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* Posts by Dave 126

4135 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Size matters – how else could Dell squeeze 15 million pixels into this 27" 5K monitor?

Dave 126
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Rampant Spaniel is correct...

... the usually quoted PPI figures for human vision are wrong, and are based on some assumptions. There are also situations where our eyes can resolve more detail on a VDU, such as a single-pixel wide diagonal line - of the sort often encountered when working with CAD.

http://www.cultofmac.com/173702/why-retina-isnt-enough-feature/

Basically, Steve Jobs based his 'Retina Display' figures on the assumption that we can resolve 1 arcminute, whereas most estimates place the figure at between 0.6 and 0.4 arcminute.

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You can thank Brit funnyman John Oliver for fixing US broadband policy, beams Netflix

Dave 126
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Re: Totaly unrelated

He wasn't born in the USA, so can't be President. However, his place of birth probably doesn't disqualify him for Ruler of Earth,

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Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy

Dave 126
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Re: Dieter Rams

It is Ive, not Ives

Deluded? He was joking with colleagues, something people often do when a project is nearing completion to their satisfaction. "Switzerland is fucked".

He hasn't copied any Dieter Rams design, but rather Dieter Rams' methodology - this requires hard work, as Dieter himself will tell you.

Switzerland doesn't rely on luxury watches.... again, Ive was joking.

Seriously Mage, if you want to talk about Ive and Rams, at least look beyond Wikipedia. Here is an interview with the man himself, for starters:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/apple/8555503/Dieter-Rams-Apple-has-achieved-something-I-never-did.html

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Lenovorola TRIPLE-ola: New Moto G, Moto X and 360 wristputer UNZIPPED

Dave 126
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Good comment, points well made, reasoning shown.

A smartwatch would mitigate the 'dig phone out of pocket when it rings only to see that it is another PPI cold-call' shuffle. Socially, it is possible that smartphones might encourage more people to leave their phones in their pockets or bags when in company, and not have them sat on a table.

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Dave 126
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Define small, Bahboh.

Both the Sony Z1 Compact and Z3 Compact share the same footprint (146.5 x 72 x 7.3 mm), but the former has a 4.3" screen and the latter a 4.6" screen, due to smaller bezels. They have the same Snapdragon SoCs as most other high-end Android phones.

I have an older Android phone that has a screen roughly the same size as that on an IPhone, 4"... I get on with it well, but my close-up eyesight is fairly acute and my fingers aren't too sausage-like. It seems that most Android apps are designed for slightly larger screens, so your experience of Android on c. 4" screens might be less than ideal.

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You are here => Earth is in 'the suburbs' of an IMMENSE HEAVEN

Dave 126
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>A hundred quadrillion is about* a third of the number of water molecules in one-hundredth of a cubic millimetre of water. Does that help?

Thank you for your effort, but... I've never seen a molecule of water. Could you possibly scale that up to 'grains of sand in X number of swimming pools', or another other Reg-approved unit of volume?

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

Dave 126
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Re: So basically, MS says ...

>What if the hackers have heard about the gmail "+" trick? If they had, then they'd be able to write a script to defeat your countermeasure.

How?

They would have to brute force your username at the same time as trying to brute force your password. And as we know: lots x lots = shitloads.

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Dave 126
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Re: So basically, MS says ...

>if you re-use passwords from other sites, it only takes one of them to leak the password in a weak manner and all of your accounts are screwed.

In the article in which they discuss that, their advice is to reuse passwords across low-value sites - such as forums - and to reserve dedicated passwords for important sites, such as your email, shopping and banking services.

In addition, attackers have to know which email address you have used as your username for each site in order to use compromised password - if you use you+ebay7antelope@gmail.com for eBay and you+amazon4mountain@gmail.com for those respective sites, a compromise of one site's system won't reveal your username for another.

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Apple Fanbois (and girls) already lining up for NEW iPHONE

Dave 126
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Re: andyelliott@outlook.com

Self promoting? They're promoting some software, not themselves. And shit, sometimes you get a good atmosphere of camaraderie in queues... they can be more fun than many people's workplaces.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why?

From the linked article:

"While waiting, the Rays are promoting an app from VideoMedicine that allows patients to Skype with doctors."

The details of the deal between the Rays and the app developers aren't made clear, but there is more going on here than the Reg article suggests.

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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

Dave 126
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>But *everyone* needs to use secure passwords. At least for stuff they care to keep secure. It's not a complex concept, really.

Not a tricky concept, but a PITA in practice. Such is life! Some people advocate the use of password managers, though only last month The Reg reported of a security failure in a popular example of the breed.

Personally, I use the tiered approach, so might reuse the same password across low value sites (seldom-visited forums, for example) whereas email and banking sites get complicated (non-dictionary, UPPER lower case, !"£$, numbers, mixed up) passwords.

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Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015

Dave 126
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Re: increasingly @AC

>whereas health bands are probably a fad,

For younger people, maybe... but for older people with, say, heart conditions, 'tele-medicine' is going to pushed ever more by the NHS (and insurance companies) on cost grounds.

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Dave 126
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Re: increasingly @AC

>So the watch can wait... Besides, who really wears smart watches anyway?

Not many people at the moment. Still, before iPads and Android tablets I hadn't seen many people using touch-based keyboard-less computers (just the occasional surveyor or mechanic.)

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Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER

Dave 126
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Re: Does it matter??

>Put a dog turd on a strap, slap an Apple logo on it and the fanbois will still buy it, claiming that it's world changing technology.

If that were true, Apple would have just bunged some Bluetooth chip in the iPod Nano, and enjoyed some sales for the last few years.

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Dave 126
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Re: Quick Reader Poll:

I'd probably consider a monthly charging interval to be acceptable, though of course this depends on the usefulness of any 'smartwatch' features. This would allow people to travel without packing extra charging gubbins.

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Dave 126
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Quick Reader Poll:

Genuine question. What kind of charging interval would you consider acceptable for a 'smart-watch'?

Weekly, monthly, biannually?

Let us know!

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Dave 126
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Re: If Samsung can do it then surely Apple can...

My current watch:

Small, looks good in a plain way, tough, waterproof, years on batteries. Days, hours, minutes.

So, what 'smart watch' features would I find useful? And what comprises would I be willing to incur in order to have them?

Some features could be implemented without drastically affecting the appearance of the watch. I wouldn't want a Galaxy Gear, but a conventional watch that had a RGB notification LED or two, plus some simple media playback controls could be good. For that I might trade a 3-year battery life for a 6-month battery life, perhaps.

Citizen and Casio already make simple connected watches, but the implementations appear to be in the 'close but no cigar' territory.

Indeed, Citizen's effort is solar-powered:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Citizen-Proximity-Bluetooth-Chronograph-AT7035-01E/dp/B009LDL7TU

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Wetsuits, sunshine, bikini babes and a competitive streak: Epyx California Games

Dave 126
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Re: Reading the instructions = cheating??

>I had significant problems copying Spectrum games.

You needed a 'Romantic Robot' module, mate. It was designed to dump the Speccy's RAM to tape, so progress in games could be saved, but it had a side effect:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiface

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Another step forward for diamond-based quantum computers

Dave 126
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Re: eh?

>which means that to get acceptable accuracy the calculation may have to be performed many times in either parallel or series, which negates some of the advantages.

At least it's easy to check the results of the factorisation with a classical computer.

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PEAK APPLE: One MILLION fewer iPads sold this quarter

Dave 126
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Re: I wouldn't say it is Peak Apple

In support of your argument, I'd also suggest that people are more willing to overlook shortcomings in their tablets than they are in their phones. Most tablets tend to reside in the home, so are closer to a power point.... battery isn't as important. Weight isn't as big an issue, since they aren't carried around as often as phones. Because phones are carruied out and about, they are more likely to incur damage, cosmetic or otherwise.

If a phone runs out of battery, the user is put out of touch with friends and family. If a tablet runs out of juice, a phone can pick up most, if not all, of the tablet's duties.

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UK WhatsApp duo convicted of possessing extreme porn

Dave 126
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or a reference to:

-The Ring - Japanese horror film in which anyone who watches a certain videotape dies a week after watching it.

-Monty Python's The Funniest Joke in the World sketch, in which a joke is penned that causes anyone who hears it to die of laughter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gpjk_MaCGM

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Dave 126
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Re: Soooooo...

>Who's going to get off on a 48x48 icon...

Not that this changes one's impression of this case, but on a technical note:

What'sApp downloads a full-size picture to the phone when it is viewed in What'sApp.

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Dave 126
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Re: -Why did they not have solicitors?

Possibly due to cuts in Legal Aid. Dunno.

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Cut price Android on steroids: OnePlus One – should we look gift horse in the gob?

Dave 126
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Re: Battery capacity

Even if you had a technically correct measure of the battery, you would of course still need to know the power consumption of the components to form a useful impression of the phone in real-world use. Although this phone uses the same SoC - Snapdragon 801 - as competitors, some manufacturers have implemented software and hardware features to extend battery life.

If it is really important to you, you'd do better to consult a site that measures how long it takes the battery to run flat under various standardised tests. i.e, Looped HD video, web-browsing, calls etc. Take these Anandtech benchmarks of the LG G3 phone as an example of this approach:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/8169/the-lg-g3-review/3

(Graphs. Lots of graphs).

If nothing else, you can compare the battery life of new phone Y, against your existing phone X whose battery life you already have a feel for.

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

Dave 126
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Re: " we do not know how the human body reacts to different gravitational fields"

>The men that went came back fine and their entire trip was monitored, if I am not mistaken.

MachDiamond was talking about years on Mars, not a few days. However, there have been a fair few astronauts and cosmonauts who have spent extended periods in orbit, so NASA and other agencies have a fair bit of data about the effect of microgravity on the body, and the physical exercises the crew do to mitigate them. Most of the issues are related to muscle and bone density, and to the distribution of fluids in the body.

Though the gravity on Mars is less than that of Earth, at least exercise would be easier (less need for crazy-looking elastic gym machinery) than in microgravity.

Personally, if I were to be sent to Mars, I'd place the gravity issue fairly low down on the list of things that were bad for my health... behind radiation, stranded by drive failure, life support system failure and being skinned alive by a crew mate who has succumbed to SPAACE MAADNESS! Okay, not sure about that last one...

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Dave 126
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Re: Gravity

To borrow the back-of-an-evelope calculations of "Arnaut the less" above, the thrust wouldn't be enough to simulate gravity in any useful way. You'd be better off with a spinning design, a la 2001: Space Odyssey.

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Dave 126
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Re: Bugger solar panels!

It wouldn't help you get into orbit. It provides a bit of thrust indefinitely (if you have electricity) rather than shitloads of thrust for ten minutes.

In a vacuum, a bit of thrust sustained over a few days or weeks will get you going very fast indeed.

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Dave 126
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Re: I'm wainting with baited breath...

Read the abstract of the paper, linked in the article. The concluding paragraph of which is:

Test results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. Future test plans include independent verification and validation at other test facilities.

The last sentence is in keeping with the scientific method.

"We did X and observed Y. We were surprised by Y. Can anyone help us confirm that we didn't overlook unknown factor(s) Z? Thank you!"

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Dave 126
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>For instance, the following is a clean, virtually free, and super abundant energy technology (LENR) which has been verified (more than once by the way) by an impeccable third party:

f''k's sake. If what you say is true, why hasn't it been taken up by any commercial company that wishes to cut its energy bills?

Also, why haven't they claimed the $1 Million USD reward offered (by the marvelous Dick Smith) to anyone who can prove LENR works?

In February 2012 Smith expressed himself skeptical of the purported Energy Catalyzer Cold fusion device. On 14 February, he offered the inventor Andrea Rossi one million US Dollars if he were to repeat the demonstration of 29 March of the year before, this time allowing particular care to be given to a check of the electric wiring of the device, and to the power output. The offer was declined by Rossi before the lapse of 20 February acceptance deadline that had been set by Smith.

Smith has subsequently offered one million US dollars "to any person or organisation that can come up with a practical device that has an output of at least one kilowatt of useful energy through LENRs (low energy nuclear reactions)." The offer remained open until January 2013.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Smith_(entrepreneur)#Involvement_in_public_affairs

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Thin naked model slips out of Apple's secretive lab ... it's an 'iPad Air 2'

Dave 126
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Re: meet the new iPad ...

>meet the new iPad ... ... same as the old iPad ...

Indeed. Or at least as close enough to the previous models to give people no big reason to upgrade their existing device.

Older tablets tend to do all that is asked of them - web browsing, video and maybe some games. Assuming that most people who want a tablet have already bought one, there isn't a pressing need for people who already own a tablet to upgrade to a new one.

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Remember Palm's WebOS? LG does – check out its smart TVs

Dave 126
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>How long before a TV comes with a tablet for a remote?

That's a solution that works well. Current implementations include:

iPad + PS3

Android tablet + Chromecast dongle

Of course these solutions aren't fully intgrated (i.e, you can't use tablet to swtich aspect ratios, switch input, or adjust the picture settings etc).

One stupid TV 'feature': Sony TVs that turn themselves off after an hour if they receive no input from their own IR remote... we actually use the remote for the FreeSat box / BluRay drive during use.

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END your Macbook SHAME: Convert it into a Microsoft SURFACE

Dave 126
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Re: Apple

Sue them? On what grounds?

>If there is a real market for this Apple will do it.

Like truly ruggedised laptops, it's not a big market - but it does exist.

If Apple wanted to sell such a machine themselves, they could easily undercut the price of a Modbook, and possibly tweak the OS to give themselves a competitive advantage. Apple can't be bothered with a diverse product range, and so are quite happy for Modbook to fulfil this small niche.

You don't hear Harley Davidson complaining that people keep buying their motorcycles at full-price before chopping them up.

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Dave 126
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Re: Apple legal department behavior pretty much is, though

Apple are happy for you to do whatever the hell you want to a Macbook, as long as you buy it from them first.

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Dave 126
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Re: Those prices seem reasonable

Easily?

If it were easy, Modbook would have sold enough of their previous version to not require Kickstrarter now.

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Dave 126
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Hiya Trevor, you've probably missed these because they are very expensive and niche, so haven't received much general attention:

Wacom released a Win8 Tablet and an Android Tablet in the last year, the latter doing double duty as a screen/digitiser for 'proper' computers when back at your desk.

http://cintiqcompanion.wacom.com/CintiqCompanion/en/

Kind regards

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Microsoft: IE11 for Windows Phone 8.1 is TOO GOOD. So we'll cripple it like Safari

Dave 126
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Re: Mobile-specific web pages are usually a UI travesty

>Others disable pinch to zoom. Really? You've lost my pair of eyeballs, because I can't see what you have to show me!

Android > Chrome > Settings > Accessability > Force Pinch to Zoom (override a website's request to disable Pinch to Zoom)

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Google's mysterious floating techno barge SOLD FOR SCRAP

Dave 126
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Re: Google were a convincing cover story for NSA

You're right - who knows.

I'd a thought that that under-sea fibre-tapping devices don't require such a large distraction, though.

Using a commercial company to provide cover for a a purpose-built espionage boat?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSF_Explorer

formally the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), the deep-sea drillship platform initially built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968.

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Sneaker-maker Reebok cooks up performance-enhancing BACON

Dave 126
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Nike Air-Cured Ham

...sorry.

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Nintend-OH NO! Sorry, Mario – your profits are in another castle

Dave 126
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Re: "Lack of hit games"

>If only they hadn't been so hostile towards third party publishers...

... or even been a bit quicker about releasing some titles from their own popular franchises.

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BMW's ConnectedDrive falls over, bosses blame upgrade snafu

Dave 126
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Core functions?? My car's core function is to travel from A-B safely. Its GPS, remote locking system, alarm and horn etc are secondary functions at best.

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Dave 126
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Re: Confession time

Unless you are overtaking another vehicle, you should stay in the left-most lane - unless the lanes are leading to different roads, denoted by a solid line. Never undertake - unless, again, you lane is leading to another road. This isn't even a topic for discussion - its always been in the highway code, and as of this year failure to comply is subject to an on-the-spot fine.

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Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch

Dave 126
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Re: I'm curious...

Its a good way of doing this:

Strap: Always on, low power, waterproof, data logging of pedometer/heartbeat etc. Simple alerts.

Extra bit: More advanced functions, bigger display. Removed for charging, runnning, swimming etc. Will charge the smaller battery in the strap when in place.

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New Star Wars movie plot details leak, violate common sense and laws of physics

Dave 126
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Re: El Reg... Really?

At OP AC...

just because The Reg published the leaked details doesn't mean you have to read them. I haven't read the article*, but I've skipped to this comments section to get an idea of how spoilery the spoilers are. My choice, as your choice is yours.

*I know, I'm a hypocrite; I normally criticise commentards who comment on an article they haven't fully read.

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Why has sexy Apple gone to bed with big boring IBM?

Dave 126
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It would seem that you *do* need to see who authored the article.... it wasn't Mr Hamill.

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Dave 126
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Re: In a world...

> "Android grew at 127 last year while the market share of iOS shank."

This hot weather is making my brain slow, too - it took me a little while to work out that 'shank' should be 'share'.

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Apple: No, China. iPhone is NOT public enemy number 1

Dave 126
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Re: Does it still collect data when...

>Does it still collect data when... ...you turn Location Services off? Turning it off is supposed to save battery life so it must be stopping something. I would like to know, because if it continues to leak data, then I'm not buying one.

Turning off location services on most devices will save power by not using the GPS chip, and possibly saving more power by not using the WiFi and cellular chips as much (since they are used to assist the satellite location).

Whether the device transmits this data to another party depends on the OS, the settings, apps installed, permissions, presence of malware etc

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iWatch 'due November'... Y'all know what time it is? Now you do

Dave 126
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Re: Already a bit late to be part of your Gear

Kettle on the wrist? But where's the iTea angle?

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Dave 126
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Re: Already a bit late to be part of your Gear

Whilst the 'throw in everything but the kitchen sink' concept of the Gear appeals to a part of me, I'd actually prefer a simpler, more focused device. Like a normal wristwatch. Or a normal wristwatch that uses a ring of RGB LEDs to denote notifications and directions to GPS waypoints. Much of what I'd like a watch to do is to control other devices -this shouldn't be an insurmountable challenge to the traditional watch shape, since my existing watch already has a rotating bezel (read: 'scroll-wheel').

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Dave 126
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Re: I want to be an analyst

Yeah. No analyst makes the point that the company with $20 Beellion in the bank knows what the hell it is doing. Any issue that an 'analyst' can see in Apple's near future, Apple with have already employed a lot of smart people and resources to investigate.

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Microsoft's Lumia 930... a real HANDFUL

Dave 126
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Nice, but... good, cheap Android hardware is available.

I could be tempted by a WinPho, since I have only had one Android handset before and I know that I'm not too bothered by apps - I'm not really 'invested' in the Android ecosystem.

However, the Snapdragon 800 powered LG G2 can be had for less than £300, and has very good battery life, screen, performance, camera and audio. Not the best in any one category, but amongst the top three in each.

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