* Posts by Loyal Commenter

1985 posts • joined 20 Jul 2010

Get root on an OS X 10.10 Mac: The exploit is so trivial it fits in a tweet

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Re: Congratulations on repeating exploits before they can be fixed

Congratulations on repeating exploits in detail before they can be fixed by anyone...

...because all REAL hackers get their ideas from articles on the Reg, not from attempting to target known classes of vulnerability (hint: various privilege escalation exploits are nothing new). If you think that keeping flaws like this secret from the public does anything to stop a dedicated, skilled and experienced black-hat from exploiting them, then you truly must be one of the most naïve people around.

While I've got your attention, I've got a bridge here I have to sell quickly, I've got the permits and the deeds and everything. You wouldn't be interested would you?

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HP slaps dress code on R&D geeks: Bin that T-shirt, put on this tie

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Where I work

Although we are a software house, we have a dress code, which is 'shirt and tie' (except Fridays). The shirts I wear are never ironed, and the tie has holes in it. I'm smarter on a Friday in cargos and a T-shirt.

The only dress code should be not to wear clothes that would prevent others from doing their job, for example by being so skimpy as to cause embarrassment to others. Other than that, why the hell should it matter?

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Shamelessly copied from IMDB...

Kryten: I ask the court one key question: Would the Space Core ever have allowed this man to be in a position of authority where he might endanger the entire crew? A man so petty and small minded, he would while away his evenings sewing name labels onto his ship issue condoms. A man of such awesome stupidity...

Rimmer: Objection.

Justice Computer voice: Objection overruled.

Kryten: ...a man of such awesome stupidity, he even objects to his own defence counsel. An over-zealous, trumped up little squirt...

Rimmer: Objection.

Justice Computer voice: Overruled.

Kryten: ...an incompetent vending machine repairman with a Napoleon complex, who commanded as much respect and affection from his fellow crew members as Long John Silver's parrot.

Rimmer: OBJECTION.

Justice Computer voice: If you object to your own counsel once more Mr. Rimmer, you will be in contempt.

Kryten: Who would allow this man, this joke of a man, this man who could not outwit a used tea bag, to be in a position where he might endanger the entire crew? Who? Only a yoghurt. This man is not guilty of manslaughter, he is only guilty of being Arnold J. Rimmer. That is his crime; it is also his punishment. The defence rests.

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PEAK PLUTO: Stunning mountain ridge snapped by New Horizons craft

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Re: Cryovulcanism

I think they should be named The Mountains of Madness, after all we have apparently already decided to refer to a region on Pluto as 'Cthulhu', what could possibly go wrong?

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Do we even know what the 'dark' and 'light' materials are made of? presumably there's some sort of spectrographic instruments on board to measure the chemical composition? Has this been done and we're just waiting on the data?

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The Register's resident space boffin: All you need to know about the Pluto mission

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Apparently 'Charon' (the moon) is pronounced 'Shar-on', not 'car-on' (like the ferryman) because its discoverer wanted to name it after his wife (Charlene), but the naming conventions of the IAU say that objects shouldn't be named after spouses or mistresses. Charon was chosen, as a compromise, as it sounded a bit like his wife's nickname 'Char', hence the pronunciation, and also the Greek/Roman god confusion (Charon is the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, Pluto is the Roman god of the underworld, so maybe we should start referring to the planet as 'Hades').

Shall we reach a deal: you don't refer to yourself as 'Shris' and James Christy doesn't refer to his wife as 'Karlene'.

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Dwarfworld PLUTO may not have a real DOG on it - but it does have a TAIL

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Re: Astroid with 90 million tons of platinum..

I just looked it up and currently worldwide 'production' of platinum is a staggering low, only about 200 tons a year.

Because of its terrestrial rarity, there are few large-scale uses for platinum. It has industrial uses as a chemical catalyst in the reduction of alkenes amongst other things (it's the main 'ingredient' in a car's catalytic converter, which apparently accounts for the largest portion of the global production). As a catalyst, it is not needed in large quantities, and isn't consumed (although catalysts can be 'poisoned' by chemical impurities in the reaction mix, requiring them to be periodically removed and re-purified). It has the 'ooh-shiny' factor associated with rare metals and brightly coloured minerals that makes it valuable for jewellery. There are a handful of other industrial and medical uses (cis-platin is a platinum containing chemotherapy drug).

What effect would a 90 million tonne glut in the worldwide market have? Firstly, it would piss off all those people who thought they were being clever by investing in platinum. A bunch of people would find their expensive wedding rings were suddenly worth no more than something made of base metal, and industry would rejoice. Industrial applications that would previously have been considered impractically expensive could be exploited. University chemistry departments and industrial research outfits could buy the metal in bulk and find new uses for it (it is a very efficient catalyst for a number of processes after all). Platinum-based alloys would become financially practical; these may have interesting chemical or physical properties, such as superconductivity.

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UK.gov will appeal against DRIPA-busting verdict, says minister

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Re: Too little, too late .......and now flogging a dead duck horse

I was about to say that your comment made no sense, and ask whether you are amanfromMars, then I looked again...

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Re: hmmm,,,

You seem to have been cut off mid sentence there...

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Re: Hmmm....

@Aristotle's Horse, you're absolutely right.

in principle, there is no problem in the police and security services having the ability to monitor those who are suspected of a crime, subject the approval and oversight of the judiciary. This oversight is a vital safeguard in a true democracy.

The involvement of the judicial branch is a measure to prevent abuse of those powers by 'bad actors', within the police or government. it is not reasonable to presume that without such safeguards, these powers will always be used correctly, and history would indicate that they will be abused.

Even though the involvement of the courts would most likely be a 'rubber-stamp', it would mean a record of the request is kept (although this may remain secret for a number of years as national security requires). Furthermore, such 'rubber-stamping' is absolutely not the job of a politician (i.e. the Home Secretary), as there is a clear conflict of interest in cases where investigations may have a political element.

Note that the existence of such powers is in itself not a problem, if they are used correctly. On the one hand, we have the fundamental human right to privacy, but on the other, we have the rule of law, and the need to prevent criminality. This leads to the sensible conclusion that intrusive surveillance should be used only to combat crime (which includes terrorism), and not to watch the populus as a whole. This should require reasonable suspicion, so that it is not applied inappropriately, limitations so that it is not over-reaching, and oversight, so that the results can be evaluated independently to establish whether the surveillance was justified in the first place, to check any possible pattern of abuse. None of these prerequisites needs to be onerous - as I said, it is a simple matter of rubber-stamping and recording.

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High Court smacks down 'emergency' UK spy bill as UNLAWFUL

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Re: Called it :)

Given that limits and oversight were the main problems with this legislation in the first place, if these are added by regulations, this may do a lot to allay the fears that this legislation could be misused as a tool of oppression. The main issue, as I see it, is the current lack of judicial oversight, which is an absolute necessity in any real democracy.

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Please tell me that this half-witted attempt at Animal Farm is invalidated in its entirety by the ruling?

That's the wrong Orwell novel I'm afraid. Animal Farm is an allegory about a socialist revolutionary party becoming the same as the autocracy it replaces. The one about state control and surveillance, and the crushing of privacy and individuality is Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Those in power in the Tory Party (and the civil servants behind the scenes that keep pushing for this kind of legislation) should make sure they read the book in its entirety - the inevitable conclusion is not only that such state power crushes its citizens, but that it also does so unto those in power.

“If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.”

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Re: Called it :)

If the legislation is unlawful does that mean prosecutions made under it are now also unlawful and subject to appeal, or maybe even automatic overturn?

I'm not sure it's so much a law that prosecutions might be made under, rather than a law that allows The Powers That Be to do things that they might otherwise be prosecuted for doing, or at least be under proper lawful scrutiny from the judiciary while they are doing those things...

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Re: Called it :)

They may try to rush something through, but like now abandoned repeal of the fox hunting ban, and the proposed scrapping of the Human Rights Act, they will find that there is plenty of resistance from the SNP (who will certainly be opposed), Tory back-benchers (many of whom are not nearly as right-wing as the front bench), and the Labour party.

If they do manage to get past that level of opposition, there's the matter of public opinion. After the budget, there's already a growing sense of betrayal and distrust from many of those who voted for them. Trying to force something like this through will further damage their already tarnished public image.

Then there's the House of Lords. I doubt they'll be able to push it through as 'emergency legislation' this time without proper debate in the second house. Say what you like about the fairness of having hereditary peers, but as an unelected body, they don't have the same concerns of electioneering, or even party loyalty, to worry about, and any bill could meet tough resistance here.

The ham-faced boy and his party weren't expecting to get an overall majority in this parliament, and didn't plan for it. They're now having to clear up their own mess, with nobody else to share the blame with. They may find it harder going than they planned. Expect more of their election promises to vanish under the fiery glare of scrutiny...

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Osbo PRINTS first Tory budget in 19 years with his BARE HANDS

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Re: Raise more Tax

He would then have needed to invest the same amount in the Emergency Health service who would treat accidents caused by such an act of tom foolery.

You make a couple of rather grand assumptions there, and I don't think they hold much water:

1) That there are currently no cannabis users in the UK.

2) That cannabis use frequently leads to hospital admissions.

3) That if cannabis use were legalised, non-users would suddenly start using it, or that users would suddenly up their intake.

The truth of the matter is that 1 in 3 UK adults has at some point taken illicit drugs (these are most likely to have been cannabis, simply due to its availability, and fact that you can smoke it and don't have to snort or inject it). It is estimated that 5% of the UK population regularly uses cannabis - that's 3 million people, give-or-take. Hospital admissions related to cannabis use are not great in number, and are rarely expensive emergency admissions; the most likely admission is to a mental health unit due to acute psychosis, as some people react badly to cannabinoids.

From a personal point of view, I know a number of people who either have, or still do regularly smoke cannabis. I've never personally heard of a single hospital admission related to cannabis use. I do know people who have had mental health episodes which are caused by stress. On the whole, these have not been amongst people who use cannabis.

Just as a final point, I'd better mention that I obviously don't advocate the use of any illegal drugs. Although I believe that there should be more of an element of personal choice about what we can put in our own bodies, we also have to take responsibility of our actions when we do so, and the health costs that may result. This also applies to drugs which are currently legal (such as alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine), some of which could well be much more harmful than cannabis, both to individuals, and to society as a whole.

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Re: In the spirit of George Orwell, lets rename IDS's role as

Blair has made more than £100 million since leaving office, and probably paid less tax than you have on it.

Don't get me wrong, just because I despise IDS doesn't mean I have any love for the other lot. Whilst IDS is a hypocritical over-entitled leech, Blair is just as parasitic, and a war-mongering lying self-aggrandising arsehole to boot. But then, he was never a socialist, and 'New Labour' was never a socialist party.

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Re: It's like the sixth form common room

The minimum wage is about to become £6.70 per hour. Coming out at £27,872, will leave very nearly £26k after taxes are applied. Multiply the gross by 3 for mortgage purposes and you get about £83k maximum safe borrowing limit. That alone woul allow the purchase of a whole raft of protery types and locations throughout the land, except for central London.

Ahahahahahahahaha. That might buy you something in a town in the middle of nowhere where there aren't any jobs. Round where I live (which is not in London, FWIW), a 1-bed flat is going to cost you £150k+. If you're on minimum wage, and you didn't pay rent,or pay any bills, council tax, or NI, I'm pretty sure you still wouldn't have enough after a year for even a 10% deposit on that. Of course, you'd probably have starved to death trying to save enough that it wouldn't matter anyway.

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Re: In the spirit of George Orwell, lets rename IDS's role as

Point taken. Admittedly, it's a long time since I read that particular book. I might be overdue a re-read.

I just get sick of people harping on about 1984 and not having read it.

Anyway, as an analogy, I don't think Animal Farm had enough pigs in it to accurately represent our current Tory cabinet, and anyway, it was a metaphor for soviet Russia. In general Orwell seems to have written about far left-wing dystopias, rather than right-wing ones...

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Re: In the spirit of George Orwell, lets rename IDS's role as

Having read both of the books in question (and I suspect a lot of people who quote from them or allude to them haven't), I can say I don't recall any 'ass' in Animal Farm. There's a horse who gets shipped off to the glue factory, who I'm sure is supposed to be allegorical of some soviet figure or other, but that's as close as you get.

As far as I can tell, IDS is a toxic over-privileged mean-spirit moron, who deigns to make judgements on the poorest in society when he has had everything given to him on a silver plate without having done a proper days work in his life*. He knows nothing of real work, and the real struggle to make ends meet that he is making far worse for the poorest in society.

*Yes, I know he was 'in the army'. I also know his job in the army was essentially that of Captain Darling from Blackadder Goes Forth.

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Behold: Pluto's huge ICE MOUNTAINS ... and signs of cryovolcanoes?

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Re: mostly...

Should really have called it R'Lyeh...

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Re: Uranus has weather from time to time

Obligatory:

Professor Hubert Farnsworth: I'm sorry, Fry, but astronomers renamed Uranus in 2620 to end that stupid joke once and for all.

Fry: Oh. What's it called now?

Professor Hubert Farnsworth: Urrectum. Here, let me locate it for you.

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Re: Vulcanism

There was a comment that it is like the theory for the Earth's moon - a large impact knocked some of Pluto's material into orbit to coalesce as moons.

This theory had some general level of acceptance until New Horizons got closer and it turns out the albedo of Pluto and Charon are too different to comfortably accommodate this theory (Charon is quite a lot darker than Pluto). Now we see that both bodies are quite a lot less cratered than we might expect, which throws up further questions. This is all good, because it means there is still plenty of interesting science to do.

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Ex-MIT prof jailed for 'making experimental film' about bank robbery. In a bank. Without saying it was a film

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Thanks for that pearl of insight, Che.

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Russia campaigns to stop SUICIDALLY STUPID selfies

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Re: Sure it was the selfie stick?

Yup, Thor really doesn't like them

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Unions call for strike action over 'unusable' Universal Credit IT

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Re: 15.8 billion!?

That's £250 for every man, woman, and child in the UK. I'd certainly appreciate not having that sizeable a portion of my taxes wasted on a vanity project, especially not one dreamed up by the vile IDS.

Remind me again exactly who is sponging off the tax-payer, because from where I'm sitting, it doesn't look like the poorest in society.

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"In the event of any strike action the Department will ensure that the Universal Credit service continues to run smoothly."

Just a minute, let me get my breath back... I've not had such a good laugh in weeks.

It seems this particular poltico just managed to reinvent the meanings of the words "continue", "run" and "smoothly".

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Dormant ALIEN SLIME LIFE frozen in SPEEDING comet will AWAKEN - boffins

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Re: microbes (for which there is *no evidence*)

Formaldehyde is somewhat stretching the definition of 'complex carbohydrate', given that it is actually the MOST chemically simple carbohydrate possible, with the formula CH2O.

What has supposedly been detected on this comet are (amongst other things) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (which by definition have at least ten carbon atoms in them (the simplest PAH being naphthalene which consists of two fused six-member rings).

Also, blasting something with hard radiation is generally considered to be a better way of making things fall apart than stick together. An analogy might be to consider what happens if you put together a bag of flour, bag of sugar and some eggs and shoot them with a shotgun - you don't generally tend to get a cake.

Admittedly, none of this is anywhere near a remotely definitive proof of extraterrestrial life. However, if we were to find actual complex carbohydrates (the definition of which is generally considered to be multiple sugar molecules chemically linked together), it would be extremely difficult to posit that they have been produced by anything other than life, as we know of no non-life based chemical process which could produce them.

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Happy

@NomNomNom

Top trolling!

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I'm struggling to understand the downvotes; this is a perfectly reasonable hypothesis - the LHB occurred between 4.1 and 3.8 billion years ago, the earliest evidence we have for life on Earth is from around 3.7 billion years ago. Admittedly 100 million years is a long time, but in geological timescales, there is the blink of an eye between Earth cooling enough to be suited to life, and life cropping up.

Since current theories, and experiments conducted since the '70s suggest that it is rather difficult to get life going on its own, it doesn't seem totally unreasonable to posit that if life can exist in a dormant state inside a frozen astronomical body such as a comet, then it would only take a small fragment of such a body surviving re-entry intact to deliver such life to a planetary environment.

We know primitive life can survive inside such an body, because such life can survive in more extreme environments on earth (frozen for millions of years under polar ice, or inside nuclear reactors). We also know that icy meteorites can survive partially intact when colliding with Earth - superheating of the outer layers 'cushions' the interior so that it does not melt.

Frozen solid inside half a kilometre of ice would also nicely protect any microorganism from the sort of hard radiation found in space, so it is not unreasonable to suppose that if such life found its way into the interior of such a body then it could survive. Of course, the question would then be 'how did it get there', and if we were to find evidence of life in such an environment, this would inevitably suggest that such life is commonplace and abundant in the universe, and raises the further question of its ultimate origin.

Anyway, my point is, that from a hypothetical point of view, none of this is beyond the bounds of reasonable possibility, unless you happen to subscribe to the 'Earth was created in 6 days' rubbish that the less rational amongst us spout.

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This of course raises the possibility that the soon-to-active alien slime colonies of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko might find much of our planet to be prime real estate, ripe for a campaign of interplanetary conquest.

Who's to say that something like that isn't what happened ~4 billion years ago during the late heavy bombardment, and that we are not the inevitable result (amongst other organisms which we are doing a great job of trying to get rid of).

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'The server broke and so did my back on the flight to fix it'

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Re: so he scoffed “a huge handful of ibuprofen and acetaminophen”

I wouldn't advise an overdose of ibuprofen either, unless you like vomiting blood.

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Bridge, ship 'n' tunnel – the Brunels' hidden Thames trip

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Re: Them were the days!

Back then, stuff was largely done by "rule of thumb" and trial and error

We have this guy largely to thank for the end of that approach:

David Kirkaldy

He is also responsible for the rather fantastic motto, "Facts not Opinions," one which is still applicable, and which should be applied, to so many things today.

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Cunning goldfish avoided predator in tank for seven years

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Re: 10 inches

I think if you put a goldfish in a shark tank, it would probably be dead long before the shark got it, what with carp being freshwater fish, and (most) sharks living in salt water.

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Hated Care.data scheme now 'unachievable', howls UK.gov watchdog

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Re: the Health and Social Care Information Centre has been unable to implement those objections.

Sounds like it's more of a case of the original spec never being written down and agreed by anyone, least of all the public.

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BT: Let us scrap ordinary phone lines. You've all got great internet, right?

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Re: provide only internet services

@Cynic_999 - and if you think BT are struggling to find the cash for their ongoing maintenance and upgrades; their company accounts show they made a profit of over £2bn last year...

http://www.redmayne.co.uk/research/securitydetails/financials.htm?tkr=BT.A

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Re: provide only internet services

As well you should be "totally sure". That amounts to less than the salary of 1 linesman per 100 users before you factor in vehicle costs, admin and replacement equipment.

1 linesman per 100 users? Lets assume that it takes said linesman a day to fix a fault on a line (an overestimate I'd hope), that would still imply that there would be enough faults to keep him (or her) busy all year. Assuming a working year of 52 weeks, with 30 days annual holiday (lets be generous), and you get 230 working days a year to fix faults for 100 users. That would imply that BT is expecting, on average, something to go wrong with every phone line 2.3 times per year (230 days x 1 fault per day / 100 users per fault), or every 160 days or so. If any telecoms supplier gave me a service that shitty, I'd be off faster than you can say, "Service Level Agreement". It all makes me think of this.

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Re: provide only internet services

The wholesale charge for a copper line is £87.48 per year

Do you pay the wholesale price to BT for your phone line? No, didn't think so. The figure comes from their advertised rate of £15.99 per calendar month, £15.99 x 12 = £191.88. The twelve pence you can keep as a tip.

Of course, the figure of £87.48 may be closer to the real cost of maintaining the copper, but will still include a profit for BT, so the question has to be, what service are BT's customers getting for that other £104.40? My suspicion is: very little. The administration costs, and billing costs might come out of this, but I suspect that they account for maybe the £4.40 part of it, of which most of the cost is probably the postage. Given the amount of money they waste on shiny marketing guff that falls through my letterbox, I suspect they could well absorb that cost into their marketing budget and not notice it.

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Re: provide only internet services

Of course the copper line should be provided and maintained for free just like your mobile signal is......

Yeah, I'm totally sure it costs BT £192 a year to 'maintain' that bit of copper between you and the exchange, that is either buried in a hole somewhere, or strung along the tops of some long-dead trees (that last 30-40 years before needing replacement) for a mile or two.

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THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

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Re: @Roland6

the reason we haven't seen the massive extinction of species in the rainforests

...is that you've not bothered to google it.

Here, let me do that for you...

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Re: The "We're all going to die" hand-waving aside

@codejunky - glad I got your back up. I was deliberately trolling those who like to believe that anthropogenic climate change doesn't exist.

I won't argue that the finer points of theory haven't been worked out, but as someone with adequate education in physics and chemistry, at degree level, I can assure you that if you put the same amount of heat into a system, but allow less back out again, the temperature rises until an equilibrium is reached. If you think the second law of thermodynamics is up for debate, you are sadly mistaken.

Carbon dioxide absorbs some of the infrared radiation that would otherwise radiate heat back into space, and as a result warms the atmosphere. If you think the physical chemistry of carbon dioxide is also up for debate, again, you are plain wrong. This is an observable fact, not merely a hypothesis, or even theory.

That climate change exists is not in doubt, the exact effects that it will lead to are not known, as modelling them is imperfect. This doesn't mean that the extra heat will disappear, and it doesn't mean that on average, the planet won't get hotter. Bury your head in the sand all you like - as it happens there's likely to be more of it available, although you might find your head cooks when you do so.

Also, I might point out that you are making the same mistake as creationists in misrepresenting the meaning of the word 'theory'. I have no 'blind faith' (for the record I am rational secular humanist), and scientific theory most certainly is not religion. To claim these things is nothing more than an ad hominem attack.

There has been an awful lot of political spin, and uninformed opinion around the matter of climate change. Just remember, opinions are like arseholes - everyone has one, and they all stink. Try to stick to facts instead.

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Re: The "We're all going to die" hand-waving aside

I suppose you also take exception to the phrase "go spare" (or as we Americans put it, "go bananas").

Not at all, and that's a bit of a straw-man argument insofar as 'go spare' and 'go bananas' are idiomatic expressions, which don't carry their literal meaning (i.e. are metaphors), and 'go extinct' is some kind of ugly half-way house between metaphor and literal meaning. I think this is the thing that jars - there's no 'going' involved; a species that becomes extinct hasn't gone anywhere, at least not anywhere it is possible to come back from.

It might be worth mentioning that extinction isn't always necessarily a bad thing (evolution doesn't have 'direction' after all). As species evolve to fill an ecological niche, they may outcompete other species, which become extinct. This is just how nature works. However, as a species, we are both drastically outcompeting large numbers of species which are otherwise well adapted, and destroying those ecological niches.

This reduces the resilience of the ecosystem as a whole to adapt to change (in the short term at least). This may come back to bite us, when we find, for example, that climate change* makes large amounts of land uninhabitable to us, and there is no longer a genetic pool that nature can draw from to maintain life in those places. In this sort of case, we will find ourselves living on a smaller planet (in terms of habitable land mass). This might lead to a reduction in human population, probably in a rather unpleasant way for large numbers of us, but I don't think it's likely to do us in as a species, nor impact life in general on the planet in the long term.

*For the point of this discussion, I am going to make the assumption that those large number of people who actually know what they are talking about are largely correct, and that those irrational individuals who claim that anthropogenic climate change doesn't exist are as barmy, or corrupt, as they sound. Sorry guys, you know who you are.

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Re: Bee poo?

Do robot bees pollinate electric flowers?

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Re: The "We're all going to die" hand-waving aside

Call it a 'slow' extinction event if you like, I think that in geological terms, it's actually very very fast (on the scale of a few hundred years really), possibly faster than any other mass extinction you care to talk about (the K-T mass extinction which did the dinosaurs in may have taken thousands of years, it wasn't an instant asteroid-pow-everything-dead moment, it was more like an asteroid/comet impact coupled with extended volcanism (deccan traps), and cause and effect between them is far from clear.)

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Re: Oh for god's sake...

@NomNomNom I think it was called the 'green revolution'. The fact that it was over pretty much by the '70s invalidates the erstwhile prof's ideas, but still, it is kind of analogous to Moore's Law.

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The "We're all going to die" hand-waving aside

He is correct in the fact that we are in the middle of a mass extinction event, as we out-compete, or just eat, other species. This is a result of rampant human population expansion, and the resultant loss of habitat to other species. On the other hand, this means we are the ones causing the extinctions, not the ones who are going to 'go extinct'*.

*FWIW, I take unreasonable exception to the phrase 'go extinct', it just doesn't sound right to me, possibly because the verb 'go' implies motion. I far prefer 'become extinct' or in the case of anthropogenic extinctions, 'be made extinct'.

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Guy puts 1990s MacOS 7 on an Apple Watch – without jailbreaking it

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Re: I miss System 7

Beat me to it! You've got to love old hippies with synths...

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BOFH: Step into my office. Now take a deep breath

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Re: Looking back isn't that bad...

I was at Bletchley Park a few weeks back and they had some very nice examples of delay line memory. I'm pretty sure that predates any sort of your new-fangled magnetic storage.

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Banking trojan besieges Bundestag … for the second time

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Re: Actually

Surely "- bounces off the egress rules on the firewall, is logged and reported on" is the correct way to end that sentence ...

Nice in principle. Just off the top of my head, this would be trivial to circumvent by encrypting the content and sending on port 221. How would you distinguish this from normal SSL traffic? (short of blacklisting / whitelisting IP addresses which is unlikely to be practical)

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Philae warms up nicely, sends home second burst of data

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Re: This:

Yes, people voted for them, but you also have to remember that our political systems are set up in such a way that it is often a binary vote between a bad choice or a worse one, and votes for anyone else don't count.

We then have a hierarchical structure within government which further distorts the wishes of the people into being the opinions and say-so of whoever happens to be on top of the pile. They are usually motivated by public opinion, as they wish to stay in that position. In the UK at least, we used to have a meaningful cabinet until that was destroyed by the cult of personality that was a certain Mrs T.

It's a better system than many others, but I'm not sure it's the best we could have, and I don't think the 'you voted for them' argument carries very much water.

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Vodafone hikes prices to 37.5p/min – and lets angry customers flee

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Re: 084* numbers

you might be interested in saynoto0870.com

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