* Posts by Dave 126

6501 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Meet Barra's baby: Xiaomi arrives with a splash

Dave 126
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Re: on the up?

Performance-wise, one assumes that this will be as quick as any other Snapdragon 820-based phone, though I note the slides refer to two different clock speeds, 1.8 and 2.1 GHz. The 4GB RAM can't hurt, either - that's all my laptop has, and in five years I've only wanted for more on a couple of occasions.

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Apps aren't the only investment people make in iPhones - there are also bits of hardware, either from 3rd parties such as headphones or from Apple like the Apple TV, that don't work as well with Android devices. However, many of my iPhone/iPad using mates use them in conjunction with Chromecasts and Playstations rather than Apple TVs or whatever. So, it's hard to call. The price difference between a Chinese Android phone and an iPhone buys a lot of apps and peripherals.

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Intel shows budget Android phone powering big-screen Linux

Dave 126
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>Ubuntu phones have been available for a while now - don't they do this already?

But why? If to make this system work you need the bulk of a wireless keyboard and mouse, you might as well carry a stick-shaped Linux computer. That way, you can do your work on a big screen, but also take a telephone call. Or just grab your phone as you nip out to the pub for half and hour.

This 2-in-1 desktop/phone system seems like a lot of kerfuffle just to save on the cost of an SoC in a plastic case.

Ubuntu have been proposing this concept for a while. Microsoft have played with it. Meanwhile, many people just use device-independent services such as Gmail - where an email I start writing on my phone I can finish on my laptop - and it is in this direction that Apple have moved (Yeah, I know that it is in Apple's interests to sell you both a Mac and an iPhone).

Heck, I had a Sony phone with a real microHDMI socket on it. Grand. But it was nowhere near as convenient or flexible as using a Chromecast to display content on a big TV.

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Dave 126
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>If I can run some flavour of L*nux, completely open sourced, then I don't need or want any apps

Can you expand upon that? I can't work out what you actually want to use your phone for. Take away all the applications, and you'll have nothing. No dialler, no SMS client, no gallery, no browser...

I have a nicely polished pebble I found. I'll send it to you. No charge. It is 100% secure and quite ergonomic, though it can ruin the lines of a lighter jacket.

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Dave 126
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>Why bother with the Android part? Dump google and run the phone with Linux.

FFS! I've used a Linux desktop application on an Android phone (Inkscape) and it is a horrible experience. It doesn't matter how good the underlying OS is, if the UI is unfit for the Human Input method being used, it will be an exercise in frustration. Install it now if you don't believe me.

UIs are important. Those proponents of Linux who don't acknowledge that fact won't do their cause any favours. So, if you really want Linux to do well, promote good UI design. Here's the thing though: it is time consuming to get right.

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Dave 126
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Re: attack surface

A user with this hybrid device will have no higher an attack surface than a dual device set-up (i.e, an Android phone and a Linux desktop).

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NASA boffin wants FRIKKIN LASERS to propel lightsails

Dave 126
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Re: laser mounting

I think your sense of humour is a touch too subtle for some people!

That (impossible) concept of 'pulling one's self up by one's bootstraps' is why we 'boot' computers.

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Dave 126
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Re: It's true - what goes around ....

>older El Reggers may remember a very decent sci-fi/fact magazine of the 80s, called OMNI

There's an online reboot of OMNI here:

https://omnireboot.com/

More recently, Buzz Aldrin's novel Encounter with Tiber explores this method of laser propulsion.

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LG’s modular G5 stunner shuns the Lego aesthetic

Dave 126
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Re: To agree with others - wtf?

>Never owned an LG phone

>Just put the decent DAC in your phone in the first place and I might have bought it

LG did just that in the G2, yet you didn't buy it. So, what was your point again?

LG also contributed 24bit 192Khz libraries to the AOSP.

The B&O module is more about the B&O Class D amp for driving headphones than it is about the DAC per se. B&O do make good Class D amps.

Oh well, glad you feel you can have an opinion, though.

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Dave 126
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>Does the B&O DAC include coaxial digital out?

No, it is a DAC, the clue is in the name.

What B&O do have a reputation for is Class D amplifiers ('IcePower'), so you'll have a reasonable DAC and amp combo for driving a variety of headphones. If you want your own DAC, you'd just use USB Audio, or a Chromecast Audio which has an optical out.

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Dave 126
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Re: USB

You'd be dealing with two lumps connected by a cable - not very ergonomic.

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Dave 126
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LG have missed no point.

Making a fully modular phone incurs structural weakness (so it would have to me made thicker and heavier, and is harder to waterproof), and it is also of limited appeal (cos really, most lower-mid to high end Android phone buyers will want a Snapdragon 8XX SoC, a good screen and a Sony camera sensor).

So whilst buyers haven't bothered with modular phones, they already fix things to their phones, such as external microphones, DACs, IR cameras, joysticks, bigger sensor cameras, LIDAR, external batteries and keyboards. However, the power/IO sockets they plug into are not mechanically fit for holding an extra lump of gubbins. LG have addressed that issue.

Whether the G5 will be bought in any numbers remains to be seen. Maybe by folk wanting a swappable battery.

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Alcatel drives upmarket with Idol 4 smartphone series

Dave 126
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The LG G5 has a removable battery, but doesn't have the waterproofing that its Samsung and Sony competitors do.

My Alcatel Pixi3 has a removable battery and SD card slot. It has many shortcomings, but since I bought it for £25 unlocked to any network I look upon it charitably. It does the basics well enough. ('Til I get around to getting my Sony Z3 C repaired)

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FBI says it helped mess up that iPhone – the one it wants Apple to crack

Dave 126
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Re: Cook is just grandstanding

>Apple has been running ALL OSX and IOS traffic (including Phone backups and email traffic) through their services for ages, scouring every bit of their users information to see what they can monetize.

That is Google's business model. Apple make plenty of money through high-margin hardware sales, and through taking a cut of music, video and app sales. If Apple really were making tons if cash from user data, then they would seek to bring more users into their fold (by selling cheap iPhones).

>Now all of a sudden he [Cook] acts as if he cares about the privacy of their customers, which I am sure he does not give a rat's behind about.

It helps differentiate his company's wares from Google's. Since Apple make plenty of money from people buying from/through them, they have a fairly good motive to keep that distinction.

Cook's talk about privacy may be all in his financial self-interest (his reasons don't really matter), but he has been talking about privacy for some time now. Do keep up.

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Dave 126
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Re: they want Apple to do it ~For Free~.

@dan1980

Whilst I largely agree morally with your point, I suspect that legally it wouldn't hold water.

For the sake of your argument, you used the example of biological weapons - but that example stretches the argument a bit (on the grounds that biological weapons are banned by treaties). Perhaps a different example (an antidote to a poison, perhaps) would better help us to explore your point?

I can't think of a direct precedent - the closest I can think of is governments banning the sale of products (cars) that don't include another product (seat belts).

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Dave 126
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>On death doesn't the contents of account become owned by Apple? A few years ago I believe that it was mentioned widely that Bruce Willis had no ownership rights over his iTunes content so could not bequeath it in a will.

In the iTunes case you mentioned, the terms of the music licences meant that they couldn't be transferred to a beneficiary - the music licence in effect ceased (upon the death of the original buyer) and it didn't revert to Apple.

In any case, user's own data is covered by different EULAs than purchased music. If all data on a phone became the property of Apple, no company would allow iPhones anywhere near them - and we would have heard an almighty stink about it.

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Q: How many guns to arm nine coachloads of terrorists?

Dave 126
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Re: Precisely

@Loud Speaker

>I am not sure if terrorists need tour guides and I presume the BBC does not know either.

The BBC were merely reporting what a police officer said. The Reg has got it wrong, but hasn't published a correction yet.

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Dave 126
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Re: So why ...

>So why ... ... do the travellers have to be specifically terrorists? Why not hunters,

Hunters? Given the nature of some the weapons, (an anti-tank missile, and an uzi with a bayonette) that concept brings the Monty Python sketch Mosquito Hunting to mind:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZvT3MHpffk

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Dave 126
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Re: Standard measure

Rubberdingyrapids, bruv!

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Dave 126
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Re: Ha

@codejunky

The "nine coachloads" phrase was used by a policeman investigating the case, not by the BBC.

The Reg article has got this very wrong, so I'm not blaming you for writing a comment based upon the misinformation you have received.

Kind regards

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Dave 126
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Re: Isn't it more worrying ...

> The idea of actually trying to find out which viewpoint might be closer to the objective truth now appears a quaint notion fading rapidly into the mist of the past.

The objective truth is the number of weapons of different types that were recovered, as given in all coverage of the story. Reports also published pictures of the weapons that were recovered.

That the policeman said "nine coachloads", is also a fact.

What is just plain false is that "nine coachloads" was concocted by the BBC.

Whilst John H Woods' point that they [journalists] will try to achieve "balance" by repeating what they are told from people with alternative viewpoints. is an important point in general, I fail to see its relevance in this case.

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Dave 126
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What about a Mini full of barmaids?

(Nominally 5, though the record is 23 in 2012. Technically, whilst all adult human females, they weren't all barmaids, but as a child of the eighties - when such attempts were more common - that's how I want to imagine it.)

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OnePlus X: Dinky little Android smartie with one or two minuses

Dave 126
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>The only oddity I found was the capacitive navigation keys were not backlit, which defeats the object of having dedicated navigation.

My understanding is that Android navigation soft-keys remain the same, so don't really need to be visible once the user learns what they do. I may have missed something though, because I haven't kept up in the most recent versions of Android.

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New Monopoly version features an Automatic Teller Machine

Dave 126
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Re: Misses the point entirely

>to teach children addition, subtraction

They will learn those skills quicker if they play darts.

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Facebook tells Viz to f**k right off

Dave 126
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>Newflash - Facebook isn't a public service. Its a company that wants to turn a profit and it can set any rules it likes when you use its services. More fool you if you thought otherwise.

Absolutely. But if Facebook's existence is a de facto barrier to an alternative service (one that that just does what its users want, for a couple of quid a year), is there not grounds for banning it? I mean, can't we just be naive and ask our elected representatives to do what they are supposed to i.e act in our interests?

(Game theory: In some games, being the first to move gives a player an unassailable advantage. Take eBay as an example - once established, it will be the first choice of any self-interested buyer or seller)

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Dave 126
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A sad state of affairs. If only there was some sort of idiomatic reference book in which I could find a phrase that would concisely express my feelings on this matter.

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The Nano-NAS market is now a femto-flop being eaten by the cloud

Dave 126
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Re: odd way to break down devices

> I've never seen a 1 disk NAS,

I have. Lacie made a couple.

However, these days many people have upgraded to routers (for better WiFi speeds and range) that provide a USB socket... this means that a standard external HDD can play the part of a 'single bay NAS'.

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Dave 126
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Re: Also: streamed video

Even pirated material is easy streamed these days. If you can be confident of downloading a movie in five minutes legitimately or otherwise, or stream it, then you will be less fussed about storing it locally indefinitely.

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Dave 126
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Also: streamed video

It is possible that services like Netflix reduce some people's desire to store movies locally. Many of the devices people use to watch movies in their lounge are actually happier streaming content over the internet than they are playing media stored on the local network (Chromecast, NowTV dongle, some games consoles).

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Shopping for PCs? This is what you'll be offered in 2016

Dave 126
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Re: Any news on laptop resolutions?

>Will they finally stop foisting crappy 1366x768 screens on laptop buyers?

There are plenty of very high res laptops available now. The issue is waiting for 3rd party software to play nice with it.

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Dave 126
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>I'm looking forward to AMDs new line up. Did no one talk about that?

Anandtech have twenty pages about AMD's lineup:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/10000/who-controls-user-experience-amd-carrizo-thoroughly-tested

While the major OEMs, such as Dell, HP, Lenovo and ASUS will happily produce several models to fill the gap and maintain relationships with AMD, none of them will actively market a high-profile AMD based device due to the scope of previous AMD silicon and public expectation. If a mid-to-high end device is put in play, numbers are limited, distribution is narrow and advertising is minimal.

Performance per Watt is still on Intel's side.

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How to build a plane that never needs to land

Dave 126
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Re: 5kg is a lot of payload

Mikel is correct, a surveillance/coms payload of a given weight can do far more today than a few years ago.

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Dave 126
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Re: 2000 hour inspection cycle

Even having a day's downtime a week would allow one spare plane to provide cover for or six operational planes, allowing continuous uptime (weather and acts of dog, allowing). Having routine maintenance every month wouldn't be too onerous. Components, such as motor and prop assemblies can be swapped out / swapped in quickly.

I'm assuming the small size of it makes inspection of the airframe easier and quicker.

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iPhones clock-blocked and crocked by setting date to Jan 1, 1970

Dave 126
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Re: Why would anyone set their iPhone's time to 1/1/1970

>This allows an NTP attack on almost any public wifi which permanently bricks your phone.

Has this this been demonstrated in a proof-of-concept attack?

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Health and Safety to prosecute over squashed Harrison Ford

Dave 126
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Re: The rule is

I was under the impression that Jackie Chan underwrote his own film because he couldn't get conventional insurance.

Still, it would seem that nobody has been injured more in Jackie Chan films than Jackie himself (I've tried looking online to see if any of his employees have been seriously injured on set, but I can't see past the "Jackie Chan's Top Ten Injuries"-type articles.

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Dave 126
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Re: Trebles all around...

The BBC reported it as being a criminal prosecution, so penalties beyond fines are possible.

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Dave 126
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Re: "What a piece of junk!"

On one of the Indiana Jones movies Mr Ford was keen to do his own stunts... until a stunt man pointed out that it was doing him out of work. Mr Ford was, by all accounts, genuinely embarrassed that this hadn't occurred to him.

(Remember he started out as a carpenter on a movie set).

(For a very young looking Mr Ford, search Google Images for "Terminate With Extreme Prejudice")

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Dave 126
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Re: Are all employer liable?

>AFAIK the M.O.D has a "sort-off" waiver for 'elth un safe'y, but ONLY during combat situations.

Indeed, I've heard of UK military compounds where it is compulsory for car drivers to reverse-park into parking bays. It is good practise - you are less likely to knock into a pedestrian whilst reversing into a bay than you are reversing out of a bay and into a thoroughfare.

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Depressed? Desperate for a ciggie? Blame the Neanderthals

Dave 126
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Re: Echoes from the past

>The one on the right looks like me.

You're Gérard Depardieu?

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Dave 126
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Re: Echoes from the past

A rosier frame indeed, we likely won because we were more aggressive.

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Move over, Google. Here’s Wikipedia's search engine – full of on-demand smut

Dave 126
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Re: Why reinvent the wheel?

@Ilgaz

The Google search algorithms - and thus DuckDuckGo - are designed for the WWW, where any idiot can create a website (and search results are, in part, ranked by how many other pages link to it).

The approach to searching within a more structured, centrally hosted, collection of data would be different. The requirements of the user might be different, too. A user might, for example, want to search for all Wikipedia articles related to [SUBJECT] that have not been edited in the last [LAST EDIT DATE] and cite only those sources that come from [EXTERNAL SOURCE: ".ac.org"] or whatever.

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Dave 126
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>We had to rent videos - a VHS M*A*S*H cost GBP49 to buy

Is it possible that was the price video rental shops had to buy it at? They were not allowed to rent out copies that were sold to Joe Public.

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Dave 126
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Re: porn...

The 1970s book The Joy of Sex by Alex Comfort featured black and white outline illustrations by an artist by Chris Foss.

Other readers might recognise him as the man who illustrated the covers of a good many sci-fi books, but in a completely different style (full colour, brush and airbrush), often on Asimov books.

He combined the two styles in a book called Diary of a Spaceperson. Citing an Amazon.co.uk review of the same:

Imagine you have this archive of fantastic science fiction art depicting highly original and organic spacecraft with vibrating colours, painted by a legendary artist. And you also have this even larger pile of pencil sketches of topless women. Wanting to show these to the world your natural reaction might be to compile a work about spaceships and another with drawings. Not so here.

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Amazon's Lumberyard invaded by zombies

Dave 126
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>One wonders what they will make of each other.

Mutual disinterest, probably. It would make for a very boring monster mash-up movie, a la the SyFy Channel.

"Zombies Vs Skynet" The undead and terminators go about their daily business without disturbing each other

[In fairness to SyFy, whilst they are known for films like 'Sharknado!', their recent adaptation of The Expanse has been very good. Recommended for fans of hard sci-fi, set in a colonised Solar System with political intrigue. It sticks to its own measuered pace, but stay with it. Series 2 has just been commissioned.]

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Dave 126
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Hello Mr Haines. Are there any other examples of strange ToCs that you and your colleagues have seen over the years? Perhaps you could appeal to the readership here to provide examples they have seen?

Just an idea!

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Dave 126
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>It has certainly worked - the Register has now reported it twice.

I've read a couple of articles around the web about the release of Lumberyard, and this is the first I've read of the zombie clause in the ToCs - save for a comment by 'Clockworkseer' yesterday.

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Firemen free chap's todger from four-ring chokehold

Dave 126
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Re: @symon - "a course of leaches"

@TRT

>Any self-respecting leach would, of course, refuse to put their mouth parts anywhere near the pervs prives.

You can believe that if you want to to, but if you go skinny dipping in a swamp and find a limp dangly thing clung to your limp dangly thing - please do share with us here at the Reg!

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh, why not?

It's been said that Aristotle Onassis had the bar stools on one of his yachts clothed in sperm whale foreskin. I'd assumed that this was removed from a dead whale, until I read Mr Maloney's post.

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh dear sir,

>Idiots who self inflict either through drink, drugs or just being fucking idiots do NOT deserve first line care

On the grounds that laughter is a good medicine, it is appropriate that they be admitted to hospitals.

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Hold the miniature presses: Playmobil movie is go

Dave 126
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Re: And the zen question may be

Weebles! (those egg-shaped figues that wobbled on their base... sort of the antidote to Barbie's equally unrealistic body shape)

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Dave 126
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Check this out:

Next time the Reg needs to recreate a scene featuring a yuppie:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Playmobil-3911-Porsche-Carrera-Showroom/dp/B00O4E399M

It's a Playmobil exact scale replica of a Porsche 911 Carrera S, with functioning rear and front lights, customisable body and wheels, removable roof and illuminated dashboard.

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