* Posts by Dave 126

5940 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Work from home when the next big Windows 10 installation arrives

Dave 126
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Re: Even happier I chose a PS4

>And what do actually believe that that will change, instead of MS spying on you it will be Sony...

Ah yes, Sony with their advertising network.... wait, hold on!

Okay, both MS and Sony are in the hardware, software and services games, but I suspect MS have a greater motive to retain your data. Sony haven't been great at securing the data they do have. MS have seen their personal data policies as a way of differentiating themselves from [Google's versions of] Android, though it's not something I've looked into for a while.

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US Army bug hunters in 'state of fear' that sees flaws go unreported

Dave 126
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Re: FULFILL MISSION OBJECTIVES!

The US generals we have seen in recent years seem a lot more capable of critical thought than their political masters.

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Zuk it and see: China’s stealth seduction of Western phone buyers

Dave 126
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Re: "It has a a 5.5" (1080 x 1920 pixel) touchscreen..."

Yeah, it would be nice if these generic Chinese Snapdragon 80x phones came in a smaller form. Still, the Sony Z3 / 4 / 5 Compact phones are available.

Given the positive reception these sub-5" handsets have received (smaller screen helping better battery life) I'm surprised more vendors haven't followed suit.

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The iPhone 6 doused in bromine - an incendiary mix or not?

Dave 126
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Re: What a muppet

>Since when did £500 devices become so disposible they can be destroyed out the box for a laugh?

I'm just thinking of the Lamborghini Miura - and other cars - destroyed in The Italian Job, just for a laugh.

.

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Dave 126
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It's very nasty stuff, we get it..

So, here's an idea: A website with a live camera of a chemist in a lab. The paying viewer can make requests such as: "please put an avocado in liquid nitrogen and hit it with a slipper".

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We can't all live by taking in each others' washing

Dave 126
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Re: How does the GDP calculation measure Barter?

See the example of the two female police officers, both with young children. Very sensibly, they put their heads together, and arranged their shifts so that one could care for the other's children whilst the other was at work.

The taxman got involved.

On a wider note about barter, you could probably do worse than listen to this ten part ( 15 minutes per episode) series "Promises, Promises: A History of Debt" http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b054zdp6/episodes/player

You should note that if I want one of your pears, but I only have a live chicken, sorting out change might be tricky (or at least messy and noisy!). Think of a few more examples, and you'll appreciate that debt arose hand-in-hand with bartering.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not all exchanges are voluntary

*“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

― Terry Pratchett, Men at Arms: The Play

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Dave 126
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Re: Not all exchanges are voluntary

>If you accept Worstall's logic, burglary is just as valuable as manufacturing or finance.

Well, burglary creates work for locksmiths, glaziers, burglar-alarm installers and police officers. There isn't any moral determinism in these systems; arms manufacturers, tobacco growers and slavers are all a part of the economic system.

The burglar enriches themselves by inconveniencing others. A salesman who sells a low quality product enriches themselves by inconveniencing their customer. A company sells a frustrating and buggy OS to enrich themselves by inconveniencing their users.

So, we put locks on our doors. We educate ourselves and learn that a pricier but more durable product is actually better value*. We learn to use a different OS, or just accept that life isn't perfect.

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Dave 126
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>Never in the history of web journalism has so much empty crap been served dressed up as fake intellectual mumbo jumbo

Even if that's true, what is the harm? Nobody here would jump off a cliff just because "Mr Worstall told me to!" and his points are often debated and disputed here. If we believe him to be wrong, or has overlooked something, then we can make a counter argument.

Sometimes people who believe themselves to be fighting an ideology will appear to be ideologues themselves... this is always danger, so a bit of grown up discussion is generally a Good Idea.

For the record, I don't agree with much of Worstall says, but I think it is healthy to re-examine the things he attacks to test their sturdiness or otherwise.

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Dave 126
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Re: First time I have to totally disagree with you, Tim

Thank you itzman, maybe you could have a column or two? I have been thinking idly along similar lines in recent months, but drawing parallels to system theory and ecosystems*.

I strongly support your general gist and your raising of the subject, though you cover so much ground that it is inevitable that I can nitpick individual points:

When Bertrand Russell penned 'The Case for the Leisure Society', he wasn't equating leisure with idleness. Rather, he suggested that if we all only worked say twenty hours a week for food and shelter, we wouold choose more active leisure activioties (gardening, playing musical instruments, walking) and less passive (slump in front of a DVD-boxset with bottle of scotch)

>I think if we [The IT-Crowd, system administrators etc] exercised our power and controlled it properly, we would do a better job than politicians and economists...

Maybe. But in past times, scientists have thought similar things. Of course, if we all had more leisure time, IT experts might choose to read more history and philosophy, and financial experts and politicians might educate themselves about technology and systems. The electorate, with morew free time, would also take a more informed and active role in politics, too.

*All mature ecosystems dissipate more energy than immature ecosystems. There has always seemed to me to be an economic lesson there, but i can't quite articulate it.

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Dave 126
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Re: Shame

>The issue is that some people get massive residual incomes - being able to sell your time once and get millions for it years later kind of breaks things.

The people earning millions years later are probably the outliers, the extreme beneficiaries of systems (copyright, patents, IP) that are intended to fairly reward more people more modestly. The greater rewards can also offset the risk an individual assumes by investing their own time in an endeavour. A would-be inventor might spend months in her shed, but it isn't guaranteed that her tinkering will result in a working prototype, let alone a commercially-viable product.

Of course, real life will skew the principle.

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Apollo 15 commander's watch clocks up $1.6m at auction

Dave 126
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>Or has it got a really,really,really long strap?

It does indeed have a really, really long Velcro strap.

See image here:

https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/moon-watch-sells-for-$1million

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If MR ROBOT was realistic, he’d be in an Iron Maiden t-shirt and SMELL of WEE

Dave 126
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Re: Movie OS

To wrap up, this exhaustive website 'does what it says on the tin':

http://www.scifiinterfaces.com/

My apologies for veering off the topic of 'the appearance of fictional vs real computer operators', to 'sci-fi GUIs' via 'Hollywood contemporary GUIs'.

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Dave 126
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Re: Movie OS

Movie OS

Much of the time, the movie director just wants the fictional GUI to display a nice big status bar slowly inching towards "100% complete" before the bad guys arrive.

This site goes into more detail: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ViewerFriendlyInterface

Another type of 'Movie OS' is more flashy and futuristic.... think Minority Report, or Iron Man. Not all of them are completely silly:

http://www.creativebloq.com/movies/user-interfaces-movie-history-11121389

Strange to think that these days mocking up a fiction GUI is fairly easy... however, the wireframe Death Star from the pre-attack briefing scene in Star Wars took Barry Cuba months to create. Ridley Scott's VFX team had CG wireframes on screens in Alien, and later reused them in Blade Runner to keep costs down.

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Dave 126
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Re: Mr Robot

I greatly enjoyed Mr Robot. If you feel the lead character is too good-looking, just remember that what we the viewers see is clearly signposted as being from his point of view. It makes use of the 'unreliable narrator' device, even to the extent of playing upon any comparisons the viewer might make to Fight Club.

Hmm, writing this has reminded me of a 2007 film starring Christian Slater called 'He was a Quiet Man'. Worth a watch if you enjoyed Mr Robot.

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Is China dumping smartphones on world+dog?

Dave 126
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thanks for your replies guys!

I was thinking more of what the next 'feature jump' might be... some people used to pay £600 for a tiny polished Nokia 8210 when it was state if the art, but 6 or so years later a handset would have to do much much more to have that price tag.

Agreed, the list price is usually way over what a phone can be had for - at least in Android land.

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Dave 126
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Hmm, what sort of features would make a sensible person spend £600 on a flagship phone when a £250 handset is nearly as good?

With current technology, there isn't an answer to that question that is immediately obvious to me. Sure, there are esoteric features that might appeal to a few consumers - an IR camera, or Kinect-style 3D sensor, or perhaps a laser range-finder for site workers - but nothing obvious to appeal to the mass market.

If anyone of you think you know how to justify an extra few hundred quid on a handset, I'll expect you'll keep it to yourself and make money from it, rather than post it here.

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ITU rubber-stamps '3D' audio format

Dave 126
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Re: Useless

What, you mean subtitles for the heathens in the next village?

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BlackBerry opens its Priv kimono just a little wider

Dave 126
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Case-by-case permissions is in Android 6 Marshmallow, reports suggest the BB Priv is running Android 5 Lollipop at launch.

Details on how Android 6 manages permissions is here:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/android-6-0-marshmallow-thoroughly-reviewed/5/

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New Nexus 5X, 6P smarties: Google draws a line in the sand

Dave 126
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Re: These are not the droids I'm looking for...

>No SD is a big no-no for me. I like to have a large music collection stored on my mobe. I spend a lot of time working down in the bowels of a data centre where phone signal and the company WiFi are non-existant.

Two suggestions: 1, look at LG's offerings - they still have SD cards and swappable batteries, plus some models can play back native 24bit 192Khz FLAC files.

2: Your phone's battery will probably take a hit by searching for a cellular signal in vain, so ease the load by just buying a dedicated audio player with SD card support... the Sansa Clip springs to mind. Don't worry about the extra bulk; it's the size of a matchbox and is a convenient thing to wrap your headphone cables around.

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Dave 126
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Re: QI and unlocked phon

>I do find myself wondering how long it will be before someone thinks they'll make life easier for people and build the feature [QR code recognition] in to the camera application

With all the superfluous CP/GPU power smartphones pack these days, it can only be a matter of time. Or, more sensibly, the phone's photo gallery app automatically scans photos for QI codes and places any URL into the photo's metadata... as a user option, of course.

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Dave 126
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Re: Not what I expected from Google

The Z5 and Z5 Compact have 20+Mp sensors which are said to be very good, though by default the phones save 8 Mp interpolated images - sensible enough. Some reviews say the Sony camera software is a bit slow, I don't know the effect of using any 3rd-party camera app.

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Apple 1 goes on sale, expected to fetch £300,000 to £500,000

Dave 126
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>The odd thing is, it's not *that* rare. 50 machines is quite a few.

There are only around 50 Fabergé eggs in existence. They are considered rare in this world of 7 billion people.

Value is only what someone will pay on any given day... and some people will spend silly money on silly things. Your investments may go down as well as up in value etc...

EDIT: The Christies auction description states that there are around 50 Apple Is surviving.

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Amazon Echo: We put Jeff Bezos' always-on microphone-speaker in a Reg family home

Dave 126
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Re: Kieren, out of interest, how old are you?

Perhaps our views have been informed by science fiction... we have watched films in which people interact with disembodied voices. Most famously perhaps, HAL 9000 from 2001:Space Odyssey, or more recently Jarvis from the Iron Man films. The former is dangerous, because it was given poorly thought-through orders by human bureaucrats, the latter benign because it was built by its user.

We also have Colossus: The Forbin Project.

The original Cortana, from the Halo video games was a goody, but the game's developers Bungie have a history of using 'powerful AI gone haywire' as a plot driver (see 'Marathon'). In the video game, Cortana is a military ship AI, providing information pertinent to tactical decisions; in reality, Siri, Cortana et al grew out of research done for the US DOD to triage information for battlefield commanders.

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Internet daddy Vint Cerf blasts FCC's plan to ban Wi-Fi router code mods

Dave 126
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Re: Software vs Firmware

[Software / Firmware] vs Hardware

If the concern is that people can operate outside of legitimate frequencies, the authorities could just insist that OEMs make routers that can't do so. That way, it doesn't matter what firmware the user installs.

I appreciate that this might add a few cents to the cost of a router. Whilst not infallible, anyone really wanting to trespass on reserved frequencies will at least have to get their soldering iron out.

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Italian court rules in favour of lunchtime porn viewing

Dave 126
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Indeed Reg hacks are being more careful- hence today's Reg report of 3M's 'Privacy Film', that reduces the viewing angle of any screen it is placed over:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/10/15/hp_reckons_you_can_hack_a_pc_just_by_looking_at_it/

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Apple may face $900m bill after A7 CPU in iPhones, iPads ripped off university's patent

Dave 126
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Re: Why not ARM?

I dont know, it's not clear. However, from the linked document:

"9. The Court has personal jurisdiction over Apple pursuant to Wis. Stat. § 801.05(1)

because Apple is engaged in substantial and not isolated activities in this state and judicial

district, including maintaining a retail store and employees here. "

That doesnt apply to ARM

"16. Since the issuance of the ’752 patent, Apple has filed one or more patent

applications that cite the ’752 patent as relevant prior art. "

I don't know if ARM has cited patent '752

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Who gets Teslas made and throws Apple shade? It's… MUSK!

Dave 126
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Many thanks!

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Dave 126
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Yeah yeah this is fun and all, but did I miss the Reg report of Musk's plan to continuously explode hydrogen bombs above the poles of Mars?

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A thousand mile Atom merci mission: Driving from Monaco to London in an open-topped motor

Dave 126
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Re: The bloody flies (and other airborne thingies)

Of Joseph Lucas, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Lucas

He died in Naples of typhoid after drinking contaminated water (he was a devout teetotaller and would not drink wine).

Let that be a lesson to us all.

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Dave 126
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I would recommend keeping a roll of Self Amalgamating Tape - the silicone variety - in one's car to anybody. it can be used for repairing hoses and pipes, fashioning tool handles, and some have even used it as a stop-gap fan belt. It has no adhesive, but sticks to itself.

Duck Tape and zip ties are of course essential too!

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Surface Book: Microsoft to turn unsuccessful tab into unsuccessful laptop

Dave 126
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actually, I'm interestH5ed in this. Eventually like, no rush or anything. As a CAD user, the GPU is notable, because most ultrabooks neglect it.

Stylus screen might be genuinely useful, in a way plain toucscreen laptops don't appear to be.

Application UIs can only get better at taking advantage of Styli when appropriate.

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GCHQ's SMURF ARMY can hack smartphones, says Snowden. Again.

Dave 126
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Made me think of Chris Morris' film Four Lions:

BARRY:

The Feds can track your phone even if the battery’s out.

Really. They can see you underground right...

WAJ:

Can they see you if you’re not there?

BARRY:

Where’s there?

WAJ:

I don’t know.

BARRY:

They can see you everywhere, Waj.

FESSAL:

Are they looking at us through cameras?

BARRY:

Space cameras, yes

FESSAL:

But me dad says I’m not supposed to be on camera - it’s haram

BARRY:

With the greatest of respect Fessal your dad eats newspaper

FESSAL:

Not any more. He eats moths.

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Long-memoried boffins re-invent 1950s ferroelectric tech

Dave 126
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Re: The name "FMC Corporation" has been taken for decades

>If they're too dim to type type "FMC" into google and find out there's already several big companies with that name,

Fixed it for you! See:

Ford Motor Corporation

FMC Fairbanks Morse and Company - heavy plant

FMC Technologies - oil services

FMC.co.uk Dental industry publishing

It is acceptable to trade under an already used name if you are in a different sector. Do you remember a time when Apple Computer wasn't a player in the music industry, but Apple Corp was?

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World finally ready for USB-bootable OS/2

Dave 126
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Re: Ahhh OS/2 Warp

I seem to remember that is how far I got,, back when I was a spotty teenager. A hardware / media fail, not the fault of OS/2 (though as I mostly played games on my PC, I might not have had too much for it really).

In 2008, an ATM in Peru rebooted on me, and I saw an OS/2 boot screen.

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Intel's 6th gen processors rock – but won't revive PC markets

Dave 126
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Re: Too many processors will confuse the market

>Although many of these processors are not actually manufactured specifically but are selected post-manufacture, how is the average Joe going to know which is which?

Good question, but hasn't it alwaysbeen that way? Generally, gamers will know which chip they want - they enjoy researching stuff like that! Similarly, the CAD crowd will have an idea of what they are looking for, or have a relationship with a shop or vendor who will build and guarantee (and have certified) a complete system.

The 'Average Joe', is just going to look less as a the CPU names, and maybe more at a whole laptop or PC and ask "Will it run WordyPaintWeb quickly enough", or more likely (given most CPUs have been quick enough for most tasks for some time) "How long will it last on one charge?", "How heavy is it?" and "Does the screen flip through 180 deg so I can watch movies comfortably in bed?"

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Apple's big secret: It's an insurance firm (now with added finance)

Dave 126
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Re: Jumped the Shark

Hiya, at the time of writing, the votes and comments above suggest, roughly, that half you really don't want a touscreen laptop, and half of you quite like them or the idea of them.

Maybe we can at least all agree that "Not everybody would consider a touchscreen on a laptop to be a selling point".

Personally, implementation is everything.... If a touch screen laptop only had a conventional hinge, it would be of no use to me because it would be ungainly to touch the screen. However, models with keyboards that can fold out of the way - a la Yoga Pro - I can see the point of those.

I can also see the point in just having a tablet and a laptop as two distinct machines, though well integrated - eg, the tablet can act as a second monitor for the laptop, or as a graphics tablet.

For some tasks, the latter scenario will offer the better experience.

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Dave 126
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Re: Wow - Good analysis!

>Still, Im not going to by any tech device that pretty much put together with a glue gun.

No Lotus Elise for you, then!

Okay, I won't bore you with the advantages of glue in manufacturing ( and in use, and in end-of-life recycling), since I suspect your sentiments are based on one truth: Glued devices are tricky for the amateur to repair / swap out components.

In good faith, answer me this: If a device took you one hour to repair, how cheap would it have to be for you to think "Feck it, I'll just get a new one!"?

Damned decent Android and Win phones are available today for £100. If in five years time, your standard do-it-all phone cost £30, would you still spend an hour repairing it? Would you still bother, if the manufacturer offered to part-exchange it for a new one for £10?

Please, I'm not disagreeing with you. I'm just thinking ' out loud' about at what point scarapping is the better option.

(And I mean 'scrapping' as an efficient reclamation of materials. You could almost imagine say a Fab designing SoC to be easier to reclaim the scarcer materials... or a laptop maker using cases of a single, common and easily recyclable material- oh wait...)

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Dave 126
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Re: Slow Upgraders!

If a person has already invested money in useful Android peripherals (yeah, I know!) and apps, then no Apple phone can be its equal for that individual user.

The converse is also true.

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Dave 126
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Re: It seems to me that Apple do almost everything just a bit better than their rivals...

>Re: It seems to me that Apple do almost everything just a bit better than their rivals...

>>That'll be why they have such dominant market share in enterprise software, mobile and desktop O/S, and streaming music then.

Why would any company want 'dominant market share' for it's own sake? A large market share is only desirable if it makes money, or it gives a commercial advantage that will allow money to be made in the future.

Enterprise software: Was never Apple's game, now have deal with IBM

Mobile OS: Apple don't care cos they make most of the money that is to be made.

Desktop OS: Again, Apple don't care as long as you've bought the hardware. OSX has enough users that software developers - especially in some sectors - will continue to offer OSX versions.

Streaming music: Apple do care, very much - because it has disrupted their iTunes business. However, they only joined the race in earnest a coupla months back, so who knows.

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Hats off to Nintendo’s platform supremo Super Mario Bros at 30

Dave 126
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Re: Keen

The PC platform games always seemed lacking compared to Mario and Sonic - and Wonderboy et al - on the consoles. Keen was EGA ugliness, Jilll of the Jungle was merely alright, Gods was a sort of 'run and gun' game.... Flashback wasn't as good as the Amiga version.

Still, a few years later my console and Amiga-owning friends would come round to mine for X-Wing, and later Doom

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Apple downgrades iPhone 6S with wimpy 1715mAh battery

Dave 126
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Re: I'll take the *2nd* thinnest phone in history, please

I've just made my phone 50% thicker to add to its functionality. It is now also a ruler, knife, toothpick, pen, file, tweezers and pen: I glued a Victorinox 'Swiss Card' to it.

It works for me, but i wouldn't expect it work for most people.. Similarly, I see a lot of builders with iPhones in cases ranging from slim to 'two cigarette packets' in size - it seems that the individual users can choose the level of protction that suits them. More battery? Maybe these builders are able to charge their phones off their 18v site stereos, or in their vans. I'm not sure how all these IT Commentards here are always so far away from a USB socket to charge from.

There are, if these threads are to be belived, people who are on the phone so much that they require a second battery, yet at the same time they will tolerate the faff of restarting their phone off every time they need more juice. Don't insult our intelligence by pretending that is an optimum solution.

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Dave 126
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Re: Bit of soft shoe-ing here

>But the previous model will even be better on battery life when the new iOS update happens to it.

The battery savings are more likely due to a SoC process shrink. Anandtech will probably republish a Chipworks analysis in due course.

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Dave 126
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Re: Yeah, I noticed The Register is in Apple Hate Mode

>Anyone still making buying decisions based on brand loyalty, or in the more current nomenclature, fanboyism, these days is doing themselves a disservice.

That's largely true, but if it takes an individual several days to weigh up one option against another then relying on 'track record' actually makes more sense (depending upon how much one's time is worth). Ultimately, physical products can't be completely expressed 'on paper', and trying things for themselves can take too long. If what you are used to works for you, then buying MKII or MKVII can make sense.

I don't use Apple. I use Android and Windows, Sony and Dell*. However, I don't like unnecessary snark, since it muddies any sensible discussion of useful features and good design choices.

* the aged Dell keeps trooping on, so I will overlook some of its offensive design decisions.... blue LEDs for starters.

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Dave 126
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Re: Yeah, I noticed The Register is in Apple Hate Mode

>Yeah so sorry we're not kissing the ass* of a huge multibillion dollar corporation. Funny how everyone likes our snark until we pick on their favorite* business.

'Kissing ass' is a bias, just as is 'pissing on'. Many of us here don't like any form of bias; give us straight info and let us make our own minds up. The headline suggested less battery life, whereas the article remembered that the chances are that the SoC is built on a smaller process and that the new OS version might save power. As a reader, I think it reasonale that the headline and the article agree; c'mon guys, this isn't New Scientist or Wired.com FFS!

I use a couple of Android phones, and I want them and their replacements to be as useful to me as possible... I don't see how spreading FUD about the completion helps that end. Give credit where it is due.

>it is reasonable to assume that a smaller battery means less battery life.

That's only a reasonable assumption if you haven't been paying attention to the trend in CPU power consumption for that last umpteen years. Hell, even Lewis Carroll** knew that in Alice Through the Looking Glass ( what we call the 'Red Queen Effect'). Moore's 'Law' isn't a law, but as a prevailing trend one should consider any observed exceptions to it as noteworthy. By your own admission we don't know the process size of the new iPhone SoC, and you are quite correct, but I'm curious as to why your assumption is that it doesn't fit the trend.

In Android land, the first mainstream phone to use the Snapdragon 800 SoC was the LG G2, and being first its battery life was widely applauded. SoC process size does make a difference to battery life.

* spellings that suggest the article was written by the USA branch of the .co.uk Reg site.

** Snark hunting? Frumious Bandersnatch.

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Apple's iPad Pro: We're making a Surface Pro WITH A STYLUS over Steve Jobs' DEAD BODY

Dave 126
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Re: Embarrassing

>but a stylus? Painful to watch and a betrayal of everything Jobs stood for.

It isn't a betrayal at all. A stylus on a phone is a useless hassle, if one is only making phone calls or entering text - the functions of the first iPhone.

A tablet is different beast, and a tablet used as a graphics tablet even more so.

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Dave 126
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Re: Slavishly Copied

>Stylus Copied from Samsung

Seriously? Don't be so flippin daft.

> (less well)

You've used this new Apple stylus, have you? Tell us please, how does it compare to the Adobe stylus released earlier this year? In use.

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Dave 126
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>People said that the surface pro was expensive well at least with a surface you get a full desktop OS not a smartphone OS.

That's a fairly arbitrary differentiation... If the UI works for the HI hardware and it runs suitable applications, who gives a damn what the origin of an OS is?

>Small point of inquiry. According to the apple presentation the GPU in the new iPad pro and iPhone 6s offer console level graphics. Exactly which console are they comparing it to, the PS One?

Between the PS2 and PS3, roughly.

http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/190105-does-the-iphone-6-actually-have-console-quality-graphics

http://static1.gamespot.com/uploads/original/110/1100542/2644037-3674092395-Tegra.jpg

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Dave 126
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Re: Stylus is a bit understated

Adobe have already tested these waters for Apple, by releasing pen and ruler for iPod. Obviously Adobe also released iOS software to take advantage of them, too.

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Apple iPhone 6S: Same phone, another day, but TOTALLY DIFFERENT

Dave 126
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Re: What about the memory?

The behaviour of streaming audio buffers does my nut in too - and I'm an Android user. Let us both hope that whoever finds the solution first, Apple or Android, is swiftly copied by the other! : D

In fairness, Google has a nasty habit of suggesting that an app be updated (i.e maps), when the newer version exceeds the hardware of my device (yeah, my newish phone broke, so I'm on a aged cheapo phone). Apple are aware that many iOS users are still on older hardware, and then *don't always* trip those people up with OS updates.

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