* Posts by Loyal Commenter

1908 posts • joined 20 Jul 2010

DRM is NOT THE LAW, I AM THE LAW, says JUDGE DREDD

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Foooolsssssss

You cannot kiiiill what doesssss not liiiive.

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Trading Standards pokes Amazon over 'libellous' review

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Re: But what will become of the other "creative" reviews?

I think in the case where a review is clearly parody (of which there are many, of varied quality on Amazon), it is obvious to the reader that it is such. The famous examples (sugar free gummi bears, hideously expensive interconnect cables, three wolf moon shirt, etc.) aren't defamatory because they aren't claiming to be factual.

On the other hand, a review which does claim to be factual, but is factually incorrect, and clearly so (as in this case) can't be anything other than defamatory. One wonders as to the motivation (and identity) of the reviewer - for example, do they have a vested interest in the product being reviewed negatively because, for instance, they are the producer of a rival product.

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RADIOACTIVE WWII aircraft carrier FOUND OFF CALIFORNIA

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Re: @ Ian Emery (was: humans)

it really depends on whether you are counting height above sea level, which Everest wins, by being on the Tibetan plateau, or height from base to peak, which Mount McKinley wins, or if you count bits that are underwater, in which case Mauna Kea wins. Or if you count mountains not on Earth, in which case, you get Olympus Mons...

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Someone set us up the bomb!

All your boat are belong to us!

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iPhone vs. Galaxy fight hospitalises two after beer bottle stabbing

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Re: This wouldn't have happened…

"since when were guns capable of defending themselves ?"

...Megatron...

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NASA probe sent to faraway planet finds DWARF world instead: Pics

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Re: Can't wait

I can also see three other 'blobs' off to the left. Is it possible that these are Pluto's other satellites* (there are apparently four others, and four dark blue areas in this picture), rather than just image artefacts?

*Although the term 'satellite' here is a little iffy, because the centre of mass of the Pluto-Charon system is outside the radius of Pluto, so the both orbit a point in-between.

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It's 2015 and a RICH TEXT FILE or a HTTP request can own your Windows machine

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Re: Flash Player - or a Prayer?

Easy solution (in Firefox at least):

Tools - Add-Ons - Shockwave Flash - Change the drop-down to 'Ask to activate' and only activate it on those websites that won't work without it, and even then, think about whether you need to use that site...

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Fancy a wristjob from Tim Cook? TOUGH LUCK, you CAN'T HAVE ONE

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Just goes to show...

...idiot hipsters really do love the '80s, including bringing back the concept of being mugged for your watch.

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National Grid's new designer pylon is 'too white and boring' – Pylon Appreciation Society

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Re: White pylon

"If we keep burning fossil fuels because renewables arn't up to the job then the kids will have more urgent things to worry about than a few hundred tons of nuclear waste which could happily fit in a few railway wagons."

Whilst I agree with you on principle, it's probably only remotely sensible to put the low level waste in this sort of containment (stuff like gloves used to handle the outsides of the containers of higher-level stuff, etc.)

With high level waste, like spent fuel, you might find you end up with a couple of railway-carriage shaped holes emitting a strange blue glow.

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

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Alright the lot of you

Get back on the bus!

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Cybercrime taskforce collects huge botnet scalp on first go

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Good work all round!

I wonder if there are any clues as to the source of the malware from such things as original domain registrations fort eh C&C domains, IP address logs etc.

It's nice to see something being done an an international scale to tackle this sort of organised crime. It would be nicer to see the culprits identified and stopped.

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El Reg offers you the chance to become a Master Investor – for free

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"Now, this isn't one of those pyramid schemes you've been hearing about"

"It's more of a truncated rhombus... Oh shit, the Feds!"

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ALIENS ARE COMING: Chief NASA boffin in shock warning

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Re: Actually....

Was it a rush job? Looks like you got the wrong size skin for the head...

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Idiot thieves walk free after stolen iPad uploads pics of them with loot

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Re: Prison is about 45% effective

@Graham Marsden

Restorative Justice is a very effective method of re-engaging offenders with society, allowing them to see their actions in a broader context.

Sadly, it can only work if the offender admits guilt; if they plead 'not guilty', then even when convicted, they cannot engage in restorative justice unless they later admit their guilt. A core principle of restorative justice is the contract between the offender and the victim; there obviously has to be an agreement for them to meet and discuss the impact of the crime, or the concept cannot work. Compelling either party to engage against their will is only counterproductive.

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Re: Prison is about 45% effective

It's worth remembering that the US has one of the world's highest per-capita prison populations (just under 1% of the US adult population is in prison), and its judicial system is also heavily race-biased (about 5% of the adult black male population of the US is in prison!)

Now, these are quite startling numbers, so here are some figures to back this up*:

(wikipedia article)

Now, you have to ask yourself whether incarceration works as a deterrent to crime, when around 10,000 people are killed by hand-guns in the US each year.

Sure, rehabilitation within society doesn't always work, but it is cheaper than incarceration, and when it does work, the offender can re-enter society, whereas prison institutionalises inmates, especially those with long sentences, making it more difficult to re-enter society when the sentence is complete.

Personally, I'm all for evidence-led policy on crime and punishment, and you won't often find that those who have a criminology degree are the ones shouting to 'lock them up and throw away the key'. Tackling the root cause of crime (most often poverty) does a lot more than punishment to reduce the societal impact.

*Yes, I know this is Wikipedia, but the figures here appear to be accurate

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Ding Dong, ALIENS CALLING

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Re: Build it out of dark matter

I'd better put on my peril-sensitive sunglasses right now.

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Re: A baseball can do 30 megatons of damage?

Methinks someone has been reading Randall Munroe's 'What If?'.

edit - Here

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Isn't the idea of any kind of 'warp' propulsion that it moves a 'bubble' of spacetime rather than the contents, which effectively stay stationary. This is also known as 'frame-shifting'.

This might be bad news for anything in the path of that bubble, which presumably would get either bumped to one side, or torn apart, but the whole notion of accelerating anything to near the speed of light as a means of moving it astronomical distances is obviously a non-starter.

Relativity tells us that this would involve impractically (if not impossibly) vast amounts of energy for one, rising exponentially as you approach C. Your mass would increase accordingly, and time would slow down, which would be a definite problem if you wanted to go to another solar system and still stay in touch with your friends at home, who would all be long dead by the time you get there.

So what these guys are saying, is that if you tried to use an impractical method of transportation, it would be impractical. Nice tautology there...

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$17,000 Apple Watch: Pointless bling, right? HA! You're WRONG

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Re: Yellow gold is pure gold

That's not strictly true, as the carat measure is done by weight, not molar amount. It depends what the gold is alloyed with. The atomic weight of Gold is 197, silver is 107, copper is 64, so 18 carat gold alloyed with copper contains significantly less gold than 18 carat gold alloyed with silver.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: I'll pass on the expensive version

JL has certainly kept her value a lot longer than anything Apple have ever produced.

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Re: Not intended for you

Since when have Apple done anything to encourage things to be upgradable, rather than disposable? From changing form factor to type, size, and layout of connectors. My money is on the iWatch 2.0 having a different form factor (thinner, and with a different aspect ratio) for starters.

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Re: Perceived value

But he is also saying that we should care what such people do. Personally, I couldn't give a tinker's cuss what such people get up to as long as I'm not forced to share their presence.

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It's quite simple

This will appeal to arseholes. It will attract to them women who like arseholes. Nobody who is not an arsehole wants to be around that sort of woman anyway. As far as I'm concerned, they can all disappear up their own...

As much as I dislike Apple, good on them from extracting money from those who do not deserve to have it.

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Universal Credit could take 10 YEARS to finish, says Labour MP

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"Our current plan is on track"

Their current plan, presumably, being that of funneling as much public money into their own pockets as possible until they get voted out and someone else gets a turn.

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A gold MacBook with just ONE USB port? Apple, you're DRUNK

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Re: I get it..!! Finally

The cynical might suggest that they are strongly trying to encourage their users to put all their data on Apple's proprietary cloud storage, so that they can then do whatever they like with it. Has anyone read the EULA?

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Re: The only real criticism is the CPU

I expect that if I wanted one, I could actually afford the pointless watch. Jealousy is not the issue here, it's not wanting to make a fool out of yourself by throwing away your money on a shiny trinket in what is nothing more than a demonstration of dick-waving.

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Re: Getting rid of Magsafe was a mistake

At a minimum, if Apple was going to compromise so drastically as to only have one USB port they should have at the least included an extra on the power adapter.

I'm pretty sure it's exactly Apple's business model to charge a large wedge of cash for the 'official' adaptor in such situations, and to design it to have a limited life, so they get the repeat business. After all, they have a long history of using non industry-standard ports and connectors entirely so that they can charge extra for cables.

The new iPhones have a socket which looks superficially like a micro-USB (which every other phone on the market uses), but which require a proprietary connector.

This goes all the way back to the old Macintosh computers with SCSI ports which had the same connectors as standard parallel ports, but were utterly incompatible, in some cases damaging hardware that was plugged into the wrong type of port.

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Loyal Commenter
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Form Over Function

If Apple made shiny bricks at $100 a piece, there would still be people out there who would buy them and build a house out of them, just to show off their over-inflated sense of self-worth.

"A fool and his money..."

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ALL comp-sci courses will have compulsory infosec lessons – UK.gov

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Doesn't sound like a bad idea to me

Security is something which should be designed into software from the start, rather than tacked on the outside. Teaching students the basics of information security is likely to make them more mindful of this.

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GSMA: Er, sorry about that MWC brothel ad with our logo

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Re: Exploitation?

Oh look, a man is in favour of prostitution. Stop the press.

Nobody in their right mind is going to claim that there is no exploitation of women in the sex industry. On the other hand, prostitution is not going to go away just because people don't like it, and it doesn't have to involve exploitation, in the sense of women being forced to do something against their will. There are plenty of examples of women selling sex because they choose to.

The correct attitude, in terms of reducing such exploitation, would appear to be legalisation and regulation of the sex industry. Since prostitution is legal in Barcelona, it seems perfectly reasonable to assume that such businesses should be permitted to advertise.

The flip side, of course, is that if you criminalise prostitution, you push it underground. You end up with what is a growing, and real, problem in the UK and other countries, where women and girls are forced into sex work against their will by organised criminal gangs. They may be beaten or drugged and are often smuggled from one country to another, so they are frightened about their legal status and are unfamiliar with the local language, so cannot seek help. Prudishness does nothing to help such victims.

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Shove off, ugly folk, says site for people who love themselves

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Re: Tawnie Lynn (pictured)

Because as we all know, you only get a couple of good qualities when you're born and if you choose looks or popularity, you must also be stupid or shallow.

I think it's more a case of, if you judge people solely by their looks, then you are 'stupid or shallow'. Stupid, because people have no choice over the looks they are born with, and shallow, because when it comes to the vast number of attributes that a person may possess, their looks are a single one.

Judging people based on their appearance would appear to be the sole function of this site, so it is reasonable to conclude that the users are, in fact, quite likely to be stupid and shallow individuals.

The featured individual's reference to 'polluting the gene pool' also smacks rather of eugenics, which doesn't exactly endear her to me.

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El Reg's plucky Playmonaut eyes suborbital rocket shot

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As anyone who has worked with liquid nitrogen cooled apparatus in a university physics or chemistry lab should be able to attest, distilling liquid oxygen from air is trivially easy if you have a ready supply of liquid nitrogen, a length of tubing, and a vacuum pump.

Vacuum distillation lines routinely use a nitrogen cooled trap to catch any volatiles before they end up in the vacuum pump's oil sump. One has to be careful not to open the other end of the line to the air, or you can end up with LOX in the trap, which is hazardous in its own right, but downright dangerous if mixed with any trace organics there might be already in the trap. A case of, "what's this pretty blue liquid?" followed by BOOM!

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$10,000 Ethernet cable promises BONKERS MP3 audio experience

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Re: Casting the first stone n'all

I don't know about you, but if I'm maintaining code that falls foul of 'cargo cult' programming, I tend to remove the offending code, refactor it so it is properly documented, and then ensure it is properly tested to prove it still does what it is supposed to without the voodoo.

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Silicene takes on graphene as next transistor wonder-stuff

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Re: Valence

Since silicon atoms generally form four bonds, they are tetrahedral (as is carbon when forming single bonds). The typical shape of a six-membered ring is therefore either 'chair' or 'boat' shaped as in cyclohexane. To form a regular lattice, the configuration that tesselates is the 'chair' shaped one.

Graphene on the other hand, is composed of carbon atoms which are not forming 'single' bonds. Thyey are usually drawn as alternating single and double bonds, although the truth is that they are a hybrid of the two, as this configuration has a lower energy. The bonds in question are in a planar configuration, so graphene itself is truly flat. it is the special properties of the hybridisation of these bonds which leads to the delocalisation of the electrons, and the conductive properties of graphene.

I haven't seriously studied any chemistry for over a decade, but IIRC, the energy level of the bonds in silicon are close enough that they make it a semiconductor, unlike tetrahedral carbon (as in diamond, or in alkanes), which is an insulator.

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'Revenge p0rn' kingpin Kevin Bollaert faces 20 years in jail

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@Richard Altmann

You're trying to justify this sort of behaviour by blaming the victim.

I've said this before, and I'll state it again, so it might get through your thick skull:

This is akin to blaming rape victims for being 'dressed provocatively', or for being drunk at the time. This sort of defence does not go down well in court, and for good reason.

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@Freemon Sandlewould

Looking at your other posts, I'm trying hard to determine whether you are a rather inexpert troll, or just a terrible excuse for a human being. Neither reflects well.

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Loyal Commenter
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The problem is here is your emotions are not what is important. Freedom of speech on the internet IS IMPORTANT.

Yes, freedom of speech is important. You are free to say whatever you like, but if you commit a crime in doing so, expect to be prosecuted for it.

If you can't see why what this complete arsebucket did was both illegal and, perhaps more importantly, utterly immoral, perhaps you should be on some sort of medication.

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Enough is ENOUGH: It's time to flush Flash back to where it came from – Hell

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Re: Leverage, Leveraged, Leveraging

Nah, that's when we mean 'sequencer'.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: This type of mentality is irrational, bordering stupidity.

Mozilla and Google run automatic checks against their code to pick up bugs which could be used for exploits in the future and correct them before they are.

Mention the terms, 'coding to an interface', 'unit testing', or even 'bounds checking' to an Adobe programmer and I expect you will get nothing more than blank looks. Sadly, best practice is something often ignored by a lot of companies.

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Crackdown on eBay sellers 'failing to display' VAT numbers

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Re: Small Business Boo Hoo

This would have exactly zero impact on those eBay sellers who are listed as 'UK Seller' but then mysteriously ship you your purchase by slow boat from China anyway.

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'Revenge porn' bully told not to post people's nude pics online. That's it. That's his punishment

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@Dan1980

Whilst I agree that this sort of behaviour is probably covered by existing laws, and that passing new legislation requires careful thought, and even more careful wording, I think in this sort of case, the perp deserves to be prosecuted for something a little more that distributing copyrighted images (which isn't even a criminal offence, it's a civil matter, at least until industry interests raise the cash to pay for copyright infringement to become a criminal matter).

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: I'm not sure I feel that sorry for the "victims" here

That sort of attitude is the same as saying, "She was dressed provocatively m'lud, so it's her fault I raped her". That won't get you very far in court.

Blaming the victim displays a lack of compassion and empathy that should raise a red flag to everyone around you.

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Horrifying iPhone sales bring Apple $18bn profit A QUARTER

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Re: So what happen to Peak Apple?

Oops, Freudian slip - I said Apple Employees, when of course I meant customers...

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: So what happen to Peak Apple?

When you are calling nigh on a billion of the world's wealthier consumers - including a majority of CEO's and business leaders - gullible fools, it's time to look in the mirror.

Just because 'nigh on a billion' people do something, that doesn't make it clever. A case in point - pick any two of the world's major religions. They can't both be right, therefore all the adherents of at least one of those religions are, by definition, such gullible fools.

Just because something is absurd, doesn't stop people following it. In this case, it is absurd to pay over the odds for something that has designed-in obsolescence that is quite blatantly done in order to extract more money from you.

The sad fact is that the world is full of idiots, and everyone has the capability to act like one at times. The level of fanaticism seen in Apple Employees is both comical, and saddening to those of us who can sit outside of the phenomenon and observe it. To Apple, and their shareholders, it is a positive boon.

Very few of the 'business leaders' I come across use Apple products in their day-to-day work. Being high earners makes them more likely to purchase high-cost items. The same people seem to enjoy buying personalised registration plates, that do nothing other to act as a money sink and to make other road users think, "what a twat". There seems to be little correlation between level of earnings and idiocy in such cases, and certainly not an inverse one. You'd probably find a more solid correlation between earnings, who your parents happen to be, which school you went to (although not academic results), and who you happen to know.

Extolling me to 'look in the mirror' does nothing to help your argument, other than turning it into a rather pathetic ad hominem attack.

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Google Translate MEAT GRINDER turns gay into 'faggot', 'poof', 'queen'

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Re: Google can't win

Of course, you cannot translate the geometry of the Ancients. If you try to make sense of the angles of R'Lyeh, it will send you insane.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Fact Hunt!

@big_D

I absolutely agree; if you trust the translation from Google, you are asking for what you get. As I said, caveat emptor

Fun examples can be had by taking a sentence of your choice, using Google Translate to translate this to a second language, then taking this translation, translating it to a third language, and finally back to the original language.

The above sentence translated to Greek, then Japanese, then back to English, reads:

"Fun example, Google is, to translate it in a second language, taking this translation, translated into third language, using eventually return to the original language, by taking the penalty of your choice you can be had."

You can be had indeed...

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I've not seen the film in question myself, but on the website from which I cribbed this information:

Bringing Up Baby in 1938 was the first film to use the word gay to mean homosexual. Cary Grant, in one scene, ended up having to wear a lady’s feathery robe. When another character asks about why he is wearing that, he responds an ad-libbed line “Because I just went gay”. At the time, mainstream audiences didn’t get the reference so the line was thought popularly to have meant something to the effect of “I just decided to be carefree.”

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/02/how-gay-came-to-mean-homosexual/

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Re: Fact Hunt!

You are requesting a fairly major increase in functionality. Certainly what you are suggesting would be useful, but it's beyond the scope of what Google currently does.

Given that organisationally, Google are perfectly set up for exactly this sort of data analytics, you'd probably be surprised at how little work this would be. I reckon it would probably turn out to be a couple of weeks work for one programmer, to define the rules and techniques for extracting such information, and then a learning period for the software as it goes to work categorising the data. Given that Google's Oompah-Loompahs are purportedly given a day a week to work on their own projects, it wouldn't surprise me if someone was already working on it.

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Top smut site Flashes visitors, leaves behind nasty virus

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Re: We at least the UK laws are thinking of the Children...

virulent plage

Is that a French beach, near to a sewerage outfall?

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Re: "campaign leveraging the recent Adobe Flash zero day vulnerability "

I think 'leveraging' is something the BOFH does on the roof, with an old tape safe, and a length of broom handle, and involves waiting for people who use the word in every-day conversation to walk past at street level.

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