* Posts by Dave 126

6177 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Epic Games forums breached, salted passwords nabbed

Dave 126
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>confused about the above comment , i'd think they'd love people to use weaker password words

Strategically, the UK Gov might want more data, but doesn't want its citizen's (and corporate organisation's) data to be snaffled by some other nation states.

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Dave 126
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Re: Given the commentary about weak/strong passwords at the end

RightStallionCellClip it is then! :)

Alt text:

or NotwrongMarePileFastener

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Microsoft's HoloLens secret sauce: A 28nm customized 24-core DSP engine built by TSMC

Dave 126
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Re: What about heat dissipation?

The DSP will be doing more work when its 'view' changes - i.e when the wearer moves or rotates their head. When the wearer moves or rotates their head, there will be more airflow.

I'm assuming that Hololens production won't ramp up until MK II or III or whatever - so there's some scope to fab at process sizes smaller than 28nm.

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Dave 126
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re: ARM?

> Maybe they should have just gone for an ARM-based SOC instead of a custom thing with an Atom on the side, Windows 10 is supposed to be cross-platform after all.

Quite a few of the software partners are used to developing for x86:

http://www.winbeta.org/news/microsoft-announces-long-list-hololens-partners-new-use-case-scenarios

Not sure why you suggest an ARM-based chip in place of this custom DSP - even phones use GPUs that aren't ARM-based.

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Sex ban IT man loses appeal – but judge labels order 'unpoliceable'

Dave 126
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Re: Shame on the GP

The law was changed in the UK, ohh, about ten years or more ago. It was in the news and everything.

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Dave 126
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Re: They might be painful to remember they exist

The recent Karl Urban one was very good, but we only saw a bit of MegaCity One - and other than him passing Anderson's probation, it was presented as being just another day for Dredd. A great shame that no sequels are planned, though Karl Urban is keen - even suggesting that he could do one in a decade or two, portraying different parts of Dredd's career.

The Stallone film, whilst blaspheming, is worth watching for the production design and more ambitious scope - we go to Cursed Earth, even if its poorly realised. Stallone has since apologised for not making the film as it should have been.

Still, we'll always have RoboCop (emotionless lawman in a satirised world), and Dirty Harry (Clint being an influence on Dredd)

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Four in five Android devices inherit Linux snooping flaw

Dave 126
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Re: Well as i run

You didn't spot the tongue in a cheek, kryptylomese? :)

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Microsoft’s Continuum: Game changer or novelty?

Dave 126
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Re: "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers"

>Of course all I know about this historic literary figure is what was in that episode of Blackadder III, so I'm no more refined than the next lout.

Just to add to your knowledge of the man, Johnson was fond of insulting the Scottish and Scotland. I've yet to learn why.

http://www.samueljohnson.com/scotland.html

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Dave 126
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Re: "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers"

>Just out of curiosity why didn't you use Muslims have for Women Imams instead of "Samuel Johnson had for women preachers", given there are Women Preachers and there's zero Female Muslim Imams.

Your curiosity didn't extend to clicking the link? The alternate analogy you provide wouldn't express the nuance of the author's views.

Johnson: "Sir, a woman's preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all."

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Uber and Volvo take on Ford in race to launch self-driving vehicles

Dave 126
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Re: Got fed up of being flashed.

>Will it insist on putting the side lights on even when it's sunny? Easy to bypass with a switch on the dash!

Why would you want to turn them off? Daytime Running Lights have been shown in studies to improve safety for years*. Even your own observations as a driver should tell you they substantially increase a car's visibility in most driving conditions. Even on bright sunny days, when a road moves through areas of shade, DRLs really help other drivers a, spot you, and b, better judge your speed. If you haven't observed this, then I hope driverless cars arrive sooner rather later.

The number of people (usually in grey or silver cars) who don't turn on their lights in dusky, misty or rain-spray conditions is incredible. It's almost as if they want to be invisible on the motorway.

*The first study of DSLs I read of in New Scientist, about fifteen years ago, was conducted in Australia. I'm assuming you have a rough idea of the difference in visibility conditions between New South Wales and, for example, South Wales...

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Snowden says Russia ‘probably responsible’ for NSA hack

Dave 126
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Indeed he is, and you can sense his anger. Rather than a retelling of a Le Carre novel, this shenanigans could be from the pages of one of his recent books, such as 'A Most Delicate Truth'

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Google's brand new OS could replace Android

Dave 126
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>I don't see why this would change anything wrt the pushback from equipment manufacturers and network operators that is slowing the rate of updates to a crawl.

Because with a different OS architecture, you could update more parts without waiting for an SoC vendor to release a binary blob to an ODM.

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Dave 126
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Re: Because most of the planet

>I can't tell whether you're joking. QNX as a mobile OS died with Blackberry's smartphone

And QNX lives on as it has for decades, battle tested, real time - and a tenth the size of Linux. Google are happy of there are devices around that inform them about their users, but those devices don't have to be phones.

Still, it'll probably save them headaches if they roll their own OS.

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Dave 126
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Re: How does using the Linux kernel prevent Google from distributing Android updates?

>The real reason they can't distribute updates quickly is because they let the OEMs customize it, thus they depend on the OEMs to port their changes onto new versions before they can be released.

Doug, you're forgetting a few stages, such as the chip set vendors creating binary blobs that are them passed onto the ODMs.

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'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

Dave 126
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Re: quality..

>Worse still I can find no evidence it [http://www.pwbelectronics.co.uk/product/cream/cream.html] is a spoof Someone has reinvented snake oil sales for the 21st century.

No proof of a spoof, but all evidence points that way:

Free sound improving techniques:

Plain piece of paper under one of four feet.

Pinning back one corner of a curtain.

Plain piece of Blue paper under any vase of flowers or any pot plant in the listening room.

Tying a Reef knot.

Freezing using a domestic deep freezer.

Pieces of quarter round wooden doweling in all right angles.

Aligning the slots in screw heads.

- http://www.pwbelectronics.co.uk/free-sound-improving-techniques

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Dave 126
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Re: Are we sinking into a kB/Kib-like mess?

>So when you buy a TV, you have to peer at the specs to find out if they are kilopixels or kibipixels? Stuff that.

Don't bother, just look for the UHD tag - that'll mean that it is 3,840 x 2,160 and that's all that most available content will take advantage of.

Then look at your viewing habits and environment - do you watch TV in a well lit room, or is it in a darkened cave for cinema-style film viewing? This has a bearing on which display technology will be most suitable.

After that, just make a decision about whether you want to spend extra for UHD Premium and/or Dolby Vision - these refer to the colour and dynamic range. Do note that the UHD term alone means that a TV will likely offer superior colours and dynamism than your older TV anyways.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dearth of content

The BBC are making Planet Earth II (narrated by David Attenborough) in UHD. It's due to be broadcast later this year, hopefully with a UHD BluRay to follow.

I know it's not David Lean, but like Lawrence it should have some spectacular scenery in it! :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Dave 126.

> Googling "IPS glow" should give you some pretty extreme illustrations.

I don't need to Google it, I've seen it! :D Very noticeable when watching 'letter-boxed' content (i.e a movie whose aspect ratio is different to that of my old LCD/LED screen. The 'black bars' at the top and bottom of my screen are not black, and can be easily seen against the background if the room's lights are turned off.

My friend's OLED TV is a different matter. You just cannot discern any letterboxing at all in a dark room - which is what you would expect. It really does make for a better film viewing experience, especially during darker scenes. He knew his viewing habits, weighed up the benefits against the cost and made decision.

However, read up on it - if you use your TV for watching football on a Saturday afternoon for example, you might be better served by the greater maximum brightness of a modern LED set.

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Dave 126
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Re: Dave 126.

>But how does it offer "greater dynamic range"? It is a TV with pre-recorded content, OLED and black is black, white is white. How can they "increase" that via the source data or by changing from 8bit to 10bit colour? They can't. ;)

How? Because UltraHD includes the Rec 2020 colour space specification, at either 10 bit or 12 bit per pixel. The specs cover the content, not just the final display output.

'White' is not the brightest. For a demonstration of a file having more information that the display device, just download a *.EXR or *.HDR image file, view them in PhotoShop (Gimp users need a fork called CinePaint) and play with the slider in the bottom left hand corner - it is akin to adjusting the exposure of a camera. Such files are used as environment maps in 3D raytracing, because light sources depicted in the images have their brightness defined by the extra bits per pixel - thus the rendered object will have highlights and shadows. To a lesser extent, many RAW files will also contain more information than most monitors can display.

If you reread my original post, you'll see that I said that UltraHD TVs have greater dynamic range, not '4K' TVs per se. That was very deliberate distinction, though of course most '4K' sets will soon conform to UHD (the first 4K sets were sold before the standards were finalised).

>The UHD/4K provides better resolution.

UHD is a set of standards that include resolution *and* colour space, including a greater dynamic range.

>The OLED provides better dynamic range. (Black has always been black, white has always been white, everything else is false advertising)

OLED does allow for proper black (each pixel is its own light source), but there are techniques that increase the dynamic range of LED sets (effectively 'local dimming'). LED sets still won't have the absolute black of OLED, but they have greater absolute brightness. This is accounted for by UHD standards.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra-high-definition_television#Color_space.2C_dynamic_range.2C_and_frame_rate

>TL:DR, the advertisers and marketers are very good at using the wrong words to describe real changes, and you seem to have fallen for it.

I'm not clear what you think I've fallen for. Your post suggests that you think UHD only covers resolution. The idea that 'black is black and white is white' applies to printed images but not necessarily to display devices (or for that matter, stained glass windows).

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Dave 126
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Re: quality..

>... not to mention the fact that the analogue vinyl recording format makes no provision for DRM

Well, vinyl wouldn't provide Digital Rights Management, hehe! The idea of 'vinyl Analogue RM' may have been around, but it never worked in practice - if it was ever implemented at all:

Copy-protection for vinyl in the 1970s

http://www.currybet.net/cbet_blog/2008/01/copy-protection-for-vinyl-in-t.php

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Dave 126
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Re: quality..

CDR? Get back to your cave, Mr Flintstone! :D

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Dave 126
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Re: Skeevy bastards

'4K' is only really a marketing term, but a useful one - the screen is almost 4,000 pixels wide, and the screens have nearly 4 times the resolution of 'HD' screens.

I can't really think of a better, easily grokkable term for them: 'SuperDuperUltraHD' or somesuch would only confuse consumers after the whole 'HD Ready / Full HD / i / p' kerfuffle.

UltraHD TVs can be very nice - not because of the extra pixels, but because of the greater dynamic range that is contained within the standard. A friend of mine recently bought an OLED 4K TV, which cost about 4 times more than a LCD/LED 4K TV... but the image is gorgeous.

Annoyingly, few 4K TVs have DisplayPort inputs, and few non-gaming graphics cards have HDMI 2.0 output yet. For sure, most 4K TVs can access 4K content by themselves (Netflix et al), but it would be nice to have a 4K computer display for pictures and the like.

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Dave 126
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Re: quality..

>a very poor audio mastering on CD can still be worse than a very good audio mastering on vinyl... ...lets not kid ourselves (or trick innocent people into believing that vinyl has some "mystical" and "warmer" sound - they might as well start investing in hand-braided interconnect cables and special speaker cabinet wax).

Indeed. Because of its inherent limitations, mastering on vinyl requires greater care - by a human being with ears. This can give some recordings a different sound on vinyl compared to CD, sometimes a sound that can be called 'warmer'. High fidelity? No, it is isn't. Better sounding than CD? Sometimes yes, though of course it is subjective - and largely a function of the mastering, not the medium.

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MoD flings £800m at Dragons' Den miltech startup wheeze as post-Brexit costs bite

Dave 126
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Details here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/innovation-initiative-to-bring-future-tech-and-ideas-to-the-armed-forces

The 'VR Helmet' mentioned in the article is actually an AR (augmented reality) helmet for training exercises - infantry in a real field can see - and respond to - simulated tanks and aircaft etc.

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League of lawsuits: Game developer sues cheat-toting website

Dave 126
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IDSPISPOPD

Doors? Where we're going we don't need doors!

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£1m military drone crashed in Wales after crew disabled anti-crash systems – report

Dave 126
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Re: The shape of things to come ...

Well in this case, the highly trained operators knew they knew best - or rather, they knew of limitations and some 'known issues' with the automated system.

The Tesla crash was probably caused by its user not using it as intended - i.e, it was designed to supplement and not replace his control. However, there is a school of thought, as cited by Volvo, that this 'half-way house' approach is potentially dangerous, since human nature is to lose concentration at times.

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Foxconn profits plummet 31%

Dave 126
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Yeah, Marvin had been chatting with them.

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Revealed: How a weather forecast in 1967 stopped nuclear war

Dave 126
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Re: This icon over 'ere....

In this day and age, Major Kong would use a selfie stick to record his bomb-riding hijinks.

""Survival kit contents check. In them you'll find: One forty-five caliber automatic, Two boxes of ammunition, Four days' concentrated emergency rations, One drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills, One miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible, One hundred dollars in rubles, One hundred dollars in gold, Nine packs of chewing gum, One issue of prophylactics, Three lipsticks, Three pair of nylon stockings....Shoot, a fella' could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff.""

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Dave 126
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Re: "90% mortality

> if nukes launched we'd have over 90% mortality in one year. The electrical grid would go down, and then it wouldn't be rebuild for a very, very long time.

At least we'd only need to rebuild it to 10% of today's capacity!

But seriously, for some grim, depressing viewing - though accurate - try 'Threads (1984)': https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Threads

In its depiction of a nuclear winter, it makes post-apocalyptic films look like a walk in the park.

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Italian MP threatens parents forcing veggie diets on kids with jail

Dave 126
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Re: Criminal offence to impose a diet lacking in essential elements ?

>Did you know, they will not collect blood from anybody who spent more than one year in the United Kingdom between 1980 and 1996.

The reason is fear of CJD, a human version of Mad Cow Disease. The Canadians and Australians have - or have had - similar rules.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1116429/

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'Alien megastructure' Tabby's Star: Light is definitely dimming

Dave 126
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>You only need a Dyson sphere if you can't control your population size.

You only need to control your population size if your living habitat is limited.

As it is today, in developed countries with good healthcare, female education and access to contraception, birth rates are fairly close to death rates. But hey, maybe aliens with extended life spans might rear several hatchlings to maturity over their lifetimes, just for the joy of having the young ones around.

>Which is surely an absurd flaw for a highly developed civilisation to have. Unless there's some kind of moral imperative to bring as many sentient beings as possible into existence,

You're second-guessing the ethics of a highly advanced civilisation? It's not unreasonable that a civilisation will see nothing wrong with converting sterile space rock into living space.

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Dave 126
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Re: ALIENS!

>Out of the untold trillions of stars out there, one flickers in a way we have not yet observed....So it must be a Dyson Sphere....HAH! As if! Get real.

You have so missed the point. Astronomers don't believe there is a Dyson Sphere, and they know that their colleagues don't believe so, either. Therefore, their use of the Dyson Sphere concept is just a fun way of signposting to their community that they have some interesting unexplained data on their hands.

Just to make things clear to you: Jocelyn Grace Bell didn't really believe that there were Little Green Men sending messages when she recorded the signals that lead to the discovery of pulsars, even though she joked that the alien buggers were sending signals purely to mess her PhD research up.

RAF technicians never really believed in Gremlins. It was a joke.

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Dave 126
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>Why building a huge super-structure around a star, at a distance safe enough to live for the foreseeable future, which is covered on the inside by energy-gathering whatevers, and has living space throughout is some "end game" goal for a civilisation, I can't fathom.

The end game is to waste as little available energy as possible, so as to allow the maximum amount of consciousness. As a sci-fi trope, the idea is speculation about factors that limit a population's continual growth.

Similarly, Iain M Bank's 'Orbitals' concept - a descendant of Niven's 'Ringworlds' but more modest in scale - is based around the idea of providing as much human-habitable area for as little matter as possible. Banks would be the first to admit that he was a fiction writer, so let's ignore the need for impossibly strong materials and radiation-shielding force-fields etc.

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Dave 126
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>Literally the scale is so vastly infeasible I don't get why it even gets mention in things like this.

Because scientists have a sense of humour. The Dyson Sphere concept can be safely used a placeholder, since no one will mistake it as a serious explanation (without extraordinary evidence). 'Tabby's Star' is also refereed to as the 'WTF? Star' (Where's the Flux?), which again signposts the researchers interest. Similarly, the signal that originally lead to the discovery of pulsars was jokingly known as LGM-1 - 'Little Green Men'.

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Intel's smartwatches are so hot right now – too hot: Basis Peak recalled for skin burns, blistering

Dave 126
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Re: You know what doesn't get too hot and combustable on my wrist?

>I was going to suggest the Casio F-91 but I've never owned one so couldn't vouch for it's reliability and it's flamability

Nine out of ten terrorists wouldn't use anything else in their bombs!

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Dave 126
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Re: What are you; some sort of Common Sense Nazi?

>Why would anyone buy hardware or software that can be shutdown at the whim of a cloud provider?

>>Steady on old chap; are you calling the myriad delights of, say, the IoT or Smart Metering into question?

Why the hell are all these purveyors of gizmos (watches, thermostats, security cameras, MiFi cards etc) sending stuff to the cloud? Surely there is market opportunity for a domestic device - a low-power, always on server the user keeps at home - and supporting platform, that individual users can send the data their gadgets generate to? The vendors individual gadgets can write for this platform, and if the user desires they can mirror it on a cloud-based docker, one which only they control.

There doesn't seem to be any consumer need for their unencypted data to spaffed around tinternet. Or have I missed a few things?

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Dave 126
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Re: So hot right now

Hehe!

Recently rewatching Zoolander, what stood out was the film's parody of fashionistas' tiny mobile phones. Yep, having a tiny mobile used to be cool!

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Samsung Note 7: Probably the best phone in the world. Yeah – you heard right

Dave 126
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Re: I might buy one ...

Aye, there are many phablets, it was just becoming a chore digging through for camera reviews. The Note 4's camera was given good reviews. My dad just gets annoyed with trying to type on a 5" Nexus 5 phone and kept threatening to just buy another handset, and I noticed that he had made it his primary photographic tool, too - so figured a 5.7" screen and good camera would fit the bill - not too fussed about other specs or price.

I'm not afraid of lesser known brands (hell, the important bits, i.e the SoC, camera hardware and screen all come from the usual suspects anyhows). Personally I'm using a Huwaei so cheap it's almost disposable (yet really not annoying).

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Dave 126
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Re: Still doesn't have front facing speakers..

>Do you own a samsung by any chance

No, not since the 'feature phone' days.

>Video is so much better...

For sure. It's just that if I'm at home, I use a bigger screened device (TV, laptop, tablet), and if I'm in public I'd use headphones out of courtesy to the people around me.

>...using it for a little background music in the shower, kitchen etc stereo despite not a lot of separation just sounds better.

I don't listen to music on small speakers. I'm not an audiophile, but if there isn't a minimum level of fidelity I don't bother. If I'm in the shower I might use a rechargeable Bluetooth speaker for spoken-word content. Mine was a tenner from Aldi, friends swear by their Bose speakers.

>Rear speakers are so stupid, your heads on the front

Only if you're looking at the screen at the same time - hence my statement that the front speakers are for video. Podcasts etc work fine with the phone placed downwards.

>, i got so sick of cupping my old (reflecting the sound) phones to be able to have a low volume level and make out what was being said on something as the audio was firing away from me.

For sure, if watching video is your use-case, then prioritise front-facing speakers. Otherwise headphones are your friend. Or a discrete speaker.

>I had samsung devices for a long time until the s3 and they screwed me on updates time and time again.

I'm sorry to hear that

> Im so glad i moved this last time to a nexus device,

I hear it's a good phone.

> I dont really see any real world usefulness from having a curved edge screen, all your doing is introducing a weak spot for when you drop it.

Nor me, which is another reason I haven't bought one. I'm not sure how it would work with a case, either. Still, it might actually be tougher than the ABS plastic that is used for the bezels of some phones.

Be well.

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Dave 126
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Re: I might buy one ...

I was looking at a Note 4 for my old man - a big screen for his sausage fingers, and a good camera. However, the LG V10 is now on the shortlist - a very similar beast, but without the stylus. £100 cheaper.

I hadn't heard of the V10 until recently - all the noise around LG has been around their 'G' series phones, which can be a little novel. The V10 seems to be a 5.7" phone flagship-spec phone with a good camera but without too much weirdness.

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Dave 126
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Re: Still doesn't have front facing speakers..

Front facing speakers are only useful for watching video in a private place. So yeah, if you travel a lot a find yourself catching up on TV shows in hotel rooms, good front facing speakers are nice. However in your own home you'd probably being using a bigger-screened device.

-Audio-only podcasts: rear speaker is fine

-Public transport: headphones

-Best sound quality: headphones or bigger discrete speakers

-'House party': Big discrete speakers

All design and engineering is compromise, and Samsung have evidently decided that that the 'cost' (weight, space) of including front speakers wasn't worthwhile, given the limited circumstances in which a user might use them. The weight/space etc budget will have been spent on other features such as a bigger battery, or a front panel layout that makes the phone more comfortable to hold.

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Huawei P9 Plus: Leica-toting flagship gets a big brother

Dave 126
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Re: Barelling

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/6229436014/sony-s-curved-sensors-may-allow-for-simpler-lenses-and-better-images

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What's long, hard and full of seamen? The USS Harvey Milk

Dave 126
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On the Good Ship Venus

By Christ you should have seen us

The figurehead

Was a * in bed

*ing a dead man's *

Part of the fun is composing your verses. The above is found in Loudon Wainwright III's version. If you know that the rhyming scheme is AABBA, you should be able to work out the the last *.

More here, NSFW: http://www.lyricsmania.com/good_ship_venus_lyrics_loudon_wainwright_iii.html

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Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies

Dave 126
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Re: Patching speed is probably the issue

>Really, why can't the core OS and libraries be auto-patched for security as most Linux distos do?

Because [technical reasons].

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Since you love Flash so much, Adobe now has TWO versions for you

Dave 126
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Re: Given the choice between Adobe Flash and the mercy of Ming

HELLO! I'M BRIAN BLESSED!

(Caps because...)

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If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

Dave 126
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Re: Devil's in the details

I too had to fix a CNC machine - every so often, but not always, the machine would engage its brakes (by design it locks itself rigid if it loses contact with the stand alone XP PC it shipped with, for safety reasons) and though it would resume the tool path would have been knocked off kilter. The cables were innocent this occasion. I swapped out its Pentium 4 CPU for a faster Pentium 4 HT*, and the problem never came back. Faith restored, we could leave it on a 30 hour job and go to the pub.

In all likelihood, the original CPU would have been up to the job, were it not for Windows XP sometimes deciding to do something you haven't asked it to do, thus momentarily distracting the CPU from the one thing we asked of it.

*I happened to have this CPU lying around ever since the pick donutty thing on its previous motherboard turned brown.

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Dave 126
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Re: gonna use this one from now on...

Then there's WOMBAT - Waste Of Money Brains and Time

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Dave 126
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Re: Backups underwriters and overpriced household furniture

I remember a magazine in the nineties had a frebie on the cover: a mouseball-sized textured sphere with a hexagonal shaft.

Yep, it was actually a tool for cleaning the gunk off the rollers inside mice with a power drill.

Urgh, the horror of mechanical mice!

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Dave 126
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Re: Pournelle's law, well one of them anyway...

Well, the good thing is that even not knowing the a coiled wire thingy was, I could see that it wasn't where it was supposed to be! Hmmm, the groove in this lump of solder matches the wire that comes off this strangely free thing....

Similarly, one of the pink donut things on a motherboard of mine was brown and dirty looking, unlike its friends. Diagnosis was the motherboard was, and I do believe this is a technical term, fucked.

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Security gurus get behind wheel of driverless car debate

Dave 126
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Re: Given the Nice tragedy ...

Yeah, thats some very saddening news from Nice.

For sure, one can imagine automated or semi automated trucks in five years time that are incapable of running people over - but then, if someone was determined enough, they might be able to disable those systems.

Alternatively, would the police in the future be able to remotely stop any human-driven vehicle? (though of course last night's tragedy occurred too quickly for such measures)

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