* Posts by Dave 126

5940 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

The Windows 10 future: Imagine a boot stamping on an upgrade treadmill forever

Dave 126
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For some people, sure.

Some applications, in finance, engineering and content creation are still tied to Windows, though VMs and and WINE are sometimes viable options. For some of these applications, I see them becoming platform-agnostic before they become ported specifically to Linux - though the end result (no barrier to using Linux as primary OS) will effectively be the same.

A curious driver that I haven't seen much comment on - some organisations using fleets of old, second hand (but still perfectly fast enough for office tasks) PCs, where adding Windows and Office licenses would multiply the cost of the machine by a factor of four or five. (though I can't be arsed to find to find the info and do the sums to factor in the power consumption cost of using Pentium 4-era PCs over more modern efficient machines)

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Dave 126
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Re: @Trevor

If only cancer could be cured by restoring from a known-good (genetic) system image!

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Dave 126
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Re: So...

>"those still struggling to get rid of IE & ActiveX crap are in for a massive re-wire effort either way."

>>Which gives them the opportunity and reason to make a long-term decision.

I get the impression that whatever one uses to replace IE5 and ActiveX is platform-agnostic. That is, people having learnt their lesson about getting stuck in the mud before will not make the same mistake again, and make the decision to keep their options open in future. I'm no expert, but it seems that if even productivity software such as 3D CAD can now be run through a web browser, the actual OS of the desktop computer (er, terminal?) doesn't matter so much any more for many tasks, so long as it's secure and reliable.

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Dave 126
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Re: RE: Will be used to download Android desktop

Android really isn't suitable - each OS update requires input from various OEMs. That's why Google developed ChromeOS.

However, many of the people who might move to ChromeOS - i.e those not dependant on Windows applications - may well have already moved to some mainstream flavour of desktop Linux.

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Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Dave 126
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Re: Ruskies robbed!

>a plot-line about the Eurovision Song Contest being rigged by Aliens or the CIA?

That actually is the plot from an episode of Father Ted.

My Lovely Horse!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzYzVMcgWhg

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Dave 126
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Re: Ugh, it's in Innopolis

>as far as I can see, Innopolis is pretty much in the middle of nowhere

Zoom out dear boy, zoom out from the link you provided, and you'll see that Innopolis is about 15 minutes car journey from Kazan, a city with over a million residents. Indeed, Innopolis appears to be nothing but a technology park on the outskirts of Kazan, as the name suggests. A quick Google confirms Innopolis was created in 2012 as Special Economic Area.

I can't spot Kazan night clubs from the air, but they seem to have some massive civic buildings, an imposing a university, a huge basketball stadium... I get the impression that your entertainment tastes can be catered to, whatever they are.

Wikipedia then confirms that Kazan is one of the foremost cities in Russia for science and for sport.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazan

Thank you, I had not heard of the place before!

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Dave 126
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Re: Building a more secure system than Android shouldn't be hard

>Such a simple CPU would be small enough to be understood by a single person so it can be audited easily.

I don't doubt what you say, but of course the handset/terminal is but one part of a chain... any audit would have to extent to all the systems the handset interacts with. Already this week the Reg has reported that the identity of GSM handsets (and thus Telegram, Whatsapp users et al) can be easily spoofed.

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Dave 126
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Re: "Trusted"

In support of @foo_bar_baz's comment:

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/a-post-modern-dictatorship3f/5752628

(Page has link to mp3 podcast, no transcript, sorry!)

Peter Pomerantsev argues that the one great difference between historical Soviet propaganda and what Russians see today, is that for the Soviets, the idea of truth was important—even when they were lying. Today's regime displays its indifference to and playfulness with the truth.

It's an interview with Peter Pomerantsev, TV Producer, essayist for the LRB and The Atlantic. The host of the radio show is Philip Adams, a former film producer, advertiser, farmer and self-proclaimed 'old leftie'.... and he's been sacked by Rupert Murdoch twice. He's interviewed everyone from Monty Pythons to Mikhail Gorbachev.

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Art heist 'pranksters' sent down for six months

Dave 126
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I had to scan the article a couple of times too. They didn't pretend to kidnap a random member of the public, the 'hostage' was actually an accomplice:

Later that same day they staged a similar "prank" at Tate Britain - this time appearing to take a female hostage, although she too was part of the team.

And whilst I'd like to think I'd jump to the rescue of someone being kidnapped (if I could without further endangering the victim), you never know how you react in these situations until they happen.

A friend of mine has been 'phoney kidnapped', but that was all above board - it was part of a training course he was sent on before working for an NGO in some troubled countries.

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Inside Electric Mountain: Britain's biggest rechargeable battery

Dave 126
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Re: It's not a battery

'Battery' comes from the Latin 'the act of beating', and so organised groups of artillery became known as batteries. This usage was extended to other arrays of similar things, so a group of power cells became known as a battery. In fact today we often use 'battery' for mere single cells, as 'AA' often are - by contrast, square 9V 'PP3's are batteries of lower voltage cells. This power station is a battery of valves and turbines.

And should you be standing in the wrong place at the wrong time, it would certainly batter you, like an egg in a food blender!

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Aussie wedges spam javelin in ring spanner

Dave 126
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Re: How impressive?

Spanners are drop-forged then case-hardened, that is they are hard on the outside and tough on the inside - else they would deform when used or shatter if dropped.

Instead of cutting it off, they could heat the spanner, then rapidly quench it and then twat it with a large hammer, thus shattering the spanner and liberating the man's tool... oh, wait... well, I guess he wouldn't do it again!

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Curiosity find Mars' icecaps suck up its atmosphere

Dave 126
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Re: Forget and don't worry about dumb space rocks, Dave 126

>Better to have the ability to haul any potential asteroid-mitigating technology inro orbit, and / or wirk towards a self sustaining extraterrestial colony.

>>Genuine question: Why?

Well, y'know, it's good to have a hobby!

>the only real benefit would be some kind of political escape/hermitism to break away from the main cluster of civilization.

That and having some form of redundancy of habitat for our species. And if you see our future as being VR/Brain-Computer link/ Uploaded Conciousness or whatever, then what matters if our inert bodies / brains in jars are on a terrestial Eden or in orbit around the sun?

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Dave 126
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Re: New Orderly World Orders AI …. for Live Operational Virtual Environments ‽

That's all well and good, but it'd only take one lump of space rock crashing into Earth to wreck any dteams of a terrestial utopia.

Better to have the ability to haul any potential asteroid-mitigating technology inro orbit, and / or wirk towards a self sustaining extraterrestial colony. Once wehave assured our survival we can tgen work towards making it a fair and beautiful survival.

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Italians rattle little tin for smartmobe mini lenses

Dave 126
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Sounds like geckos' feet

Medical bods have been interested in a non-adhesive but very grippy surface for a while - potential applications include holding back skin during surgery.

Geckos achieve this by having an extremely high surface area of their pads - a surface which sub-divides many times.

https://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ronf/Gecko/

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Auto erotic: Self-driving cars will let occupants bonk on the go

Dave 126
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Re: Windows

You can already buy LCD-based films for windows, that will switch from transparent to translucent at the flick of switch.

It's available as a self-adhesive film for easy retrofitting to windows, apparently.

http://www.invisishade.com/

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Dave 126
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Blobby cars?

Look back to the past...

The only product known to have been bought by what is to believed Apple's car division is a 1959 Fiat 500 Multipla:

http://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/gallery/FIAT-600-Multipla-2342_18.jpg

It doesn't look completely dissimilar to the Google car, but is more attractive. The use of interior space is good too, and could be further advanced with an electric drivetrain.

Who knows, it's all conjecture. Jony Ive is known to be a Fiat fan, though his daily vehicle is a chauffeur driven (at his bosses' insistance) Bentley Mulsanne

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Dave 126
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Re: Fatal flaw in self drive?

Indeed.

Volvo believes that Level 3 autonomy, where the driver needs to be ready to take over at a moment's notice, is an unsafe solution. Because the driver is theoretically freed up to work on email or watch a video while the car drives itself, the company believes it is unrealistic to expect the driver to be ready to take over at a moment's notice and still have the car operate itself safely. "It's important for us as a company, our position on autonomous driving, is to keep it quite different so you know when you're in semi-autonomous and know when you're in unsupervised autonomous,"

Volvo's Drive Me autonomous car, which will launch in a public pilot next year, is a Level 4 autonomous car — this means not only will it drive itself down the road, but it is capable of handling any situation that it comes across without any human intervention. As a result, the human doesn't need to be involved in the driving at all. If something goes wrong, the car can safely stop itself at the side of the road.

- http://www.theverge.com/2016/4/27/11518826/volvo-tesla-autopilot-autonomous-self-driving-car

(Please don't take this post as a recommendation of Volvo's products - I'm no expert. However, their approach does strike me as being safer. There was a racing video game called WipEout which featured a 5 second autopilot 'powerup' - resuming control of the racing craft always gave me nervous, and would occasionally result in me crashing my virtual vehicle. )

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Dave 126
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Re: If you are required to be available to take over

@DougS

This is exactly the point that Volvo are making. They claim they are making a system that can drive in all situations, and they are critical of Tesla's system that still requires a human driver to suddenly take over in the event of something unexpected occurring on the road.

Also, the size of a Volvo is more amenable to horizontal dancing than a Tesla... I think Volvo's marketing department has missed a trick by not making more of this!

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Wi-Fi network named 'mobile detonation device' grounds plane

Dave 126
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Re: Lots of lateness

People have said on forums that they give their phone's WiFi hotspots names like 'FBI Surveillance Van' to deter leeches, and 'Ebola Response Unit 2' just for the giggles, but just for when they were in earth-bound cafes - none of them advocated silliness on a plane.

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SpaceX adds Mars haulage to its price list

Dave 126
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Re: Less than $200 an ounce

According to this still from the documentary 'Total Recall', Trump has already been to Mars:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7114/7423325574_33f7ee54aa_b.jpg

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Watch it Apple: time has come for cheaper rivals' strap-ons

Dave 126
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Re: Android wear

Good to her that the Sony Smart Watch 3 is working well... Sony actually had a connected watch years, but their first attempt didn't receive great reviews (would too often lose connection, apparently).

Another Sony gadget that makes some sense - and could be considered a 'wearable' - is their usb-stick-sized Bluetooth Headset. It can clip to your top like small MP3 players, and can be held to your ear to make calls or you can plug wired earphones into it, as you would a phone. It includes media controls, for playing back music from a phone, or can function as an FM radio independently of the phone. It also has a monochrome display for phone notifications. It makes sense for people with big phones, or for people whose phones live in the bottom of a bag.

I'm not recommending it here - you can find your own reviews - but I'm mentioning it because it is curious that so much coverage and discussion of 'wearables' omits devices like this.

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Dave 126
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Re: Too late to market...

This was a nice thread until you came along with your ad hominem attack. Everyone was showing consideration for other's points of view, even if they didn't agree with them. Well done.

Most of the people on this thread either don't wear a watch, or don't want a smartwatch to do as much as an Apple Watch - so its strange that you should feel threatened by one comment in support of it.

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Dave 126
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>Only annoyance is the Citizen only seems to work with iPhone.

When it was first released, it, like the Casio, only worked with iPhones because Android didn't support Bluetooth Low Energy at that time (though a some Samsung handsets had the hardware).

Sadly, there still appears to be no Android version - and a plea on XDA has gone unanswered. Maybe Citizen didn't sell enough of them, so haven't invested the time into an Android version?

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Dave 126
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Thank you mentioning the Chronos. If could be made cheap enough - which it could be if it there was enough demand - people could buy two, and swap one for the other when the battery is flat.

Casio and Citizen also make Bluetooth watches, with 1 year plus and indefinite battery lives respectively. But hey, neither look as good as a 1969 Omega Chronostop!

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Dave 126
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Have an upvote for the Red Dwarf reference!

However, I do see a lot of fitness trackers on the wrists of people on the street. So maybe niche, but not too rare. I might take small issue with 'fitness fanatics' - they have been using dedicated heart-rate monitors for years - because I get the impression that many of these fitness trackers are worn by people hoping to wear to lose a few pounds.

On the other hand, I've only seen four Apple Watches 'in the wild' since its release.

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Dave 126
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Re: “a category waiting for a market”

Actually, it's a category that aims to be the solution to real problems, but so far the implementations are not quite there.

Being able to 'page' a phone to find it - useful. Quick check of notifications - useful. Programmable function key to activate a phone function (e.g dictaphone) - useful. None of which require a colour screen or heavy power draw.

The Apple watch, to my taste, tries to do too much.

Citizen and Casio come closest in my book - the Citizen just looks like a analogue-handed 'sports' watch. A touch too brash in its styling for me, but it looks just like a normal watch.

Still, it is subjective. Some people on the Reg don't see the point in even having a conventional watch - and if they wake up next to an alarm clock, drive to work (dashboard clock) and sit at a computer (desktop clock) - I won't disagree with them.

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Q. What's the difference between smartphones and that fad diet you all got bored of? A. Nothing

Dave 126
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Re: No Choice

>In a bygone era there was a wide choice of different style phones with differing specs.

Indeed. The picture used to illustrate the article is of the Xperia Go, which was ruggedised and waterproof (sadly it was crippled by too little RAM, and couldn't cope with the version of Android Sony updated it to). Since then, Sony haven't asked you to choose between a fast flagship phone and a waterproof phone.

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SpaceX: We'll land on Mars in 2018 (cough, with NASA's help)

Dave 126
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Re: Why send it empty?

>as many rolls of gaffer tape as will fit!! And a few packs of chewing gum and maybe a ball of string for good measure.

According to 1950s Sci Fi B-movies, it's the underwires from ladies' bras that are used to fix some critical machine, for some odd reason. It would seem technology has moved on since then!.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why send it empty?

A manned mission would require a much larger spacecraft, so the addition of what little you could fit in this Dragon module won't be super helpful. Then you have the problem of the retrieving whatever useful gear the dragon is loaded with - a manned mission might land dozens or hundreds of miles away.

I'm sympathetic to your point though... how about some scientific equipment, or a rover?

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Dave 126
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Re: How on Earth (or Mars)...

> Is he going to melt the ice-caps? Seriously?

Musk did mention an idea to continuously detonate nukes above the Martian poles, to create two temporary 'suns'. Was he serious? I don't know. My assumption was that it would be pointless trying to create an atmosphere on Mars without a magnetosphere to protect it from solar wind, but then Musk has access to people a million times more expert than myself. If someone can point me towards an informed online discussion on this subject, I'd be grateful.

Surprisingly, some of the homework for creating what is in effect a magazine-fed nuke gun has already been done for Project Orion - the idea of launching a massive spacecraft from Earth by firing a nuclear bomb behind it every second.

http://mashable.com/2015/10/02/elon-musk-nuke-mars-two-suns/#nWFrq_I7Vqqh

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Orion_(nuclear_propulsion)

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Dave 126
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Re: !!!*!!!*!!!*!!!

An entertaining movie (seemingly) inspired by an event in 2010: Odyssey 2:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/europa_report/

Critics Consensus: Claustrophobic and stylish, Europa Report is a slow-burning thriller that puts the science back into science fiction.

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Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

Dave 126
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Re: Poor IT Standards at this outfit

>Why on earth would you want to buy Linux when it available free of charge.

There are some good reasons for buying a Linux PC - all the drivers will be supplied and tested. This isn't a comment about the availability of Linux drivers - I understand that's all good - but of assurance. It happens in the Windows world as well - CAD vendors have lists of certified workstations that have been extensively tested with their software. You have the peace of mind that the hardware, drivers, OS version and application version will all play nice together.

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First rocket finally departs Russia's Vostochny cosmodrome

Dave 126
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Re: Trees

Trees being trees, were there before the cosmodrome was built, and why clear more than you need to? There is also a fringe benefit - should there a Rapid Unplanned Disassembly, the trees would help attenuate the force of any shockwave before it hits the command bunker (this is why trees were planted around the oil refinery in Milford Haven). Of course, the trees wouldn't be necessary at the cosmodrome - the bunker would be strong enough anyway, and placed at an appropriate distance from the launch pad.

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Apple man found dead at Cupertino HQ, gun discovered nearby

Dave 126
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This argument has been played across the internet so often over many years. Quite why, I don't know - the evidence largely speaks for itself.

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Dave 126
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Re: Advice, too late

Ever since I heard the news of Apple's stock price drop on the BBC World Service last night, I have checked the Register for an article. Reading a mention of it appended to this news doesn't sit well with me - not sure yet why yet.

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LG: Stop focusing on Apple and Samsung. There's us. And our G5. Look at it. Look at it

Dave 126
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Re: Does it take an SD card?

Okay - I'll give you some credit - the idea of having two batteries so that one can be 'hot swapped' is a good one - I've suggested the same in these forums before ( the secondary battery only has to be good for five minutes or so, enough to swap the primary battery with some margin).

The SD card - in the time it took you to wrote about, you could have googled it. Yes, it has an SD card, no, it doesn't support all the ways of using it that the new Android would otherwise allow.

The battery - you're griping about it, but the G5's battery is replaceable.

Extra GPU? Why have it attached to the phone? Makes more sense to have it in a HDMI stick and just use the phone to shunt content to it. The last LG model did 4K playback on screen, but the problem of shifting it to a TV is more likely to be that of interconnect standards.

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Dave 126
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Re: IR Blaster

>Some other asshole who thinks he has the right to control TVs in establishments that he is merely a customer in will decide to turn up the volume to ear piercing levels,

Any decent establishment will either:

- have no televisions, or

- have the television's audio routed to an amplifier behind the bar - nobody wants the tiny noise that comes from the speakers internal speakers.

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Google Loon balloon crash lands in Chile

Dave 126
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Re: I'm not saying it's aliens...

Ah, it turns out I had seen it, but had also forgotten.

"Our minds our but dung heaps for the seeds of other people's thoughts" etc

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Dave 126
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I'm not saying it's aliens...

...but it's aliens.

Hehe, back in the nineties, and the heyday of the X-files, nutters might have said this was a crashed UFO and the Balloon story was just a cover-up. These days, since for the last decade a lot of people have carried a (phone)camera in their pockets most of the time, there have been no large corresponding rise in the number of picture of UFOs, Nessie, Bigfoot etc.

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Pro who killed Apple's Power Mac found... masquerading as a coffee table

Dave 126
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Re: iFurniture next?

>iFurniture next? Maybe this is the next business direction for Apple?

I know you're joking, but Apple now employ Marc Newson, whose Lockheed Lounge set the record for a 'design object' when sold at auction.

http://www.dezeen.com/2015/04/29/marc-newson-lockheed-lounge-new-auction-record-design-object-phillips/

>rounded corners that are patented,

That was what in the UK we would call 'Trade Dress', like the shape of the grills on an Aston Martin for example, but confusingly called a 'Design Patent' in the USA. Whether or not Apple's implementation of the rounded corners is enough to qualify as a design patent is a valid question, but it was never a 'Utility Patent' (USA) or 'Patent' (UK).

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RIP Prince: You were the soundtrack of my youth

Dave 126
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Re: Death Warms Up Your Hits

Well, there was quite a buzz around his sell out shows in London (he said he would play as many nights as required for everyone who wanted to see him to see him) and his blistering Super Bowl half-time show.

But yeah, I accept your observation. Maybe you can instigate an annual "Spontanous celebration for famous living person we've not heard much of for a while Day"?

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Dave 126
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Re: Atmospheric Nuclear testing when they were kids?

That article only talks about thyroid cancer ( where the body naturally concentrates iodine, radioactive or not), and I'm suspicious of its tone. Even if I wasn't, then on the assumption that many different environmental factors can contribute to cancer risk, there are just too many factors to take into account. Only the other day, I was listening to the Australian BC Radio National Science Show, and a segment was the risk of throat cancer from cunnilingus (men are more likely to get it as a result of the HPV virus after accounting for hetro/homo folk, so working assumption is that women are afforded some resistance if they encounter it in the cervical area. So yeah, a populations sexual behaviour can change, as does food, chemical pollutants, working patterns, worrying, reading the Daily Mail, etc etc etc etc.

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Dave 126
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>Yup, better have that Kim Kardashian live rolling Twitter tribute piece ready to print, just in case 2016 continues to deliver.

He's a video of Prince telling kim Kardashian to "get off the stage!":

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xgxwbt_prince-kicks-kim-kardashian-off-the-stage_news

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Dave 126
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Re: Not my kind of music

He rips it up in a few genres of music... it wasn't really brought to my attention just how stunning a guitarist he was until about ten years ago.

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Dave 126
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Re: Meh

He's had more that two hits as himself, and he's also written hits for other artists, as well producing them. He's had his own attitude towards the music industry, and was releasing several albums a year which were only sold through his website for a period. But all that doesn't really matter, just watch the man play the guitar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMknUo6O9jQ&feature=youtu.be

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Dave 126
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Re: Unexpected

It's a little known fact that Keith Richards can't be killed by conventional weapons.

(According to the Preston from Wayne's World 2, AKA Danny the Drug Dealer from Withnail and I)

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Dave 126
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Re: Seems to be a mass die-off of celebrities at the moment

Re: Seems to be a mass die-off of celebrities at the moment

This was covered by the BBC radio programme 'More or Less' which, in conjunction with the Open University, looks at statistics in public life.

They of course noted the difficulty, because of fuzzy definitions of what one considers a celebrity, but after some analysis they concluded that yes, 2016 has seen more famous deaths than would be expected.

The Guradian's analysis, on the other hand, appears to just be yabbing in about how many z-list celebrities there are these days. Ah well. Prince, Bowie, Rickman, Wood, et al were no mere celebrities, they were famous for being very good at stuff.

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HTC 10: Is this the Droid you're looking for?

Dave 126
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Re: Meh

>Not really. Speakers should be listed about 20th on any smartphone manufacturers list of importance. >Speakers in phones will be hamstrung whether you invest millions in micro speaker tech or not

A person who listens to spoken-word podcasts whilst cooking is no weirder than someone who wants to snap pictures of their day. Speakers are used for more than just music.

When it comes to music, I agree with you - I'm quite fussy about audio reproduction. I'm not an audiophile nutter, but small tinny speakers do my nut in. I'm perfectly happy with my bookshelf speakers and 30W amp, bought for about £100 many years ago.

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Official: EU goes after Google, alleges it uses Android to kill competition

Dave 126
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Re: So you're saying

>What other OS options do the manufacturers have? Not iOS, not Blackberry's.

Well, you've just identified an area where the idea of competition breaks down. You can't have true like-for-like competition for thing like bus services, cos that would mean that every half hour three buses from different companies turn up at the same bus stop. Software support for OSs is similar - much wasted work (inefficient) to supply users with much the same application but for various OSs.

Another example is eBay - sellers want the most people possible to bid on their goods, so why would they advertise on another service? The very nature of eBay precludes competition.

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Dave 126
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Re: Alternate operating systems

>Is this not a wish to express to your phone supplier?

@ Tom dial

Google doesn't allow a phone vendor to use Google Play Services if said vendor also sells phones running a fork of the Android Open Source.

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