* Posts by Dave 126

4340 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

The last PC replacement cycle is about to start turning

Dave 126
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Re: Advertorial

>If it's more powerful than a three year old MacBook then why does it run a cut down phone OS instead of OSX?

The iPhone is powerful enough to run OSX, but it wouldn't be an optimal experience for the user. The underlying OS would work, but the UI wouldn't. A good number of Android phones are powerful enough to run OSX, too.

Apple will have their own business reasons for not making an OSX tablet or whatever, but I would be surprised if they haven't compiled OSX for ARM as an experiment- as they always did for OSX on x86 before they left PowerPC.

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Dave 126
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Re: This article is more interesting for what it tells you about...

> they are not mainstream beause Android is useful as a touch UI. iOS is useful as a touch UI. they don't translate back well, and vice versa for traditional OSs.

Absolutely. Wasn't there a once a Windows laptop that could switch to Android (for quickly checking one's email inbox without draining the battery)? I seem to recall the software attempted to make it easier to swap documents between the two OSs. Or maybe I ate too much cheese before bedtime.

Apple's approach is to keep one UI per device, and to use iCloud and 'Continuity' to allow a person to start writing an email on an iPhone, and finish it on their Mac - without digging into the 'drafts' folder.

The idea in the article - use an Apple TV to let an iPhone ape a Mac - is amusing because the first AppleTVs could be made to run OSX, essentially making them low-powered MacMinis. http://www.appletvhacks.net/2007/04/01/mac-os-x-running-on-apple-tv/#.VGNBdvmsXQo

With things like Intel's NUC form factor, we essentially have headless laptops that could be slung in a bag and plumbed-up to the nearest TV.

Another thing that tickles me is that nobody in this thread has cited the 'netbook' formfactor - it's as if they never existed! You wouldn't want to write a novel on one, or even browse the web for long, but you could if you had to - for a device that would fit in a big jacket pocket. Tablets and 'ultrabooks' largely stole their lunch, but they are handy for connecting external peripheral devices and cheaper than 'ultrabooks'.

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Dave 126
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Re: I love these articles

>Perfect reply to this load of dingo kidneys.

It is not a bad reply, but perfect? Personally, I feel that the discussion below that this article has prompted is useful, not least because we have different understandings of what 'tablet' and 'laptop' entail.

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Dave 126
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Re: Fascinatingly myopic

>I still consider them as PCs though.

I'm sure you're not wrong localzuk.

My point is just that some define a PC by its OS, some by its form factor, some by its architecture. All valid.

Ultimately, banks and call centres care about the ergonomic working position of their workers for fear of lawsuits. They are serious (or at least serious enough to tick the check boxes on a form to cover their asses) about chairs, desk heights, monitor heights and glasses for those staff who need them - it is just cheaper to look after staff in this way than it is to compensate them for RSI.

How that is achieved - local ARM or x86, thin client, full office suite, web form or proprietary software, whatever- doesn't really matter. The example given in the article - a phone connected to a projector - is no different in concept to phone connected to a VDU and a keyboard. A phone without a screen is just a little ARM box. A monitor with a computer built-in is an 'All-in-one'. A tablet on a stand is just an ARM-based 'All-in'one' PC with a funny OS. A 'desktop' is just a VDU, a box and a cable! However, people are just as valid if they choose their definitions based on pragmatic considerations such as: Does it run this application? Can I connect that device to it?

The definitions are a little fuzzy, is all.

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Dave 126
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Re: This article is more interesting for what it tells you about...

>So you are saying that a tablet would be more suitable if a few more alterations were made to it to make it more inline with a traditional OS?

Kind of. What I was getting at is that the words we are using are poorly defined, and might lead us to argue when really we are in broad agreement. There is also a difference between the concept and the current executions.

For example, it is only convention that makes us assume a 'tablet' is ARM-based running a touch UI on top of a OS that hasn't been designed around local storage and peripheral devices. However, there have been x86 XP tablets around for years, and there are ARM / x86-based laptops that don't really do local storage (Chromebooks). I have even seen x86 laptops running a Linux distro specifically to connect to a VPN and prevent local storage (for security reasons).

A keyboard and a tablet (placed at the correct height) is, from an ergonomic typing perspective, closer to a desktop than a laptop. However, this solution is sub-optimal when it comes to transporting it (it takes a little longer to stow away than just closing the lid and picking it up).

Maybe one solution is to have ARM tablets that can act as monitors for grunty x86 CPUs housed in keyboards (return of the Amiga/Spectrum Atari ST form factor!). Who knows?

Talking about the death of the PC is a bit silly - things tend to evolve rather than go extinct - but it is has made us think!

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Dave 126
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Re: Desktop uses?

>Photo editing

With respect, a tablet with proper software and enough grunt could be just as good at photo-editing as a laptop, if not better. See Cintiq Hybrid, or Modbook

The issue is with the current crop of software, not the hardware form-factor itself.

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Dave 126
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Re: Fascinatingly myopic

>I hate to break it to you, but your local bank won't be doing all its work on tablets any time soon. They might augment certain roles with them, but the bulk will still be a traditional PC or similar. The local call centre? That'll continue to use something PC-like for a while yet.

It looks like you have just identified two environments where thin clients would work rather well. I've worked in a call centre, and the rows of XP-based Dells were doing not much more than running legacy I.E forms. There was certainly nothing they did that that a low-powered ARM device couldn't handle. Keyboard plus mouse plus monitor plus modest processor is all that's needed.

Banks similarly, especially when you consider their data-protection obligations.

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Dave 126
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Re: This article is more interesting for what it tells you about...

>"I *could* use a bluetooth keyboard and a tablet for all my ssh and text writing needs. I probably will if there is an emergency and I have that handy. I won't, because a laptop is so much better for doing that when I am about. I am writing this on a laptop keyboard because I can type, and hopefully proof-read, this so much easier than a tablet. If I could type as well on a tablet, that would be *in-spite* of being on a tablet. Not because it is the best tool for the job."

There is no inherent reason why a tablet plus keyboard couldn't be a better solution than a laptop for your use case. At the moment, a tablet isn't suitable for you because of the touch-centric nature of its UI and applications. If these were fixed, than a tablet plus keyboard would offer you:

- Your choice of keyboard... chiclet, mechanical, number keypad, whatever you want

- Screen placed independently of the keyboard for a better typing position. (Current laptops are already an ergonomic compromise compared to desktops)

-Being able to proof-read away from your desk. A lot of us currently don't proof read on a monitor, but print out hardcopy and grab a coffee. A tablet or e-reader could emulate a 'red crayon'.

I'm not for a moment saying you ditch your laptop now, but only that some things aren't written in stone.

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Dave 126
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Re: Followed by....

> A similar-spec desktop costs less than a notebook, and much faster desktops are available if the goal is raw processing power.

Here's the thing: You are unlikely to be using all that extra processing power all the time.

If you want more power to save time, you either build a CPU/GPU-cluster (again, to get value for money you want to be running it all the time) or you take advantage of a cluster that someone else has already built - i.e you rent processing power from the cloud.

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Dave 126
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Re: The laptop and desktop are dead.

>I like the term 'workstation' as it defines where these devices still provide for a strong need - work (ie, content creation)

Bus stations are where buses stop.

Train stations are where trains stop.

On my desk I have a workstation...

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Dave 126
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Re: Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

>Hardcore gamers. (There strife for power is never ending)

>CadCam (was mentioned the article)

>Video Editing ( was mentioned the article)

I'd be interested to see some rough breakdown of how desktops are used... my guess is that most of them are fairly low end for general office tasks, followed by enthusiast gaming machines, followed by intensive productivity workstations (CAD, video-editing).

One trend worth noting is that for the last few years, new Intel CPUs have been geared towards energy efficiency instead of raw grunt - they are already fast enough for most tasks.

Gamers do push the limits of GPUs, but some may trade that against size and noise to run a 1080 TV in their front room (SteamBox). The other drivers here are ultra HD displays, multiple monitors and maybe the Occulus Rift... Most modern games don't benefit from any CPU faster than an i5.

CAD can be run on a laptop, and the big number-crunching - rendering and simulation - can be farmed out to an array of GPUs or even the cloud. Hell, some CAD can be used over the cloud - there are some advantages (pay per use, easier security administration, cheaper local machine, team collaboration tools).

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Texas boffins put radio waves in a spin

Dave 126
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At this time in the morning...

... I might need a diagram or two:

The university explains that circulators work by breaking the symmetry in a wave transmission between two points.

Cheers!

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Samsung slams door on OLED TVs, makes QUANTUM dot LEAP

Dave 126
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For sure, its very hard to get excited by terms like "QD backlit LCDs", but they are only marketing shorthand for tangible benefits that can be expressed in numbers, such as:

Power efficiency

Price

Brightness

Contrast ratio

Dark blacks

Viewing angle

Colour accuracy

Refresh rate

Input lag

Resolution

I'd be interested in the technologies that can provide a huge dynamic range in the displayed brightness - but to get the benefit then the content would have to be shot, processed and delivered on HDR kit.

For now, just reflect on how cheap room-filling televisions are these days. The communal experience is still valid, be it for a good movie, co-op video games or a thought - and discussion-provoking - documentary.

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Modern Panic V: A world of H.R. Giger, spunking unicorns and deeply unsettling puppets

Dave 126
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Re: Not quite wrong

>I'll throw my hat in the ring of What? What is wrong with the article?

I believe Destroy All Monsters was making a point about the Giger sculptures being based on his work for Scott's 1979 film Alien, and not Scott's 2012 film Prometheus. The newer film does contain 'Space Jockeys', and alien spacecraft of the same design, but the jockeys aren't in the seat as shown, and the alien craft isn't 'Derelict'. Whilst Alien is generally considered to be a very good film, Prometheus was not liked by everybody - to put it kindly. Indeed, some fans of the 1979 film consider Prometheus to be dreadful.

Giger had been working on an adaptation of Herbert's 'Dune' before 'Alien', as had Chris Foss (famous for the airbrushed cover art of many an Asimov paperback, and for the black and white illustrations to The Joy of Sex) and Dan O'Bannon. After that project collapsed, the three of them worked on Alien.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alejandro_Jodorowsky#Dune_and_Tusk_.281975.E2.80.931980.29

> Obviously I'm not a Giger habitual fan

Friendly note - if you research him further, the images may be NSFW.

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Apple strap-on wristjob: You WON'T be able to spend more than $5,000!

Dave 126
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Re: Apple Watch Sport Edition

Apparently it's water resistant, not waterproof, so contact with water is fine, but it doesn't like any head of pressure (from either being submerged or subjected to a jet of water as in a shower).

http://www.cultofmac.com/295055/apple-watch-water-resistant-waterproof/#RRSMQfT6gmwGV83O.99

I'm not in the Apple eco-system, but if I was I would wait for MK II. Personally, I wouldn't require a connected watch to do as much as the iWatch (an 'iWatch Nano' would be a better fit), but for the point it occupies in the features/size/battery space, it largely appears well designed, software- and hardware-wise.

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Dave 126
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Re: Who wears a watch these days?

>Who wears a watch these days?

Anyone who doesn't spend their days in rooms with with clocks, evidently. I thought you were into horseriding, or is that just Mrs jake?

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It's the WORST game ever, just pulled from a desert DUMP ... now ET can be yours for $500

Dave 126
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The same site as AC has linked to also has fixes for E.T, if you want to roll up your sleeves and play with a HEX editor:

http://www.neocomputer.org/projects/et/

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Google Glassholes haven't achieved 'social acceptance' - report

Dave 126
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Re: I'd get some for the workshop.

Continued:

- it highlights the location, Terminator-style, of that 6mm Allen key that is hiding amongst other tools.

- It lets me order parts there and then, before I forget.

-It 'draws' lines and points on surfaces - centre of face, midpoint between edges etc - for cutting and drilling.

- It flashes when someone enters the room - often u'd can't be heard over the sound of machinery.

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Dave 126
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I'd get some for the workshop.

... if they were under £50.

-Being able to refer to instruction manuals and data sheets hands free

- Record a sequence of 'which screw came from where' during disassembly.

-Replay the above in reverse when I put stuff together again

-Protect my eyeballs whilst operating powertools etc.

-Make voice notes of key measurements, to be used ion CAD later on. Or better yet, make it a 'mini-Kinect' system, to assist in 3D scanning and measurement.

I wouldn't wear them in public though, any more than I would wear my boiler-suit down the pub.

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Trickle-down economics WORKS: SpaceShipTwo is a PRIME EXAMPLE

Dave 126
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Bicycles were originally the playthings of the rich.

After a while, they became affordable and allowed people who could never have afforded a horse to make trips to the next neighbouring towns and back in a day. This led to marriages between people who otherwise would have never have met, with effects on the British gene-pool. Decades later, the image of thousands of workers commuting by bicycle became almost a big a symbol of communist China as Chairman Mao.

Okay, there are some big gaps in my analogy, but attacking private space travel merely on the grounds of 'rich man's playthings' doesn't hold.

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Russians hear Tim Cook is gay, pull dead Steve Jobs' enormous erection

Dave 126
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Re: Cheap dig

>"Sorry, what was the point you're trying to make because as far as I can see you failed miserably since you can't seem to differentiate between human sexuality and legal statutes"

And yet Boltar, I made the same argument but without invoking the law, and you had no response for me.

An adult individual using a vulnerable individual for selfish ends, and likely damaging them in the process, is wrong. Where (gay) men differ is that they are past their formative years, and are in a position to make a judgement about whether they will enjoy and benefit from whatever is proposed to them.

There are many other differences, too... paedophiles attracted to young children have had issues with the development of their brain... blunt head injuries before puberty are not uncommon in their case histories. This is not true of homosexual men.

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Dave 126
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Re: "Being gay is not a lifestyle choice"

>But being "gay" is a lifestyle choice.

No, it isn't. Being gay is just how someone feels about who they fancy - they don't 'choose' it, any more than I choose to find some women attractive. You might be able to make a weak argument for calling gay sexual relations as a lifestyle choice, but only if you say that having heterosexual relations outside of marriage is a 'lifestyle choice' - the latter is also disapproved of by some parts of society. You don't choose how you feel; you choose what you do.

Generally speaking, I'm not always fond of people being overtly sexual in public - be them straight or gay, but I that is just my taste... just as I might not find a brash or loud person to my taste. But hey, that's just the way they are. I don't like people bragging. I also don't like people forgetting to indicate at roundabouts, or playing music on their mobile phones in pubs.

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Dave 126
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Re: Cheap dig

>"It's as repellent to disapprove of someone because of their sexuality"

>>Really? How come we lock up paedos then?

It is simply a matter of being able to give informed consent. Children cannot do so. Adult men, and adult men (and adult women) can.

Therefore what adult men do in private is their own business. If children are being abused by adults, the society has a duty to intervene, since we should protect the vulnerable.

True, us adults can hurt each other, but we are beyond our most formative years. As adults, broken hearts (and carpet burns) will heal over time.

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Dave 126
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Re: Cheap dig

>We got much bigger problems in the world. You know, a raging closet homosexual with nukes who is invading countries.

That reminds me of an old Stephen Fry column... after citing examples such as Alexander the Great and Lawrence of Arabia, he arrives at the tongue-cheek-conclusion that ' yes, gays should be kept out of the military - because they are too bloody good at warfare!". His point being that whilst he was pro-gay, he was anti-war.

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iBail: American Psycho actor Christian Bale rejects Steve Jobs role

Dave 126
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"Apple sauce, bitch!"

- Ben Affleck in "Good Will Hunting 2: Hunting Season'... sorry, i meant 'Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nnESedN4vSI

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Dave 126
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Re: These "biopics" never interest me

>Because lets face it, unless you had a hidden camera following the subject for his entire life it's basically just made-up 3rd-hand bollocks.

Yeah, but then David Lean's 'Lawrence of Arabia' was a very good film, yet still it differed from T.E Lawrence's book... which itself might have differed from reality at points, and certainly diverged from common syntax.

I think people watching the film will, like you Yugguy, be aware that is not a documentary.

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Dave 126
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Re: Jobs is not God, Apple is not heaven.

What disgruntled said. Films are more interesting if the protagonist isn't an unalloyed saint.

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Dave 126
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Re: Beyond even Bales acting abilities....

Is Arctic Fox an American?

In the UK the word 'cunt' is used to insult mainly men. From what I have seen of US film and TV (Kill Bill part 2, The Wire, Weeds) it is only ever used to insult women.

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Dave 126
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>I strongly doubt the issue is the script. Maybe they're finding out what sort of chap Jobs was

So... you're saying Jobs was a 'baddie'. Actors enjoy playing baddies, don't they?

If you're suggesting that jobs was a 'baddie', but the script was portraying him as a 'goodie', then surely the issue, from your perspective, is with the script?

Maybe Jobs was neither a goodie or a baddie, but just an imperfect human being like the rest of us. Maybe the actors think it might be a redundant role, since there is video footage of the Steve Jobs presenting products. Maybe Christian Bale has just received a call about work from his old mate Christopher Nolan, since the latter has just wrapped up his latest film?

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How Hollywood film-makers wove proper physics into Interstellar

Dave 126
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Re: though i feel there will chronic oversights still

>maybe they'll fix the ships computer with a iPhone from outside the ships hull

From the director who doesn't use email, writes his drafts on his fathers typewriter, and even used 35mm film for the 'Skype'-like video-chatting in the film?

Whatever you say.

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Seriously, for real this time, the 12in MaxiPad is TOTALLY on the way ...

Dave 126
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Re: Why an iPAD?

>If they are looking to make a "Professional" device then why would anyone believe this to be an iPAD architecture?

Are you conflating the underlying OS with the User Interface? The most professional UI is the one that is most fit for purpose - so an iPad like device with a fancy digitiser (see 'Modbook, or 'Wacom Hybrid') might be the better device for a graphic artist than a Macbook. A musician might find an iPad a better device to use as a control surface, and find it perfectly secure and reliable enough.

Currently we tend to associate ARM architecture with touch interfaces, and x86 architecture with keyboards and mice - but that is largely to do with the power constraints of mobile devices. It is not written in stone.

OSX, like NeXT before it, has run on different hardware architectures in the past. 3rd party applications might have to be rewritten for an ARM OSX, but they would have to be modified anyway in order to work well with a touch/stylus interface.

Microsoft too are dabbling with x86/ARM agnosticism.

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The Great Smartphone Massacre: Android bloodbath gathers pace

Dave 126
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Re: Android OEMs are copying Apple in all the wrong ways

Weird. My midrange Xperia P was updated twice, first to ICS and then to Jelly Bean. There was some Sony software on it but it wasn't all rubbish, and they didn't mess the stock Android around very much (compae to Samsung).

One can take 'somthings' word for it, or one can check XDA to get an idea of how vendors release updates.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dear Sony.

Can't find a Nexus 5? Get an LG G2 for the much the same money. Still considered to be a good phone.

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Dave 126
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Re: No surprises

>why pay the prices Sony and Samsung charge for the handset (as good as they are compared to the TCO of a contract) when I can get something like the OnePlusOne for half the price?

Shop around mate.

The Z3 Compact's lst price is £450, but it can be had for around £350 - sometimes less.

Try looking at this 'deals' forum:

http://www.hotukdeals.com/mobiles/deals/hot

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Intel: A tiny video drone? Disguised as a BRACELET? Great! Take half a million dollars!

Dave 126
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Re: Not cool enough...

Or look like a mosquito, like the drone found in Iain M Banks' Consider Phlebas.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not small enough?

>(They aren't around today, but the fossil record shows that the dragonfly design works at much larger sizes).

There was once a lot more available oxygen in our atmosphere... it was this allowed very large insects to breathe. They don't have lungs, and rely on little tubes to take in oxygen, so its a surface area / volume thing.

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Dave 126
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Re: This is the winner?

>I can just see 10,000 people at a sporting event suddenly launching these things...

Well, that's still preferable to people launching water bottles full of piss, no?

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Got a spare $600k? Then an ancient Apple-1 could be yours

Dave 126
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>I know a collector and their money are often parted. But seriously.

That doesn't necessarily make the collector a fool - who knows if the value will go up or down? An example is included in this very article:

"It is currently owned by Robert Luther, a collector from Virginia. He bought the expensive machine during 2004 at a police auction" I don't expect he paid $600k for it.

You might compare it to art, antiques, vintage wine or commodities markets - some people lose money, sure, but others gain. If you, Indolent Wretch, are able to predict who is who with certainty, then I expect you've posted your comment from your private yacht moored off the Cayman Islands.

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Pitchforks at dawn! UK gov's Verify ID service FAILS to verify ID

Dave 126
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Re: Offline fallback required

The French have notaires in every small town - if a document needs to be signed by you and posted off, you can just pop in to the notaire with your proof of ID and they will stamp the document to say that you are who you say you are.

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Snapper's decisions: Whatever happened to REAL photography?

Dave 126
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Re: Good article

>All that's needed now is for a manufacturer to crack the problem of the fully electronic shutters on systems cameras

Yeah, I was quite naffed off once when attending an acoustic music gig, and a young person (well, my age, it was a few years ago) was taking shots with a big - and loud - DSLR. It was grating because she not seeing that she was placing her 'content creation' over that of the singer we has all come to hear play.

I believe some DSLRs have the option for a silent 'digital shutter', but I haven't the experience to know their disadvantages - other than the viewfinder is disabled and the camera has to use contrast detection autofocus as opposed to phase shift (except for those Sonys with the translucent mirrors).

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Dave 126
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>Decent control over the sensitivity (usually measured in ISO equivalence) is the major factor in allowing you to shoot high shutter speeds in lower lighting levels; although you'll get a trade off in noise.

Yep. How much noise at higher ISO settings depends upon the camera. Only the human operator can decide if the scene contains moving subjects (a noisier image is better than a blurred face), or if the camera will be kept still to better capture detail of a non-moving subject, and thus balance the trade-off accordingly. Play.

Whilst talking about instant feedback, cameras with higher resolution screens can aid the learning process, since soft-focus shots are easier to identify whilst reviewing.

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Dave 126
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Re: Excellent

>It's very hard to find any Consumer Still or especially video camera with Manual everything.

Try the cameras listed here, or their forebears:

http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_g7_x_review/rivals/

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Dave 126
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Re: Digital photography isn't dead yet

>Claiming that there's a void between the iPhone and Medium Format digital is plain wrong.

There does seem to be more interest in the 'premium compact' market these days, with Sony and Fuji joining Panasonic and Canon in the fray. I'm talking about cameras that will just about fit in the inside pocket of a jacket, and have sensors larger than those normally found on compacts, large apertures and have an option of full manual control.

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Dave 126
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Re: Many good points - however

The Canon G-series have lots of physical manual controls, but consider also the smaller Canon S95, S100 etc. They compete with the Lumix LX-5, LX-7 etc. More recently, the Sony RX100 MK2 - a similar size but bigger sensor - is said to trounce them for image quality but Sony's user interface is supposedly awkard at times. Its existance has caused Panasonic to up their game, and their LX-100 looks very interesting.

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Dave 126
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Re: Enjoyed this

>I still have a couple of 35mm and wanted to know where a semi-decent place is to source and develop b+w film these days, along with a set of prints?

Perhaps try asking around a local art college... they might be able to steer you in the right direction, or find a student who will use their darkroom on your behalf for beer money.

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Dave 126
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>Above all when you get your kit don't be afraid to experiment with it; go out there and take pictures to find out what the camera will do, what limitations or quirks it has, and to refine your techniques before you need them in anger.

Agreed. A lot of learning comes from the desire to mitigate the shortcomings of an imperfect camera.

An aid to learning is having the camera with you often.

I started with a 3MP phone camera - horribly noisy, low resolution... but it made me think about just what is was in the shot that I was trying to capture - what it was that had an emotional impact or interest, and trying to accentuate it in Photoshop. I wasn't going for realism, or print-quality.

I then used a cheap Samsung compact camera whilst travelling - but it did have manual controls, enough to get a feeling for shutter and aperture.

Then a Lumix LX-5, a 'premium compact' whose competitors are the Canon S95 and Sony RX100 and the like. Small enough for a jacket pocket, I carried it often, and played with it a lot. I could get away with low-light photography - parties, street scenes etc - if I was careful in my settings. I learnt more about which compromises to make for a particular situation. Bokeh was possible, but only at the widest zoom... filling the frame with someone's face without zooming would make their nose look too big.

Currently I have an LX-7. It builds upon the LX-5, and offers an aperature of f1.4 - albeit married to a relatively small sensor - bigger than most compacts, but smaller than a m4/3rds or DSLR. Portraits benefit, because I can zoom a little, yet still soften the background.

Play, play, play. The more you use it, the quicker you learn. If a compact camera means you carry it more often, so be it. You will learn its shortcomings, and if you decide to more money on a pricier, bigger camera, you will have a better idea of what you want from it.

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Branson on Virgin Galactic fatal crash: 'Space is hard – but worth it'

Dave 126
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Re: Is it really worth it IN THIS CASE, though?

>this is a rich man putting good men at risk in order to develop a sham space experience for other rich men (and women). Is he saying that it's worth killing off a few pilots for this?

A fair question. One assumes that these pilots asked it of themselves, as intelligent adults. The answer they, as individuals, arrived at is evident.

Though wages for commercial airline pilots in the US can be relatively low, I suspect these men had a more advanced skill set, one that would have allowed them a choice of employment to support them and their families. In this respect they differ from a disadvantaged young person who enlists the army for a foreign war because they perceive their employment options as limited.

There have been men and women who have signed up for this sort of risky activity, and have had their trust abused by the management of a contracting firm- see: Feynman, O-rings. There is no suggestion at this stage that this is this case in this sad incident -it is not in Virgin Galactic's business interests to cut corners.

EDIT: The management of the O-ring contractors was leant on by NASA management.

Report of the PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accidenthttp://history.nasa.gov/rogersrep/v1ch5.htm

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

Dave 126
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>5k of pixels is a lot to push through the graphics shaders, and I would have liked to know how the game they tested ran at full resolution.

They couldn't test the Windows games at full resolution. They tried, but:

"From 5k to 4k

The first thing I noticed upon booting up in Windows 8.1 is that Windows does not run at the display’s native 5120x2880 resolution. When I logged on, I was greeted by a desktop running at 3840x2160, one of a number of different resolutions commonly lumped under the "4k" banner (this particular 4K flavor is usually referred to as "Ultra HD").

Interestingly, the non-native resolution didn’t exhibit any visible scaling artifacts. The high pixel density seems to more than make up for the loss of resolution from "5K," and the display blends the 8,294,400 points yielded by 3840x2160 into the native 14,745,600 pixels quite smartly. Even sitting with my nose an inch or so away from the screen—a distance my mother assured me when I was younger would ruin my eyes—I couldn’t see any feathering or blurring around edges and lines. Type remained sharp, and everything looked crisp."

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/10/the-retina-imac-and-its-5k-display-as-a-gaming-machine/

The above article was just a preliminary gaming test, and they will be updating it:

... just based on the performance of Alien: Isolation, any fears prospective Retina iMac owners might have had that the system’s high resolution will outstrip the GPU’s ability to keep it fed appear to be unfounded.

...I’ll be playing the hell out of my Steam library on the thing over the next week before I have to send it back. Peter Bright is already spitting rage at me in the Ars staff IRC channel that I didn't benchmark with Battlefield 4 or Far Cry 3 (simple explanation: I don't own those games and don't play them, and I didn't have press Steam or Origin codes readily available), so I'll see about adding those to the mix before I drop the iMac back off at FedEx.

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Dave 126
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Re: The display

@AC - the figure of $2500 didn't come from Anandtech. It came from http://www.pcworld.com/article/2841732/why-5k-displays-matter-the-one-spec-that-tells-all.html and teh figure is in accordance with every other tech site out there... mainly because that is the figure that Dell announced.

Where Anandtech made a guess was supposing that the Dell used the same panel as the iMac.

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Multi Jet Fusion: THAT's HP's promised 3D printer, not crazy 'leccy invention

Dave 126
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Re: How to Sanity Test the over-hyped BS claims made by 3D Printer vendors

I guess 3D printing has evolved product design more subtly in the last few years, since the it has allowed smaller players to develop products. However, it should be taken into consideration with:

-Cheaper, more affordable and more mature CAD software and workstations.

-3D printing aiding the development of prototypes

- 3D printing reducing the cost of tooling for product manufacture

-Crowdrunding for start-ups.

-Cheaper SoCs, and near off-the-shelf electronic components.

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