* Posts by Dave 126

5033 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Another day, yet another emergency Adobe Flash patch. Because that's how we live now

Dave 126
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Re: Why Won't it Die?

"The slow death of Adobe Flash has been hastened — YouTube, which used the platform as the standard way to play its videos, has dumped Flash in favor of HTML5 for its default web player. The site will now use HTML5 video as standard in Chrome, Internet Explorer 11, Safari 8, and in beta versions of Firefox. "

- http://www.theverge.com/2015/1/27/7926001/youtube-drops-flash-for-html5-video-default

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Horrifying iPhone sales bring Apple $18bn profit A QUARTER

Dave 126
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AC has nailed it on the head - most people who want an iPad already have one.

Last time I saw some figures, iPads accounted for the majority of UK tablets (though that might have changed since the cheaper Android tablets have become more cheerful), and of those iPads, the majority rarely leave their owner's home (so battery and weight-saving improvements aren't as crucial as they might be for phones). As a device to quickly conduct a web search or view some images, an older iPad looses little to its newer siblings.

AC can see the bleedingly obvious, whereas Wired.com is talking bollocks as usual:

"Nobody Knows What an iPad Is Good for Anymore"

- http://www.wired.com/2015/01/nobody-knows-ipad-good-anymore/

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Dave 126
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This was a earnings call, which most public companies make to their investors, not a product announcement. Therefore one would expect there to be words like "Sales, net profit, fiscal, revenue, dollars" etc.

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Fanbois to gamebois: Apple paperwork reveals iOS FUNPAD

Dave 126
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In context:

Apple made the filing in the same year as the first iPhone was released. I can't be the only one who has wondered before why Apple haven't made an iOs gamepad - or released a reference design for the 3rd party peripheral manufacturers.

The answer probably is that Apple have been able to sell plenty of iPhones without such a gamepad.

Apple historically have been a little wary of the games market too - in the Mac days they feared that games would negatively affect how people saw their computers.

The Android hardware market is a bit more fragmented ( witness the inability of Android phone vendors to settle on a standard for wired remote control headsets, or music/charge docks) and no big player (Google?) took a lead on gamepads.

Sony made a decision not to release a proper 'Playstation Phone', probably because it would cannibalise sales of their dedicated PSP machines. Sony then tried the 'Playstation Mobile' initiative - but only a small number of phones (even fewer non-Sony phones) were supported - so it probably didn't gain enough critical mass of users and developers to continue. They seem to have a change of heart (part of the 'One Sony' strategy), and have made their recent phones and tablets work with Dualshock 3 controllers 'out of the box' - and other vendors' phones can be made to work with them too.

Ever more Android phones now support USB OTG, which is a straightforward if inelegant way of adding a gamepad to a phone. Not all games support gamepads, but the classic console emulators for Android mostly do.

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Cash'n'Carrion January sale: Get in there while you can

Dave 126
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Re: 3D printed...

SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!

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Dave 126
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The Victorinox ('Spartan') penknife is good - works out at £16 after code, about what you'd pay in a camping or hardware shop. It is all you need to rewire a plug, apply filler, open wine, paint, beer and baked beans, drill holes, remove splinters from your fingers and food from your teeth.... It can also be used to sew some crude clothing a la Rambo First Blood but I haven't done that myself. Both blades are very sharp, and it's handy to have the smaller blade stay wickedly sharp for precision tasks after using the larger blade for cruder jobs. The steel is easier to resharpen than Leatherman's.

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Anonymous: Snap on that Guy Fawkes mask, we're marching against child sex abuse

Dave 126
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>I wonder if anyone has ever told Anonymous what happened to Guy Fawkes?

Yes, Alan Moore has:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-16968689

Anonymous don't emulate Guy Fawkes, they emulate a character called V. Why Moore played upon Fawkes is explained in the link above.

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Dave 126
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Re: Isn't this the equivalent of marching against malaria?

>Just not sure what benefit a march in masks promoting Warner Bros IP is going to do to improve that? It's like the lamest possible version of vigilantism.

I largely agree, Cliff. However, unlike past campaigns by national papers, it probably won't do any harm. After all, however lame the protest, they are only asking that a proper inquiry be conducted - so I'm inclined to give them benefit of the doubt this time.

You're right though - given the reasonableness of Anon's demands on this occasion, I don't see the need for the masks.

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Dave 126
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Re: Isn't this the equivalent of marching against malaria?

> Are you saying the police should 'do something'? They are doing something.

Really? What do the names Rotherham and Rochdale mean to you in the context of recent news coverage?

>Isn't this the equivalent of marching against malaria?

No, it isn't. It would be more the equivalent of marching against people being paid to research malaria but who are just sitting about.

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Dave 126
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>oh gawd, they're gonna start naming and shaming. and if they name the wrong people.... /o\

They don't seem to be doing a 'News of the World' and naming and shaming - or indeed indulging in any direct action. By their own words they are merely demanding that the Inquiry into Historic Child Abuse actually gets going, and isn't artificially limited in its scope as previous inquiries have been.

Whatever one thinks of their past actions, in this case they are behaving more responsibly than any Red Top newspaper.

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Dave 126
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Re: What could possibly go wrong?

Chris Morris and Brass Eye did a much needed and superb job of lampooning the media hysteria surrounding paedophilia. However, whilst the red tops like the News of the World were inciting vigilantism by people who didn't know what a 'paediatrician' was, Anonymous are merely calling for inquiries into the abuse of power:

"We demand independent inquiries untainted by the corrupt, with full power to investigate. We demand an end to secrecy,"

Well, they can dream. The record of British public inquiries is a bit poor. The current one into historic child abuse has failed to get off the ground. Chilcot's inquiry into the Iraq War has taken six years so far. Anonymous's view of this is no different to the writers of Yes Minister:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FRVvjGL2C0

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Dave 126
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Re: Isn't this the equivalent of marching against malaria?

>The whole justice system is deeply geared up to punish paedophiles already. I doubt it could be made more critical of paedophilia TBH - statutory rape of a minor has terms akin to murder, so what iis the march for, exactly?

The protesters take the view that the justice system has failed the victims of child abuse, especially historically. As we have seen with the Catholic Church, the structure of some organisations can offer individuals the opportunity to abuse children, and to have their colleagues ignore complaints or cover up their crimes. People working for churches, schools, children's homes and in entertainment have been convicted of child abuse, organisations that structurally aren't too different from police forces, the judiciary and politics.

Many of the survivors of abuse become troubled teenagers and young adults, and have issues with substances abuse, mental health and petite crime... this places them at a great disadvantage when making complaints or testifying against well-connected 'pillars of the community', should they even overcome their distrust of authority figures enough to even make a complaint in the first place.

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Nexus 6 would have had a fingerprint reader, but Apple RUINED IT ALL

Dave 126
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Re: Nobody can break into my brain for a password.

@Crisp

I guessed where your link was going, and I was correct!

Now, it could be possible to have a 'dummy disk' - containing innocuous emails, innocent landscape pictures, fake bank details etc - that is revealed with a dummy password. The real, or full disk is only revealed with the correct password. That approach might buy some time - until disk sizes are compared - for the device's owner before the wrench is picked up again.

It's the equivalent of carrying a dummy wallet to give to a mugger. All they get is a cancelled debit card and a fiver.

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Dave 126
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Re: Court ruling

>Just implement a feature where using a certain digit (or password) invokes a hard data erase.

A buzzing alerts you to an incoming call. You fumble in your pocket to retrieve your phone, and run the wrong finger over the sensor...

Interesting concept, needs refining! :)

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Dave 126
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Re: If they felt AuthenTec was clearly superior

AC, for criticising someone who has answered a question with a fairly clear explanation of the system as it is, you are coming across as wilfully ignorant. Well done.

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Dave 126
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Re: Court ruling

>I find to hard to believe they could say that police can't force you to provide a password to unlock your phone but can force you to provide a finger.

It is a moot point, since it is only an engineering process to unlock an iPhone once you have a photograph of a fingerprint, and if you are arrested the police already take good images of your fingerprints:

Once he has the digital image, Krissler can use the same method he previously described for unlocking Touch ID with physically obtained fingerprints: he inverts the colors of the obtained print, so the ridges of the fingerprint are rendered in white and the grooves in black, then prints the image in black ink. The black ink on the paper provides just enough texture to recreate a fingerprint's three-dimensional shape, but inverted.

Krissler then pours glue or plaster over the print of the fingerprint. The ink print serves as a stamp, imprinting the fingerprint's whorls and ridges into the glue and creating a mold that can successfully unlock a Touch ID-locked iPhone 6.

- http://www.tomsguide.com/us/iphone-touch-id-hack,news-20066.html

Your fingerprints are found upon your person, just like a piece of paper with username and password details could be.

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Apple patch shields Macs from Thunderstrike

Dave 126
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Re: according to a report.

> i may be mistaken, but IIRC the original report said this wasn't fixable in software/firmware.

I got the impression that it wasn't fixable after the attack, but it could be prevented from occurring in the first place: "To secure against Thunderstrike, Apple had to change the code to not only prevent the Mac's boot ROM from being replaced, but also to prevent it from being rolled back to a state where the attack would be possible again. According to people with access to the latest beta of OS X 10.10.2 who are familiar with Thunderstrike and how it works, that's exactly the deep, layered process that's been completed."

- http://www.imore.com/thunderstrike-attack-also-fixed-os-x-10102

So it would seem to be a case of putting a better latch on the stable door before the horse has legged it.

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Dave 126
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Re: Is this an issue for any PC using EFI

The proof-of-concept attack only attacks Macs, but it has never been seen in the wild - it needs the attacker to have physical access to the machine or else use social engineering to trick the user into attacking themselves.

The attack uses Thunderbolt, which is seen comparatively few non-Apple machines - there probably isn't a big enough pool or PC targets for it to worth an attacker's effort. Even on these PCs, "Intel has never allowed [PC] motherboard vendors to hang the Thunderbolt silicon / add-in card off the CPU's PCIe lanes. These have to hang off the platform controller hub (PCH). On the other hand, Apple was allowed to hook up the Thunderbolt silicon directly to the CPU."* so this might prevent a similar attack on generic PCs.

* http://www.anandtech.com/show/8529/idf-2014-where-is-thunderbolt-headed

As a PC user, I wish Thunderbolt was more common. The idea of a thin-n-light laptop plugging into an external GPU+monitor is an attractive one for CAD users- but I appreciate it might be a bit niche when USB 3 and ethernet takes care of most users' data transfer needs.

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Ex Machina – a smart, suspenseful satire of our technology gods

Dave 126
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Garland took on some of the duties traditionally associated with direction during Dredd 3D.

http://www.webcitation.org/6AeJkhk7A

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EE data network goes TITSUP* after mystery firewall problem

Dave 126
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Re: Nothing Nowhere

I stand corrected. Thank you Blane.

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh, dear...

Thanks AC, thanks OllyL...

They both appear to be apps that map mobile phone coverage... now what we need is an app to compare the apps that compare the networks! :-)

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Dave 126
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Re: The flipside of competition

Until Worstall writes a piece, the man who gave us the PHB has written:

http://blog.dilbert.com/post/102544401421/confusopolies

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh, dear...

>I'd be willing to pay around a 15% mark-up over their competitors if I knew it was better.

Okay, let's roughly divide that 'reliability' into two categories:

- Day-to-day coverage of a wide geographical area. Okay, you can get some data for this, and make your decision accordingly.

- Protection from occasional blips in service. This is harder to judge, so is harder for companies to compete on. Every company has been known to mess up from time to time, so without knowing the future I'm not sure how you can make your choice based on this criterion. Okay, that extra 15% you pay might allow for some extra redundancy in some areas of the network, or possibly allow a system where you get priority over other customers during areas/periods of congestion... but it might only take one engineer to screw up once to deprive you of service for a few hours.

If you wanted the greatest possible reliability, you'd carry several phones on different networks and pack a satellite phone too. And a pager. Sod it: radios SW and CB, a scanner, Aldis lamp and flares.

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Dave 126
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Re: Nothing Nowhere

Nothing Nowhere = Something Somewhere <= Something Everywhere <= Everything Everywhere

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Dave 126
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Re: Oh, dear...

>What we really need is a reliable set of metrics, publically and independent, so that we can more easily see who is best on service. If the government wanted to do something useful with the networks, gathering and publishing official statistics would be the single best thing they could do

An app on people's phones might be the best way of gathering that information. After all, the phone knows where it is, and the phone can test its up/download speeds. Having tens of thousands of phones gathering this data would make such a coverage map fairly quick to compile.

Just an idea. I'm not sure who would be best to implement it. Maybe we'll end up with soft-SIMs, and just use whichever operator has the best signal in an area.

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Dave 126
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Re: I'm sure that any of these companies could do far better if they just doubled their prices

>Why is this a surprise? People shop by price, putting quantity over quality, as always.

Only they don't; in this market, people can't shop by price because it is near impossible to compare tariffs. It's what Dilbert-creator Scott Adams dubbed a 'confusopoly'.

https://fitforrandomness.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/confusopoly.png

Instead, people often go by which network offers best reception in their area, or ditch an operator if they get messed around by them.

The best way to get a good tariff is to buy your phone out-right, and then negotiate a SIM-only tariff, since they know that you can switch operator at any time. It also has the bonus that your phone is covered by the Sales of Goods Act, so if it malfunctions you can insist on a full refund or a straight swap for a new unit from the retailer, without having to wait a fortnight for a repair.

"£16, you say? Umm, seems a little high... £15... lower, lower, nah, lower or I'm switching to Vodaphone... £12? Okay, that'll do. Thank you."

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Windows 10: The Microsoft rule-o-three holds, THIS time it's looking DECENT

Dave 126
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Re: Read the whole thing...

>[ Microsoft claimed that this could lead to a 50 per cent performance boost for some games.] Well, without further explanation I must assume the upgrade fixes hindering bugs and uses hardware features previously unused

Yeah, why use Google when you can just assume? Let's see what impressions professionals from the hardware and game engine industries have:

"DX12 has the potential to be much more efficient than DX11 at the cost of some effort on the part of the developer."

nVidia engineer Henry Moreton http://blogs.nvidia.com/blog/2014/09/19/maxwell-and-dx12-delivered/

"Right now, it’s too early to discuss performance due to the alpha state of Windows 10 and DirectX 12 drivers, however we are happy with the numbers we’re seeing."

Unity blog http://blogs.unity3d.com/2015/01/22/staying-ahead-with-directx-12/

Sounds cautiously optimistic, no?

The 50% claim is for games in which the bottleneck is the CPU (so generally not FPSs like Crysis, you mentioned Halo but there hasn't been a PC version for years).

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Drinking to forget? OK. But first, eat a curry... QUICK!

Dave 126
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Re: Hmmm...

No, not cannabis. MDMA:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/07/11/mdma-molly-therapy-ptsd-cure/10683963/

There have been a few studies - dating back a fair few years now- each with enough promise to justify larger trials. Indeed, it was with therapeutic applications like this in mind that the drug was developed in the first place.

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MYSTERY RADIO SIGNAL picked up from BEYOND our GALAXY

Dave 126
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Re: More research needed

The Reg recently used 'Boffins' in this article: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/01/17/boffins_its_easy_to_make_you_grass_yourself_up_for_crimes_you_never_did/

whereas the Reg of old would have used the term 'Trick cyclists'. What's changed?

The old Reg had the tacit understanding that 'boffins' either made cool stuff- like explosions, laser-equipped sharks and robots - or otherwise used maths so complicated that blackboards would collapse under the weight of chalk and us lesser mortals would get a headache just looking in the general direction of one of their published papers.

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Dave 126
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Re: What accounts for fast radio bursts?

Depends upon the information density of the signal, and whether it is compressible - which would suggest a repeating component...

"We buy any UFO dot com! We buy any UFO dot com! We buy any UFO dot com! We buy any UFO dot com!"

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'If you see a stylus, they BLEW it' – Steve Jobs. REMEMBER, Apple?

Dave 126
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Re: re:some of us were not born with dainty little pinkies but chipolata digits

@fruitoftheloon & Professor Clifton Shallot

Thanks for the tips!

@Fluffy Bunny

>But it really was limiting, wasn't it. Be honest with yourselves fanbois.

Fanboi? I've never owned an iPhone. My Android phones have been a similar size, so I tend to use them one-handed - a stylus isn't suitable. It might have been limiting for the original iPhone to not have a stylus, but then it had limited processing power, battery and resolution. Some people will say that it was limiting for the iPhone not to have a physical keyboard, a Blackberry style trackball, or a gamepad - it's depends upon the task in hand and the application UI.

If you read the rest of my post, you'll see that I was supporting the idea of tablets with stylii - even more so now that they have high resolution screens and the distance from the pixels to the top of the glass has been reduced. Not everyone will have a use for the stylus though - those people who primarily use their tablet for content consumption and checking train timetables will gain little.

I tend to use CAD software more than Photoshop - so I use 'snaps' and dimensions rather than rely on pin-point cursor accuracy, even when using a mouse. However, I know professional 3D modellers who use graphics tablets because they find them more comfortable.

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Dave 126
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Re: Whipped out the Newton the other day

>So unless Apple changes the whole iPad interface the whole thing just smells of fail.

Uh? Why?

My laptop has several interfaces (main OS plus UIs in applications), some supporting more than one form of Human Input. I might use a mouse to launch a game, and then use a joystck. I might use the keyboard to launch an application in which then use the mouse.

I don't see why iOS would have to be completely reworked for a stylus to work well in some apps.

If you look at OSX, they have integrated 'iOS-like' gestures such as pinch to zoom whilst retaining menus and keyboard short-cuts.

>• you can write on the resistive touchscreen without worries about where to put your hand

This can be faked in software. iPads already selectively ignore some finger input near the edge of the screen, when it suspects that it merely the hand that is supporting it. My laptop can be made to ignore its touchpad whilst I'm typing.

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Dave 126
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Re: re:some of us were not born with dainty little pinkies but chipolata digits

A stylus allows accuracy.

Finger input allows nuance, by interpreting multiple points of contact.

Some phones that relied on styli did so because their software wasn't well thought through - rough translations of mouse-driven desktop UIs.

A lot of interaction on a modern phone consists of selecting items from a list, or pushing a nice big button... the accuracy of a stylus isn't required, so why faff around finding a stylus?

Accuracy. As someone who draws, I have never found a phone to be a perfect replacement for a notepad. (I haven't yet used a Galaxy Note for long enough to judge it. )

There is a market for pen-driven tablets, especially markets that have been traditionally served by OSX Macs. See the Modbook (a pricey cut n' shut Macbook with a Wacom digitiser), or the Wacom Hybrid tablet.

Adobe, whose software works well with styli on OSX, have started to play in this space on iOS - their 'Project Mighty' is now called Adobe Ink, a hardware stylus and associated software.

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MARS NEEDS BROADBAND, insists Elon Musk

Dave 126
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Re: Wrong question altogether

>So, frankly, doing something about getting that region out of poverty should probably come first [before broadband internet].

Well, that depends upon whether access to to broadband internet can help to get the poorest people out of poverty. It's complex, so I won't call it either way. There is potential for broadband internet to help with education, access to market data, organisation of people into groups to better represent their interests. There is potential for abuse, too.

Even if broadband didn't actively help get these people out of poverty, it might be that Branson is taking a punt on them becoming wealthier over time anyway, in which case by the time they can afford his broadband services his infrastracture will already be in place.

BTW, the £40 monthly bill in the UK is for the fast 50Mb cable broadband. The term 'broadband' is also used in the UK for copper wire internet (2 Mbs and up), for which the consumer is charged much less.

I've just tried to dig up the speech Arthur C Clarke gave on the launch of the first satellite to provide India with satellite television (reproduced in the book 'Greetings! Carbon Based Bipeds'). He speaks optimistically about the potential using it to cheaply deliver health and agriculture information to millions of rural people, and his concern "what a shame if it is merely used to peddle soap".

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David Cameron: I'm off to the US to get my bro Barack to ban crypto – report

Dave 126
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Re: Utterly pointless

>Hell, for all we know (pass me my tin foil hat) some commentards on here could be using code words to assist the ne'er-do-wells in carrying out some explosive mischief.

A manfrommars1 has been, but the GCHQ staffer assigned to monitoring his messages has broken down in tears.

And then there is that online video game Grand Theft Auto in which I saw a player's avatar jump jump duck jump duck duck duck duck duck jump head-but lampost jump duck fall-over jump... clearly some sort of code.

And did you really think that the 'typos' in Reg articles are accidental?

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Dave 126
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Re: @AC "11 mins" whatever that means, ElReg (was:Whatever.)

>And that's "jake", not "Jake". Computers are quite literal. Are you?

As users of written English, we have conventions to make communication clearer. One convention is the capitalisation of proper nouns. It makes text easier for us to parse. One assumes that one would only break from this convention if there was good reason to do so. Can't think what it could be, though.

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Dave 126
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Re: @AC "11 mins" whatever that means, ElReg (was:Whatever.)

I think jake's point might have been that he doesn't see the point of encrypted communications because he never knows if the message recipient or their computer is trustworthy. Maybe he just works on the basis that there may be security holes in the encryption that he is not aware of.

Disc encryption is different in that you don't have to trust a second party. It is good practice, for the sake of client relations, should your laptop be stolen or lost.

I said might.... it is also possible he was just being a bit jake... he doesn't see why anyone would wear a wristwatch because our computers have clocks, yet his good lady wife is a keen horse rider.

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Dave 126
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Re: Basically he's declaring war on private conversation

>... What's next, a government mandated microphone in every pub bog and living room around the country?

Following the deaths in the last couple of decades of some older gentlemen with a cavalier attitude to the law and regulations, we keep meaning to sit the retired pub landlord down with a microphone for a week to record the oral history and anecdotes, before he too shuffles of the mortal coil. It lead me to thinking, if only there was a way to wire a pub for sound but with a mathematically-enforced 100-year embargo on the recordings.

I'm not a mathematician, but I'm not aware of any way of accomplishing that.

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Samsung's first Tizen smartphone is HERE ... by which we mean India

Dave 126
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Re: Tizen's dead...

@Bazza

You are of course correct. I meant to say "Android or Tizen could run a car's 'Infotainment Centre', but [QNX] is reliable enough to run the car itself." but I left out 'QNX', so my sentence was the opposite of what I meant to say!

Thanks for the correction.

The Samsung Blackberry rumour has now been denied.... Oh well. QNX does seem a good fit for 'connected home' appliances.

I don't work in the automotive industry, but I know that CANBUS clearly divides the safety critical systems (engine, brakes etc) from the infotainment and HVAC systems. I wouldn't feel comfortable in a vehicle that used Android or Tizen for its drivetrain.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tizen's dead...

>So Tizen runs HTML5 apps, but no compatibility with the Android apps found on the vast majority of >Samsung smartphones.

>Given today's news, for the first time ever I believe Project Ara has a better chance of success than Tizen.

That was my first thought, but I'd never considered how developers are attracted to HTML 5... the yet-unrealised dream is that they write an app once and it runs on any platform.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tizen's dead...

>Ok Sammy might get some useful tech and possibly a few patents but what would they want with BB's os? Add a load of extra crud and make it like their Andriod offerings?

There is a very good reason why Samsung put that Touchwiz crud on their phones, and it is the same reason that they give you their own apps that duplicate the functionality of Google's, such as an app store, mail client, calendar and translator...

The reason is that Samsung want the option of leaving Google. The idea of Samsung having that option would give them more influence with Google. Samsung could potentially merely swap to the non-Googley AOSP Android - like Amazon have done - or go with Tizen or (possibly) QNX. The point is, whatever the OS, the user experience could be much the same as the existing TouchWiz UI that Samsung users are familiar with.

Thing is, Blackberry's QNX is a better fit for devices like smartwatches and wirelessly-controlled light bulbs. Android or Tizen could run a car's 'Infotainment Centre', but is reliable enough to run the car itself. Samsung, with their diverse product portfolio, could get more use out of QNX than BB have.

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Dave 126
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Re: Tizen's dead...

As I understand it, the main two issues with Tizen are the fuzziness surrounding its licencing, and the perception of it as being way too late to market to compete with other mobile phone OSs.

However, Samsung see it as an OS for TVs, watches, cameras and household appliances, from light bulbs to fridges, not just phones.

That said, Blackberry's QNX OS is more suitable for home automation (an area that Samsung, with its wide range of consumer goods and appliances, is competing in) as it is much smaller than Linux-based OSs, and because of its proven and certified reliability.

Samsung Buying Blackberry rumour... Interesting.

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GoPro feels COLD BREATH of APPLE on back of neck

Dave 126
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Re: Please tell me...

Prior? The article says the patent was reassigned from Kodak, so I assume (I can't remember Skegby Kodak ceased R&D) it predates GoPro's product line.

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Disney, McLaren and National Rail walk into bar: Barkeep, make me a Wearable

Dave 126
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And competing against mature, market proven solutions (fitness sensors) and emerging products with huge $$$ backing (Google, Apple, Samsung, Sony, LG, myriad startups, cheap n cheerful Chinese watches) - with travel info, fitness, shares in health companies, links to NFC payment systems, ecosystems of app developers...

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Dave 126
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What the hell?

I need to re-read the article just in case ...

EDIT

No, it's just as daft as it looked before. In an area where one needs a critical mass of adoption, what can they hope to achieve that won't fall out of Google, Apple and Kickstarter?

I just can't help but feel this is a bit late in the game. They would get a better return if they knock the hotel idea on the head, and put more money into Maclaren's and Loughborough's health sensors - at least then any spin-off company might be snapped up by Apple or Google for the benefit of the tax-payer.

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Preserve the concinnity of English, caterwauls American university

Dave 126
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Happy

For a bit of fun...

... search the Reg forums for some of these obscure words.

For example, with the exception of this thread, the last time 'knavery' was used by a commentard was a month ago, but that was the first use of it since 2012.

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Dave 126
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Re: I'm perturbed

>They have 'pertubate' as a verb in that list.

I've very rarely heard that word used as-is, but it is quite common to hear someone say "I was perturbed because [unsettling experience]".

Curious how sometimes only one use of a word is continues in common use.

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Dave 126
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Re: There... completed the assignment and used them all.

>melange is a French loan word than offers nothing more than mix or mixture.

Melange is also an English jargon term in Geology for certain bodies of mixed rock, and in gem stone trading for an assortment of diamonds of different sizes. Some also say it gives Guild Navigators the ability to fold space....

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What do UK and Iran have in common? Both want to outlaw encrypted apps

Dave 126
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Re: Surely...

Mr Cameron said the government had acted to safeguard powers for so-called communications data, which refers to the details of when and how people have contacted each other but not the content of messages.

He went on to say he would also legislate in the "more contentious" area of the content of these online communications.

There should be no "means of communication" which "we cannot read", he said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-30778424

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Hawking and friends: Artificial Intelligence 'must do what we want it to do'

Dave 126
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Re: Problem we don't have for tech we don't have to be solved by open letter. Conclusion: Arseholes

>Personality, drives, and motivations are orthogonal processes and have nothing to do with a smart learning/modelling machine.

Yeah, but we don't just want our AI machines to learn... we want them to act, too. We humans are concious... why? We evolved through natural selection of the fittest individuals and communities to local environments. Is our conciousness just a by-product of our brains' useful learning mechanisms, or does our conciousness actually confer an advantage to us that we do not yet fully understand?

If the latter, could it be that machine conciousness would aid machine intelligence?

I don't know. I don't know anyone who does know, either.

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