is already on the road away from Flash.

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Cats understand the laws of physics, researchers claim

Dave 126
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From a science fiction author:

“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.”

- Robert A. Heinlein

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Dave 126
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Re: Not really understanding.

Similarly, I've been told that a sportsman like David Beckham can take advantage of some damned tricky physics and kick a ball so that it curves in mid flight. Its never been suggested to me that he understands that laws of physics that govern the flight of the ball, only that he has a damned good feel for it.

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Forget Game of Thrones as Android ransomware infects TVs

Dave 126
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>I am not convinced that a proprietary dongle is any better than a proprietary 'smart TV'.

With respect to the topic of this thread, it is clearly better for a cheap dongle - proprietary or open-source - to be 'bricked' by malware than an expensive TV.

A discussion about Kodi and its sources is a different conversation.

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Dave 126
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Re: Aahh!

> Apparently you think I live in the UK. I do not ;)

Your browser's address bar reads: Theregister.co.uk...

If you engage in a discussion about consumer rights, fine, but please respect that the the UK is the default value.

Also, you have used that icon incorrectly - if you hover your mouse over each icon, you can read a guide to how to use it. For the icon you have used, we'd be expecting references to equations, rockets, or very, very small things at least!

Anyways, no worries, and welcome to the Reg! : )

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Dave 126
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Re: @Dave126

>What if it connects to the neighbour's network? Or somebody walking past?

Android TVs don't do that! Stop plucking bullshit out of the air, FFS!

There is nothing stopping you from using these TVs as dumb screens - just don't connect them to the fucking network if you don't want to. It. Really. Is. That. Simple.

>But, sadly, that doesn't sound flash enough for marketing so this shite is wheeled out instead.

This 'shite' (iPlayer et al) is useful for many people and adds less than tenner for the bill of materials on a £400+ television, if that.

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Dave 126
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Re: Good news for *big* screen fans though ...

Or for viewing in wider range of lighting conditions: Just buy a TV but don't connect it to a network. Easy.

If you want the 'smart' functionality, it can be delegated to a discrete and low cost dongle.

Projectors are good for some circumstances, but not for all.

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Apple quietly launches next-gen encrypted file system

Dave 126
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Re: Case sensitive for now

Thank you Monty75, that was my reading of it too. Everything online says "This is a developer preview, and as such is currently case-sensitive only". Compare and contrast with the Reg article:

"The file system is also case-sensitive and that apparently cannot be disabled, which will lead to all sorts of knock-on compatibility issues. Yep, you will have to buy more Apple gear: a new watch to go with your new phone to sync with your new laptop. Apple is always looking after that bottom line."

Talk about adding 2 to 2 and getting 5. The lack of [fact checking] around here is getting beyond a bit daft.

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